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January 12, 2013

Bullying Nonconformity in Bradbury's "All Summer in a Day"


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Class,

In the comment box below, . . .

. . . the note-taker/scribe from each group should retype the question your group discussed today in class and provide an answer with quotations from the text to support your answers. You MUST put the page number (or, paragraph number if there are no page numbers) in parentheses after any quotation used.

Enter your work on this text as prescribed in class. For example:

Remember: I have to "approve" all comments so you won't see it immediately after posting. After hitting submit, you should see a screen that confirms this.

We are beginning to use some concepts in our discussions that you may or may have had practice using before. I want to be sure that you have a clear understanding of the words we use in class (no more blank stares!) so be sure you are looking up words you don't feel you yet "own" (means, making it a part of your personal vocabulary) by utilizing your dictionaries to the fullest.

Dr. Hobbs

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Posted by lhobbs at January 12, 2013 10:29 PM

Readers' Comments:

Terrance Browne
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 122
28 January 2013

Question:(a.) Identify the point of view that Bradbury uses to tell “All Summer in a Day” and (b.)
identify both the dynamic, round characters and the static, flat characters he created. Of the flat
characters, which ones are stereotypical, boilerplate types? Who is the antagonist? Explain

Answer: To me I believe that the point of view that the writer was using was a kind of sad, lonely view or look due to the fact that its raining everyday and the children have never gotten to see the sun. That's why i feel like the writer wanted to use a "fly on the wall aspect to the story, where you can't tell what the characters are thinking your just observing. "Margot stood alone. She was a frail girl who looked as had been lost in the rain for years"(Bradbury,2).Also the only child who has seen the rain they lock her up inside of a closet until the rain stops. The writer also has two different types of characters in the story Marget would be the to round character the story mostly because she has the most personality in the story and has a background "and then,of course the biggest crime of all was that she had come from earth five years ago" (Bradbury,2). The flat characters would be William the bully mostly because all he would be is just the bully and the to be mean and also the teacher who has no name and nothing to say the whole story.

Posted by: Terrance Browne at January 28, 2013 10:15 AM

Peter Mercadante
Dr.Hobbs
Eng. 122 CAO5 Academic Writting II
28 January 2013

Question: Explain why Margot doesn't fit in with the other children. Identify quotations from the text to defend your position.

Answer: Margot simply doesn't fit in with here peers because of the things she remembers from earth, the sun.She remembers the sun and how it felt and looked in the sky. "Margot stood apart from these children who could never remember a time when there wasn’t rain and rain and rain. They were all nine years old, and if there had been a day, seven years ago,when the sun came out for an hour and showed its face to the stunned world, they could not recall." (Bradbury pg.1)She can remember what the others couldn't, she had seen the sun before as these kids havent. Then she grew even more apart from the other students, she grew quite. "Margot stood alone. She was a very frail girl who looked as if she had been lost in the rain for years and the rain had washed out the blue from her eyes and the red from her mouth and the yellow from her hair."(Bradbury pg.2) She was almost brain washed by the rain. Gone mad by the 24/7 rain that goes on for 7 years. The other students saw her as a weird quite girl even though she was the most normal, just shocked and drained by the rain. "She had come here only five years ago from Earth, and she remembered the sun and the way the sun was and the sky was when she was four in Ohio. And they, they had been on Venus all their lives, and they had been only two years."(Bradbury pg.2) this is the main thing that set her apart from the others. Its also what changes her, getting use to a life without sun.

Posted by: Peter Mercadante at January 28, 2013 10:16 AM

Alexandra Rivera-Vega
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 CA05
28 Jan 2013

Question: Before the children see the sun, they hate Margot for “reasons, of big and little consequence.” After the children see the sun, they “could not meet each other’s glances” when they think of what they have done to Margot. How has seeing the sun changed the children? Identify
quotations from the text to defend your position.

Answer: Seeing the sun change the children's opinion of Margot because they realized that they all just wanted to see the sun and they know how they feel now that the sun is gone. They feel bad because they know that the sun will not return for another seven years and the fact that they made Margot miss it, really makes them feel horrible. The sun is the one thing these children look forward to and they made her miss it. "They glanced out at the world that was raining now and raining and raining steadily. They could not meet each other’s glances. Their faces were solemn and pale. They looked at their hands and feet, their faces down." (Bradbury 6)

Posted by: Alexandra Rivera-Vega at January 28, 2013 10:19 AM

Octavio Herrera, Adrie Johnson
Dr.Hobbs
Academic Writing II CA04
28 January 2013

Question: Explain why Margot doesn’t fit in with the other children. Identify quotations from the text to defend your position.

Answer: Margot has a hard time fitting in with the other children because she believes that the sun will be coming up, while the other children do not. Margot also says that she remembers the sun while she lived on earth “she remembered the sun and the way the sun was and the sky was…” (Bradbury 1954). The other children believe that Margot is lying about remembering how it feels and what the sun looks like “You’re lying, you don’t remember!” (Bradbury 1954).

Posted by: Octavio Herrera, Adrie Johnson at January 28, 2013 12:19 PM

Ana DeMaio and Anthony Jannetta
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 CA04
30 January 2013

Question: Writers depend on imagery to paint the mental pictures they want you to see with your mind’s eye. (a.) Identify the details in the story that describe the climatic conditions and environment Bradbury imagines to exist on the planet Venus. (b.) How does the author make Venus’s setting convincing? How do these images contrast with Margot’s memories of Earth’s climate?

Answer: (a) ” It had been raining for seven years; thousand upon thousands of days compounded and filled from one end to the other with rain, with the drum and gush of water, with the sweet crystal fall of showers and the concussion of storms so heavy they were tidal waves come over the islands. A thousand forests had been crushed under the rain and grown up a thousand times to be crushed again” (All Summer in a Day, 1) Venus is a planet where it’s always raining, where the rain never stops. There are also a lot of forests.
(b)He makes it convincing by describing how it looks like using a lot of imaging and a lot of description about the weather. The Venus’ weather is the opposite of the earth’s weather. Indeed she remembers the earth as always being hot: “It’s like a fire,” (All Summer in a Day, 3), she also remembers the sun as something beautiful, sweet: “I think the sun is a flower” (All Summer in a Day,2).

Posted by: Anthony Jannetta at January 28, 2013 04:39 PM

Alison Schucht
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA05
28 January 2013

Question: Plot, says Roberts, can be discovered by identifying the conflicts. Identify the conflicts in "All Summer in a Day". Of the conflicts you can identify, what is the central one and how is it introduced? Give one example of how the plot is developed toward the structural climax. What is the climax? How is the chief conflict finally resolved?

