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January 05, 2013

Bisecting Beowulf: Dividing What You've Seen and What You've Read



CAPTION: The Death of Beowulf
Image Source:http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/eng/hml/img/04000.jpg

Students,

. . . enter your work on this text as prescribed in class.

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To see other English-Blog entries on the subject of Literature, please click HERE.

Posted by lhobbs at January 5, 2013 09:38 AM

Readers' Comments:

4. (1) Identify who/what plays the role of a/the “ring-giver” in this epic and (2) give an example of “ring-giving” and explain what it represents.

The Lord is the ring-giver. A ring giver is usually the king and it is someone who gives sort of a reward for a job well done. Usually the king got all of the treasure after a battle so he would give a piece of it to a warrior for vanquishing a foe.

Posted by: Quinten J at October 16, 2008 11:19 AM

Anna R
Engl 225
CA01
Oct 16th, 2008
Dr. Hobbs

Question 6.
Grendel and his mother are both monsters descending from Cain. The reason why Grendel wanted to attack the Danes was because of loneliness and bitterness which he developed over the years due to not having any friends and being an outskirt to everyone. When Grendel is killed eventually by Beowulf, his mother gets angry and wants revenge on Beowulf. That is the reason for her attack; however, she is also killed by Beowulf.

Posted by: Anna R. at October 16, 2008 10:21 PM

2. Identify the religious background(s) of both (1) the characters in the poem and (2) the poet who apparently composed and recorded their story.
The introduction leads us to believe that this is a pre-Christian society, leading me to say that this area was of the Norse religion. The poet however is clearly Christian cutting out almost all mention on any of the Norse god’s names and making it so one might think that even these people believed in Christianity.

Posted by: John Anderson at October 17, 2008 10:19 AM

Walter Perkins
Eng 225
CA 01
Dr. Hobbs

10-15-08 Checking Quiz

1. Antongist are Grendel, Grendel mother and Dragon
2. They are Pageans. They worship multiple Gods.
3. Geographic Regions are sweden, Danes, Denmark, Anglo-Saxons.
4. King gives gifts. gives them to his companion. Represent loyalty.
5. Origin of Grendel's Mother. Killed by Beowulf, Came from Cain. Cain killed Abel
6. Grendel attacks because he was lonely and separated from humanity. Grendel Mother attacks because Grendel was killed and wanted revenge.
7. Kill monsters, dragons. Winning. Being the best
8. Cope, bard. Tells stories, musicals.
9. Trials. Danes and Swedes, Danish royalty house. Geats and Swedes.
10. Violence. Be a man, be tough. irony because in civiliazation the goal is for everyone to get along, but with violence we are worshipped.

Posted by: Walter P at October 17, 2008 11:08 AM

10. Following the instructions given to you in-class, explain what other “great triumphs” Beowulf accredited to his “younger” self when he first greeted King Hrothgar at Heorot.

When Beowulf met with King Hrothgar at Heorot, he told him all about his accomplishments when he was younger. He told the king how his awesome strength is known by everyone and that:
“They had seen me bolstered in the blood of enemies
when I battled and bound five beasts,
raided a troll-nest and in the night-sea
slaughtered sea-brutes. I have suffered extremes
and avenged the Geats (their enemies brought it
upon themselves; I devastated them). (419-424)


Quinten Jones
ENG 225 CA01
October 18, 2008

Posted by: Quinten J at October 18, 2008 01:56 PM

Paola Silvestri
ENG 225
Question 1
Following the instructions given to you in-class, explain why “a young prince,” such as Beowulf “must be prudent […] giving freely while his father lives.”
A// This quotation is talking about Beowulf being the son of Shield. A young prince must be prudent while his father lives so that when he becomes an adult, he is respected and admired. “So that afterwards in age when fighting starts/ steadfast companions will stand by him/and hold the line/Behavior that is admired is the path to power among people everywhere.” (Pg. 1632; Lines 22-25) If Beowulf is prudent while growing up he will have many companions surrounding him, who will admire and respect him. Prudent behavior is what will give Beowulf power among people everywhere.
Norton Anthology of World Literature. Beowulf. Volume B; pg. 1626-1702

Posted by: Paola S at October 18, 2008 02:11 PM

4. Following the instructions given to you in-class, explain what Hrothgar was said to have done in the Prologue (and, was thereafter known for) after he had been favored by the “fortunes of war.”

It was explained that Hrothgar was favored by the fortunes of war because he used all his money to build a mead-hall for everyone to drink and spend time together. This was a place that all people of Hrothgar could go and tell war stories and be honored by the king. Hrothgar “handed down orders for men to work on a great mead-hall meant to be the wonder of the world forever” (line 69-70) pp. 1633. Throughout the story everyone is always gathering in the mead-hall to have big meetings and hear stories or war and battle. For example this would be just a place that you would go to hang out with all your friends and have a good time. It was a place for everyone to go and have fun.


Lawall, Sarah, ed. The Norton Anthology of World Literature. Ed. Maynyard Mack. 2nd

ed. Vol. A. Ser. 3. New York, NY: W. W Norton & Company, Inc, 2002. 2-1199.

--.”Beowulf”.Trans. Seamus Heaney, Lawall, Sarah. pp.1633.

Posted by: Nichole Tyler at October 19, 2008 02:06 PM

Alex Slavin
October 19-08
English 225
Dr. Hobbs
Question 2
Quiz
2. Following the instructions given to you in-class, explain what happened to the person known as “Shield” and what his “warrior band” of Danes did for him afterwards.
-His name is Shield Sheafson and he builds a mead hall called Heorot where his warriors can gather to drink and receive gifts and exchange stories. “His warrior band did what he bade them when he laid down the law among the Danes: they shouldered him out to the sea’s flood, the chief they revered who had long ruled them”. (pg. 1632, 28-31) Shield Sheafson has traveled far and saved this group of Danes; they were in his debt. When it was time for him to leave they praised him. “They stretched their beloved lord in his boat, laid out by the mast, amidships, the great ring-giver”. (pg. 1632, 34-36) Shield Sheafson was sent out to see with more treasure then he knew what do with. When he reached the world of Heorogar, Hrothgar, he wanted to continue his leadership and gave orders to men to build the great mead-hall that people continue to come and tell their tales.

"Beowulf." The Norton Anthology of World Literature. Second ed. Vol. B. 1632-1634.

Posted by: Alex Slavin at October 19, 2008 07:38 PM

Anna R
Engl 225
CA01
Oct 19th, 2008
Dr. Hobbs

8. Following the instructions given to you in-class, explain what “lays” are and about whom they were sung when “Grendel ruled in defiance of right.” What were their “tone”? Note: you have already read several “Lays” by Marie de France for this course.

In the lines of “Sad lays were sung about the beset king, / the vicious raids and ravages of Grendel,/ his long and unrelenting feud” (pg 1635, line 151) it is explained why lays were sung. Grendel was a lonely and bitter beast, who attacked the Danes and killed everything in sight every night he came to their land. Since he was lonely, he went to Heorot at night to listen to the bards but when he heard the songs about god’s creation of the earth, he got mad and started ravaging since his family is said to descend from Cain, the evil son of Adam and Eve and murder of his brother of Abel. “Cain’s clan, whom the creator had outlawed / and condemned as outcasts. For the killing of Abel” (Pg 1634, line 106). A lai is a song form which was composed in Northern Europe and had a lamenting tone. Whether they were about love, war or death, they were lamenting and written in poetic style with different stanzas.

Mack, Maynard. World Literature. New York: W.W. Norton&Company, 2002.

Posted by: Anna R. at October 19, 2008 08:10 PM

Kamille G

10. Integrating quotations from the text to explain and bolster your answer, explain what other “great triumphs” Beowulf accredited to his “younger” self when he first greeted King Hrothgar at Heorot. Be specific, not general, and cite the line numbers and page(s) where your answers are found.

When Beowulf first greets King Hrothgar at the Hereot he informs King Hrothgar that in the past he has succeeded in significant battles when he says, “When I was younger, I had great triumphs” (lines 408-409). Beowulf then tells Hrothgar what his actual triumphs were when he explains to Hrothgar about his victory in his battles with five beasts when he says, “They had seen me boltered in the blood of enemies when I battled and bound five beasts,” (lines 419-420), and also refers to his victory in killing the sea-brutes when he says, “and in the night-sea slaughtered sea-brutes.” (line 421-422). Beowulf then goes on to say that he has succeeded in raiding a troll-nest when he says, “when I … raided a troll-nest” (lines420-421), and avenging the Geats when he says, “I have suffered extremes and avenged the Geats… I devastated them” (lines 423-424).

Heaney, Seamus. “Beowulf.” The Norton Anthology of World Literature.
Sarah Lawall, ed. New York: W.W.Norton, 2002.

Kamille G
English 225 Sec. 1
20/10/08

Posted by: Kamille G at October 19, 2008 09:32 PM

Brandon Mckoy

October 20th 2008

MWF 12:30-1:20


1. Integrating quotations from the text to explain and bolster your answer, explain why “a young prince”, such as Beowulf “must be prudent […] giving freely while his father lives.” Be specific, not general, and cite the line numbers and page(s) where your answers are found.

In the text, page 1632 lines 20-24 states that Beowulf, “A young prince must be prudent like that/giving freely while his father lives/so that afterward in age when fighting starts/steadfast companions will stand by him and hold the line”. This means that Beowulf must make wise decisions that will benefit all and provide for the future, because when his father is no longer around he is on his own and will need the people to fight along with him. Therefore he needs to show and prove to the people that he is a good leader and can make decisions with good judgment and sense so that they will trust him and fight with him. Line 24-25 states “behavior that’s admired is the path to power among people everywhere” which backs up what I was saying that Beowulf need to make wise decisions and have good behavior that the people admires so he will have that power with them.

Posted by: Brandon Mckoy at October 19, 2008 10:25 PM

strahil s.

Dr. Hobbs

ENG-225

October 20, 2008

9. Following the instructions given to you in-class, explain who challenged the Geats with the phrase “What kind of men are you?” What was this person’s occupation/purpose and why might have he been concerned?

The watchman challenges the Geats upon their arrival at Dane's shores. His duty is to watch the waters for comers who may bring danger to his people.

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Note from Professor:

Failed to follow instructions: No quotations integrated into the text, no in-text parenthetical citations with page numbers and line numbers of quotations, and no MLA citation of work cited See other student's entries. Also NOT submitted to turnitin.com as directed.

Dr. Hobbs


Posted by: strahil s. at October 20, 2008 01:30 AM

Myles Godet
October 20, 2008
English 225
12:30

5. Following the instructions given to you in-class, explain, explain who (and where) the “prowler” was and why, exactly, he was “harrowed.”

In the poem Beowulf the character of Grendal is considered to be a “prowler”. This is because Grendal is a descendent of Cain. The descendents of Cain like Cain were banished from society as a result of Cain killing his brother Able (106–107). As a result of being an outcast his entire life Grendal developed jealousy and hatred towards the rest of society. He preyed on Hrothgar's warriors in the king’s mead hall and was known for being very menacing and showing no remorse for his actions (137).

Posted by: Myles Godet at October 20, 2008 01:37 AM

Question #2
While still in good health Shield died, and as a tribute to their good king his warriors gave him a pagan burial as he requested. (30-35) “Far-fetched treasures were piled upon him, and precious gear…. Bladed weapons and coats of mail.” (36-40) were set upon him on the boat at set adrift. (pg. 1632-1633)

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Note from Professor:

Failed to follow instructions: Question was not re-typed and no MLA citation of work cited. See other students' entries.

Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: JustinW at October 20, 2008 10:05 AM

ENG 225
Oct. 20th
Dr. Hobbs

3. Integrating quotations from the text to explain and bolster your answer, explain what, exactly, "fell to Beow" after the death of "Shield." How was he "regarded" and whom did he rule? Who were his children? Be specific, not general, and cite the line numbers and page(s) where your answers are found.

After the fall of Shield Sheafson, the forts fall to Beowulf after he is able to escape. "Thence Beowulf fled
through strength of himself and his swimming power,
though alone, and his arms were laden with thirty
coats of mail, when he came to the sea!" (Gutenberg Beowulf Line 1930-1932) Beowulf is well regarded and rules the Danes for many years. Beowulf has no children and after his death, Wiglaf is named king.

Widger, David The Project Gutenberg EBook of Beowulf: July 23rd 2008

Posted by: Joseph S. at October 20, 2008 10:37 AM

3. Following the instructions given to you in-class, explain what , exactly, “fell to Beow” after the death of “Shield.” How was he “regarded” and whom did he rule? Who were his children?
Sheild was the ruler of the north and and the people he ruled thought highly of him. He had a son and his name was Grain and when he died Beowulf ruled his land.

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Note from Professor:

Failed to follow instructions: No quotations integrated into the text, no in-text parenthetical citations with page numbers and line numbers of quotations, and no MLA citation of work cited.

Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: John Daniel at October 20, 2008 10:45 AM

Shayne Tavares
Eng 225 12:30-1:20

7. Identify to whom “the Eternal Lord had exacted a price” for “the killing of Abel” and what, exactly, that price was. Be specific, not general, and cite the line numbers and page(s) where your answers are found.

Answer: In the story of Beowulf they provide a background story as to the origin of both Grendel and his mother. The character who had received was exacted a price for killing Able, was his own brother Cane. Cane killed Able out of jealousy due to Cane’s sacrifice not begin rejected and not Able’s. The punishment, or price exacted by the Eternal Lord to Cane was punishment from his current home land known to him and a make given to him which would be passed down from each generation of his family.
Citation: This can be found in the introduction of Beowulf Volume B


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Note from Professor:

No quotations integrated into the text, no in-text parenthetical citations with page numbers and line numbers of quotations, and no MLA citation of work cited See other student's entries.

Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: S.Tavares at October 20, 2008 11:11 AM

Walter Perkins
Engl 225
CA01
10-19-08
Dr. Hobbs

8. Integrating quotations from text to explain and bolster your answer, explain what “lays” are and about whom they were sung when “Grendel ruled in defiance of right. “ What were their “tone”? Note: you have already read several “Lais” by Marie de France for this course. Be specific, not general, and cite the line numbers and page (s) where your answers are found.

On page 1635, line 151 it states “Sad lays were sung about the beset king, the vicious raids and ravages of Grendel, his long unrelenting feud”. The line explains why the lays were sung. Grendel was shunned from humanity and very biter and he attacked the Danes because of those reasons. Grendel had multiple attacks on the Danes at night and killed everything moving. Grendel would go to Heorot and listen to them sing songs about God’s creation of Earth and would get very angry as a result. Grendel family is descended from Cain, who is the evil son of Adam and Eve who killed his brother Abel. A lay is a song that is composed in Northern Europe with a lamenting tone. The songs either talked about love, war or death or were very poetic in style.

Posted by: Walter P at October 20, 2008 11:18 AM

6. Following the instructions given to you in-class, explain the function and place of the “skilled poet,” what his “clear song” was about, and how it made the “prowler” feel.
“the clear song of a skilled poet / telling with mastery of man’s beginnings,” (page 1634 line 90-91) telling of “Cain’s clan, whom the Creator had outlawed and condemned as outcasts” (page 1634 line 106-107) this upset Grendel who then began to cause trouble “Grendel was the name of this grim demon / haunting the marches, marauding round the heath / and the desolate fens;” (page 1634 line 102-104). If the Christian author was right then it is a shame that the poet decided to recount man’s beginning.

“Beowulf." Lawall, Sarah. The Norton Anthology of World Literature book B. Ed. Maynard Mack. New York: Norton & Company Inc., 2002. 1626-1702.

Posted by: john anderson at October 20, 2008 11:26 AM

D.J. Garry
Dr. Hobbs
English 225
20 October 2008
Beowulf
6. Following the instructions given to you in-class, explain the function and place of the “skilled poet,” what his “clear song” was about, and how it made the “prowler” feel.
The skilled poet was a bard or a jester. He entertained guests in the mead hall with songs that were telling stories. His clear song was about how God created the earth. This is explained in the following quote, “telling the mastery of man’s beginnings” (Lawall 1634). This made the prowler feel lonely and angry.

Beowulf. Norton Anthology of World Literature : 100-1500 with Inserts. Ed. Sarah Lawall. Boston: W. W. Norton & Company, Incorporated, 2002. 1634.

Posted by: david g. at October 20, 2008 12:19 PM

Myron Kirchner
ENG 225
M-W-F
Following the instructions given to you in-class, explain who challenged the Geats with the phrase “What kind of men are you?” What was this person’s occupation/purpose and why might have he been concerned?

The Watchmen at the coast was the one who asked Beowulf and his warrior this question. He is supposed to guard the coast against possible spies and invaders. He was intimidated by the presence of these, but most of all he was intimidated by the sight of the Beowulf. He guessed right away that Beowulf is some sort of a hero.


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Note from Professor:

Failed to follow instructions: No quotations integrated into the text, no in-text parenthetical citations with page numbers and line numbers of quotations, and no MLA citation of work cited. See other student's entries.

Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: Myron Kirchner at October 20, 2008 12:28 PM

22 October 2008

ENG 225 Students:

Be sure to read all of the material below from the 20th of October post. For your homework, contact the others in your group (if you are in a group, see the link HERE) and plan your first out-of-class meeting. Secondly, in the comment box below, type up a paragraph outlining the major and minor differences between the text of Beowulf and the film Beowulf and Grendel which we screened (most of) in class today and the past two meetings. Don't forget that the peer-review day for paper 2 is on Friday, our next meeting.

Dr. Hobbs
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*FROM*20 October 2008

ENG 225 Students,

Today in class, there was a second quiz which I will expect to be answered on BOTH the English-blog here AND on the newest folder on turnitin.com called "Quiz II for Beowulf."

For those of you who were absent today, email me BEFORE Tuesday to get your quiz question if you want to get credit.

Remember to answer ONLY the number you selected from the pile and then signed up for on the attendance sheet today (don’t forget—I won’t remind you). Follow the instructions carefully—it IS a quiz. The questions and instructions adapted liberally from ones developed by Professor Boyer of Saint Xavier University's "ENG 201: English Literature to 1700" HERE) were:

DIRECTIONS: This is a quiz question—Do NOT misinterpret this assignment as “optional.” Retype your question (NOT THE INSTRUCTIONS), skip a space, and then answer in full the question below. I will expect to see “quotations” from the text to support your answer with in-text parenthetical citations mentioning the specific line and page number you are quoting, e.g. (line 190, p. 1636). This is good practice for how you should be “engaging” your primary texts in your second paper. Due on BOTH Turnitin.com AND English-blog by our next class meeting.

[Prologue: The Rise of the Danish Nation] (lines 1-85)

1. Realize that this prologue introduces the Danes, not Beowulf or his people the Geats. What was unusual about the way Shield came to be ruler of the Danes? What was his funeral like? What relation is Hrothgar to Shield?


[Heorot is Attacked] (lines 86-188)

2. What magnificent work did Hrothgar undertake? Who attacked it, and with what result? How long did the attacks last? What was the response of the Danes?


[The Hero Comes to Heorot] (lines 189-490)

3. What does Beowulf do when he hears of Hrothgar's problems with Grendel?

4. Whom do the Geats first meet when they arrive in Denmark? What does he do, and what do they do?

5. After their arrival to Denmark, the Geats meet Hrothgar's “herald.” Who is he? What does he tell them? What does he tell Hrothgar? What does Hrothgar respond? Are you surprised that Hrothgar knows Beowulf so well?

6. What does Beowulf tell Hrothgar when he enters Heorot? What did Hrothgar do for Beowulf's father?

[Feast at Heorot] (lines 491-661)

7. Of what, specifically, does Unferth accuse Beowulf? What is Beowulf’s reply to Unferth? How is this episode relevant to the poem as a whole? Of what does Beowulf accuse Unferth?