Answer: There are two conflicts that Bradbury portrays in this story. One is the characters in the story having to deal with the rain, and no sun, every seven years. The other conflict, which is also the central conflict, is Margot being an outcast from her class. This conflict is introduced when Bradbury writes, "Margot stood apart from the children..." (Bradbury, 1). Margot's knowledge of the sun finally appearing causes one of her classmates to lock her into a closet because they don't believe her, this is the climax of the story. Afterwards, the sun finally comes out and the children are all playing in the sun, until it begins to rain again. When the rain begins to fall, a classmate remembers Margot is still locked in the closet, she was the only one who didn't witness the sunshine. Finally, this conflict is resolved when all of her classmates unlock her out of the closet.

Posted by: Alison Schucht at January 28, 2013 08:22 PM

Rannell Smith
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122
28 January 2013

Question: In “All Summer in a Day,” the children discriminated against Margot.(a.) Why do people often discriminate against each other?(b.) Does your reason apply to the situation in “All Summer in a Day”? Speculate on the motivation of the children to discriminate against Margot. Identify quotations from the text to defend your position.

Answer: Firstly, when there is something unknown or strange about a person, people will be very quick to single them out. People often discriminate to feel higher up, so they take it out on people who are different especially if they have a different race, religion, age or gender. As a result, my reason does apply to the situation in the story. In "All Summer in a Day" the children are discriminatory towards Margot because she is different. According to the author, "he was a very frail girl who looked as if she had been lost in the rain for years and the rain had washed out the blue from her eyes and yellow from her hair. She was an old photograph dusted from an album, whitened away, and if she spoke at all her voice would be a ghost" (Bradbury 2) This clearly shows that Margot is indeed unlike the other children. She makes the other children feel insecure about letting her join the public, so they single her out to create a more comfortable environment for themselves. In addition, jealousy also causes people to discriminate. The children were jealous because Margot had seen the sun and they had not.

Posted by: Rannell Smith at January 28, 2013 10:10 PM

Octavia Robinson
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 CA05
28 January 2013

Question: 5. Every seven years when the Sun comes out the plant life on Venus changes. What happens?
Identify quotations from the text to defend your position.

Answer: In Ray Bradbury's short story "All Summer In A Day". The plant life on Venus blooms for the one day every year. This is backed by the quote, "It was a nest of octopi, clustering up great arms of flesh-like weed, wavering, flowering this brief spring"(Bradbury3).

Posted by: Octavia Robinson at January 29, 2013 08:37 PM

Lauren Irish
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 122 CA04
29 January 2013

Question:This story uses many comparisons to present ideas. For example, when the children recall that
Margot was left behind in the closet, the author writes, “They stood as if someone had driven
them, like so many stakes, into the floor.” Two kinds of literary comparisons are similes and
metaphors. A simile, such as the example above, is a comparison that uses “like” or “as.” A
metaphor is a comparison that does not use “like” or “as,” e.g. “War is Hell,” or “Love is War,” or
“Love is Hell,” etc. Identify other similes or metaphors on the story. Identify quotations from
the text to defend your position.

Answer: Throughout All Summer in a Day there were many metaphors and similes. An example of a metaphor is "I think the sun is a flower, That blooms for just one hour." " She was a very frail girl who looked as if she had been lost in the rain for years".An example of a simile is “It’s like a fire,” she said, “in the stove.” Another simile is when she describes the sun "like a lemon".

Posted by: Lauren Irish at January 29, 2013 09:42 PM

Kathryn White
Dr. Hobbs
ENG122 CA05
January 29, 2013
Question: 6. This story uses many comparisons to present ideas. For example, when the children recall that Margot was left behind in the closet, the author writes, “They stood as if someone had driven
them, like so many stakes, into the floor.” Two kinds of literary comparisons are similes and
metaphors. A simile, such as the example above, is a comparison that uses “like” or “as.” A
metaphor is a comparison that does not use “like” or “as,” e.g. “War is Hell,” or “Love is War,” or
“Love is Hell,” etc. Identify other similes or metaphors on the story. Identify quotations from
the text to defend your position.

“Margot stood alone. She was a very frail girl who looked as if she had been lost in the rain for
years and the rain had washed out the blue from her eyes and the red from her mouth and the
yellow from her hair. She was an old photograph dusted from an album, whitened away, and if she
spoke at all her voice would be a ghost. Now she stood, separate, staring at the rain and the loud
wet world beyond the huge glass.”(Bradbury) This paragraph is a perfect example of the metaphors and similes that Bradbury uses throughout the entire short story, “All Summer in a Day.” These metaphors and similes play a key role in this story, because it helps the reader get a real feel of what is going on; to better understand the situation.

Posted by: Kathryn White at January 29, 2013 10:19 PM

8. writers depend on imagery to paint mental pictures the want you to see with your minds eye.
a. identify the details in the story that and describe the climatic conditions and environment..
b.how do he make these settings convincing?
answer: Ray Bradbury describe the setting of Venus very well. he describe it as raining all the time.
he makes this setting convincing because he says that the rain would destroy forest, and when they grew back would get destroyed again.
Venus differs from the earth conditions because on earth the sun comes out often instead of every 7 years.

Posted by: Ryan Nowotny at January 30, 2013 07:55 AM

Jillian Stolzenburg, Jacob Gates
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 CA04 "All Summer in a Day"
30 January 2013


Question: Plot, says Roberts, can be discovered by identifying the conflicts. Identify the conflicts in “All Summer in a Day.” Of the conflicts you can identify, what is the central one and how is it introduced? Give one example of how the plot is developed toward the structural climax. What is the climax? How is the chief conflict finally resolved?

Answer: The main conflict in "All Summer in a Day" Is Margot's beliefs about the sun verse the beliefs of her class mates. The conflict here is that both parties want to be right. This conflict is also majority verse minority. Margot being a minority because she is the only one who is from earth and knows the actual truth. "“It’s like a penny,” she said once... “No it’s not!” the children cried " (Bradbury 3). This is just one example of how Margot had the whole class disagreeing with her. The other children were jealous of her because she had come to Venus much later and remembered more about earth and the sun. "And then, of course, the biggest crime of all was that she had come here only five years ago from Earth, and she remembered the sun and the way the sun was" (Bradbury 2). The climax is developed when the conflict is resolved. In this story the climax is when the sun actually comes out and the children all see that Margot was actually right. The story resolved with the kids letting Margot out of the closet.