8. What is Queen Wealhtheow doing during the feasting at Heorot?


[The Fight with Grendel] (lines 662-835)

9. Heroic poetry normally has a scene in which the hero arms for battle. What is different about Beowulf's preparations for his fight with Grendel?

10. Once Beowulf has arrived, what happens when Grendel enters Heorot? How does Beowulf fight with him? What happens when Grendel tries to leave? Does Grendel escape? What does he leave behind?


[Celebration at Heorot] (lines 836-1250)

11. When the Danes and Geats return from following Grendel's tracks to the “mere,” someone sings in Beowulf's presence, comparing him to Sigemund and saying that he was not like Heremod (lines 883-914). How is Beowulf like Sigemund? How is he not like Heremod? (Be alert for inserted stories such as this one. Beowulf contains many of them, most much more complex that this one.)

12. At the celebration, how does Hrothgar respond to Beowulf's deed? What does he offer to do for him? What does Unferth have to say now?

13. At the first celebration, the singer sings of Finn during the feasting (lines 1070-1158). The exact details of the Finn story are not clear, but in general, what happens? What does it suggest about the wisdom of using a woman as bride to heal enmity between tribes?

14. After the death of Grendel, when the feasting resumes, what does Wealhtheow ask Hrothgar not to do?

15. Wealhtheow gives Beowulf a large, broad necklace. What later happens to it? What does Wealhtheow ask Beowulf to do?

16. Why do so many men remain in the beer hall to sleep? Why is it a mistake?


[Another Attack] (lines 1251-1382)

17. Why has Grendel's mother come to Heorot? Is it the same reason Grendel had?

18. What is Hrothgar's response to the attack of Grendel’s mother? Whom has she killed?

19. Grendel's mother kills whom in retaliation for her son's death? Where does Grendel's mother live?

20. Identify both what the “mere” is and what that place is like as described in this section.

Thanks Professor Boyer for writing these questions.

Also, remember to hold on to your class note sheet from today. You may need it again for future screenings.

Now, see the attachment I e-mailed you with more details about the new group project option that half of you elected to do instead of doing a third formal, research-informed, critical/analytical paper. I am also reprinting them below. (NOTE: If I must update or add to the parameters of the assignment, I will do so here on the English-blog):

If you signed up to do the Optional Group-Work Project Instead of a Formal Academic Paper, please see the revised instructions HERE: http://www.english-blog.com/archives/2008/10/eng_225_critical_essay_assignment_details_finding_scholarly_sources_1.php

See you in class,

Dr. Hobbs

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Image Source:
">http://www.heorot.dk/ms/BEOWULF%20INTRODUCTION%20-%20Junius%20ms%2011%20-%20f54%20with%20Beo-173v20-185v13.jpg

From: 17 October 2008

ENG 225 Students:

In class today, the majority of you elected to have an open-book exam when given the choice. I've arranged for yours, today, to be a take-home exam. Below you will find the questions from today's quiz, the instructions of which you will be/were given in class. They were:

*You will need your textbook to answer the question you signed up for on today's attendance sheet. This take-home quiz (open book) must be posted FIRST on turnitin.com and SECOND in the proper entry on the English-Blog, in order to get credit. You must (1) retype your question and question number, (2) skip a space and incorporate quotations with in-text parenthetical citations (line numbers, page numbers) into your expository answers and (3) skip a space and include the full, MLA citation. Your answer must appear in BOTH places online to get credit. This WILL count as a quiz score. Due by beginning of next class meeting. Bring your textbook to EVERY class meeting. The next time I offer an open-book exam, it will be very unfortunate for you if you do not have it.
1. Following the instructions given to you in-class, explain why “a young prince,” such as Beowulf “must be prudent […] giving freely while his father lives.”

2. Following the instructions given to you in-class, explain what happened to the person known as “Shield” and what his “warrior band” of Danes did for him afterwards.

3. Following the instructions given to you in-class, explain what , exactly, “fell to Beow” after the death of “Shield.” How was he “regarded” and whom did he rule? Who were his children?

4. Following the instructions given to you in-class, explain what Hrothgar was said to have done in the Prologue (and, was thereafter known for) after he had been favored by the “fortunes of war.”

5. Following the instructions given to you in-class, explain, explain who (and where) the “prowler” was and why, exactly, he was “harrowed.”

6. Following the instructions given to you in-class, explain the function and place of the “skilled poet,” what his “clear song” was about, and how it made the “prowler” feel.

7. Following the instructions given to you in-class, explain identify to whom “the Eternal Lord had exacted a price” for “the killing of Abel” and what, exactly, that price was. Be specific, not general, and cite the line numbers and page(s) where your answers are found.

8. Following the instructions given to you in-class, explain what “lays” are and about whom they were sung when “Grendel ruled in defiance of right.” What were their “tone”? Note: you have already read several “Lais” by Marie de France for this course.

9. Following the instructions given to you in-class, explain who challenged the Geats with the phrase “What kind of men are you?” What was this person’s occupation/purpose and why might have he been concerned?

10. Following the instructions given to you in-class, explain what other “great triumphs” Beowulf accredited to his “younger” self when he first greeted King Hrothgar at Heorot.

NOTE: Bringing your textbook to class is NEVER optional. It is ALWAYS mandatory.

I hope you enjoyed today's screening of Beowulf and Grendel and the Halloween candy. If you missed it, you may watch a much "lower" quality version of part 1 of 4 here (search for the rest on google video):

If you did benefit from today's screening, please let me know in your comments and I will show further ones in a future class meeting.

Have a great weekend!

Dr. Hobbs

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*FROM: 15 October 2008

ENG 225 Students:

Below you will find your assigned readings for each day of the Beowulf section. On Monday, October 13th, the day of the mid-term examination, you were reminded that you were still responsible for the text of "Thorstein the Staff-Struck" and the beginning of the Beowulf text. I interpret the "beginning" of the text to include the "introduction," don't you? As in our previous meetings, you are expected to read the introductions to each new text.

*NOTE: No more page numbers given. I held your hands the first half of the semester. You are all "big" boys and girls, so look up the pages you need in our textbook on your own. Here is what I'll expect you to read for each remaining meetings in the Beowulf section:

Wednesday, October 15: You should have already read the "Introduction" to Beowulf. Begin reading for the next class meeting: "Prologue," Heorot is Attacked," "The Hero Comes to Heorot," and "The Feast of Heorot."

Friday, October 17: You should have already read the chapters named "Prologue," Heorot is Attacked," "The Hero Comes to Heorot," and "The Feast of Heorot." Begin Reading for the next class meeting: "Fight with Grendel," "Celebration at Heorot," and "Another Attack."

Monday, October 20: You should have already read the chapters named, "Fight with Grendel," "Celebration at Heorot," and "Another Attack." Begin reading for the next class meeting: Beowulf Fights the Mother of Grendel," "Another Celebration at Heorot," and "Beowulf Returns Home"

Wednesday, October 22: You should have already read the chapters named, "Beowulf Fights the Mother of Grendel," "Another Celebration at Heorot," and "Beowulf Returns Home" Begin reading for the next class meeting: "The Dragon Wakes," "Beowulf Attacks the Dragon," and "Beowulf's Funeral."

Friday, October 24: PEER-REVIEW DAY for PAPER 2. Bring HARDCOPY of first draft. You should have already read the chapters named, "The Dragon Wakes," "Beowulf Attacks the Dragon," and "Beowulf's Funeral." Begin reading for the next class meeting: Niccolo Machievelli's Letter to Francesco Vettori, "That Food Which Alone is Mine." (look in the TOC of Volume C for the page numbers).

If for some reason you do not have your textbook which has the Seamus Heaney translation I will be using in class, you can find links to the full-text online (by other translators) on a wonderful page of "Resources for Beowulf and Old English Literature" maintained by Professor James Hunter of Edgewood College in Madison, Wisconsin HERE and on Araby Greene's magnificant "Resources for the Study of Beowulf" available at the link HERE.

*NOTE: Although I will present some multi-media material on some of the Beowulf days, I reserve the right to quiz you on any of the readings on any of the class meetings. So, be prepared. Some of you have a very low score on this part of your final grade so I would suggest you begin to ace the remainder of the quizzes if you are shooting for a higher final score. I may focus the discussions on the differences between the text and the multimedia renditions of Beowulf, so it is imperative that you do the readings to properly participate.

*ALSO: I will no longer spoon-feed you the questions for the final examination as I did for the mid-term exam. I wanted you to get the "feel" of the class by easing you into it during the first half. For the second half of the course, I will expect you to do a better job of taking notes during the in-class lectures, in-class film screenings, in-class class discussions, in-class group/pair discussions, and anything else that is covered in the course. Do follow the blogs, especially when I tell you that material is posted there, but not rely SOLELY on the blog for the material I will draw from for the final exam. Anything discussed is fair game, so be responsible, rise to what is expected of college students in a 200-level, sophomore-level course and take notes. Listen to what others ask and to how I and other students respond to such questions.

More to be posted as this section of the course develops,

Dr. Hobbs


Caption: A page from the Beowulf text
Image Source:
">http://z.about.com/d/historymedren/1/0/c/9/beowulf1.jpg




Caption: Have you wondered what Beowulf sounded like in Anglo-Saxon? Listen to either this very short clip with snippets from Hollywood films--done in a "trailer" format, or listen to the more authentic reading in the video below (longer) where the "translation" for Anglo-saxon is flashed on the screen as the narrator reads.

Video Source: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4L7VTH8ii_8



Caption: This two-minute video is pretty cool because it shows how a "scop" or a "bard" might have looked as he/she read the poem, instrument in hand. There are "subtitles" in contemporary English. See if you can recognize any of the words by sound.

Video Source: http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-3775015288243799323&hl=en



Caption: This three-minute video does not have subtitles but instead gives you a short one minute reading in Anglo-saxon of Beowulf's battle with Grendel's Mother and then follows with a dramatic reading of the same passage in contemporary English (about a minute in length each). Some interesting artwork serves as the backdrop.

Video Source: http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-4999110936947337680&hl=en


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Questions from the “Introduction” to Beowulf on pages 1626 to 1631 of Lawall, Volume B

1. Essentially, Beowulf is a fairy-tale poem in which the hero slays three enemies. Identify two out the three chief “antagonists.”
2. Identify the religious background(s) of both (1) the characters in the poem and (2) the poet who apparently composed and recorded their story.
3. Identify the differing geographical “regions” that were native to both (1) the characters in the poem and (2) the intended “audience” of the poem. In other words, (1) the personages in the narrative were from ______ and (2) those who would have read it were from _________.
4. (1) Identify who/what plays the role of a/the “ring-giver” in this epic and (2) give an example of “ring-giving” and explain what it represents.
5. The Christian poet who reinterprets the tale of Beowulf from its original oral form, redefines the “origin” or “genesis” of Grendel and his mother. Who are their ancestors/from whom do they descend?
6. What motivates both (1) Grendel’s attacks on the Danes and (2) Grendel’s mother’s attacks on the Danes?
7. In the world of Beowulf and his contemporaries, what “is the primary means by which a man earns the respect of his fellows?” Explain in a sentence or a few words.
8. Identify (1) what a “scop” or a “bard” is/does and (2) where/when such a person is usually found.
9. The introduction reminds us of more than three tribal or family feuds in this particular epic. Identify two. Note: you must clearly identify both parties, e.g. the Trojans vs. the Greeks, or Medea vs. the Corinthians.
10. Explain the role “violence” in this epic poem, i.e. what purpose does it serve? For example, why is it necessary and/or why is it a paradox?

-----------------

*NOTE* The deadline for this particular assignment has now passed. Any comments listed below are *ONLY* for the reposting of comments that I specifically asked to be revised or are ones from non-student posters. Any 'student' posts below that missed the assignment deadline will not get credit for the assignment.

~ Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: Dr. Hobbs at October 20, 2008 04:49 PM

Neal Carter II
Dr. Hobbs
ENG-225
20 October 2008

5. Integrating quotations from the text to explain and bolster your answer, explain who (and where) the “prowler” was and why,
exactly, he was “harrowed.” Be specific, not general, and cite the line numbers and page(s) where your answers are found.

The prowler was Grendel, he was an outcast, “Then a powerful demon, a prowler through the dark, Nursed a hard grievance”. Grendel haunted the marshes and heaths around the Danes, with their king, Hrothgar. He was harrowed because he is aggravated at being an outsider, and feels affronted when he has to see the blissful festivities of Heorot hall, “It harrowed him To hear the din of the loud banquet” that was built by Hrothgar. (Beowulf, 86-89; 101)

Maynard, Mack and Lawall, Sarah. The Norton Anthology of World Literature. Beowulf. Volume A. New York. W.W. Norton and Company, Inc, 2002. 101.

Posted by: Neal Carter II at October 20, 2008 09:52 PM

5. After their arrival to Denmark, the Geats meet Hrothgar’s “herald.” Who is he? What does he tell them? What does he tell Hrothgar? What does Hrothgar respond? Are you surprised that Hrothgar knows Beowulf so well?

A herald is a messenger. Hrothgar’s herald is Wulfgar, “a Wendel chief/renowned as a warrior, well known for his wisdom/and the temper of his mind” (Lines 348-350, page 1639). He tells them to state their business and then that he “will take this message,/in accordance with your wish, to our noble kind” (Lines 350-351, page 1639). He then goes and tells Hrothgar:
People from Geatland have put ashore.
They have sailed far over the wide sea.
They call the chief in charge of their band
by the name of Beowulf. They beg, my lord,
an audience with you, exchange of words
and formal greeting. (Lines 361-366, page 1640)

Hrothgar then responds saying:
I used to know him when he was a young boy.
His father before him was called Ecgtheow.
Hrethel the Geat gave Ecgtheow
His daughter in marriage. Thie man is their son,
Here to follow up an old friendship. (Lines 372-276, page 1640)

It wasn’t a surprise for me that Hrothgar knew Beowulf because I think in the introduction it says that Beowulf is his nephew or cousin or something.

Posted by: Quinten J at October 21, 2008 08:44 AM

17. Why has Grendel's mother come to Heorot? Is it the same reason Grendel had?
It was clear that Grendel’s mother was upset about the death of her son. She felt that she needed to take revenge on the people of Heorot. “She came to Heorot. There, inside the hall, Dane’s lay asleep, earls who would soon endure a great reversal, once Grendel’s mother attacked and entered” (line 1279-1281, p. 1661). It was not until after the death of her soon did Grendel’s mother hear the noise and become very angry. “Then it became clear obvious to everyone once the fight was over, that an avenger lurked and was still alive, grimly biding time” (1255-1258, p. 1661).
Lawall, Sarah, ed. The Norton Anthology of World Literature. Ed. Maynyard Mack. 2nd
ed. Vol. A. Ser. 3. New York, NY: W. W Norton & Company, Inc, 2002. 2-1199.
--.”Beowulf: Another Attack”. Trans. Seamus Heaney, Lawall, Sarah. Pp. 1661-1663.

Posted by: Nichole.Tyler at October 21, 2008 12:07 PM

Alex Slavin

October 21-08

English 225

Dr. Hobbs

Quiz 2

19. Grendel’s mother kills whom in retaliation for her son’s death? Where does Grendel’s mother live?

-Grendel’s mother kills Aeschere, Hrothgar’s trusted advisor in retaliation for her son’s death. “Then this roaming killer came in a fury and slaughtered him in Heorot. Where she is hiding, glutting on the corpse and glorying in her escape, I cannot tell; she has taken up the feud because of last night, when you killed Grendel” (line 1330, p. 1662). After her she committed the murder, she resides back to where she lives and she lives in a swamp. Beowulf travels to her swamp to seek revenge; “they dwell apart among wolves on the hills, on windswept crags and treacherous keshes, where cold streams pour down the mountain and disappear under mist and moorland” (line 1356, p. 1663). Beowulf dives into Grendel’s mother’s lair in the swamp and kills her.

Posted by: Alex Slavin at October 21, 2008 02:32 PM

D.J. Garry
Dr. Hobbs
English 225 CA01
21 October 2008
10. Once Beowulf has arrived, what happens when Grendel enters Heorot? How does Beowulf fight with him? What happens when Grendel tries to leave? Does Grendel escape? What does he leave behind?
Beowulf put up more fight than any other man has to Grendel. This is shown in the following quote, “The captain of evil discovered himself in a handgrip harder than anything he had ever encountered in a man” (lines 749-751, p. 1648). Grendel leaves the hall but, he leaves behind his arm because Beowulf rips it off with his strong grip. This is also explained in a quote, “the hero had displayed high up near the roof: the whole of Grendel’s shoulder and arm, his awesome grasp” (lines 833-835, p. 1650). Even though Grendel escapes, his wounds are fatal, he will soon die.
Beowulf. Norton Anthology of World Literature : 100-1500 with Inserts. Ed. Sarah Lawall. Boston: W. W. Norton & Company, Incorporated, 2002. 1648-650.

Posted by: david g. at October 21, 2008 10:53 PM

Kamille G
6. What does Beowulf tell Hrothgar when he enters Heorot? What did Hrothgar do for Beowulf's father?
When Beowulf enters the Heorot he describes his historical background to Hrothgar. He tells Hrothgar that he is Hygelac’s kinsman “I am Hygelac’s kinsman, one of his hall-troop” (line 407-408, p.1641), who has succeeded in many battles in the past when he says, “When I was younger, I had great triumphs” (line 408-409, p.1641). Beowulf describes some of his accomplishments to Hrothgar and says “I battled and bound five beasts, raided a troll nest… slaughtered sea-brutes” (lines 420-422 p. 1641). Beowulf then informs Hrothgar that he has come to conquer Grendel when he says, “Now I mean to be a match for Grendel ” (line 425 p.1642), and he hopes that Hrothgar will give him permission to do so, “my one request is that you won’t refuse me” (lines 429-430 p. 1641). Hrothgar settled the feud with the Wulfings and Beowulf’s father, Ecgtheow, after he “With his own hands … killed Heatholaf ” (line 460, p.1642) who was a Wulfing. Hrothgar resolved this feud by sending treasure to the Wulfings “I shipped a treasure-trove to the Wulfings” (line 471 p.1642), and thus saved Ecgtheow from the Wulfings’ war.

Kamille G
Eng. 225 Sec.1
22/10/08

Posted by: Kamille G at October 21, 2008 11:04 PM

[Prologue: The Rise of the Danish Nation] (lines 1-85)
1. Realize that this prologue introduces the Danes, not Beowulf or his people the Geats. What was unusual about the way Shield came to be ruler of the Danes? What was his funeral like? What relation is Hrothgar to Shield?
He became ruler of the Danes by having his tribe take over all of the other ones and them being forced to worship him. For his funeral, every tribe had to pay tribute to him. In regard to Hrothgar, Shield was his great grandfather. He was the son of Halfdane, who was the son of Beow, who in turn was the son of Shield.

Posted by: Matt M. at October 21, 2008 11:45 PM

strahil s

Dr. Hobbs

ENG-225

October 22, 2008

7. Of what, specifically, does Unferth accuse Beowulf? What is Beowulf’s reply to Unferth? How is this episode relevant to the poem as a whole? Of what does Beowulf accuse Unferth?


Unferth questions Beowulf’s heroic character. Is this Beowulf the same one who lost a swimming contest? If this is the same Beowulf, how could he possibly win against Grendel? In the obvious aspect Beowulf calls Unferth a drunk and a coward. The reasoning is that if there was any heroism in Unferth (and the Danes) there simply wouldn’t have been the need for Beowulf to arrive at the scene and deal with their problem. On a deeper level though, we can really begin to see Christian motifs running through this otherwise pagan story about northern heroism and honor. The conflict between Unferth and Beowulf indirectly lays lines from the Bible such as: “Actions speak louder than words,” and “help thy neighbor.” From this perspective we can begin to question ourselves if Beowulf is just about heroism, honor, and all other important aspects of the Scandinavian people at that time, or if the work is a vehicle for the author’s Christian point of view and tribute to God, with who’s help good prevails over evil. OK, enough bullshit for today guys…

Posted by: strahil s. at October 22, 2008 12:37 AM

Myles Godet
October 21, 2008
English 225
12:30

3. What does Beowulf do when he hears of Hrothgar’s problems with Grendel?

When he hears of the problem that king Hrothgar is having with Grendel he decides that he wishes to help. Therefore he and a number of his fellow warriors leave there their home of Geatland on a voyage to offer their help to king Hrothgar the Danish king. When they reach Daneland Beowulf and his men are taken to the Dane’s mead hall to meet the king. Upon meeting with the king he is warmly greeted and treated to a feast. He tells the king of how he wishes to help him and his people by killing Grendel the troll that has tormented their village. The king accepts this offer and Beowulf in short order accomplishes what he came to do.

Posted by: Myles Godet at October 22, 2008 01:50 AM

Brandon Mckoy
Eng 225 MWF 12:30-1:20
October 22nd 2008

4. Whom do the Geats first meet when they arrive in Denmark? What does he do, and what do they do?
The Geats first meet a coast guard when they arrived to the shore of Denmark. The guard is a watchman whose task is to watch the sea-cliffs when he see’s the Geat’s boat come ashore and the men vaulting over the side. The Geats moored their boat and began unloading their battle equipment. The guard saw this and had to find out what the arrivals were, he rode his horse down to the shore to question the Geats and asked “what kind of men are you who arrive rigged out for combat in your coats of mail, sailing here over the sea lanes in your steep-hulled boat?” (line 237-240, p. 1637)Beowulf, who was doing all the talking for the Geats, tells the guard that they can show Hrothgar a way to defeat his enemy and they have come to help. The guard orders his comrades to guard the Geat’s boat. The guard led the Geats the timbered hall and then left them to go back and guard to sea cliff.
After the guard the Geats come to meet Wulfgar, Hrothgar’s herald and officer. Beowulf speaks to Wulfgar and ask him to ask Hrothgar for a formal geeting and if they can be an audience with him. Hrothgar sends a message to Beowulf and the Geats that he knows Beowulf’s father, they are welcomed there and that they are free to move forward to meet Hrothgar.

Posted by: Brandon Mckoy at October 22, 2008 02:27 AM

Neal Carter II
Dr. Hobbs
ENG-225
20 October 2008
[Heorot is Attacked] (lines 86-188)
2. What magnificent work did Hrothgar undertake? Who attacked it, and with what result? How long did the attacks last? What was the response of the Danes?
King Hrothgar, of the Danes, undertook the magnificent work of building Heorot; the great hall for banquets and prize and gift giving, “It came in his mind to bid his henchmen a hall uprear, ia master mead-house, mightier far than ever was seen by the sons of earth, and within it, then, to old and young he would all allot that the Lord had sent him, save only the land and the lives of his men”(line 67, p101). Grendel, the outcast demon was so perturbed by the noises of the festivities that it decided to end the Danes’ celebrations. Thus, in a surprise attack on the hall, one night Grendel slaughters thirty sleeping men, “Unhallowed wight, grim and greedy, he grasped betimes, wrathful, reckless, from resting-places, thirty of the thanes, and thence he rushed fain of his fell spoil, faring homeward, laden with slaughter, his lair to seek” (line120, p101). This murdering streak is repeated the next night and for twelve years following, he kills the Danes in such assaults. King Hrothgar, is grief stricken as no one can sleep safely in the hall and not even their own warriors can protect them.

Maynard, Mack and Lawall, Sarah. The Norton Anthology of World Literature. Beowulf. Volume A. New York. W.W. Norton and Company, Inc, 2002. 101.

Posted by: Neal Carter at October 22, 2008 08:27 AM

Anna R
Oct 21st, 2008
Engl 225. CA01
Dr. Hobbs

1. Realize that this prologue introduces the Danes, not Beowulf or his people the Geats. What was unusual about the way Shield came to be ruler of the Danes? What was his funeral like? What relation is Hrothgar to Shield?

Shield Sheafson is the king of the Danes as well as the founder of the royal line. What is special about him is that he was not born into a rich family of royalty; he was abandoned by his parents which in fact made him more powerful and stronger. When Shield died after a great time of ruling and being loved by his people, the Danes granted him a big funeral where his dead body was placed in a boat within armor and treasury and sent off to the sea, just as his life had begun in first place. ”They deckled his body no less bountifully / with offerings than those first ones did / who cast him away when he was a child / and launched him alone out over the waves” (line 43, pg 1633). Hrothgar is the third descendant after Shield to become king and did this with great success.

Posted by: Anna R at October 22, 2008 10:55 AM

12. At the celebration, how does Hrothgar respond to Beowulf's deed? What does he offer to do for him? What does Unferth have to say now?
When the king came out to greet the people at the celebration he was glad that the burden of Grendel was taken from him. He adopted Beowulf into his heart as his son and he said that in his eyes Beowulf was immortal (line 945-953, pg. 1652). He also said that Beowulf will want for nothing. Unferth was amazed because many others had tried and could not kill Grendel. So he did not say much he mostly stood there in amazement (line 980-985, pg. 1653).

Posted by: John Daniel at October 22, 2008 11:07 AM

Walter Perkins
Engl 225
CA01
10-21-08
Dr. Hobbs

15. Wealhtheow gives Beowulf a large, broad necklace. What later happens to it? What does Wealhtheow ask Beowulf to do?

The meaning of the necklace that is given to Beowulf from Wealhtheow represents the bond of loyalty between her people and Beowulf. It is symbolic because Hygelac died in battle wearing it, which furthers the thought that it meant continuity. Wealhtheow said this to Beowulf as she handed him the golden torque “Take delight in this torque, dear Beowulf, wear it for luck and wear also this mail from our people’s armory: may you prosper in them!”(Line 1216-1218, page 1660). This quote expresses that Wealhtheow asks Beowulf to wear it in future battles for good luck. Beowulf accepts the gifts from Wealhtheow and wears the “towering war-helmet, webbed mail-shirt, golden torque and great-shafted spear” with honor and during future battles (Lines 1245-1246, page 1660).

Posted by: Walter P at October 22, 2008 11:17 AM

13. At the first celebration, the singer sings of Finn during the feasting. The exact details of the Finn story are not clear, but in general, what happens? What does it suggest about the wisdom of using a woman as a bride to heal enmity between tribes?
It sounds to me as if the initial plan to have peace worked, at least for a year,”until another year” (line 1134). However this bride only wished for vengeance for she did not wish to be a bride of the other tribe, “longing woke / in the cooped-up exile for a voyage home-- / but more for vengeance” (line 1138-1140). This lets me believe that a woman bride to quell enmity is not a good idea unless maybe she wanted to be the bride of another tribe.

Posted by: john anderson at October 22, 2008 11:25 AM

#20
The “mere” is a lake or pool near where Grendel lived, and in which he drowned. The water was described as “bloodshot… (with) loathsome upthrows and overturnings of waves and gore and would-slurry.” Grendel found this mere, and on the verge of death, threw himself into it and drowned. (pg. 1650 ln. 846-851)

Posted by: JustinW at October 22, 2008 11:42 AM

Jonathan Till
10-21-08
Eng 225.

“What is Hrothgar’s response to the attack of Grendel’s Mother? Whom has she killed?”
Grendel’s Mother is initially consumed by rage over the death of her son, and wishes to seek revenge against all those who wronged her. “Grendel’s mother, monstrous hell bride, brooded on her wrongs” (lines 1258-1260, p. 1661). Grendel’s mother attacks Heorot and wreaks destruction where she passes. The one she kills is Aeschere “He was Yrmenfal’s elder brother and a soul mate to me, a true mentor” (line 1323-1325, p. 1662). Hrothgar himself offers to pay great wealth upon whomever ends the feud.

Posted by: Jonathan T. at October 22, 2008 12:04 PM

Myron Kirchner
ENG-225
Beowulf Quiz 2
Heroic poetry normally has a scene in which the hero arms for battle. What is different about Beowulf’s preparations for his fight with Grendel?

Unlike other heroic figures in poems and Epic Beowulf preparation involved taking of his armor and giving his weapon away. He did this because he was told that Grendel did not use armor or weapons. He figured that he would be equal to Grendel during the fight if he was unarmed. Another reason for not using the sword is because Grendel cannot be hurt by any human weapon.

Posted by: Myron Kirchner at October 22, 2008 12:20 PM

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*NOTE* The deadline for this particular assignment has now passed. Any comments listed below are *ONLY* for the reposting of comments that I specifically asked to be revised or are ones from non-student posters. Any 'student' posts below that missed the assignment deadline will not get credit for the assignment.


~ Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: Dr. Hobbs at October 22, 2008 12:57 PM

The movie Beowulf has mostly the same basic story as the book we are reading, but there are some major differences. Near the beginning of the book, it talks about how Beowulf and Breca race across the ocean by swimming, and how Breca wins; the movie shows Beowulf come to shore before Breca, saying that they were on a ship that was sank. The book is pretty serious in the action and dialogue, but the movie actors and script has a comedic touch in a lot of different places. A major difference in the movie is that Grendel takes his time attacking; it takes a few nights before he attacks because he says that Beowulf hasn’t wronged him whereas the book he just comes the first night and attacks. The book says Beowulf pins Grendel and practically rips off his arm but the movie shows Grendel doing it. There’s a witch in the movie that tells how people die and even bears Grendel’s daughter, but in the book, Grendel doesn’t have a daughter and there is no witch.

Posted by: Quinten J at October 23, 2008 08:45 AM

There were many differences between the text Beowulf and the film version Beowulf. The first main one was the way that the story started. In the film version there was Beowulf’s father that was mentioned. In the text there was no sign of Beowulf’s father recurring his son. It showed how the King of Shields was drunk all the time in the film version and not really that much in the text version. In the movie Beowulf would take back the heads of people and in the test hew would take back the whole corpse to the cave and pile them there. Also, when Beowulf first came on the island in the text version the kings guards had to go back and tell him first of his arrival to see if he could come back but in the movie Beowulf was just sent to the king without approval. Another big difference in the two stories was that Beowulf cut off his own arm in the battle during the movie and in the text Beowulf cut his arm off. During the actual fight with Grendel it only took Grendel coming to the mead-hall once in the text. However, during the movie Grendel came back more than once before the attack actually occurred. Also, Grendel had sex with the witch and produced a child. In the text version there was no notice of this.

Posted by: Nichole.Tyler at October 23, 2008 01:19 PM

D.J. Garry
Dr. Hobbs
Eng. 225 CA01
22 October 2008
Beowulf Book Vs. Movie
When comparing the book Beowulf, with the movie Beowulf and Grendel there are several things that were different. The first thing that I noticed was that the movie begins with Grendel and his father. His father was not mentioned at all in the book. Another difference in the movie is that the movie is much more realistic. Grendel and his mother are not as supernatural; they are made to be more humanistic. The movie also has Grendel’s son which is not mentioned in the book. Another difference is that in the book, Beowulf kills Grendel the in the first night. In the movie, it is not until several nights later that Beowulf kills Grendel.

Posted by: David G. at October 23, 2008 03:07 PM

Eng 225 - CA01
October 23rd, 2008

When watching Beowulf and Grendel, i found a lot of differences from the original story. One of the big things I found different was not something that actually happened in the story but how the characters were portrayed. For example, when I read Beowulf, I portrayed Beowulf as a "mountain of a man." I would almost say a mix between man and beast. When I saw him in the story, he seemed to be more weak than i thought. Also in a few of his battles, he didn't outright win.

Another part of the story that I felt was much different was Salem. I never remember there being a Salem in the original story. Also, I found it pretty weird that Salem was the father of Grendel's child. I liked the way that the movie Beowulf and Grendel was made, but I felt that they missed some vital points in the movie and should have left some parts out to not confuse people who know the story.

Posted by: Joseph S. at October 23, 2008 07:18 PM

Brandon Mckoy
Eng 225 MWF 12:30-1:20
October 23rd, 2008

What are the major and minor differences between the text of Beowulf and the film Beowulf and Grendel which we screened?
There where a few signification changes incorporated into the film which was not in the text. For one, the poem did not start as the movie did with Hrothgar killing Grendels’s father. Actually, the text did not mention Grendel’s father at all or anything about when Grendel was young. Another thing incorporated in the film that was not in the text was the witch Selma which we saw Beowulf speak to several times and also had intercourse with in the film. Also in the text there was no mention of Grendel having a son however the film showed that he did. These are just a few of the differences between the text Beowulf and the film Beowulf and Grendel.

Posted by: Brandon Mckoy at October 23, 2008 07:41 PM

Kamille G
What are the differences between the film version of Beowulf and Grendel and the text- version of Beowulf?
One of the most apparent differences between the film and text-version are the characters present in each of them. In the film version, three new characters are introduced that were not mentioned in the text-version which includes Selma the witch, Grendel’s father, and Grendel’s son mothered by Selma. In addition, the text-version does not mention that Grendel’s father fell off a cliff after being killed by Hrothgar and his warriors, which created a motive for Grendel to kill the Danes in the Heorot. The film version also illustrates that Grendel’s murdering of Aeschere, was not just random killing or the result of Grendel’s perverse nature, but instead it illustrates that Grendel’s motive to kill him was because Aeschere had destroyed Grendel’s father’s head in the cave. The text-version does not mention any of these motives which Grendel had in the film version. Furthermore, the text-version does not mention that Grendel grew up in a cave where he kept his father’s head that he had cut off from his corpse in the film version. The film version also indicates that Grendel is resistant to fight Beowulf because Beowulf has done nothing to him, while the text version portrays Grendel as someone who was willing to kill anyone who stayed in the Heorot regardless of whether or not he was motivated to do so. Another very small difference is that in the text-version the Danes were drinking mead in the Heorot, while in the film version the Danes were drinking beer.
Kamille G
English 225 Sec. 1
24/10/08

Posted by: Kamille G at October 23, 2008 11:49 PM

Paola S
ENG 225
10/24/08
BEOWFUL
In the film we watched in class there were several differences in comparison to the text and the recent Beowulf movie. One of the first differences is in the film we watched in class, where it showed how Grendel’s father is killed, and how Grendel is spared. The story in the book has a different beginning; it starts off talking about Beowulf. Another difference is that in the most recent Beowulf movie, Grendel is not a human-looking creature. Rather, he is like a monster and much bigger in size.
A clear difference between the film and the text is how Grendel is killed. In the film Grendel is trapped by Beowulf and hangs from a rope. After a while his arm rips off and he runs off to the beach where he dies. On the other hand, in the text Beowulf cuts Grendel’s arm off and Grendel runs off and dies.
Also in the text it mentions that Beowulf needs a different sword to kill Grendel’s mother, but in the film he kills her with her sword. After killing Grendel’s mother a child appears in the film, but not in the text.

Posted by: Paola S at October 24, 2008 12:32 AM

Alex Slavin

October 24-08

English 225

Dr. Hobbs

Beowulf

There are some differences in the story Beowulf compared to the movie we saw in class. In the book, Beowulf sails to Denmark without any complications, while in the movie we see while he is sailing, his arm is grabbed from a creature that lives in the water. It is believed that it is Grendel’s mother and in a way it is almost foreshadowing of what is to come. In the second attack against the Danes, it is said in the book that when Grendel tried to escape that Beowulf cuts his arm off, but in the movie Grendel cuts his own arm off. In the story it tells that Beowulf dives into Grendel’s mother’s lair to kill her and bring up the head of Grendel. In the movie, He does dive into her lair to kill his mother, but does not bring up the head of Grendel. Another difference is that Grendel’s daughter is down in the lair protecting the body of her dead father in the movie. One of the most major differences between the two is that in the text, is taken place in Iceland and in the movie it is taken place in England.

Posted by: alex.slavin at October 24, 2008 10:37 AM

Anna R
Engl 225.01
Dr. Hobbs
Oct 23rd, 2008

Beowulf and Grendel:
In today’s part of the movie we saw how Grendel finally dies and in essence how Grendel’s mother, a beast as well, comes for revenge. What I would have not expected from Grendel’s death is that it was not spectacular. He cut his own arm off and went to die by himself in the ocean, so how is Beowulf responsible for that? Grendel’s mother comes to get revenge on Beowulf and the Danes for her son’s death when in reality he killed himself. We also saw the part of Beowulf fighting Grendel’s mother, which was different from the book as well. It was much more dramatic in the text than the actual movie and some parts were changed and/or left out. Also, in the movie we saw Grendel’s son, who came out of the intercourse with the witch and lives with Grendel’s mother. Beowulf kills her as well and stands in front of Grendel’s son now.

Posted by: Anna R. at October 24, 2008 10:42 AM

Myron Kirchner
ENG-225
Beowulf poem and film

I thought the film different greatly from the film. I had imagined from reading the poem that Beowulf was ridiculously strong and had no problem disposing of Grendel , yet in the film it was Grendel who injured himself while trying to run away. Beowulf was also fully clothed during the fight, and he didn’t actually wrestle Grendel in Mead Hall. There also a weird side story of a “Witch” named Selma, who is also the mother of Grendel son. Grendel’s father is also introduced into the story, and while he wasn’t mentioned in the poem he does shed a little light on Grendel’s origins.


Posted by: Myron Kirchner at October 24, 2008 11:02 AM

Walter Perkins
Engl 225
Dr. Hobbs
10-24-08

Beowulf Movie
1. Grendel appears first when he witnesses his father killed. Grendel attacks the city out of revenge and hates the songs that they sing. King Hrothgar gives gifts and blessings to Beowulf at the feast in the hall. Beowulf is first found swimming and leaves Geatland to go help the Danes. The Queen is Hrothgar wife and talked to Beowulf after Grendel’s second attack. She pleaded for Beowulf to kill the beast.
2. a. Selma is missing
b. The Queen is missing
c. The sex scene is added in the movie and not in text
d. Nothing is missing

Posted by: Walter P at October 24, 2008 11:14 AM

-----------------

*NOTE* The deadline for this particular assignment has now passed. Any comments listed below are *ONLY* for the reposting of comments that I specifically asked to be revised or are ones from non-student posters. Any 'student' posts below that missed the assignment deadline will not get credit for the assignment. ~ Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: Dr. Hobbs at October 29, 2008 09:17 AM

Neal Carter II
Dr. Hobbs
ENG-225
4 November 2008

In Act III Scene 3, what is ironic about Emilia’s comments at the beginning of the scene?

In Act 3.3 of Othello, Emilia says, “Good madam, do: I warrant it grieves my husband,
As if the case were his.” (lines 3-4, page 2952 ). This is ironic since Othello will later in the scene ask Iago to ask his wife Emillia, to observe Desdemona and tell him what she sees. Othello has not been completely persuaded that his wife is unfaithful, but it is Iago who encourages his mistrust of Desmodemona, and this is made possible by Emilia’s help.

Maynard, Mack and Lawall, Sarah. The Norton Anthology of World Literature. The Tragedy of Othello the Moor of Venice.Volume C. New York, W.W. Norton and Company, Inc., 2002. 2952.

Posted by: Neal Carter at November 3, 2008 11:35 AM

Neal Carter II
Dr. Hobbs
ENG-225
5 November 2008

In Act IV, scene 2, how does Desdemona react to the accusations of Othello? To get credit for your answer, use specific examples and quotations.

Desdemona is flabbergasted at the accusations of Othello, and is in disbelief that he would call her such demeaning terms. As before, she continues to be the good wife and defends herself against his unjust accusations, saying “By heaven, you do me wrong” (line 83, page 2976”) and “I hope my noble lord esteems me honest” (line 67, page 2976). She is completely upset and astonished that Othello would hurt her in that manner when he says, “I took you for that cunning whore of Venice .That married with Othello. You, mistress, That have the office opposite to Saint Peter, And keep the gate of hell!” (Line 93 page 2977). After making a few more snide comments, he leaves the room hastily and Desdemona is left to be comforted by Emilia.