Posted by: Jillian Stolzenburg at January 30, 2013 10:29 AM

Marquisa Turner/Jazmine Dixon
ENG 122-CA04
Dr. Hobbs
28 January 2013

Question: In “All Summer in a Day,” the children discriminated against Margot. (a.) Why do people often discriminate against each other? (b.) Does your reason apply to the situation in “All Summer in a Day”? Speculate on the motivation of the children to discriminate against Margot. Identify quotations from the text to defend your position.

Answer: People often discriminate against other people because they are different from them, they don’t meet the norm. Also people are known to discriminate because of jealousy. Yes this reason applies to the situation in “All Summer in a Day”. In this quote “Margot stood apart from these children who could never remember a time when there wasn’t rain and rain and rain” (Bradbury 1), it shows how the other children could envy her because she had the opportunity to see the sun at a point in her life that she would remember. Also, Margot spent a lot of her childhood on earth so she could be considered the “new girl” and the other children perceived her to be weird and different.

Posted by: Marquisa T & Jazmine D at January 30, 2013 10:49 AM

Madison Owens
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 Academic Writing II CA08
17 September 2013

Question #7: "In “All Summer in a Day,” the children discriminated against Margot. (a.) Why do people often discriminate against each other? (b.) Does your reason apply to the situation in “All Summer in a Day”? Speculate on the motivation of the children to discriminate against Margot. Identify quotations from the text to defend your position.

Answer: People often discriminate against each other because they don't understand one another. Whether it's religious beliefs or the way someone dresses, unless someone does the exact same thing as you, they can't really understand why you are who you are. Even then, many times people will do the same things but for different reasons. This lack of understanding creates an insecurity among people, causing them to discriminate against others that are not just like them. Another part of discrimination could be jealousy, and I think that's what we find in Bradbury's short story, "All Summer in a Day". Margot is not originally from Venus, so this automatically makes her an outcast to the rest of the kids. While waiting in anticipation for the sun, Margot attempts to describe what it is like to the other children, "It's like a fire [. . .] in the stove" (Bradbury 3). The children's respond to her with what seems to be jealousy saying, "You're lying, you don't remember!" (Bradbury 3). It seems that Margot's knowledge of the sun motivates them to gang up on her in negative ways. Because she is different and not like them, they discriminate against her and tend to put her down when she tries to help them imagine the feeling and sight of the sun.

Posted by: Madison Owens at September 17, 2013 10:16 PM

Rebecca Liller
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA08
17 September 2013

Question: Every seven years the sun comes out the plant life on Venus changes. What happens? Identify quotations from the text to defend your position.

Answer: The plant life on Venus before the sun even came out was hardly existent. The rain was so heavy that it would crush the plants that would grow, and they would not be able to grow again because the storm would just happen every day and the plants do not have any room to grow into strong vegetation on the planet Venus. The author describes the horrible conditions of the plants during the rain by saying, “A thousand forests had been crushed under the rain and grown up a thousand times to be crushed again.” (Bradbury 1) However, when the rain stopped and the sun came out, the plant life changed for the better. The plants had room to grow without a horrible downpour destroying their chances into becoming strong, and developing in a healthy way. It is as if the author is describing a new beginning for the plants and them stretching out to become a big part of the planet Venus. The author describes the plant life growing again from the warm, glorious sun by explaining, “They stopped running and stood in the great jungle that covered Venus, that grew and never stopped growing, tumultuously, even as you watched it. It was a nest of octopi, clustering up great arms of flesh-like weed, wavering, flowering this brief spring. It was the color of rubber and ash, this jungle, from the many years without sun. It was the color of stones and white cheeses and ink, and it was the color of the moon.” (Bradbury 4) Both the color and shape of the plants change when the sun comes out and the plants and the children enjoy the new change on their planet they have all been waiting for seven years.

Posted by: Rebecca Liller at September 17, 2013 11:41 PM

Julieann Sauter
Dr. Hobbs
Eng. 122 Academic Writing II CA 08
18 September 2013

Question: Writers depend on imagery to paint the mental pictures they want you to see with your mind’s eye. (a.) Identify the details in the story that describe the climatic conditions and environment
Bradbury imagines to exist on the planet Venus. (b.) How does the author make Venus’s setting convincing? How do these images contrast with Margot’s memories of Earth’s climate?

Answer:
Bradbury is very detailed when talking about the climatic conditions on planet Venus. It has been raining for seven years. Bradbury uses words to make you feel cold and dark, and has a depressing tone. Bradbury writes, “thousand upon thousands of days compounded and filled
from one end to the other with rain, with the drum and gush of water, with the sweet crystal fall of
showers and the concussion of storms so heavy they were tidal waves come over the islands” (Bradbury 1). One can practically feel how it feels on planet Venus.
The author is very convincing when talking about the setting of Venus. One may get a sense of discouragement when talking about the forests that get built, destroyed, rebuilt, and on and on. It is a vicious cycle. Bradbury says, “A thousand forests had been crushed under the rain and grown up a thousand times to be crushed again. And this was the way life was forever on the planet Venus” (Bradbury 1). Another way Bradbury convinces the reader about the setting is the fact that the kids have never seen the sun. It seems unbelievable until they are talking to Margot but do not believe her.

Posted by: Julieann Sauter at September 18, 2013 02:11 AM

Ryan MacCarthy
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 CA08 Academic Writing II
18 September 2013


Question: We have already discussed setting to some degree. Explain the setting of the story and how the characters in it have adapted to it. Identify quotations from the text to defend your position.


Answer: The setting in the story is quite different from other short stories we have covered. The setting is all about the rain and the sun. It has been raining for seven straight years and the nine-year-old children cannot remember the last time they had seen the sun. The narrator states, “They were all nine years old, and if there had been a day, seven years ago, when the sun came out for an hour and showed its face to the stunned world, they could not recall” (Bradbury 1). The characters in the story have adapted to the setting, particularly the rain, and its everyday life when it constantly rains to them. Finally, when the sun does come out one day, they get to play in the jungles that cover Venus. The narrator states, “They glanced out at the world that was raining now and raining and raining steadily. They could not meet each other’s glances. Their faces were solemn and pale. They looked at their hands and feet, their faces down” (6). As the rain once again began to come down, the children quickly realized that it was just another day in their lives with just more ran and no sun.

Posted by: Ryan MacCarthy at September 18, 2013 11:27 AM

Sade Loiseau
Dr. Hobbs
English 122
18 September 2013

Question 4: Explain why Margot doesn’t fit in with other children. Identify questions from the text to defend your position?
Answer: Margot doesn’t fit in with the other kids because they always felt like she was weird and not the same from them. “Margot stood apart from these children who could never remember a time when there wasn’t rain and rain and rain (Bradbury 1)”. This story was being told in Venus, Margot moved there from Earth. So she would talk about the sun. The kids locked Margot in closet when the sun was out.