Maynard, Mack and Lawall, Sarah. The Norton Anthology of World Literature. The Tragedy of Othello the Moor of Venice. Volume C. New York. W.W. Norton and Company. Inc. 2002. 2976-2977.


Posted by: Neal Carter II at November 5, 2008 11:14 AM

Anna R.
Engl 225.01
11-24-08


1. Beowulf:
Explain in a paragraph how the origin of Grendel and his mother go back to the first human beings of Old Testament.

Posted by: Anna R. at November 24, 2008 03:24 PM

1. Beowulf- Unferth accuses Beowulf of being unworthy and unsuccessful in his past journey’s while everyone is feasting at the mead hall. How does Beowulf respond?

Posted by: alex.slavin at November 25, 2008 01:47 PM

Beowulf- Is violence necessary in Beowulf? If there was no violence and killing would the story be different? How so and why is it needed?

Posted by: Nichole T. at November 26, 2008 03:22 AM

Both Beowulf and Gilgamesh shared similar attributes associated with being a hero. Is it possible Beowulf understood the meaning of being a hero rather than Gilgamesh who understood the meaning in the end of the epic?

Posted by: S.Tavares at November 28, 2008 03:57 PM

In Gilgamesh during the Great Flood, how does the story portray the Gods from Mesopotamian?

Posted by: Joseph S. at November 29, 2008 12:20 PM

Beowulf
List and explain all the reasons that Grendel had such a hate for the Danes? How does he react?

Posted by: Walter P at November 30, 2008 11:49 PM

Beowulf
The importance of establishing identity is evident in the story. Give an example from the story where identity is established?

Posted by: Paola S at December 1, 2008 12:33 AM

Beowulf
The importance of establishing identity is evident in the story. Give an example from the story where identity is established?

Posted by: Paola S at December 1, 2008 12:34 AM

Myron Kirchner
ENG-225
Extra credit exam questions

Beowulf
Discuss the two phases of Beowulf’s heroism, and also why it’s important to the story.

Posted by: Myron Kirchner at December 1, 2008 02:54 AM

What were Beowulf’s men’s reactions during the fight with the dragon, and what did the last person do once the dragon was slain?

Posted by: Quinten J at December 1, 2008 08:16 AM

1. Beowulf -In the story of Beowulf explain in a short paragraph what happen between Beowulf and Breca.

Posted by: John Daniel at December 1, 2008 11:03 AM

Beowulf:
1.) How important is the great hall, both to the story and to the characters in the story?

Posted by: Jonathan T. at December 1, 2008 04:26 PM

Strahil S

Engl 225.01

12-01-08

1. How is Beowulf similar to earlier epics such as the Illiad and yet different? Point out essential
similarities and differences.

Posted by: Strahil at December 3, 2008 10:33 AM

Tiffany Anne Carpenter
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 435- Literary Criticism
2 March 2012
The Hero’s Journey in Beowulf
Joseph Campbell’s monomyth on the idea of the “Hero’s Journey” is an important examination various plots and characters in works when considering structuralism and deconstructionist theory. The idea is that this hero has a specific journey to complete in various ways in which he establishes himself as a hero worthy of his ultimate outcome, having to go through a series of calls, trials, battles, and make personal decisions in order to achieve his ultimate goal and end up successful by the end of his journey. This journey includes many facets, but the most important are three phases in which the hero has to go though: the call to adventure, the departure, the initiation, and the return. An example that might be considered is the hero Beowulf on his journey to defeat Grendel in the first work.
For Beowulf, his departure starts when he travels because he hears that there is a king that needs salvation and protectors. He seeks to find King Hrothgar, who tells him about Grendel and how he needs to be defeated for the protection of his land and people. The initial knowledge of this starts as Beowulf crosses the threshold by seeing the gatekeeper who allows him to enter this new extraordinary world. The man with the torch acts as the one who lets Beowulf enter this special world, where he goes to meet with Hrothgar and establishes his call to adventure, deciding to prove himself a warrior by taking on the task of defeating Grendel. Here we see Beowulf depart from his ordinary world and enter a new world where he begins the initiation phase. Hrothgar enlists the help of Beowulf to defeat this evil monster who plagues his land and people. When Beowulf accepts this challenge, he is responding to his bravery being called into question. He wants to prove himself a warrior and worthy of recognition, powerful and brave to the king.
This transformation and initiation phase that fills the middle of Beowulf’s journey is essential and filled with tests and battles. The villain is the monster Grendel, who finds out about Beowulf and tries to go after him. This is where the villainous plot comes to a head because Beowulf finds out that Grendel can’t be killed with any mortal weapon and it is this test that acts as the supreme ordeal in this section of Beowulf’s journey, giving him the chance to prove himself and be successful or not. After this, there is a series of additional events that can be considered battles and ordeals later on, such as Beowulf battling Grendel’s mother and his ultimate battle with the dragon.
Beowulf, after responding to these calls of adventure and successfully making it through his tests and battles, succeeding and transforming as a warrior and brave hero, is able to ultimately complete his return when he later dies trying to kill the dragon. He ultimately can be seen as failing his final mission because he leaves his people without a king, even though he does, in fact, defeat the dragon, but he still is able to remain a hero because “thus made their mourning the men of Geatland, for their hero's passing his hearth-companions: quoth that of all the kings of earth, of men he was mildest and most beloved, to his kin the kindest, keenest for praise.” His return is essentially his death and yet it is the culmination of his journey because it does bring honor to his name.
While this is just one examination of Campbell’s model of the “Hero’s Journey,” there are many forms that are modeled in various works, all having the commonalities of the hero on this ultimate quest to make it to an extraordinary world and answer the call to adventure, in hopes of returning home a better hero.

Work Cited
“Beowulf.” The Longman Anthology of British Literature, Volume 1A: The Middle Ages. Ed. David Damrosch and Kevin J. Dettmar. 4th ed. Vol. 1A. Boston: Longman, 2010. Print.

Posted by: tiffany.carpenter at March 4, 2012 07:01 PM

The Heaney translation does not have the lycriism of earlier translations. Sorry, Phil, reference the 4th paragraph in your comment- that isn't the case.Oft ic wib winde feohtan = Often I must fight against the wind.The following notes may be of interest. The poem Beowulf was written sometime between the middle of the 7th and the end of the 10th centuries in the language we call Anglo-Saxon or Old English.We don’t know who the author was, but he was a Christian and was familiar with Scandinavian folktales, both Norse and Anglo-Saxon and familiar with ships and the sea. It is an epic poem or saga (both meaning a long narrative poem telling of heroic deeds). The poem is an elaborate tale told in beautifully phrased language. The story is set in a pagan society, which is governed by a heroic code of honour.There is only one manuscript of the poem, a copy made in the 10th century. This manuscript survived a fire in the 18th century and is now kept in the British Library, London.The poem was written in England after the Vikings had come, but the events it describes are set in Scandinavia two or three hundred years before. Some of the kings were actual historical people. The hero, Beowulf, not an historical person, is a prince and a warrior in the land of the Geats, a territory that is in what is now southern Sweden. Early in the poem Beowulf crosses the sea to the land of the Danes to clear their country of a man-eating monster, a huge troll called Grande. Beowulf kills Grendel and Grendel’s mother who is also a monster, and returns home in triumph where he eventually becomes king and rules for 50 years. Then a dragon comes and terrorises the countryside. Beowulf considers it his duty to kill the dragon to save his people. He does this but is also killed.The poem sidesteps several times from the main Beowulf story: see lines 883 – 914; and lines 1070 – 1158. In these asides a minstrel chants poems of other stories as part of the celebration of Beowulf’s achievements. In lines 883 – 914 the minstrel tells of a folk hero called Sigemund or Sigurd who slayed a dragon. This folk hero also known as Siegfried appears in German stories as well and was used by the German composer Wagner in his operas in the late 19th century.In lines 1070 – 1158 the minstrel tells of a fight between the Danes and Frisians at the stronghold of Finn, the Frisian king. In this story, we are told of a society that believes that the kin of a slain person are to be compensated for the death of their kinsman either by slaying the killer in turn or by receiving ‘wergild’ – a price in gold. This story shows us what fate (Old English ‘wyrd’) meant to the characters both in the Finn story and in the main action of Beowulf itself. The warriors believe themselves bound to a code of loyalty and bravery, bound to seek glory in the eyes of other warriors. The little nations are grouped around their lord, the greater nations want war and menace the little nations, a lord dies, the smaller nation is defenceless without a strong leader, the enemy strikes, vengeance for the dead is sought, and bloodshed leads to further bloodshed.The threat to King Hrothgar’s realm comes from within, from the marshes and from the bottom of the mere from where Grendel and his mother trawl and scavenge. But threat also comes from without, from the Heathobards, whom the Danes have defeated in battle and from whom they can therefore expect retaliation (see lines 2020 – 2069).Hygelac, lord of the Geats, gets involved in a war with the Swedish King Ongentheow. Two of his thanes (lines 2484 – 2489) actually kill Ongentheow, but Hygelac is blamed (2922 –3003) and is known as the killer. Beowulf eventually succeeds Hygelac and his son, but we know at the end there will be war between the Geats and Swedes again after Beowulf dies.The themes are: death, divine power, horror, triumph, disgrace, personal devotion and fame.When the poem was written, England was a well organised nation. They were Christian and worshipped God in churches. Many of them may never have actually seen some of the things of which the poet speaks; the gold, the jewels, the tapestries, some of the weapons. Pagan beliefs would have been as strange to them as they are to our modern times. They were separated from Scandinavia by open sea, at a time when distance meant more than it does today and many (this was after Viking settlement) would never have been over the sea.With any good story an imagination is needed so, for example, beasts can seem real. The reader is, of course, free to interpret scenes as he or she wishes.

Posted by: Martin at October 27, 2012 08:13 PM

Taylor Schemehorn
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
3 February 2014

QUESTION #11:
What items from hi resume does Beowulf share with Hrothgar to convince him of his worthiness to fight Grendel?
ANSWER:
Beowulf shares some of his past glories in hopes that he will be able to fight Grendel. Beowulf shares that all of his people and the council approve of his decision to see King Hrothgar, and plead his case for fighting Grendel because they have seen his strengths and his ability to fight (Puchner 900). “They have seen me bolstered in blood of enemies when I battled and bound five beasts, raised a troll-nest and in the night-sea slaughtered see-brutes” (Puchner 900).

Posted by: Taylor Schemehorn at February 25, 2014 11:19 AM

Alexa Griffith-Hardy
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
25 February 2014

Question #19:
Describe how Beowulf defeats Grendel. How does Beowulf show off his victory?
Answer:
Beowulf defeats Grendel, who is known as a “grim demon haunting the marches, marauding round the heath and the desolate fens” (Puchner 893). Beowulf had realized that Grendel would not be affected by weapons “When they joined the struggle there was something they could not have known at the time, that no blade on earth, no blacksmith’s art could ever damage their demon opponent.” (Puchner 908). Beowulf won the battle because he did not fear Grendel “then he who had harrowed the hearts of men with pain and affliction in former times and had give offense also to God found that his bodily powers failed him.” (Puchner 908). Beowulf showed off his victory by “He loaded a boat: Waels’s son weighted her hold with dazzling spoils. The hot dragon melted.” (Puchner 910).
Work Cited
Puchner, Martin. Beowulf. Trans. Heaney, Seamus. W.W. Norton & Company, INC., 2001. Print.

Posted by: Alexa Griffith-Hardy at February 25, 2014 07:00 PM

Henry Adu
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
25 February 2014


Question 9
How does this lieutenant’s description of Beowulf fit the characteristics of an epic hero?

Answer:

The lieutenant describe Beowulf in the following manner: “Never before has a force under arms disembarked so openly-not bothering to ask if the sentries allowed them safe passage or the clan had consented. Nor have I seen a mightier man-at-arms on this earth than the one standing here; unless I am mistaken, he is truly noble. This is no mere hanger-on in a hero’s armor” (Puchner 246). This is similar to an epic hero because they are characterized by their armor and strength. Also, the hero is recognized as been noble without any knowledge about him whatsoever.

Posted by: Henry Adu at February 25, 2014 07:00 PM

Henry Adu
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
25 February 2014


Question 9
How does this lieutenant’s description of Beowulf fit the characteristics of an epic hero?

Answer:

The lieutenant describe Beowulf in the following manner: “Never before has a force under arms disembarked so openly-not bothering to ask if the sentries allowed them safe passage or the clan had consented. Nor have I seen a mightier man-at-arms on this earth than the one standing here; unless I am mistaken, he is truly noble. This is no mere hanger-on in a hero’s armor” (Puchner 246). This is similar to an epic hero because they are characterized by their armor and strength. Also, the hero is recognized as been noble without any knowledge about him whatsoever.

Posted by: Henry Adu at February 25, 2014 07:01 PM

Allie Clemons
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA01
26 February 2014

Question 17:
Why do we again get such a thorough description of Herot as Beowulf and Grendel battle? What is it again being likened to?

Answer:
After some research, I have come to find out that this piece is very symbolic in the biblical sense. Beowulf and Grendel are linked to the story Cain and Abel in The Bible from the book of Genesis. In the beginning of the poem, the readers are told in detail that Herot is this beautiful and still place, but it turns dark and ugly. Herot is even described as “the most famous of buildings under heaven”, and “the bright dwelling of brave men”, but when Grendel is even brought into view slightly; Herot shifts to being described as “fierce heat and hostile flame”. The shifting change of how Herot is described just emphasizes how biblical the piece really is. Herot is shown that it is polluted by the sins of the demons and needs to be cleansed, or saved.

Posted by: Allie Clemons at February 25, 2014 07:20 PM

Michael Adamson
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys into Narratives CA01
25 February 2014

Question:
What items from his resume does Beowulf share with Hrothgar to convince him of his worthiness to fight Grendel?
Answer:
The items from his resume that Beowulf share with Hrothgar to convince him of his worthiness to fight Grendel are: That he will fight Grendel without any armor or weapons, “I hereby renounce sword and the shelter of the broad shield, the heave war-board: hand-to-hand is how it will be, a life-and-death fight with the fiend” (Putchner 900). In addition, he proved his worthiness to fight Grendel by correcting Unferth when discussing his sea race with Breca. Beowulf exclaims that he, in fact, defeated Breca in that race, and that he killed nine sea monsters too, “However it occurred my sword had killed nine sea monsters. Such night dangers and hard ordeals I have never heard of nor of a man more desolate in surging waves” ((Putchner 903).

Posted by: Michael Adamson at February 25, 2014 09:12 PM

Daniella Zacarias
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
Journeys Of Transformation In Narrative Literature (220CL)
25.2.2014
Question #7
7.
What literary device is being used in these lines “None/Of the wise ones regretted his going, much/ As he was loved by the Geats: the omens were good,/ And they urged the adventure on” and what is its purpose?
ANSWER.
“Nobody tried to keep him from going, no elder denied him, dear as he was to them. Instead, the inspected omens and spurred his ambitions to go.” (Puchner 895). In these lines the literary device of amplification is used to give importance of the adventure to come.

Posted by: Daniella Zacarias at February 25, 2014 10:22 PM

Jesse Robinson
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
26 February 2014

QUESTION #7:
What literary device is being used in these lines “None/ Of the wise ones regretted his going, much/ As he was loved by the Geats: the omens were good,/ And they urged the adventure on” and what is its purpose?”

ANSWER:
The “wise ones,” while they may not be the main mentor, here they play a short role as a mentor. Vogler says there may be more than one mentor, and that the mentor may serve to either continue a story, “they urged the adventure on”, or to motivate the Hero. This quote from the story may also serve to bolster the image of the Hero Beowulf.

Work Cited
Lawall, Sarah N and Maynard Mack. “BEOWULF.” The Norton Anthology of World Literature. 2nd Ed. Vol. B. New York: Lawall, 2002. Pp. 1636. Print. A.D. 100 to A.D. 1500.

Posted by: Jesse Robinson at February 26, 2014 12:21 AM

Craig Graves
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
25 February 2014

Question 8:
What is ironic about the type of words/actions used by Hrothgar’s lieutenant who stops Beowulf and his men?

Answer:
When Hrothgar’s lieutenant sees Beowulf and his men, he asks them why they are “rigged out for combat in [their] coats of mail” and wonders why the arriving men feel they will be welcomed ashore without identifying themselves (Puchner 896). The questions from the lieutenant are ironic because he seems oblivious to the attacks by Grendel or the fame of Beowulf. The lieutenant even calls Beowulf “the mightiest, noble man-at-arms” he had ever met, but, based off of how Beowulf addresses him, he and everyone else associated with Hrothgar should be aware of who Beowulf is, at least. After all, Beowulf is the son of a famous, noble warrior-lord named Ecgtheow and has an allegiance to Lord Hygelac (Puchner 896). The irony found in the lieutenant’s questions also applies to his inability to think that ‘maybe these outsiders are here to cure the Grendel problem.’ He could have thought that Beowulf and his men were there to help kill the monster that had been terrorizing Hrothgar’s people, especially since Beowulf and his men came prepared to battle as previously stated. It could also be said that there is irony in the lieutenant’s questions because he immediately said he believed Beowulf’s story and welcomed Beowulf and his men.

Posted by: Craig Graves at February 26, 2014 12:28 AM

Zachary Daley
Dr. Hobbs
220CL Journeys in narrative CA01
2/26/2014
Question #1:
Describe Grendel’s lineage that is given in the first stanza. What allusion is used to
describe these monsters?
Answer:
Grendel is first a monster that is half man half monster. There are three different monsters in this story, Grendel is the first one, his mom is the second, and then a dragon is the third. They explain these characters as imperfect creatures and flawed from the start giving them no chance to beat Beowulf. They start by saying Grendel is too much like a human and will let his emotions get to him because of jealousy and rage. Grendel’s mother is also a little human like, because she is only driven by greed and by revenge for Grendel. Finally, the dragon is a hoarder and is only the protector of the hoard, so all of the villain’s in this story are all human like without being fully human.

Posted by: Zach Daley at February 26, 2014 12:28 AM

Nicholas Heiting
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narratives CA01
26 February 2014

QUESTION #4:
Describe Grendel’s attacks on Heorot. How long have these attacks occurred?

ANSWER:
When Grendel attacks the people of Heorot, he does so under the cover of night when they are all asleep. He despises the noises they make during their feasts. When the citizens of Heorot are sleeping, he creeps up to them and mutilates their bodies before taking their mangled corpuses back to his lair. The author explains that Grendel terrorized Heorot, “For twelve winters, seasons of woe, the lord of Shieldings suffered under his load of sorrow,”(Puchner 894).

Posted by: Nicholas Heiting at February 26, 2014 12:51 AM

Re-Chia Jackson
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 The Proverbial Road: Journeys of transformation in narrative
26 February 26, 2014

Beowulf
Question # 15
15. What is the purpose of Grendel attacks being so vividly described? (What’s the intended effect?) Identify the diction used that contributes to these horrific images.
Answer:
Grendel is this grim demon in the story Beowulf, it has been stated that ‘he hunts the marches, marauding round the heath and the desolated fens; he has dwelt a long time in misery among the banished monsters, Cain’s clan, whom the creator had outlawed and condemned as outcast”. (Puchner, 893) Grendel is Cain’s descended and god has made him very angry and miserable because of Cain’s murder of Abel. Grendel is being describe in this way because he is a demon who murders people with no remorse under Cain. Grendel crimes has to be pictured heinous, cruel and horrid. In this story they use words and phrases such as “God- cursed brute”, “grim demon”, “havoc”, powers of destruction.”(Puchner, 893) Many gruesome words and phrases has been used throughout the beginning of this story to describe the horrendous demon named Grendel.

Posted by: Re-chia Jackson at February 26, 2014 10:20 AM

Jacklyn O'Brien
Dr.B.Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
26 February 2014

QUESTION #15:
What is the purpose of Grendel's attack being so vividly described? (What's the intended effect?) Identify the diction used that contributes to these horrific images.