Posted by: Sade Loiseau at September 18, 2013 12:56 PM

Emma De Rhodo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG122 Academic Writing II CA08
18 September 2013

Question: Plot, says Roberts, can be discovered by identifying the conflicts. Identify the conflicts in “All Summer in a Day.” Of the conflicts you can identify, what is the central one and how is it introduced? Give one example of how the plot is developed toward the structural climax. What is the climax? How is the chief conflict finally resolved?

Answer: There are multiple conflicts in Ray Bradbury’s “All Summer in a Day.” One of these conflicts is between Margot and the weather. Margot, who has actually seen the sun before, desires very much to see it again(Bradbury 1). Another conflict is between the other children in the class and the weather. The children in the class are desperate to see the sun since they do not have a memory of the last time it appeared(Bradbury 1). To continue, yet another conflict in the story is one between Margot and the other students in the class. The other children in the class may be jealous that Margot has viewed the sun before(because they have not), or they may be jealous of the fact that she may be able to go back to Earth the next year(Bradbury 3). Also, she had covered her ears and head in a school shower in order for water not to come onto her, so the children decided not to interact with her anymore after seeing this reaction(Bradbury 3). Furthermore, there is also a conflict between the teacher and the other students because of the student’s unfriendliness towards Margot. The teacher has to correct a boy named William for being rude to Margot one day in class(Bradbury 2). The chief conflict, the conflict between the students and the weather, is first brought up in the beginning of story, explaining why the children are so eagerly looking out the window(Bradbury 1). The author then mentions the fact that the children(besides Margot) were merely two years old during the sun’s last appearance(Bradbury 1). Later, the climax of the story happens when the rain on Venus finally ends for a short time, and the sun comes out(Bradbury 4). The author makes the children’s excitement and fascination towards the sun obvious throughout the story. For example, he says the children “squinted at the sun until the tears ran down their faces”(Bradbury 5). The pressure on Margot to be correct about the sun coming out builds at the point in which she is locked in a closet by her peers(Bradbury 3). This event, which increases the pressure and tension in the story, helps develop the plot to move to the next large and important event, the climax. It is in this part in which the pressure is almost, in a way, released once the students finally are able to experience the sun after seven years of dreary rain. The chief conflict is therefore resolved once the children actually get to experience the sun. The children finally get to have the experience they have been hoping for. Once the rain begins to come again, they learn from Margot, the next time the rain will end and the sun will show itself to Venus(Bradbury 6).

Posted by: Emma De Rhodo at September 18, 2013 12:58 PM

Taina Valcarcel
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA08
September 18, 2013

Question:(a.) Identify the point of view that Bradbury uses to tell “All Summer in a Day” and (b.) identify both the dynamic, round characters and the static, flat characters he created. Of the flat characters, which ones are stereotypical, boilerplate types? Who is the antagonist? Explain.

Answer: The plot of the story is about a school of children in Venus where the sun only shines seven hours in a year, and Margot is the only one that remembers the sunshine.Bradbury uses the third person to tell the story. Margot is the main character in this story according to Bradbury since she is the one that remembers the sun.

Posted by: Taina Valcarcel at September 18, 2013 01:18 PM

Jeffrey Wingfield Mike Ossolinski
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 CA08 Academic Writing II
18 September 2013
In “All Summer in a Day,” the children discriminated against Margot. (a.) Why do people often
discriminate against each other? (b.) Does your reason apply to the situation in “All Summer in
a Day”? Speculate on the motivation of the children to discriminate against Margot. Identify
Quotations from the text to defend your position.

The majority of discrimination is rooted in some form of ignorance or misunderstanding. The children discriminate against Margot because she is from earth. The earth she remembers is foreign to them and they misunderstand her, seeing her as different from themselves. She talks about seeing the sun, something they have never seen so they are either jealous of her or threatened by how different she is. Bradbury explains this saying, “And they, they had been on Venus all their lives, and they had been only two years old when last the sun came out and had long since forgotten the color and heat of it and the way it really was. But Margot remembered”(Bradbury 2-3).

Posted by: Jeffrey Wingfield, Mike Ossolinski at September 18, 2013 01:52 PM

Maryerie Rojas, Tori Thomas
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA 08
18 September 2013

Question 8: Writers depend on imagery to paint the mental pictures they want you to see with your mind’s eye. (a.) Identify the details in the story that describe the climatic conditions and environment Bradbury imagines to exist on the planet Venus. (b.) How does the author make Venus’s setting convincing? How do these images contrast with Margot’s memories of Earth’s climate?

Answer: Bradbury describes that there had been no stop rain on the planet Venus for seven years. H explains that “gush[es] of water, with the sweet crystal fall of showers and the concussion of storms so heavy they were tidal waves come over the islands” (Bradbury 1). He also explains that “A thousand forests had been crushed under the rain and grown up a thousand times to be crushed again” because of the heavy rain (Bradbury 1). The setting is convincing because there is technology that can help “rocket men and women who had come to a raining world to set up civilization and live out their lives” on the planet Venus (Bradbury 1). Margot contrasts to Venus to the Earth by explaining that the sun she remembered emanated “a warmness, like a blushing in the face, in the body, in the arms and legs and trembling hands (Bradbury 1).

Posted by: Maryerie Rojas, Tori Thomas at September 18, 2013 02:06 PM

Ryan Voss
Dr. Hobbs
ENG122Academic Writing II CA08

Question:This story uses many comparisons to present ideas. For example, when the children recall that
Margot was left behind in the closet, the author writes, “They stood as if someone had driven
them, like so many stakes, into the floor.” Two kinds of literary comparisons are similes and
metaphors. A simile, such as the example above, is a comparison that uses “like” or “as.” A
metaphor is a comparison that does not use “like” or “as,” e.g. “War is Hell,” or “Love is War,” or
“Love is Hell,” etc.Identify other similes or metaphors on the story.Identify quotations from
the text to defend your position.

Answer:"Ithink the sun is a flower,"(Bradbury)Margot refers to the sun as a flower, this is because it is very seldom it comes out. It comes out every seven years for one hour. It is not what she is used to, she is used to the sun and because of the lack of it she becomes pale and seems weak.