ANSWER:

"So times were pleasant for the people there until finally one, a fiend out of hell began to work his evil in the world. Grendel was the name of this grim demon haunting the marches, marauding round the heath and the desolate fens." (BEOWULF 893) Grendel is the first monster we encounter while reading the epic of Beowulf. As Grendel begins to seek revenge he takes immediate drastic action. "Suddenly then the god-cursed brute was creating havoc: greedy and grim, he grabbed thirty men from there resting places and rushed to his lair, blundering back with the butchered corpses." (Beowulf 893) Once the sun rose and everyone began to awake, it was clear to the town that horrific events that occurred the night before. The events of Grendel's attack are very vivid and disturbing. The events were written so vividly so that the reader has a clear image in their head of what is happening in this epic. This also sets the current mood for the story as well.The author would like to make clear Grendel is not a monster to mess with.

Posted by: Jacklyn O'Brien at February 26, 2014 11:24 AM

Paola Vasquez
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
26 February 2014

QUESTION #21: What is this description of the monster’s lair an allusion to?

ANSWER: The description of the monster’s lair is basically described as a supernatural lake, that is filled with monsters whereas Herot is beautiful and pleasant. The Grendel is significant because God has cursed it and that he has committed crimes like these going back to his family tree. “ Quickly the one who haunted those water, who had scavenged and gone her gluttonous rounds for a hundred seasons, sensed a human observing her outlandish lair from above (Puchner, 925 lines 14971500)”. Also where it says, “The hero observed that swap-thing from hell (Puchner 925, lines 1518)”.

Posted by: Paola Vasquez at February 26, 2014 11:35 AM

Daniel Menezes
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG220CL CA02 Journeys in Narrative
26 February 2014

Question #3:
Who is Hrothgar? What is Heorot?

Answer:
Hrothgar is king of the danes. "Twelve winters of grief for Hrothgar, king/ Of the Danes, sorrow heaped at his door/ By hell-forged hands, His misery leaped/ The seas, was told and sung in all/ Men's ears" (Anonymous 147-1). He is the king that is essentially the model for Beowulf when he becomes king. Heorot is a grand hall that was built by Hrothgar. This is where celebrations and drinking takes place. It is a mead hall which functions as a symbol as well as the setting for a majority of the story.

Posted by: Daniel Menezes at February 26, 2014 11:46 AM

McClellan Lowry
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys into Narratives CA01
26 February 2014

Question #4 - Why do you think Hrunting and Beowulf's armor are ineffective against the lady monster.

Beowulf's armor is ineffective against the Grendel’s mother because his shield Hruntling and his armor have been bewitched by Grendel so that they can not hurt him and his mother. Upon realizing this beowulf did not want his pride injured so he removed his armor and fought bare handed as he did with with her son.

Puchner, Martin, gen. ed. The Norton Anthology of World Literature. 3rd ed. Vol. 1.
New York: Norton, 2012. 925-27 Print.

Posted by: McClellan Lowry at February 26, 2014 11:59 AM

Becca Orden
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG220CL Journey in Narrative CA01
26 February 2014

QUESTION #16:
What is Grendel’s immediate impulse when he feels the strength of Beowulf’s hand? If he’s so fierce, why does he have this particular impulse?
ANSWER:
When Grendel’s first felt Beowulf’s hand “every bone in his body quailed and recoiled, but he could not escape” (Puchner 907). I think he has this reaction because he has never met someone who was willing to take him on and he has finally met his “match”, someone who will be of equal power. He has this impulse because he comes to the realization of what is really about to happen within this battle.

Posted by: Becca Orden at February 26, 2014 12:44 PM

Antonio De Niz
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
26th February 2014

Question 2:
How is the idea of good versus evil immediately juxtaposed in the first stanza?

Answer:
The story of Beowulf starts by describing how good King Hrothgar is. He was so good to the land that they even built a statue and a hall called Heorot, this is a place where the king’s men could go and have a drink and sing songs. King Hrothgar is the good in the first stanza, but then the evil is a demon named Grendel appeared as an evil monster. Grendel did not like the songs, laughing, and all the fun that the king’s men were creating. Grendel made the decision of killing thirty men. Hrothgar’s men were powerless. This continued for several nights and Hrothgar did not know how to solve this situation. Then another good appears in Beowulf, he overheard the tale of Grendel and decided to do something, and that something is to go kill this demon. This is the idea of good versus evil, and also this is where Beowulf appears and is the set up for the rest of the story.

Posted by: Antonio De Niz at February 26, 2014 12:48 PM

Diana Berthil
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
25 February 2014

QUESTION:
# 8. What is ironic about the type of words/actions used by Hrothgar's lieutenant who stops Beowulf and his men?

ANSWER:
What is ironic about the type of words/actions used by Hrothgar's lieutenant is that he is in awe and compliments Beowulf on his army; "I am Hrothgar's herald and officer. I have never seen so impressive or large an assembly of strangers. Stoutness of heart, bravery not banishment, must have brought you to Hrothgar" (Puchner 898). Though he stops them before meeting Hrothgar's and questions their origin, he does not seem alarmed by Beowulf and his men. The statement of the lieutenant being proud, "Then a proud warrior questioned the men concerning their origins" (Puchner 898), shows the opposite of a man protecting his territory.

Posted by: Diana Berthil at February 26, 2014 12:59 PM

Kent Wood
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng 220CL CA02
25 February 2014

QUESTION #18:
Why can't Beowulf's men's do any harm to Grendel?

ANSWER:
Beowulf's men tried to assist him during the fight with Grendel. They used, "Their ancestral blades (Puchner 908)." However, these blades could not harm Grendel because, "He had conjured the harm from the cutting edge of every weapon (Puchner 908)." Which made Beowulf's men ineligible to inflict any damage upon Grendel.

Posted by: Kent Wood at February 26, 2014 01:03 PM

Mariana Convery
Dr. Lee B. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
26 February 2014

Question 6:
Who is Healfdane? Who is Higlac?

Answer:
Halfdane (Healfdane) is the father of Hygelac. According to the summary of Beowulf, the hero, Beowulf, is a Geat, part of the then Dane kingdom of the south and what is today known as Sweden; and he is, "a nephew of the king, Hygelac" (Puchner 887). Therefore, Halfdane is Beowulf's great uncle and Hygelac is his first uncle. So Hygelac is the king of the Geats, which makes him the lord of Beowulf.

Posted by: Mariana Convery at February 26, 2014 01:04 PM

Lydia Beach

Dr. B. Lee Hobbs

ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02

26 February 2014


QUESTION #1:
Describe Grendel’s lineage that is given in the first stanza. What allusion is used to describe these monsters?

ANSWER:
Grendel is descended from Cain. He is a monster but he sort of has human emotions. He acts like a monster and terrorizes the people of Heorot. He completely bullies the people of Heorot, “Grendel waged his lonely war, inflicting constant cruelties on the people, atrocious hurt” (Puchner 894). However, it also seems that Grendel hurts them because he feels hurt because of what happened to Cain. The allusion used for Grendel is, “he was spawned in that slime line” (Puchner 893). That’s a huge insult to Grendel and his lineage.

Posted by: Lydia Beach at February 26, 2014 01:10 PM

Jasmine Cedeno
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA02
23 February 2014

Question #17: Why do we again get such a thorough description of herot as Beowolf and Grendel battle? What else is it again being likened to?

Answer:
Beowolf discusses the issues of Denmark with the King and the soldiers in the mead-hall. The herot is used as a place for warriors and authority to drink beer, eat food and prepare for the next battle. It is like a bar or cafeteria for soldiers. The people of Denmark gathered around the mead-hall to meet and hear from Beowolf with King Hrothgar. Beowolf has traveled from his land of Geatland to defeat the monster Grendel. King Hrothgar offers Beowolf a deal because he once rescued Beowolf's father at a certain point in time. Beowolf accepts the challenge and watches over the men in the mead-hall. "So they duly arrived in their grim war-graith and gear at the hall, and, weary from the sea, stacked wide shields of the toughest hardwood against the wall, and collapsed on the benches; battle-dress and weapons clashed (Heaney 898)." When Beowolf arrived to Denmark to meet Hrothgar he was immediately taken to the mead-hall. The mead-hall is more than just a place to eat and drink with fellow warriors. It is a place to discuss and watch over the lands. Geatland also had a mead-hall and that is where Beowolf discusses his quest to Denmark with the Queen of Geatland, Hygelac. There he presents the treasure he has found and the journey he had taken on in Denmark. Wulfgar, the King's messager, announces a message from the king to Beowolf and everyone of the herot. At the door he says, "My lord, the conquering king of Danes, bids me announce that he knows your ancestry; also that he welcomes you here to Heorot and salutes your arrival from across the sea. You are free now to move forward to meet Hrothgar in helmets and armor, but shields must stay here and spears be stacked until the outcome of the audience is clear." The men guarded Denmark by herot. Beowolf was not allowed to proceed into Denmark and meet the king without being examined by the men in the herot.

Posted by: Jasmine Cedeno at February 26, 2014 01:11 PM

Marssiel Mena

Dr. B. Lee Hobbs

ENG 220 Journeys in Narrative CA02

26 February 2014


Question #5:

What has Beowulf Heard about how Grendel fights, and how does he vow to also fight?


Answer:
Beowulf has heard that Grendel was a horrible monster that attacked and butchering 30 of King Hrothgar's men, unable to fight against Grendel he returns the next night and does it again (Puncher 893). Beowulf also heard that weapons did not work on Grendel, no matter what they did they could not stop him. Beowulf vowed to fight Grendel without weapons or shield (Puncher 895).

Posted by: marssiel mena at February 26, 2014 01:11 PM

Jack Constant
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng220CL Journey into Narrative CA01
26 February 2014

Question: What is special about Hrothgar's throne, and why can't Grendel touch it?

Answer: King Hrothgar's throne is special because he is believed to be appointed by God. Grendel is a monster, the decedent of Cain. For this reason, Grendel is not allow to touch anything that is of Godly decent. A quote talking about Grendel being a part of Cain's Clan, "Grendel was the name of this grim demon haunting the marches, marauding round the heath and the desolate fens; he has dwelt for a time in misery among the banished monsters, Cain's Clan" (Puchner, 893).

Posted by: jack constant at February 26, 2014 01:30 PM

Chantal Bouthillier
Dr. Lee. B. Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Preverbal Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
27 February 2014

QUESTION# 25:
What is it that causes Beowulf to “[leap] back/Into battle” even after she has torn through his armor? Is this a pagan or a Christian value?

ANSWER:
Beowulf takes armor off knowing that Grendel is unarmed. Beowulf fights without weapons and an armor when he knows that the enemy he is going against one that has no weapon either. However, once his armor is torn and the battle has an unfair advantage towards the other, Beowulf will use a sword to protect him believe that this is considered a Christian value because the weapons, thrown, and armor protect king Hrothgar and Beowulf.They are protected by god.

Posted by: Chantal Bouthillier at February 26, 2014 01:33 PM

Jose Parra
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative
February 26, 2014

Question #14:
Why is Grendel a necessity in the epic poem and to the epic hero?

Answer:
A epic poem is a lengthy narrative poem usually telling of a lengendary hero and the details of his deeds, journey, adventure and legacy. Most hero's not all have villains of some sort that they must encounter and fight against in his or her journey. Most hero's have one main villain, some have many. In Beowulf there are three, Grendel, Grendels Mother and the dragon. Grendal is the main one and is basically what gets the story going, he is the reason why Beowulf goes on his journey and becomes an epic hero. Without Grendel, Beowulf would have no reason to fight him or go on his adventure and there would be no epic.

Posted by: Jose Parra at February 26, 2014 02:10 PM

Andrew Sherlock
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL - On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
26 February 2014

Question #18:
Why can’t Beowulf’s men’s do any harm to Grendel?

Answer:
Because there is not a weapon on earth that can cause harm to Grendel. (Puchner 908)

Works Cited
"Beowulf." Puchner, Martin. The Norton Anthology World Liturature Vol. 1. New York: W. W. Norton & Comany, 2013. 891-960.


Posted by: Andrew Sherlock at February 26, 2014 02:15 PM

Daniel Menezes
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
26 February 2014

Question #45:
Why is the focus on Beowulf as a hero rather than a king? What is the difference?

Answer:
"So. The Spear-Danes in days gone by
and the kings who ruled them had courage and greatness.
We have heard of those princes' heroic campaigns" (Anonymous 1-3). Immediately the story opens up defining what makes a great hero, courage. This work focuses on Beowulf as a hero rather than a king because Beowulf is a lousy king. He does treat his people well and is considered a good king by them, he is nowhere near as good a king a Hrothgar. Beowulf fulfills all of the aspects of a good hero in every way possible, but he fails as a king. He does not marry in order to pass the thrown down and bear children, he doesn't inspire his people as well as Hrothgar, and he dies trying to be a hero. A good king would not have fought the dragon, he would let his men take are of it. The difference between the king and the hero is that a good hero usually does not make a good king. He was to busy attempting to maintain his hero status, this is what leads to his downfall as a king. Beowulf was stuck in hero mode and his caused him to have some short comings as a king. As a hero however, he was an ideal.

Posted by: Daniel Menezes at February 26, 2014 02:18 PM

Alvaro Rambaldi
Dr. B. Lee. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
25 February 2014

Question #56
In the third episode (the meeting with Aegeus/ Aigeus), what question did Aegeus/ Aigeus ask of the Delphic Oracle? What was the oracle's answer? Explain.

ANSWER:
Aegeus, the king of Athens was married twice. After being married twice to Meta and Chalciope respectively, he was desperate because both women were unable to present him with a child. Fearing the fact that he could be unfertile, he seeks the Delphic Oracle to know what his problem is and why he is incapable of having an heir. The oracle tells him "do not loosen the bulging mouth of the wineskin until you have reached the height of Athens".

After his meeting with the oracle he stops at Troezen and asks Pittheus to decipher what the Oracle meant. Pittheus understands the meaning of the Oracle's words and gives Aegeus plenty of wine to drink throughout the night. He later on introduces his daughter Aethra to Aegues, which eventually sleeps with her. Aethra is able to get pregnant and has a son called Theseus.

Concluding, after everything that has happened it is easy to understand what the Oracle meant when she said those words to Aegeus. Because of the wine he was able to impregnate Aethra and have a male son, which would guarantee him as king of Athens.

Posted by: Alvaro Rambaldi at February 26, 2014 02:24 PM

Wilfred Ras
ENG 220 CL
Dr. Hobbs
25 February 2014

Homework Assignment
Question:
Explain the imagery when Heorot is first described. What purpose does this imagery serve?

Answer:
The way I interpreted this was that Heorot is not someone. Heorot is a place. It is described in the book as somewhere that might be in danger. They were talking about the murder of someone would only make it more dangerous for this place. Also, what I understood is that this is a place they like to hangout at. This was a place for the King to hangout and protect.

Posted by: Wilfred Ras at February 26, 2014 02:44 PM

Mariana Convery
Dr. Lee B. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
27 February 2014

Question 8:
What is the message to “all men” at the end of the recited poem? (end of work)

Answer:
The message to “all men” at the end of Beowulf is that bravery is one of the most important virtues to have to be a great ruler, but that it’s not bravery alone that makes a great hero, leader or king. This is evidenced in the last three lines wherein Wiglaf and the Geat people said, “of all the kings upon earth/he was the man most gracious and fair-minded and keenest to win fame” (3180-3182). So it takes kindness, grace and unselfish fairness to make a man as great as Beowulf. Since the other warriors did not help Beowulf, their entire kingdom is in jeopardy, and so because of their selfish and cowardice actions, the opposite of Beowulf’s example is showing them how important it is to have a leader with all of these virtues.

Posted by: Mariana Convery at February 27, 2014 03:31 PM

Taylor Schemehorn
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
27 February 2014
QUESTION #32:
What does he do differently in planning for how to fight this battle? Does this reveal any changes in him? Explain.
ANSWER:
Beowulf decides that he is going to fight Grendel with no weapons to match Grendel who has no weapons. He asks Hrothgar to fight alone, with just his own men. He feels nothing is more powerful then he, and that is why he prepares by removing his armor and weapons and stays awake all night thinking about the battle waiting to hear or see the monster, Grendel. “When it comes to fighting, I count myself as dangerous any day as Grendel” (Puchner 905).

Posted by: Taylor Schemehorn at February 27, 2014 04:02 PM

Henry Adu
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
27 February 2014

Question 47
Who are the Swedes and Frisians? Why are we given so much detailed information about the history of their quarrels with the Geats?
Answer
The Swedes and Frisians are two tribes known for their rivalry and they always fight with the Geats. There are so much detailed information about the history of their quarrels because it is an important part of their lives. Beowulf gives the Geats hope because he provides a protection and a heroic figure to them. This can be seen in the passage; “People from Geatland have put ashore. They have sailed far over the wide sea. They call the chief in charge of their band by the name of Beowulf” (Puchner 360).

Posted by: Henry Adu at February 27, 2014 06:56 PM

Alexa Griffith-Hardy
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
27 February 2014

Question #38:
What is the message to “all men” at the end of the recited poem?
Answer:
At the end of the recited poem there is a message to “all men” is about accepting another man as family. The queen spoke trying to allow the men to have a joyful happy night. The queen described the men as noble “I am certain of Hrothulf. He is noble and will use the young ones well.” (Puchner 918). The men were willing to work hard and adopt new men into the court.
Work Cited
Puchner, Martin. Beowulf. Trans. Heaney, Seamus. W.W. Norton & Company, INC., 2001. Print.

Posted by: Alexa Griffith-Hardy at February 27, 2014 08:25 PM

Alexa Griffith-Hardy
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
27 February 2014

Question #38:
What is the message to “all men” at the end of the recited poem?
Answer:
At the end of the recited poem there is a message to “all men” is about accepting another man as family. The queen spoke trying to allow the men to have a joyful happy night. The queen described the men as noble “I am certain of Hrothulf. He is noble and will use the young ones well.” (Puchner 918). The men were willing to work hard and adopt new men into the court.
Work Cited
Puchner, Martin. Beowulf. Trans. Heaney, Seamus. W.W. Norton & Company, INC., 2001. Print.

Posted by: Alexa Griffith-Hardy at February 27, 2014 08:25 PM

Becca Orden
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG220CL Journey in Narrative CA01
27 February 2014

QUESTION #46:
Where does the dragon come from? Why does he attack the Geats? Is the dragon a greater or lesser threat than Grendel? Why does Beowulf go to fight him?
ANSWER:
The dragon comes from Earnaness. The dragon attacks the Geats because he has been upset by a slave stealing one of his goblets (Puchner, 910). I think that Grendel is greater than the dragon because Grendel is seen as an indestructible creator.

Posted by: Becca Orden at February 27, 2014 08:33 PM

Dexomia Livia
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CL-Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
27 February 2014

QUESTION #13
Describe the differences that exist between Hrothgar and Beowulf in your opinion.

ANSWER:
In my own opinion, Beowulf is the strongest man alive; he is the “mightiest man on earth, highborn and powerful” (Puchner 895). In addition, Beowulf, who represents a true hero, is also the leader of the troop that will defeat the Grendel demon. On the other hand, in the beginning of the story, Hrothgar shows strength, bravery, and leadership, “his mind turned to hall-building: he handed down orders for men to work on a great mead-hall” (Puchner 892). In addition, Hrothgar is the king of Danes, who later on becomes a father figure to Beowulf.

Posted by: Dexomia Livia at February 27, 2014 09:58 PM

Daniella Zacarias
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
Journeys Of Transformation In Narrative Literature (220CL)
27.2.2014
Question #40
40.
Who is Scyld? Where does he come from? Where do he go? What does he do? Why does the poem begin here, rather than with Hrothgar and Grendel?
ANSWER.
“There was Shield Sheafson [Scyld Scefing], scourge of many tribes.” (Puchner 891). Shield, or Scyld, is was the king of the ancient Danes and founder of Hrothgar’s royal lineage. His origins are mysterious, but it is known that he was not born into royalty; instead, “his worth was proved.” (Puchner 891). As far as him going somewhere, the poem mentions that he died and “crossed over into the Lord’s keeping.” (Puchner 891). Shield, had become a great king and fathered a famous son, Beow (who fathered Halfdane, who fathered Hrothgar). The poem begins with the mention of Shield, so as to declare Hrothgar’s power and greatness (he comes from great men, and therefor is a great man himself).

Posted by: Daniella Zacarias at February 27, 2014 10:15 PM

Jasmine Cedeno
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA02 Journeys to Narrative
28 February 2014

Question #31: What is threatening his kingdom and why does he go to fight it?

Answer:
A monster that descends from an important character in the Bible inherits the same wickedness. This monster, Grendel is related to the Cain, the son of Adam who murdered his own brother Able because of jealousy. This family is the beginning to original sin in the Christian Bible and Grendel is evil because of sin, according to Christian beliefs. Grendel is a monster that kills and destroys by ripping men apart to eat their flesh. He drinks the blood of everything he kills. For twelve years, he has been killing men in the Heorot of the Danes. He has become extremely jealous of their life in the mead-hall where the men drink beer and tell stories. His attacks have suppressed the soldiers and the King Hrothgar. They are unable to defeat the monster and become helpless.
Beowulf, nephew to the king of Geatland is the greatest warrior at the time and hears about the attacks of the monster. He sails away to the Danish land to accept the challenge in defeating Grendel. He may feel obligated to kill the monster for two reasons. The first reason is because he is the greatest warrior in the world who is able to kill anyone or anything. The second reason Beowulf may feel the need to kill the monster is because Hrothgar had done a favor for Beowulf’s father in the past. The main reason why Beowulf decides to fight the monster is because he wants to protect the men in the mead-hall from any more attacks. He has heard the story and may believe they have suffered long enough. The narrator intentionally states Beowulf has not decided to kill the monster because he is in debt to the king but because he wants to kill the monster himself. King Hrothgar promises Beowulf he will have anything he wishes if he can kill the monster and survive. “Never, since my hand could hold a shield have I entrusted or given control of the Danes’ hall to anyone but you. Ward and guard it, for it is the greatest of houses. Be on your mettle now, keep in mind your fame, beware of your enemy. There’s nothing you wish for that won’t be yours if you win through alive (Heaney 905).”
One night, the monster decided to stalk the mead-hall after the men had fallen asleep. “Nor did the creature keep him waiting but struck suddenly and started in; he grabbed and mauled a man on his bench, bit into his bone-lapping, bolted down his blood and gorged on him in lumps, leaving the body utterly lifeless, eaten up hand and foot (Heaney 906).” The monster barges into the hall and begins killing immediately. The men watch him as he attack everything even Beowulf. At this point, Beowulf grips the monster into an arm lock where the monster would eventually scream like a loser. “Everyone felt it who heard that cry as it echoed off the wall, a God-cursed scream and strain of catastrophe, the howl of the loser, the lament of the hell-serf keening his wound (Heaney 907).”

Posted by: Jasmine Cedeno at February 27, 2014 10:55 PM

Jacklyn O'Brien
Dr.B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
27 February 2014

QUESTION #27:
What saves Beowulf from the dagger? Does this show a pagan or christian belief?

ANSWER:
After Beowulf's failed attempt of attacking Grendel's mother with a sword, the two of them begin to wrestle. After Beowulf falls, Grendel's mother grabs a dagger to try and stab Beowulf's shoulder. Thankfully the chain mail Beowulf was wearing turned and had saved the dagger from ending Beowulf's life. This represents a christian belief. This scene has been compared to the christian stories of god punishing the evil. Beowulf could be considered "Holy" having the christian faith backing him up while he rids the world of evil.

Posted by: Jacklyn O'Brien at February 27, 2014 11:29 PM

Dexomia Livia
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CL-Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
27 February 2014

QUESTION #37
What does Wiglaf’s speech reveal about the important of honor and the consequences of dishonorable behavior in this time period?

ANSWER:
During Beowulf‘s funeral, Wiglaf made a speech about the important of honor in which he reveals the respect and the reputation of a great hero that Beowulf has gained. This is stated on page 954, when Wiglaf says to the rest of the warriors about the weapons that they have now thanks to Beowufl, “the lord of men who showered you with gifts and gave you the armor you are standing in” (Puchner). Secondly, Wiglaf also states on his speech the consequences of dishonorable behavior to the warriors who did not help Beowulf. He said to them that princes will know how these warriors disgraced themselves, and the warriors will “sooner die than live a life of shame” (Puchner 954).

Posted by: Dexomia Livia at February 27, 2014 11:38 PM

Nicholas Heiting
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narratives CA01
27 February 2014

QUESTION #32:
What does he do differently in planning for how to fight this battle? Does this reveal any changes in him?

ANSWER:
When Beowulf goes off to fight the dragon, he does so with a sword, shield, and armor. He states that since he is “old,” “the king of his people,” and “knows no other way to fight a dragon” are the reasons he uses his weapons and armor for this battle (Puchner 946). It seems that age has affected his outlook on battle. In addition, since he is king, he feels more obliged to stay alive for the sake of his people and fights for their safety. He states, “Men-at-arms, remain here on the barrow, safe in your armor, to see which one of us is better in the end at bearing wounds in a deadly fray” (Puchner 947). This statement depicts Beowulf as feeling responsible for this battle alone and protects the men under his command.

Posted by: Nicholas Heiting at February 27, 2014 11:43 PM

Allie Clemons
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA01
28 February 2014

Question 44:
What do the poets within Beowulf sing about? To whom do they sing their songs? What is the purpose of their performances?

Answer:
“The song recounts the fight at Finnsburg between the Dane Hengest and the Jute Finn.” (P.914) It starts off describing Jute Finn’s wife and how her unnamed son was killed in the first battle. All these fights are basically people battling to become the ruler of this land and some people come together and join forces to be able to win, but ultimately another battle would erupt after that because they both would still want to be in line. The song is being sung to the queen. The purpose of their performance is to foreshadow events that are soon to happen.

Posted by: Allie Clemons at February 27, 2014 11:52 PM

Michael Castronuovo
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
28 February 2014

QUESTION #34:
Who is Wiglaf and how does he differ from Beowulf’s other followers?

ANSWER:
Wiglaf is a son of Weohstan’s, and “a well-regared Shylfing warrior” (Puchner 948). Wiglaf differs from Beowulf’s other followers because he has somewhat of a personal history with Beowulf. For starters, he is also from the clan of the Waegmundings, just like Beowulf (Puchner 948). Another thing they both relate to is that Wiglaf’s father killed Eanmund, whose brother was later assisted by Beowulf in seeking vengeance (Puchner 948).

Posted by: Michael Castronuovo at February 28, 2014 12:09 AM

Craig Graves
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
27 February 2014

Question 36:
What honor did he [Beowulf] bestow of Wiglaf?

Answer:
As he lay dying following slaying the dragon, Beowulf asks Wiglaf to preform favors for him such as show him some of the treasures the dragon was hoarding, take care of the Geats, and to bury Beowulf in a barrow named for him (Puchner 952). The honor Boewulf has bestowed upon Wiglaf is the honor of being the new king and leader of the Geats. Beowulf literally says to Wiglaf that “it is up to [him] to look after their needs now” and gives Wiglaf his armor before he dies (Puchner 952-953). The reason Beowulf decides to give the kingdom to Wiglaf is because Wiglaf was the only of his men to accompany him to kill the dragon and Beowulf never had children to be his heirs.

Posted by: Craig Graves at February 28, 2014 08:46 AM

Chantal Bouthillier
Dr. B. Lee. Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Preverbal Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
28 February 2014

QUESTION #42:
Trace the history of the hall Heorot-why was it built, what happened within its walls, how and by whom was it destroyed?

ANSWER:
The hall of Heorot was built for King Hrothgar as a place for him to stay as in a place in his protected godly throne. The Heorot hall was used for the king and warriors to gather to drink and feast. The hall resembles power and contains jewels, armor, and wealth. . “Hrothgar, king of the Danes, or Scyldings, builds a great mead-hall, or palace, in which he hopes to feast his liegemen and to give them presents.” Within its walls, men party and sing about god. Until one night, when Grendel heard the warriors singing he become irritated and jealous so he made his way to the Heorot. Grendel kills many men until Beowulf stands up to him. The death of Grendel angers his mother and she wants to seek revenge. Grendel’s mother arrives to the Heorot while Beowulf is gone and everyone was sleeping. That night was when many more men were killed and the Heorot hall was destroyed.

Posted by: Chantal Bouthillier at February 28, 2014 10:26 AM

Rebecca Maldonado
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL: Journeys in Narrative CA01
27 February 2014

QUESTION #41: What is Grendel’s lineage? What do the characters in the poem know about Grendel? How is this different from what we, the audience, know?
ANSWER:
Grendel and his mother have been described as looking like a woman and the other “warped in the shape of a man,” (Puchner 921). “They are fatherless creatures/ and their whole ancestry is hidden in a past/ of demons and ghosts,” (Puchner 922). Reportedly, Grendel hails from the lineage of Cain. This is why his lineage is said to be an unnatural and demonic one because Cain brought murder into the world. We as the audience know the Biblical lineage of the monsters while the characters in the story assume that the monster’s past is hidden.

Posted by: Rebecca Maldonado at February 28, 2014 11:36 AM

Andrew Sherlock
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL - On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
26 February 2014

Question #35:
Who does Beowulf give thanks to before dying?

Answer:
Beowulf gives thanks to God by saying “To the everlasting lord of all, to the King of Glory, I give thanks that I have been allowed to leave my people so well endowed on the day I die.” (Puchner 952)
Works Cited
"Beowulf." Puchner, Martin. The Norton Anthology World Liturature Vol. 1. New York: W. W. Norton & Comany, 2013. 891-960.


Posted by: Andrew Sherlock at February 28, 2014 11:42 AM

Diana Berthil
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
28 February 2014

QUESTION:
# 30. What honor does Beowulf receive after Hygelac and his son have died? For how long does he rule?

ANSWER:
After Hygelac and his son have died, Beowulf receives the honor of ruling over the kingdom; “A lot was to happen in later days in the fury of battle. Hygelac fell and the shelter of Heardred’s shield proved useless against the fierce aggression of the Shylfings: ruthless swordsmen, seasoned campaigners, they came against him and his conquering nation, and with cruel force cut him down so that afterwards the wide kingdom reverted to Beowulf” (Puchner 940). Beowulf rules the kingdom, “for fifty winters” (Puchner 940).

Posted by: Diana Berthil at February 28, 2014 12:19 PM

Paola Vasquez
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
28 February 2014

QUESTION #29: What two trophies does Beowulf return with?

ANSWER: The two trophies Beowulf return was Grende’s head and the sword hilt to Hrothgar. This assured his future security. “Grendel’s head was hauled by the lair, dragged across the floor where the people were drinking, a horror for both queen and company to behold. They stared in awe. It was an astonishing sight (Puschner, 928, lines 1647-1650).”

Posted by: Paola Vasquez at February 28, 2014 12:47 PM

Paola Vasquez
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
28 February 2014

QUESTION #29: What two trophies does Beowulf return with?

ANSWER: The two trophies Beowulf return was Grendel’s head and the sword hilt to Hrothgar. This assured his future security. “Grendel’s head was hauled by the lair, dragged across the floor where the people were drinking, a horror for both queen and company to behold. They stared in awe. It was an astonishing sight (Puschner, 928, lines 1647-1650).”

Posted by: Paola Vasquez at February 28, 2014 12:47 PM

McClellan Lowry
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA01
28 February 2014

Question - What is Grendels lineage? what do the characters in the poem know about Grendel? How.is it different from what we know?

Grendels lineage originates from cain of the old testament who murdered his own brother which is where Grendels savageness comes. The characters of Beowulf know that Grendel is a monstrous and of his mother. They are unaware of what the readers know the tragic side of gerendal a creatuer forever displaced to a swap.

Posted by: McClellan Lowry at February 28, 2014 12:52 PM

Antonio De Niz
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
26th February 2014

Question 50:
What are some of the differences between the poet’s world and that of the characters in the poem? What are the continuities between these worlds? Is there irony in our vision of this past age? How does the poet create a distance between the characters and himself – and how does he express their own sense of a distant past?

Answer:
There are differences between the poet’s world and that of the characters. In the poem, the poet writes as if it is not a fantasy but the characters act like it is a fantasy world. With monsters living there, it is a folk tale. The continuity between the two worlds is that the story takes place in medieval times, the reason for that is that there are Vikings and folk songs being sung. There is an irony of our vision in past age because we think it is so different from our world when there is no difference, except for technology. The poet creates separation by not mentioning himself and making the story more about the other characters. With each character, there is a different story, and that is how he expresses the distant past.

Posted by: Antonio De Niz at February 28, 2014 12:56 PM

Re-Chia Jackson
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 The Proverbial Road: Journeys of transformation in narrative
28 February 2014

Beowulf
Question #45
45. Why is the focus of the story on Beowulf as a hero rather than a king? What is the difference?
Answer:
The focus on Beowulf being a hero the story rather he being king is because through all his heroic activities he was just a hero. He didn’t become king until after the slaying of Grendel the demon and Grendel’s mother. Than he becomes king of his land.
A king is a male ruler of a country. A hero is admire or idealized for courage for his outstanding achievements. Normally in fairy tales, folktales, myths, and many stories past down you would have the one man who is the hero that becomes the king after he has save the land from a monster or beast that terrorized the people. He saves them by killing this beast than they declare him king.

Posted by: re-chia.jackson at February 28, 2014 01:04 PM

Kelsey Stevens
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys In Narrative CA02
2/28/14

Question 49: When Beowulf dies, does he go to heaven?
Answer: When Beowulf dies, his body is placed in a pyre that was built for him. Beowulf’s body was placed in the middle of the pyre, and there was a great funeral fire. A woman began to sing at his funeral and heaven swallowed the smoke from the fire (Puchner 959). The idea that the smoke from the fire was swallowed by heaven means that Beowulf also ascended to heaven in spirit.

Posted by: Kelsey Stevens at February 28, 2014 01:04 PM

Marssiel Mena
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 Journeys in Narrative CA02
28 February 2014​

Question#44
What do the poets within Beowulf sing about? To whom do they sing their songs? What is the purpose of their performances?

Answer:
The poets within Beowulf, sing because the victory Beowulf had with Grendel, they " [...], recite with skill, rehearsing Beowulf's triumphs and feats [...], (Puncher 909). They sing their songs to Hrothgar​, Beowulf and their men not only about beowulf but about Wael's son and Sigemund (Puncher 909).. They sing because Beowulf saved them, " clear proof of this could be seen in the hand the hero displayed [...], the whole of Grendel's shoulder and arm (Puncher 908). They told these songs to now honor Beowulf, their hero.

Posted by: marssiel mena at February 28, 2014 01:19 PM

Daniel Menezes
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
28 February 2014

Question #65:
How many warriors does Grendel eat on the first night he attacks Heorot?

Answer:
The first night that Grendel attacks Heorot, he finds the warriors asleep after a celebration. “Unhallowed wight,
grim and greedy, he grasped betimes,
wrathful, reckless, from resting-places,
thirty of the thanes”(anonymous 8). He takes thirty sleeping men and kills them. He later carries their bodies home to eat.

Posted by: Daniel Menezes at February 28, 2014 01:47 PM

Jose Parra
Dr, B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation Narrative
February 28, 2014

Question 31:
What is threatening his Kingdom and why does he have to fight it?

Answer:
Grendel is demon descended from Cain, who according to the bible killed his brother Abel). For the last twelve years he has been attacking Hrothgar's warriors and has single handedly taken over Heorot. The news spreads far and fast until it reaches Beowulf, nephew of King Hygelac, and the greatest hero in the world. Beowulf hears how Grendel has been terrorizing Hrothgar's kingdom decides to travel to Heorot and defeat Grendel.

Posted by: Jose Parra at February 28, 2014 01:50 PM

Wilfred Ras
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL
28 February 2014

Question #39:
Does this ending fit that of an epic hero? Why / why not?

Answer:
After Beowulf took over Geats he ruled wisely for fifty years. He really brought prosperity for this land. Though problem occurred. They experienced some hardship and people’s lives were taken. After the dragon started to break this land apart, Beowulf played the hero role, and killed this dragon. However, did not get out clean. He was bit by this dragon in the neck and died after a few hours. I do think he was a hero for these people. He just did not kill the beast that was harming them, but also died in the name of this land.

Posted by: Wilfred Ras at February 28, 2014 03:06 PM

Chantal Bouthillier
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Preverbal Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
28 February 2014

Question # 76:
Grendel’s mother kills who in retaliation for her son’s death?

ANSWER:
Grendel’s mother kills Hrothgar’s warrior, Aeschere, for her son’s death. This so happens to be a man who was everything to Hrothgar. “ To Hrothgar, this man was the most beloved of the friends he trusted between the two seas. She had done away with a great warrior, ambushed him at rest.” (Puchner, 920).


Posted by: Chantal Bouthillier at February 28, 2014 08:10 PM

Lydia Beach

Dr. B. Lee Hobbs

ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02

28 February 2014

QUESTION #36:
What honor does he bestow on Wiglaf?

ANSWER:
Beowulf gives Wiglaf the golden collar which means that Wiglaf now runs the kingdom as the one who holds the throne.

Posted by: Lydia Beach at February 28, 2014 11:06 PM

Dexomia Livia
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
1 March 2014

Question 71
What is Unferth’s reaction to Beowulf showing up to save the day? How does he challenge Beowulf?

Answer:
Unferth, son Ecglaf, reaction towards Beowulf “made him sick with envy” (Puchner 901). He is jealous and cannot “brook or aside the fact” that Beowulf came to save the day by claiming to kill the beast (Puchner 901). Moreover, Unfelth challenges Beowulf’s claims about himself by suggesting that Beowulf lost the swimming completion against Becca, and he will not last a night against Grendel. Unfelth states, “Becca made good his boast upon you and was proved right [. . .] this time you’ll be worsted; no one has ever outlasted an entire night against Grendel” (Puchner 902).

Posted by: Dexomia Livia at March 1, 2014 06:03 PM

Diana Berthil
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
2 March 2014

QUESTION:
# 64. According to the story, from what famous person does Grendel trace his monstrous lineage?

ANSWER:
Grendel’s lineage is mentioned several times throughout Beowulf, the instance of it mainly being in the beginning of the story when the description of Grendel is given and his terrorization of Heorot. Grendel’s lineage is traced back to biblical times of Genesis, where he is the descendant of Cain; “Grendel was the name of this grim demon haunting the marches, marauding round the heath and the desolate dens; he had dwelt for a time in misery among the banished monsters, Cain’s clan, whom the Creator had outlawed and condemned as outcasts. For the killing of Abel the Eternal Lord had exacted a price: Cain got no good from committing that murder. . .” (Puchner 893). Cain is ultimately banished by God after he murders his only brother Abel and as his lineage continues so are his descendants including Grendel and his mother; “She had been forced down into fearful waters, the cold depths, after Cain had killed his father’s son, felled his own brother with a sword. Branded an outlaw, marked by having murdered, he moved into the wilds, shunned company and joy. And from Cain there sprang misbegotten spirits, among them Grendel, the banished and accursed, due to come to grips with that watcher in Heorot waiting to do battle” (Puchner 920).

Posted by: Diana Berthil at March 2, 2014 03:01 PM

Jasmine Cedeno
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA02 Journeys to Narrative
03 March 2014

Question #68:
What king does Beowulf serve? Why does Beowulf leave this king to help out Hrothgar? What qualification or achievements does Beowulf have that make him suitable for fighting Grendel?