Posted by: Ryan Voss at September 18, 2013 02:10 PM

Ryan MacCarthy
Taina Valcacel
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 CA08 Academic Writing II
18 September 2013


Question: This story uses many comparisons to present ideas. For example, when the children recall that Margot was left behind in the closet, the author writes, “They stood as if someone had driven them, like so many stakes, into the floor.” Two kinds of literary comparisons are similes and metaphors. A simile, such as the example above, is a comparison that uses “like” or “as.” A metaphor is a comparison that does not use “like” or “as,” e.g. “War is Hell,” or “Love is War,” or “Love is Hell,” etc. Identify other similes or metaphors on the story. Identify quotations from the text to defend your position.


Answer: Throughout the story, similes and metaphors are used constantly to describe the setting and the emotions of the characters. One of the best similes happens in the beginning, “The children pressed to each other like so many roses, so many weeds, intermixed, peering out for a look at the hidden sun” (Bradbury 1). As the children are pushing up against each other looking for the sun, Bradbury uses this simile to describe as if the children were weeds looking for sunlight. Another simile used in the story was one to describe the sun and how the children had different views on what the sun looked like. Margot exclaimed, “It’s like a fire, in the stove” (3). While all the children have different perspectives on what the sun is like, Margot has an interesting one by describing it like a fire. While there were not many metaphors as there were similes, there was one metaphor that Margot used to describe the sun. Margot stated, “I think the sun is a flower, that blooms for just one hour” (2). Margot uses this metaphor in a poem in which she compares the sun to a flower that is only out for an hour before it goes back to die.

Posted by: Ryan MacCarthy at September 18, 2013 02:19 PM

Madison Owens & Rebecca Liller (Group 2)
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 Academic Writing II CA08
19 September 2013

Question #2: "(a.) Identify the point of view that Bradbury uses to tell “All Summer in a Day” and (b.) identify both the dynamic, round characters and the static, flat characters he created. Of the flat characters, which ones are stereotypical, boilerplate types? Who is the antagonist? Explain."

Answer: Bradbury writes "All Summer in a Day" in third person omniscient. We know this because the narrator seems to "know all". For instance, the narrator says, "There was talk that her father and mother were taking her back to earth next year" (Bradbury 3). This knowledge was clearly gained from another action or conversation that the narrator witnessed outside of the short story that we are reading. We as readers do not know who said that there was talk of such thing, or where the narrator would have gotten this information, so we can automatically assume he, or she, is "all knowing". Margot is clearly a dynamic character. Where we aren't necessarily focusing on her during the short story, all throughout the reading she has dialogue and her feelings towards Venus are often brought forth. With Margot in the story, it seems to help make the plot enticing. William could be considered border line between being a round character and a flat character. His true colors are shown when the narrator says, "What’re you looking at?” [. . .] Speak when you’re spoken to.” He gave her a shove" (Bradbury 2). There are dimensions added to him as being the "bully" or "class leader", but you can't necessarily say that he is a dynamic character. We see William as an antagonist because all throughout the story he makes sure to discriminate against Margot and tends to target her out of all the other children in the class. Though William does bully Margot, he couldn't be consider a typical bully because he only focuses on one person, rather than just bullying all the children in general. With that said, the teacher is very flat. She doesn't pay mind to William and the way he influences the other children, nor does she seem to take notice to the fact that Margot is missing while the other children are out playing in the sun. When the students are preparing to go outside the narrator says that the teacher just glances at her watch without making sure everyone was present (Bradbury 4). She is quite absent minded and doesn't really bring anything to the story.

Posted by: Madison Owens at September 20, 2013 12:01 AM

Julieann Sauter and Ryan Voss
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 Academic Writing II CA 08
18 September 2013

Question: Plot, says Roberts, can be discovered by identifying the conflicts. Identify the conflicts in “All Summer in a Day.” Of the conflicts you can identify, what is the central one and how is it
introduced? Give one example of how the plot is developed toward the structural climax. What
is the climax? How is the chief conflict finally resolved?

Answer:
There are many conflicts in “All Summer in a Day.” We can see this when Margot fights with the other children. The driving cause for the other kids acting this way is jealousy. If the other kids had ever seen sun, they would not be so upset when Margot talks about it because they would remember too. The main problem, however, is Margot has moved from Earth to Venus and she knows what it is like to have sun. Therefore, the kids in school with her dislike her very much. All the kids would get jealous and torment Margot because of her accurate descriptions of what the sun is like. This conflict is introduced in the beginning when it is explained that Margot used to live here on Earth. We can see this when the story says, “Margot stood apart from these children who could never remember a time when there wasn’t rain and rain and rain” (Bradbury 1). Margot could remember, therefore letting the other children know that she knew what the sun was like became a big problem between the children.
The climax is when the rain finally stops that one day and the sun comes out. The kids are now able to understand what Margot has been talking about the whole time. A big issue though, is that Margot is locked in the closet during this time. We know this is the chief conflict because there is not much more plot that gets developed after this. This conflict is finally resolved when Margot is let out of the closet.

Posted by: Julieann Sauter at September 20, 2013 12:49 AM

Emma De Rhodo and Alex Koufas
Dr. Hobbs
ENG122 Academic Writing II CA08
20 September 2013

Question #5: Every seven years when the sun comes out the plant life on Venus changes. What happens? Identify quotations from the text to defend your position.

Answer: Even though Ray Bradbury’s story “All Summer in a Day” takes place on Venus, the author still mentions the fact that there is some plant life on the otherwise known as lifeless planet(Bradbury 4). The author says of the plant life: “It was the color of rubber and ash, this jungle, from the many years without sun”(Bradbury 4-5). Once the sun came out, however, Bradbury mentions the plant life is growing rapidly, and this growing does not end while the sun is making its appearance(Bradbury 4). Speaking about the wild growth of the plant life, the author mentions “It was a nest of octopi, clustering up great arms of flesh-like weed.” He also continues to describe the plants by saying they were “flowering this brief spring,” pointing to the fact that this beauty in nature which has finally come does not last long at all(Bradbury 4).

Posted by: Emma De Rhodo at September 20, 2013 10:54 AM

Sade Loiseau, Kiara M.Burgos Diaz, Tirani Rye
Dr. Hobbs
Englsih 122
20 September 2013

Question 1: We have already discussed setting to some degree. Explain the setting of the story and how
the characters in it have adapted to it. Identify quotations from the text to defend your position.
Answer: The setting of All Summer in a day was in Venus. In Venus its rains 7 years straight and then the character has one day where the sun comes out for an hour; its bloom, dark and cold. “It had been raining for seven years…(Bradbury 1)”. The characters adapt to the setting due to the fact that it rains for 7 year. They are used to it.