Answer:
Even though, the story takes place in the Danish land and the king mostly recognized in the beginning of the story is King Hrothgar, it is not the king Beowulf serves. Beowulf is from Geatland where he serves a king who is related to his father. He is the nephew to King Hygelac. In Geatland, Beowulf decides to take on the challenge of leaving his homeland to defeat the monster Grendel in the Danish land. He accepts this challenge because he wishes to help King Hrothgar. King Hrothgar has known about Beowulf because the king once helped Beowulf’s father. King Hrothgar sent treasure to the Wulfing tribe after Beowulf’s father fought Heatholaf, a member of the tribe. Beowulf declares he is going to defeat Grendel because of his own heroic behavior. Beowulf believes he knows the way in defeating the monster and ending the destruction Grendel has caused in the mead-hall. He says, “I come to proffer my whole-hearted help and counsel. I can show the wise Hrothgar a way to defeat his enemy and find respite- if any respite is to reach him, ever (Heaney 897).”
Beowulf is an experienced warrior. He is the most sought out warrior in the world at the time. In the beginning of the story, the narrator describes Beowulf as the strongest and bravest warrior. “When he heard about Grendel, Hygelac’s thane was on home ground, over in Geatland. There was no one else like him alive. In his day, he was the mightiest man on earth, highborn and powerful (Heaney 895).” Beowulf qualified as the warrior to defeat Grendel because he was already well known in defeating other monsters. A man is the mead-hall during the festivities call upon Beowulf to point out a story he heard about Beowulf once being defeated. In this story, he says a childhood friend, Breca in a swimming match, defeated Beowulf. Unferth is the man responsible for questioning Beowulf’s heroic status. Beowulf replies by retelling his side of the story. He states the difficulty in the swimming match and defeating the sea monsters. Unferth believes Beowulf is just being vain and does not have the cridentials to defeat the monster. In reply, Beowulf says he is well qualified and Unferth is the one unable to fight Grendel. Beowulf says, “We’d been children together and grew up daring ourselves to outdo each other, boasting and urging each other to risk our lives on the sea. And so it turned out. Each of us swam holding a sword, a naked, hard-proofed blade for protection against the whale-beasts. But Brecca could never move out farther or faster from me than I could manage to move from him (Heaney 902).” This story was boldly stated in the mead-hall in front of all of the other men. Beowulf wanted to present himself in the mead-hall as capable of being able to defeat Grendel or any monster. This story defends Beowulf’s reputation and allows the mead-hall to carry on with the queen’s adorations.

Posted by: Jasmine Cedeno at March 2, 2014 08:41 PM

John-Wesley Ingraham
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
27 February 2014

Question #20:
What traits of Beowulf and Grendel raise the fight between them to the level of an epic struggle between the two great opposing forces in the world (good versus evil)?

Answer:
In the story of Beowulf, Beowulf the main character is a hero character-strong, brave, warrior like. Whereas Grendel is a symbol of evil-mysterious, with supernatural powers. Grendel comes from a line of killers, starting, of course, with Cain. Cain was the first killer in the Bible; he killed his own brother like Cain, kills for selfish purposes, “Grendel…dwelt from a time in misery among the banished monsters, Cain’s clan, whom the Creator had outlawed and condemned as outcasts. For killing Abel”(Puchner 893). Beowulf being the hero, protects life and this creates the battle of good verses evil, life taker against life protector.

Posted by: John-Wesley Ingraham at March 2, 2014 09:07 PM

John-Wesley Ingraham
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
29 February 2014

Question #33:
Describe Beowulf’s battle with the dragon.

Answer:
Beowulf prepares for his fight with the dragon by biding farwell to dear compainions one final time. Beowulf engages the dragon in battle but is quickly reminded that his strength is not what it once was. Beowulf strikes the dragon in the head with his great sword Naegling, but the sword snaps and breaks, “the war-king threw his whole strength behind a sword stroke…and Naegling snapped” (Puchner 950). As a result, Beowulf was bitten by the dragon. Wiglaf runs to his aid and strikes the dragon down low, allowing Beowulf to deliver the final blow, “he lunged at the enemy lower down…Beowulf dealt it a deadly wound” (Puchner 950). Despite slaying the beast, Beowulf is overcome by his wounds and dies.

Posted by: John-Wesley Ingraham at March 2, 2014 09:09 PM

John-Wesley Ingraham
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
1 March 2014
Question #77:

Where does Grendel’s mother live?

Answer:
Grendel's mother lived in a cave. To get to it, Beowulf had to swim down into a lake, “it was his last swim. He was swiftly overwhelmed in the shallows” (Puchner 923). The cave is similar to the hall where the men slept. Beowulf is confronted by many strange sea beast on his way to the cave, “a bewildering horde came at him from the depths, droves of sea-beasts who attacked with tusks and tore at his chain-main in a ghastly onslaught” (Puchner 925).

Posted by: John-Wesley Ingraham at March 2, 2014 09:10 PM

Alexa Griffith-Hardy
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
2 March 2014

Question #66:
How long does Grendel haunt Heorot until Beowulf comes to help the Danes?
Answer:
Grendel haunted Heorot a long time the news had to travel by mouth not only through Heorot but over the waters until Beowulf hears such and decides to be a hero. Night after night Grendel would attack “He was numb with grief, but got no respite for one night later merciless Grendel struck again with one more gruesome murders.” (Puchner 894). Grendel tried to make it clear we wants everyone to fear him “He took over Heorot, haunted the flittering hall after dark, but the throne itself, the treasure-seat, he was kept from approaching; he was the Lord’s outcast.” (Puchner 894).
Work Cited
Puchner, Martin. Beowulf. Trans. Heaney, Seamus. W.W. Norton & Company, INC., 2001. Print.

Posted by: Alexa Griffith-Hardy at March 2, 2014 09:49 PM

Nicholas Heiting
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narratives CA01
2 March 2014

QUESTION #64:
According to the story, from what famous person does Grendel trace his monstrous lineage?

ANSWER:
Grendel’s lineage is trace back to Cain from the_Bible_. The author writes, “…among banished monsters, Cain’s clan, whom the Creator had outlawed and condemned as outcasts” (Puchner 893).

Posted by: Nicholas Heiting at March 2, 2014 11:01 PM

Michael Castronuovo
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
3 March 2014

QUESTION #74:
What decoration or trophy does Beowulf stick on a spike over the entry-way to Heorot?

ANSWER:
After Beowulf’s battle with the monster, Grendel, he boats his victory by hanging the arm of Grendel on the roof of the entry-way to Heorot (Puchner 908).

Posted by: Michael Castronuovo at March 3, 2014 12:37 AM

Craig Graves
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
2 March 2014

Question 60:
In between every story and its audience stands a narrator who tells the story; the narrator has certain attitudes, opinions, interests, and objectives which direct the audience’s understanding of the story. This is one of the most basic, and yet most complex, facts of literature. Describe the relationship between the narrator and the story, and between the narrator and the audience, in Beowulf.
Answer:
In Beowulf, the narrator seems to have a close view of the story as if he (or she) were alive during it. It is certain, however, that the narrator was alive shortly after Beowulf’s funeral as there is a sudden shift from past to present tense and first-person pronouns are used (Puchner 955). The shift in tense and pronoun usage is short-lived as it reverts quickly back to past and third-person, which makes it seem like the narrator is trying not to become too involved in the story and keep it simply to the facts even though much of the story is most likely fictional.
The relationship between the narrator and the audience is a little distant, but the narrator seems to be proud of the story he or she is telling. The language the narrator uses to refer to the Geats or any characters on the ‘good side’ is always positive while the characters on the ‘bad side’ are referred to with negative language. Grendel and his mother are described with words like “lonely war,” “atrocious,” “demonic,” and “menace” (Puchner 894, 906, 923). Beowulf and his men are described with words such as “mighty,” “clever,” and “strong” (Puchner 896, 903, 920). This pattern of language shows the audience that the narrator is biased towards Beowulf and his allies.

Posted by: Craig Graves at March 3, 2014 01:06 AM

Marssiel Mena
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 Journeys in Narrative CA02
28 February 2014​

Question#62:
What typical activities do the people engage in at this place Hrothgar makes?

Answer:
In the place Hrothgar makes, Heorot people come together for lots of celebration and fun. In this " great hall of Heorot there is communal gathering, feasting, social interaction, oaths are made and, people come to hear sungs of great heroes," including the new hero Beowulf (Puchner 887).

Posted by: Marssiel Mena at March 3, 2014 09:36 AM

Re-Chia Jackson
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 The Proverbial Road: Journeys of transformation in narrative
3 March 3, 2014

Beowulf

Question #62
62. What typical activities do the people engage in at this place Hrothgar makes?
Answer:
The activities that the people of Danish engage in at Hrothgar are parties, dancing, socializing at night with one another, feasting, and hunting.

Posted by: re-chia jackson at March 3, 2014 09:52 AM

Allie Clemons
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA01
3 March 2014

Question 73:
What does Beowulf do to Grendel that mortally wounds the monster?

Answer:
Beowulf wounds Grendel by cutting off his arm. Grendel then returns to his swamp where his mother is and he lay there and bled to death. Beowulf returns and hangs the arm as a trophy for his hard work to keep the moors safe. The King was pleased with Beowulf that he told him “Wear these bright jewels, beloved Beowulf. Enjoy them, . . . oh fortunate young warrior; grow richer, let your fame and your strength go hand in hand; and lend these two boys your wise and gentle heart! I'll remember your kindness. Your glory is too great to forget, spread your blessed protection across my son, and my king's son!"( P 61-62) Grendel’s mother was so enraged by this that she decided she would avenge her son. During the battle, Beowulf ends up killing his mother by beheading her and returns to where Grendel was and beheads him as well.

Posted by: Allie Clemons at March 3, 2014 09:56 AM

Becca Orden
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG220CL Journey in Narrative CA01
3 March 2014

QUESTION #63:
What does the bard sing about inside the hall early in the narrative? Why does this anger Grendel?
ANSWER:
The bard sings about ancient times and about Beowulf’s story to honor him (Puchner 907). He also sings about the story of Sigemund, a great hero who slew a terrible dragon.

Posted by: Becca Orden at March 3, 2014 10:50 AM

Andrew Sherlock
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL - On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
3 March 2014

Question #35:
Where does Grendel’s mother live?

Answer:
She lives in a cave in the hills. (Puchner 922)
Works Cited
"Beowulf." Puchner, Martin. The Norton Anthology World Liturature Vol. 1. New York: W. W. Norton & Comany, 2013. 891-960.


Posted by: Andrew Sherlock at March 3, 2014 11:14 AM

Mariana Convery
Dr. Lee B. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
3 March 2014

QUESTION #72:
How is Beowulf’s story about the swimming match with Breca different than
Unferth’s version of the tale?

ANSWER:
Unferth challenges Beowulf by stating that he failed in a swimming match against Breca. He also states that the match was only because Beowulf is full of himself where he says:
It was sheer vanity made you venture out
on the main deep. And no matter who tried,
friend or foe, to deflect the pair of you,
neither would back down: the sea-test
obsessed you (Lines 509-12).

So the point Unferth is trying to make here is that Beowulf talks the talk, but based on the results of the swimming contest and the fact that Beowulf lost to Breca, Unferth is pointing out that although he comes saying he can slay Grendel with his boasting language, he is making the point that perhaps he’s just full of talk and will end up being devoured by Grendel.

Beowulf responds to Unferth by stating that, yes, he definitely took the challenge on based on vanity, as it was something his buddy, Breca and him would do throughout their childhood saying, “We’d been children together and we grew up/daring ourselves to outdo each other” (535-36). Yet, he vindicates himself by stating that although he may not have come in first, when Breca and him got separated in the water, not only did he battle the fierce cold and currents and harsh waves, he says, “However it occurred, my sword had killed/nine sea-monsters” (574-75). He then goes on and says:
Now I cannot recall
Any fight you entered, Unferth,
That bears comparison. I don’t boast when
I say
That neither you nor Breca were ever much
Celebrated for swordsmanship
Or facing danger on the field of battle
(581-85).

Therefore, Unferth is stating here that based on the winner of the swimming competition, he claims that Beowulf is all talk and won’t be able to save the kingdom from Grendel. Beowulf says that perhaps Breca was a great swimmer, but it was Beowulf who not only survived the harsh sea, because he is a better swordsman and warrior, he also battled nine sea-monsters and killed them, making the sea safer for sailors and still survived the ordeal. In the end, Unferth is satisfied with his answer and has great faith in Beowulf after all.

Posted by: Mariana Convery at March 3, 2014 11:25 AM

Jose Parra
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative
March 3, 2014

Question 65:
How many arriors does Grendel eat on the first night he attcks Heorot?

Answer:
On the first night of his attack, the demon Grendel killed thirty men "Suddenly the God-cursed brute was creating havoc: greedy and grim, he grabbed thirty men from their resting place and rushed to his lair, flushed up and inflamed from the raid, blundering back with the butchered corpses" (p. 863).

Posted by: Jose Parra at March 3, 2014 11:39 AM

Rebecca Maldonado
Dr. B. L. Hobbs
ENG 220CL: Journeys in Narrative CA01
3 March 2014

Question #68: What king does Beowulf serve? Why does Beowulf leave this king to help out Hrothgar? What qualifications or achievements does Beowulf have that make him suitable for fighting Grendel?
Answer:
Queen Hygd had offered Beowulf the chance to Rule since her son Heardred was too young. Although Beowulf refused, he served the young king until Hrothgar needs him. According to Hrothgar’s messenger, “I have never seen so impressive or large/ an assembly of strangers. Stoutness of heart,/ bravery not banishment, must have brought you to Hrothgar,” (Puchner 898). Hrothgar had known Beowulf since he was a young boy and feels God “…guided him here to the West-Danes, to defend us from Grendel,” (Puchner 899). In addition to being an old friend of Hrothgar’s, Beowulf was a renowned warrior across Geatland, making him a good candidate to defeat Grendel.

Posted by: Rebecca Maldonado at March 3, 2014 11:53 AM

Daniella Zacarias
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
Journeys Of Transformation In Narrative Literature (220CL)
2.3.2014
Question #57
57.
Wealhtheow, Hygd, Hildeburh, Grendel’s mother – what do the female characters in Beowulf do? How do they do it? Do they offer alternative perspectives on the heroic world (so seemingly centered around male action) of the poem?
ANSWER.
For the most part, the epic of Beowulf is male-centric. However, there are predominating female characters; Wealhtheow, Hygd, Hildeburh, and Grendel’s mother.
Hildeburh, is the peacemaker; yet peace has not exactly been surrounding her. In lines 1070 through 1160, “Hildeburh had little cause to credit the Jutes [...] Over sea-lanes then back to Daneland the warrior troop bore that lady home” (Puchner 914-917) Hildeburh’s story is told in the form of a song-poem by a skald (poet of Scandinavian scop). The song talks about the fight at Finnsburg between the Dane, Hengest, and the Jute, Finn. Hildeburg was the daughter of the Danish King, Hoc, and wife of Finn. In her story, she had lost both her son and brother (both unnamed in the poem). Hildeburh was a gift from the Danes to the Jutes in hopes of bringing peace between them and establishing an alliance. Hildeburh fulfilled her duty as a peacemaker by maintaining loyalties with both her country of origin, and her husband's.

Wealhtheow, the wife of King Hrothgar (a Dane), plays the role of powerful hostess. She holds the status of a warrior, as line 1168 states “The queen spoke...” (Puchner 918). For a woman to speak out loud, so that everyone in Heorot can hear, signifies her political power. Her political power is evident in lines 1180- 1191, when she publicly requests that her husband, King of the Danes, not allow Beowulf (a Geat) to be the heir to the throne, and for him to honour the social standards of her sons being the rightful heirs. She then proceeds to send Beowulf a cup of mead and gifts, in order to let him know that she meant no harm in her words, she was only protecting her children’s’ rights as heirs to the Dane throne.
Grendel’s mother counteracts all social expectations of women in the epic. She embodies masculine energy by attacking anyone physically, not politically with words as the last to women mentioned. Her desire to avenge her son’s death is obvious in lines 1302 to 1306; “There was an uproar in Heorot. She [Grendel’s mother] had snatched her trophy, Grendel’s bloodied hand. It was a fresh blow to the afflicted bawn. The bargain was hard. Both parties having to pay with the lives of friends.” (Puchner 920-921). In a way, Grendel’s mother is the ultimate counterpart of the men of the epic; she is just as focus on the fight as they are, and perhaps more than them since it is she who lost a son.
As for Hygd, Beowulf’s young queen, she also serves the purpose of the hostess and powerful political entity. As lines 1925 to 1931 put to it; “The building was magnificent, the king majestic, ensconced in his hall; and although Hygd, his queen, was young, a few short years at court, her mind was thoughtful and her manners sure. Haereth’s daughter [Hygd] behaved generously and stinted [spared] nothing when she distributed bounty to the Geats.” (Puchner 933-934).

Posted by: Daniella Zacarias at March 3, 2014 11:59 AM

Paola Vasquez
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
3 March 2014

QUESTION #67: What is the one thing in the mead-hall Grendel is unable to touch or ruin?

ANSWER: The one thing in the mead-hall Grendel is unable to touch or ruin is Hrothgar’s Throne. “ So Grendel waged his lonely war,/ inflicting constant cruelties on the people,/ atrocious hurt. He took over Heorot,/ haunted the glittering hall after dark,/ but the throne itself, the treasure-seat,/ he was kept from approaching; he was the Lord’s outcast./ These were hard times, heartbreaking (Puchner 894 lines 165-170).”

Posted by: Paola Vasquez at March 3, 2014 12:14 PM

Kelsey Stevens
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys In Narrative CA02
23 February 2014

Question 72: How is Beowulf’s story about the swimming match with Breca different than Unferth’s version of the tale?

Answer:
Unferth is very jealous of Beowulf, so when he tells the story of the swimming match with Breca, he tries to make Beowulf look bad. In Unferth’s version of the story, Beowulf was out swam. He said, “Breca make good boast upon you and was proved right” (Puchner 902). Beowulf quickly replies back with his version of the story. Beowulf claims that he was the strongest swimmer of them all (Puchner 902). He says that each of them swam while holding a sword. Beowulf tells how they were side by side the whole time, no one was beating the other. This is when Beowulf said he was attacked by sea creatures and pulled under the water (Puchner 903). He fought off nine sea creatures and claims to have saved future sailors.

Posted by: Kelsey Stevens at March 3, 2014 12:20 PM

McClellan Lowry
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA01
3 March 2014

Question - 75 - Who came to avenge Grendel's death?

Grendel's mother came the night after Beowulf defeated Glendale to avenge here son's death.

Puchner, Martin, gen. ed. The Norton Anthology of World Literature. 3rd ed. Vol. F.
New York: Norton, 2012. 920 - 923. Print.

Posted by: McClellan Lowry at March 3, 2014 12:55 PM

Alexander Hoschak
ENG 220CL Journeys into Narrative CA01
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
03 March 2014

Question:
Who comes to avenge Grendel’s Death?

Answer:
Grendel’s mother comes to avenge his death.

Posted by: Alexander Hoschak at March 3, 2014 12:57 PM

Antonio De Niz
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
3rd March 2014

Question 54:
Try to construct a relative timeline (without specific dates) for the events narrated and alluded to in the poem. Include the reigns of the Danish kings (Heremod, Scyld, etc.), the Swedish-Geatish wars, the life and death of the hero Beowulf, the destruction of Heorot, and any other events which seem relevant to your understanding of the story. Which plots are told in a straightforward narrative, and which are not? Why are there so many digressions and allusions? Discuss the relation between the plot (what happens) and the story (what order things are told in) in Beowulf.