-----------------

*NOTE* The deadline for this particular assignment has now passed. Any comments listed below are *ONLY* for the reposting of comments that I specifically asked to be revised or are ones from non-student posters. Any 'student' posts below that missed the assignment deadline will not get credit for the assignment. ~ Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: Sade Loiseau at September 20, 2013 01:00 PM

Maxx Howarth
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG122 Academic Writing II CA12
3 February 2014

QUESTION #8:
Writers depend on imagery to paint the mental pictures they want you to see with your mind's eye. (a.) Identify the details in the story that describe the climatic conditions and environment Bradbury imagines to exist on the planet Venus. (b.) How does the author make Venus' setting convincing? How do these images contrast with Margot's memories of Earth's climate?

ANSWER:
(a.) Within the story, "All Summer in a Day," Bradbury uses one main instance to act as a description of his ideal image of Venus. Whilst talking about the endless growth and death of the forests, he states, "It had been raining for seven years; thousands upon thousands of days compounded and filled from one end to the other with rain, with the drum and gush of water, with the sweet crystal fall of showers and the concussion of storms so heavy they were tidal waves come over the islands. A thousand forests had been crushed under the rain and grown up a thousand times to be crushed again. And this was the way life was forever on the planet Venus" (Bradbury 1).
(b.) Bradbury makes Venus' setting convincing by describing the children of the class dreaming of what little recollection they had of the sun, only having seen it for the one day, seven years ago. However, having been only two years of age, nearly all of the children were mentally strained by trying to bring forth such an old memory. After dreaming, "they always awoke to the tatting drum, the endless shaking, down of clear bead necklaces upon the roof, the walk, the gardens, the forests" (Bradbury 1). However, Margot had only moved to Venus five years ago, and thus "she remembered the sun and the way the sun was and the sky was when she was four in Ohio" (Bradbury 2). Thus, the children of the class were envious of Margot and all displayed hatred towards her (Bradbury 3).

Posted by: Maxx Howarth at February 3, 2014 04:42 PM

Berlin Waters
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
4 February 2014

Question #9:
Before the children see the sun, they hate Margot for “reasons, of big and little consequence.” After the children see the sun, they “could not meet each other’s glances” when they think of what they have done to Margot. How has seeing the sun changed the children? Identify quotations from the text to defend your position.

Answer:
Before the sun came out all of the children seemed to have a hatred toward Margot. It's as if the children were so jealous of her and how she had seen the sun before them, how she remembered it and knew what it felt like and they did not. They envied her memory of it so much they even denied that she had any. "It's like a fire" Margot would tell them, and they would scream back "you're lying, you don't remember!" (Bradbury 3).

After the sun had came and gone and the children had seen it and felt it in all its glory they remembered what they had done to Margot. They had abandoned her in the closet not to be let out to see the one thing that made her happy. The world around them had turned dark again, not to see light for seven more years. They came back inside, "their faces solemn and pale" as the children had remembered what they had done. They realized that she had been right all along about the sun and it was exactly how she described it to them. With "their faces blue and terrible" they went and released Margot from behind the closet finding her in silence (Bardbury 6).

Posted by: Berlin Waters at February 4, 2014 05:30 PM

Makenzie Holler
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
4 February 2013

Question #8: Writers depend on imagery to paint the mental pictures they want you to see with your mind's eye. (a.) Identify the details in the story that describe the climatic conditions and environment Bradbury imagines to exist on the planet Venus. (b.) How does the author make Venus's setting convincing? How do these images contrast with Margot's memories of Earth's climate?

Answer: Bradbury uses countless amounts of imagery to portray the setting. Bradbury says Venus is "from one end to the other with rain, with the drum and gush of water, with the sweet crystal fall of showers and the concussion of storms so heavy they were tidal waves come over the island" (Bradbury 1). The setting that he portrays sounds awful to live in. To live in such a rainy community all day everyday would be terrible.
Bradbury makes this setting convincing through what Margot thinks. She believe that the rain is going to stop, which we soon find out that it stops for a little while. The little kids were so used to the rain, they barely could remember what the sun was life. Margot "remembered the sun and the way the sun was and the sky was when she was four in Ohio" (Bardbury 2). It rained so much in Venus that Bradbury says "Thousands forests had been crushed under the rain and grown up a thousand times to be crushed again" (Bradbury 1). All the kids know nothing more than rain.

Posted by: Makenzie Holler at February 4, 2014 06:14 PM

Traneisha Cunningham
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II
2 February 2013

QUESTION #4:
Explain why Margot doesn't fit in with the other children. Identify quotations from the text to defend your position.

ANSWER:
Margot doesn't fit in with the other children because she mainly arrived to Venus five years ago. Only having arrived to Venus five years ago, Margot stood apart when she could remember the sun while the other children could not since they had come to Venus when they were only two years old (Bradbury 2). Bradbury mentioned multiple examples in text showing how Margot didn't fit with the other children.

The first example Bradbury showed within the text that Margot is different when the children stood by the window. "Margot stood apart from these children who could never remember a time when there wasn't rain and rain and rain" (Bradbury 1).
"They edged away from her, they would not look at her. She felt them go away. And this was because she would play no games with them in the echoing tunnels of the underground city" (Bradbury 2). The reader first ntoices how Margot is treated by the other children and is given an insight of why they treat her like this.

Another example Bradbury gives readers is when he gives readers a look into how all the children act in class. "When the class sang songs about happiness and life and games her lips barely moved. Only when they sang about the sun and the summer did her lips moved as she watched the drenched windows (Bradbury 2). This is one way Margot stood apart from the rest. She longed to see the sun like the other children but what set her apart is the fact that she remembered it while the others did. She would then talk about the sun yet the other children would not believe her, thinking that she was just lying.

Posted by: Traneisha Cunningham at February 4, 2014 06:54 PM

Bianca T. Smith
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Academic Writing II CA12
4 Feb. 2014

Question #5: Every seven years when the sun comes out the plant life on Venus changes. What happens? Identify quotations from the text to defend your position.

Answer:When the sun comes out, the environment changes. "It was the color of flaming bronze and it was very large. And the sky around it was a blazing blue tile color. And the jungle burned with sunlight as the children, released from their spell, rushed out, yelling, into the springtime" (Bradbury 4).


Posted by: Bianca T. Smith at February 4, 2014 08:26 PM

Gabriela Caminero
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
4 February 2014

Question #2:
Identify the Point of view that Bradbury uses to tell “All Summer in a Day” and identify both the dynamic, round characters and the static, flat characters he created. Of the flat characters, which ones are stereotypical, boilerplate types? Who is the antagonist? Explain.

Answer:
The point of view that Bradbury uses to tell the story is third person point of view. The dynamic round character is Margot. Throughout the story they talk about her living on Earth and they describe how much she missed the sun, therefore describing her a bit better. The quote, “ There was talk that her father and mother were taking her back to earth next year; it seemed vital to her that they do so, though it would mean the loss of thousands of dollars to her family.”(Bradbury, 3) gives enough details about her to make her a round character. She is also a dynamic character because she does change throughout the story. In the beginning she is unhappy, quiet and reserved; however, even though at the very end of the story she does go back to her old self, she does change in the sense that she smiles and for a few minutes she is happy. The flat characters that are created are the other students in the classroom and the teacher. The antagonist of the story are the children, specifically William because they spend the whole story tormenting and picking on Margot.

Posted by: Gabriela Caminero at February 4, 2014 08:39 PM

Sawyer Hand
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
5 February 2014

Question: Explain why Margot doesn't fit in with the other children. Use examples from the text to support your answer.

Answer: Margot doesn't fit in with the other children because she is able to remember the sun unlike all the other children who were too young to remember it. This is easy to tell with lines such as, " And then, of course, the biggest crime of all was that she had come here only five years ago from Earth, and she remembered the sun and the way the sun was and the sky was when she was four in Ohio. And they, they had been on Venus all their lives, and they had been only two years old when last the sun came out and had long since forgotten the color and heat of it and the way it really was. But Margot remembered" (Bradbury 4). You see this more in the story in little lines such as, "You're lying, you don't remember"(Bradbury 5). Little lines like this throughout the story show that this is why she clearly doesn't fit in with the other kids.

Posted by: sawyer hand at February 4, 2014 09:05 PM

Jeffrey Wingfield
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
4 February 2014
We have already discussed setting to some degree. Explain the setting of the story and how
the characters in it have adapted to it. Identify quotations from the text to defend your
position.

The setting in the story is Bradbury’s understanding of Venus. It rains all day every day for seven years at a time. Bradbury writes, “It had been raining for seven years; thousand upon thousands of days compounded and filled from one end to the other with rain, with the drum and gush of water, with the sweet crystal fall of showers and the concussion of storms so heavy they were tidal waves come over the islands.”(Bradbury 1) The characters no longer notice the rain and look forward to their one day in the sun.

Posted by: Jeffrey Wingfield at February 4, 2014 10:36 PM

James Jessop
Dr. B. Lee. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
4th February 2014

Question 2 - (a.) Identify the point of view that Bradbury uses to tell “All Summer in a Day” and (b.) Identify both the dynamic, round characters and the static, flat characters he created. Of the flat characters, which ones are stereotypical, boilerplate types? Who is the antagonist? Explain.

Answer – The point of view being used by Bradbury is third person objective. I believe this as it is written from a neutral perspective, everybody is written about but there is not one specific person whose thoughts are being told. A round character is normally one is the center of attention in a fiction writing, you are told enough about a character that they become memorable (Roberts 68). In this case, I believe Margot to be this character. Although she would not be classed as the `cool` kid in the story, being bullied by others throughout, an example being “Hey, everyone, let’s put her in a closet before teacher comes!” (Bradbury 3), she is an ever present figure and Bradbury even finishes the piece with “They unlocked the door, even more slowly, and let Margot out” (Bradbury 6) which leaves you thinking about the character even after finishing the story. A flat or static character Bradbury creates would be the teacher. The teacher is a very one dimensional character in this story and doesn’t really do a lot, nor provides the story any real excitement. “Now don’t go too far, called the teacher after them.” (Bradbury 3) Is a quote which I believe shows the flatness of the character as it’s very basic. The character is there because it needs to be, not necessarily to add great excitement or mystery to the story.
An antagonist is someone who is hostile to somebody or something. In this story, I believe the antagonist to be William. ““Speak when you’re spoken to.” He gave her a shove.” (Bradbury 2) Is a quote that shows this. He is needlessly aggressive and confrontational towards Margot, he is antagonistic.

Posted by: James Jessop at February 4, 2014 11:49 PM

Sarah A Ellis
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
5 February 2014

Question 7:
In “All Summer in a Day,” the children discriminated against Margot. (a) Why do people often discriminate against each other? (b) Does your reason apply to the situation in “All Summer in a Day?” Speculate on the motivation of the children to discriminate against Margot. Identify quotations from the text to defend your position.

Answer:
When a person is discriminating another, it means that they are against a person based on class, race, ethnicity, gender, or any other categories that define that certain person. People discriminate others because of jealousy of the individual person or disliking the person for being a part of a certain group that they are categorized in. The other children discriminated her for Margot states that she remembers what the sun looked like (Bradbury 3). The other children were jealousy that she remembered and they were too young to recall what the sun looks like.

Posted by: Sarah Ellis at February 5, 2014 12:53 AM

Hubert Reuter
Dr .B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
05 February 2014

Question:
Plot, says Roberts, can be discovered by identifying the conflicts. Identify the conflicts in “All
Summer in a Day.” Of the conflicts you can identify, what is the central one and how is it
introduced? Give one example of how the plot is developed toward the structural climax. What
is the climax? How is the chief conflict finally resolved?

Answer:
Of the many conflicts in All Summer in a day the ones that I can gather are person vs. person. This is when William pushes Margot, "What're you looking at?" said William.
Margot said nothing. "Speak when you're spoken to." He gave her a shove (Bradbury 2). There is also person vs. group when the children bully Margot, crying, back into a tunnel, a room, a closet, where they slammed and locked the door. They stood looking at the door and saw it tremble from her beating and throwing herself against it (Bradbury 3-4).One other conflict I recognized was person vs. nature. When Margot wanted to see the sun but cannot because of the rain. The conflict that I find to be the main one is person vs. group, or Margot vs. The other children. Finally the climax of this story is that the sun actually does come out and all of the kids go out and enjoy it, seeing for themselves that Margot was right. The chief conflict is finally resolved by the children letting Margot out of the closet.

Posted by: Hubert Reuter at February 5, 2014 10:00 AM

Sergio Velazquez
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng122 - ACADEMIC WRITING II 

Question 3. Plot, says Roberts, can be discovered by identifying the conflicts. Identify the conflicts in “All Summer in a Day.” Of the conflicts you can identify, what is the central one and how is it
introduced? Give one example of how the plot is developed toward the structural climax. What
is the climax? How is the chief conflict finally resolved?

The main conflict in the story is, the sun coming out. This story is staged on Venus where no one has ever seen the sun, “ so every person on the planet has never seen the sun, except for the people who have commuted from earth.”(Ray 1) The story is set in the present but the protagonist has vivid flash backs of the sun, giving the reader the understanding of how important it is to her. After all the children see the sun the chief conflict is resolved, because even thought are protagonist does not see the sun again he can at least hold it in her hand.

Posted by: Sergio Velazquez at February 5, 2014 10:14 AM

Shelby Marrero
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG Academic Writing II CA12
5 Feb.2014

Question #9:
Before the children see the sun, they hate Margot for “reasons, of big and little consequence.”
After the children see the sun, they “could not meet each other’s glances” when they think of
what they have done to Margot. How has seeing the sun changed the children? Identify
quotations from the text to defend your position.

Answer:
See the sun has changed the children because they realized that while they were enjoying the sun, they forgot that Margot was still in the closet and she didn't have a chance to see the sun. They probably felt ashamed because "They could not meet each other’s glances. Their faces were solemn and pale. They looked at their hands and feet, their faces down." (Bradbury 6) Knowing Margot will have to wait seven more years to see the sun again.

Posted by: Shelby Marrero at February 5, 2014 10:15 AM

Sawyer Hand and James Jessop
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
7 February 2014

Question: Before the children see the sun, they hate Margot for “reasons, of big and little consequences.” After the children see the sun, they “could not meet each other’s glances” when they think of what they have done to Margot. How has seeing the sun changed the children? Identify quotations from the text to defend your position.

Answer: At the start of the story, before the children have ever seen the sun, they are really mean to Margot since she claims to remember the sun. They are constantly making fun of her and making jokes about the sun. Once they finally get to see the sun their attitudes change. At first they are just really happy to finally see it and they are running around playing. The author shows this in lines such as, “The children lay out, laughing, on the jungle mattress, and heard it sigh and squeak under them, resilient and alive. They ran among the trees, they slipped and fell, they pushed each other, they played hide-and-seek and tag, but most of all they squinted at the sun until the tears ran down their faces” (Bradbury 5). This shows how much the children truly enjoyed the sun. After this it starts to slowly rain again and the children realize what they have done. They immediately start to regret everything they have ever done to Margot and feel terrible that they had locked her in a closet while the sun came out. The author shows this on the last page with quotations such as, “Then one of them gave a little cry. ‘Margot!’” (Bradbury 6). He continues with this later on in the page with the paragraph, “They stood as if someone had driven them, like so many stakes, into the floor. They looked at each other and then looked away. They glanced out at the world that was raining now and raining and raining steadily. They could not meet each other’s glances. Their faces were solemn and pale. They looked at their hands and feet, their faces down” (Bradbury 6). This really shows that the kids realize what they have done and that they were wrong. The story ends with them letting Margot out of the closet.

Posted by: Sawyer Hand and James Jessop at February 5, 2014 11:04 AM

Shelby Marrero & Bianca Smith
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG Academic Writing CA12
5 Feb 2014

Question #5:
Every seven years when the Sun comes out the plant life on Venus changes. What happens? Identify quotations from the text to defend your position.

Answer:
For seven years without sun the jungle grows nonstop because in the story is says, "They stopped running and stood in the great jungle that covered Venus, that grew and never stopped growing, tumultuously, even as you watched it." (Bradbury 4)

Posted by: Shelby Marrero & Bianca Smith at February 5, 2014 11:17 AM

Jared Arnold, Hubert Reuter
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
6 Feb 2014

Question 6:
This story uses many comparisons to present ideas. For example, when the children recall that
Margot was left behind in the closet, the author writes, “They stood as if someone had driven
them, like so many stakes, into the floor.” Two kinds of literary comparisons are similes and
metaphors. A simile, such as the example above, is a comparison that uses “like” or “as.” A
metaphor is a comparison that does not use “like” or “as,” e.g. “War is Hell,” or “Love is War,” or
“Love is Hell,” etc. Identify other similes or metaphors on the story. Identify quotations from
the text to defend your position.


Answer:
On page 4 the writer uses the simile "feeling the sun on their cheeks like a warm iron"(Bradbury 4). Drawing the illusion that the children were looking strait up at the sun allowing all the sun light to hit the in the face. Found on page 3 the writer uses the Simlie "its like the fire in the stove" (Bradbury 3). This is comparing the heat the sun is giving off to the heat a fire gives off from a stove. The Writer uses this illustration because the children are experiencing the heat from the sun for the first time and that would be the first thing they were able to compare the heat to.

On page 1 the writer uses the metaphor "with the sweet crystal fall of showers" (Bradbury 1). Is comparing the rain from the storm to clear crystals.

Posted by: Jared Arnold Hubert at February 6, 2014 06:31 PM

Gabriela Caminero, Sergio Velazquez
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
5 February 2014

Question #4:
Explain why Margot doesn’t fit in with the other children. Identify quotations from the text to
defend your position.

Answer:
Margot doesn’t fit in with the other children because she saw the sun and since she has not seen it in so many years she acts strange. There was an incident that happened when all the children realized that she was strange, “And once, a month ago, she had refused to shower in the school shower rooms, had clutched her hands to her ears and over her head, screaming the water mustn’t touch her head.” (Bradbury 3). After that day everyone thought that she was strange.

Posted by: Gabriela Caminero at February 6, 2014 09:24 PM

Traneisha Cunningham Sarah Ellis
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
5 February 2013

QUESTION #7:
In “All Summer in a Day,”the children discriminated against Margot. (a.) Why do people often discriminate against each other? (b.) Does your reason apply to the situation in“All Summer in a Day”? Speculate on the motivation of the children to discriminate against Margot. Identify quotations from the text to defend your position.

ANSWER:
People often discriminate against each other because they feel uncomfortable and out of place when another person seems to be different from them. Yes my reason does apply to the situation in "All Summer in a Day" and it can be shown how the children discriminated against Margot because she was different from the rest. Margot had only come to Venus a few years ago while the other children had been there since they were two years old (Bradbury 2). Margot was not like the others in multiple ways for instance, when they played in the underground tunnel Margot stayed behind and didn't play (Bradbury 2). The main example would be that while the other children waited for the sun to come out the imagined how it would be and feel while Margot remembered how the sun was. Margot was different from the other children and they discriminated against her and also punished her for it by not only pushing her while they waited for the sun but also locked her in the closet while the sun came out for two hours not allowing her to enjoy the sun like the rest of the children.

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*NOTE* The deadline for this particular assignment has now passed. Any comments listed below are *ONLY* for the reposting of comments that I specifically asked to be revised or are ones from non-student posters. Any 'student' posts below that missed the assignment deadline will not get credit for the assignment.


~ Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: Traneisha Cunningham Sarah Ellis at February 7, 2014 10:07 AM

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