Answer:
The story starts with the Ruling the Danish kings Heremod and Scyld. Then the great war of Swedish-Geatish. That is how Beowulf got recognized because of his heroic deeds to his country. He annihilated the enemy side and got recognized as the best warrior in the world. After Beowulf was recognized, he headed down to defeat the demon Grendel. He defeated Grendel but died from it. The destruction of the Heorot came after that, the reason why the Heorot was destroyed is because of the King and Beowulf’s death. The plot that is told in a straightforward narrative are the plots that are directly related, a straightforward narrative will not tell you any backstory. There are so many digression and allusions because the story needs that, it would not be the same story if there were none of those things.

Posted by: Antonio De Niz at March 3, 2014 12:57 PM

Alvaro Rambaldi
Dr. B. Lee. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
2 March 2014

Question #74
What decoration or trophy does Beowulf stick on a spike over the entry-way to Heorot?

ANSWER:
Beowulf and his army of Geats head to Heorot after knowing about the terrifying Grendel monster is killing people at Heorot and bringing danger to everyone. Beowulf and his men's primary objective is to defeat the monster.

During a fight Beowulf and Grendel battle through the mead hall of Heorot. Beowulf defeats the monster by tearing his arm away from his shoulder. Grendel, who is extremely wounded goes back to swamp house and eventually dies. As the symbol of victory, Beowulf hangs Grendel's arm on the wall of Heorot. Later on the arm is revealed as a steel arm, proving even better that Beowulf is a man with no weaknesses.

Posted by: Alvaro Rambaldi at March 3, 2014 02:04 PM

Kent Wood
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng 220CL Journeys In Narrative CA02
3 March 2014

QUESTION #46:
Where does the dragon come from? Why does he attack the Geats? Is the dragon a greater or lesser threat than Grendel? Why does Beowulf go to fight him?

ANSWER:
The dragon was asleep in the, "Steep vaults of a stone-roofed barrow where he guarded a hoard (Puchner 940)." A thief from that country had entered his lair and interfered with his golden "Gem-studded goblet (Puchner 940)." The dragon was a greater than Grendel because it was said to be his greatest foe yet. Beowulf had to fight him because he was king of the people the dragon was attacking and he wanted to for the glory of winning.

Posted by: Kent Wood at March 3, 2014 03:09 PM

Wilfred Ras
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220 CL
3 February 2012

Question #76
Grendel’s mother kills whom in retaliation for her son’s death?

Answer:
Grendel’s mother killed Aeschere. Aeschere was Hrothgar’s best friend. After Beowulf killed Grendel’s son, her mom came back to the spot where the kings were and in their sleep she grabbed Aeschere and killed him.

Posted by: Wilfred Ras at March 3, 2014 03:12 PM

Kent Wood
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
3 March 2014

QUESTION #55:
What is the status of gold and gift-giving in the poem? Who gives gifts, who receives them, and why? Are the modern concepts of wealth, payment, monetary worth and greed appropriate for the world of Beowulf?

ANSWER:
In the story of Beowulf gold and other values were often given to kings and war heroes. After killing Grendel Beowulf was given a gold necklace. At this time gold seemed to have the most significant value. This was depicted when, "The sleeping dragon guarded a hoard filled with golden gem studded goblets (Puchner 940)." If gold was not of such great value a dragon would not be guarding the precious items. Additionally, after the goblet was stolen the dragon would not have reacted with such violence if gold was worthless. Modern concepts are seemed to be aligned with that of Beowulf's world. For example when a man is seeking marriage he buy's his wife a golden ring for the occasion.

Posted by: Kent Wood at March 3, 2014 04:32 PM

Kent Wood
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng 220CL Journeys In Narrative CA02
3 March 2014

QUESTION:
What is missing from this version? What has been added to this version? How is this adaptation different from how you imagined it (characters, setting, etc.).

ANSWER:
Upon watching the animated film of Beowulf in class, I noticed quite a few additions and omissions when compared to the text from of Beowulf. Also, the film seemed totally different from what I had pictured mentally while I read the text of Beowulf.

Some of the omissions included the back story of Beowulf. The animation started after all of the previous heroics done by Beowulf in life. "Afterward a boy-child was born to Shield a cub in the yard, a comfort sent by God to that nation (Puchner 891)." The quote tells us about the origin of Beowulf. However, the animated film started with Beowulf already grown up into a man.

A few additions noticed in the film was the dragon using fire as its main weapon of attack, the thief after stealing the goblet tries to resell it, and Beowulf returning from battle with both the heads of Grendel and his mother. The animators of the film really took the story of Beowulf and spiced it up a bit. They added a few extra twists and turns of their own. Especially during the battle with Grendel and the dragon. Beowulf was repeatedly placed in illusions throughout each battle. For instance with the dragon, before killing it he had to run through images of himself and with Grendel he was seen swimming inside of his body and having to cut himself out.

The animated film was completely different from what I mentally pictured. I saw Beowulf as a huge, powerful, almighty character. However, in the film he looked like a regular blonde fellow with a beard and a little sword. The setting was also different from what I pictured. I thought it would be a more vivid setting with green grass and hilly meadows. However it was a gloomy place filled with fog and fire.

Posted by: Kent Wood at March 4, 2014 02:44 PM

Becca Orden
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG220CL Journey in Narrative CA01
4 March 2014

A.)Missing from the animated adaptation of Beowulf is explaining the background of both Beowulf and Grendel and how they came to be.
B.)In this version the director added small details that the book did not include, such as how Beowulf went inside of Grendel and then ripped his arm off, and how he went into the water and didn’t really come up to breathe ever.
C.) This adaption is different than how I imagined it would be only in the sense of how the characters looked mainly Beowulf and Grendel. I imagined Beowulf looking much more creature like, maybe more like a werewolf rather than a human. Grendel I thought would be less blob-ish and have more of a structure. I know he is a sea monster but the way I imagined him was more like Ursula from Little Mermaid, only in male form.

Posted by: Becca Orden at March 4, 2014 06:09 PM

Michael Adamson
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys into Narratives CA01
4 March 2014

Question:
1. What is missing from this version?
2. What has been added to this version?
3. How is this adaptation different from how you imagined it?
Answer:
This visual version of Beowulf has many similarities and differences what compared to the written version. In this visual adaptation, there is no mention of the sea race between Breca and Beowulf, although, it is in the written version it is. Also, in the written version when Beowulf and Grendel face off Beowulf is completely naked of clothes and weapon, while in this visual version, he is only naked of weapon. Additionally, in the written version, Beowulf rips Grendel’s arm off; in this visual version, it seems as if Beowulf jumps inside of Grendel and rips his arm off from the inside. This adaptation is different from how I imagined it in that I imagined Grendel as a human-looking character instead of as walking sewage.

Posted by: Michael Adamson at March 4, 2014 06:46 PM

Zachary Daley
Dr. Hobbs
220CL Journeys in Narrative
3/4/2014
Question 49:
When Beowulf dies, does he go to heaven?
Answer:
Beowulf did go to heaven, because as it says in the text, he looked for treasure unselfishly and was a great and kind king. He was ignorant and arrogant as a young man but as he grew, he became a great king to the people. I think that Beowulf did go to heaven because of the things he did as a king, if it was based on what he did when he was young, then he would be going to hell. The people loved him so much and thought they needed him so much that they made a monument for him to help lost sailors. Also the book says that heaven swallowed the smoke from his funeral.

Posted by: Zach Daley at March 4, 2014 08:28 PM

Alexa Griffith-Hardy
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
4 March 2014

Question:
What is missing from this version?
What has been added to this version?
How is this adaptation different from how you imagined it (characters, setting, etc.)

Answer:
The animated film and the story of Beowulf have the same general story, yet there are many details that each lack. The text makes the story a lot more detailed; the scene with the dragon is cut extremely short in the animated film. The preface of the story about Brecca winning the swimming race with Beowulf, was left out of animated version. When the thief tries to sell the gold to the powerful people of the village that is a scene that is not in the book. The movie has a lot more fire in it then the book described as the dragon wakes up and begins to attack. The scene where the village men warns everyone at the party about Grendel coming. As the man attempts to kill the dragon, imagines of himself flash repeatedly. The character Grendel was much more blob like than I imagined. Grendel is such a monstrous character I thought he would have much more detail. I expected the people to stay in their homes not sleep on the floor of the palace. Overall, I felt like the movie was a lot less detailed than the book.

Posted by: Alexa Griffith-Hardy at March 4, 2014 08:59 PM

Craig Graves
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
3 March 2014

Question:
What was missing or was added to the animated adaptation of Beowulf shown in class? How was it different than how you envisioned?

Answer:
The animated version of Beowulf added a backstory for Beowulf instead of him just appearing as he does in the original story. The video also added a story for the dragon’s treasure to have a reason for being in the cavern. One major thing that was missing from the video was Grendel’s backstory. In the story, Beowulf is bitten by the dragon and poisoned to death as a result; the video just had him fall down after he broke his sword in the dragon. There are many aspects of the video that I did not envision for the story. I had pictured Beowulf to look more rugged and visibly strong instead of thin and lanky. Grendel and his mother were depicted in the video as seaweed monsters, which I found to be silly instead of frightening as I had always thought of them as human-animal hybrids. I also did not imagine Beowulf’s battles to take place as they had in the video. When he was fighting Grendel’s mother, Beowulf was constantly underwater in the video, which is impossible. In contrast, I had always imagined Beowulf swimming into a cave underwater where ther was a large air pocket in which he could fight Grendel’s mother.

Posted by: Craig Graves at March 4, 2014 09:17 PM

Henry Adu
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
4 March 2014

Question
-What is missing from this version?
The book is much more detailed than the film. Some of the scenes eliminated from the film include when Brecca beats Beowulf in a swimming race. The dragon scene is less detailed than in the poem.
-what has been added to this version?
The movie includes a lot more fire when the dragon wakes up and attacks, than in the poem. Another scene that has been added in the animated version is when the thief tries to sell gold to the villagers. This scene was not in the poem. A third scene that has been added is when the villager warns of Grendel’s arrive at the party.
-How is this adaptation different from how you imagined it (characters, setting, etc.)
The Grendel character is different from what I imagined because he is not as intimidating as I thought. In the animated version where Beowulf sees the reflection of himself, it did not seem realistic. I do understand why the people always slept at the party instead of going home.

Posted by: Henry Adu at March 4, 2014 09:35 PM

Taylor Schemehorn
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
4 March 2014
QUESTION:
What is missing from this version? What has been added to this version? How is this adaptation different from what you imagined?
ANSWER:
The version of Beowulf watched in class was missing multiple details through it. First there is more set up in the book then in the film. The lead up to Beowulf fighting Grendel is short in the animation, but in the book, they go into detail about the legends that proceed Beowulf. In the book Beowulf’s sword breaks and so does the second old sword he finds but that is not shown in the film. Something else that is missing in the film is that the hanging of Grendel’s hand does not get enough attention. Something’s that were added in the film included, were that when the slave tries to sell the piece of gold he finds, that does not happen in the story. During the fight against the dragon, they added fire from the dragon but that was not something that was stated in the book. They add a lot of time when Beowulf is going to die. In the book, he is poisoned and he dies quickly. The creators put an artsy twist when Beowulf kills the dragon, by making it look like he stabbing himself. The adaptation is different then I imagined mainly because the book goes into a lot more detail on all the aspects of the story. I feel the animation was dark and foggy which in some situations through the book could be suitable but not all parts of the story. There are some parallels that the film does a decent job describing but the film is only twenty-six minutes long and overall felt crammed to get everything in and added unnecessary detail.

Posted by: Taylor Schemehorn at March 4, 2014 09:59 PM

Jesse Robinson
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
3 March 2014

QUESTION #71:
What is Unferth’s reaction to Beowulf showing up to save the day? How does he challenge Beowulf?

ANSWER:
Unferth seems to imply that Beowulf has un-noble intentions when Unferth, regarding Beowulf’s swimming match with Brecca, says, “It was sheer vanity made you venture out (Line 509).” Following Unferth’s accusation, Unferth tells Beowulf he will fail against Grendel; Unferth says, “this time you’ll be worsted; no one has ever/ outlasted an entire night against Grendel (Lines 527-528).”

Posted by: Jesse Robinson at March 4, 2014 11:10 PM

Jesse Robinson
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
5 March 2014

QUESTION: (a) What is missing from this version? (b) What has been added to this version? (c) How is this adaptation different from how you imagined it? (Characters, setting, etc.)

ANSWER:
In this version there was no explicit conflict between Beowulf and Unferth. Unferth seems to express a slight skeptical disposition when Beowulf arrives on shore, but any notice of this is quickly diminished by the continuing story line. In the adaptation there does not seem to be any mention of the contemporary politics or conflict between tribes. Grendel looks like swamp thing in the adaptation, while my vision of Grendel when reading Seamus’s translation has been perverted by Robert Zemeckis’s lumbering, deformed, macroencephalopathic Grendel. Also, in the adaptation Grendel’s mother is not as sexy as Angelina Jolie; Seamus’s version isn’t much better, but still seems more like Zemeckis’s.

Posted by: Jesse Robinson at March 4, 2014 11:32 PM

Michael Castronuovo
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
4 March 2014

QUESTIONS:
a) What is missing from this version?
b) What has been added to this version?
c) How is this adaptation different from how you imagined it?

ANSWER:
In the animated short film version of Beowulf, the people of Heorot do not pray for someone to come and save them from Grendel before Beowulf arrives, but they do so profusely in the story (Puchner 894). Also, when Beowulf goes to fight Grendel’s mother in the film version, there are no sea creatures who also attack Beowulf along with Grendel’s mother, like in the story (Puchner 925).
When Beowulf battles the dragon in the story, the dragon does not breathe fire at Beowulf. However, in the film, the dragon often breathes fire at him while they battle.
The short film adaptation is different from how I imagined it because I did not imagine Grendel or his mother to appear so ghostlike, but rather more like a dragon or similar to monsters from Greek and Roman mythology. In the film, they appear as though they are black ghosts who form from the ground and attack.

Posted by: Michael Castronuovo at March 4, 2014 11:36 PM

Chantal Bouthillier
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
5 March 2014

QUESTION:
a)What is missing from this version?
b)What has been added to this version?
c)How is this adaptation different from how you imagined it? (characters, setting, etc.)

ANSWER:
a)Beowulf killing the monsters to get to Grendel’s mother is missing in this version.

b)What has been added to this version is the man who comes to warn the king and the warriors in Heorot that Grendel is coming. In the story, Beowulf, Grendel arrives to Heorot with no one’s warning. In the story, Beowulf steps into the lake to fight sea monsters to get to Grendel’s mother. However, in the film, Beowulf jumps from a cliff into the swamp without fighting any sea monsters. Also, the thief did steal gold from the dragon, but in the movie they added that he tried to sell the gold. Another part that has been added is the artsy moment when Beowulf looks at himself before he slays the dragon.

c)I imagined the film to have Grendel’s apparel more humanly and less blurry. In the film, he looked more like a shadow rather than a monster. I also expected Grendel’s mother to look more different from Grendel and more womanly. Grendel’s mother appears to be the same as Grendel except with hair on her head.

Posted by: Chantal Bouthillier at March 5, 2014 12:13 AM

Dexomia Livia
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
5 March 2014

Question based on in class screening of Beowulf: What is missing from this version? What has been added to this version? How is this adaption different from how you imagined it? (Characters, settings, etc.)

Answer:

The parts that have been missing in the animated story of Beowulf are when Ufter challenges Beowulf, when Beowulf cuts Grendel’s shoulder, arm, and when Grendel’s mother comes to Denmark and steals her son’s arm before the hero arrives. The animated story also missed some other parts such as when the victory gifts for Beowulf were embroidered banner, breast mail, a sword, and each warrior who sailed with Beowulf received some treasure possession. In addition, during the battle between the dragon and Beowulf, the animated story does not show when the sword breaks and also, when Beowulf dies from poison. The parts that the animated story of Beowulf adds to the story are when an old man appears, in the beginning of the story, saying that he saw a beast, Grendel. Also, there is a speech that Beowulf makes during the night before Grendel arrives and when Beowulf gets to be inside Grendel’s body while fighting.

The animated story of Beowulf also added some other parts such as Beowulf only cutting Grendel’s arm and when the victory gift for Beowulf was a medal given by the queen. In this animated story, it also adds Grendel not being dead, and the beast coming back with his mother. In the end, Beowulf goes to kill both, and during the fight with Grendel’s mother, the sword comes by itself to Beowulf to kill her. Beowulf brings the body of the mother and Grendel to the warriors. In addition, it also shows Beowulf getting to be king of his land for 50 years and when he is old he fights a dragon with the help of one of his warriors. Moreover, the adaption is different from how I imagined it because Beowulf comes to Denmark to fight Grendel with good intentions; however, in the other story, Beowulf wanted to fight the beast because he wanted everybody to remember him as a hero, in addition, in the beginning of the animated story Hrothgar is a mentor to Beowulf. Furthermore, the settings in the animated story of Beowulf are dark, foggy, and there are images of old cartoons.

Posted by: Dexomia Livia at March 5, 2014 12:39 AM

John-Wesley Ingraham
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
5 March 2014

Question:
In class screening of Beowulf.

Answer:
In the animated version of Beowulf, we see a very much-cartooned version of the story. The setting is portrayed as being very grim and dark, through bland and dull colors such as green, purple, gray, and black used for the background. Characters in the story are brought to life in an attempt to replicate the story. However, despite the similarity to the actual story, this animated film, just as many films in general, has added and removed different aspects of the story to bring this mythical story to film.
In the hard copy of the story, at the begin we are learn about his birth and are given some background on the hero, where as in the film we are introduced to Beowulf as a man. From reading the book I imagined the characters in the story to be different, Beowulf was not portrayed to be as big as the story had made him out to be. Grendel and his mother, where portrayed as water like substance instead of being beast like. The dragon was made to be more dragon like than the story portrayed, being that the story never spoke about fire breathing.
All of the fighting scenes seem to have been altered as well. In the hardcopy of the story, when Beowulf fights Grendel, he places him in a armlock and rips his arm off, “the alert hero’s comeback and armlock forestalled him utterly” (Puchner 907). However, in the film Beowulf is seen to be consumed by the monster and defeats him from the inside out. In the next fight with Grendel’s mother, the hardcopy reads that Beowulf breaks his sword in battle, “then heaved his war-sword and swung his arm…this shining blade refused the bite” (Puchner 925). In the film during Beowulf’s battle with Grendel’s mother, his sword is lost during batter. In Beowulf’s last battle, he suffers a fatal blow by a poisonous dragon, “When the chance came, he caught the hero in a rush of flame and clamped sharp fangs into his neck” (Puchner 950). In the film the origin of Beowulf’s wound is unknown.

Posted by: John-Wesley Ingraham at March 5, 2014 12:58 AM

Charles Fowler
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
English 220 Journeys in Narrative
March 5, 2014

There were many differences with the Beowulf shown in class than the Beowulf that was presented in the text. There were also difference with the Beowulf movie and the text. The first difference I saw in class was the difference in appearance of Grendel. Grendel was described more in the text as a deformed human, however in the short film they portrayed him as a dark smoke like figure. In the Beowulf movie they portrayed more to the text where they displayed Grendel as a deformed human. There was also a difference with Grendel mother where she also looked like a swamp figure.
A next difference with the short film was that they never really give any details about Beowulf past. In the text they gave us the readers a view of Beowulf past and also Unferth didn’t tell us about Beowulf in the short film. Unferth was jelous of Beowulf and the short film didn’t really show it like how the text and even the movie displayed it. In the text Unferth brings up Beowulf past where he lost a swimming race with Breca. Beowulf then counter his statement saying he had to fight sea monsters. In the text Beowulf reminded me of a figure like Mr. Gatsby in “The Great Gatsby”, where there was always stories but not knowing if these stories were true.

Posted by: Charles Fowler at March 5, 2014 10:07 AM

Re-Chia Jackson
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 The Proverbial Road: Journeys of transformation in narrative
5 March 4, 2014

Beowulf
Question
What is he difference between the book and the animated version of Beowulf?
In the animated version it really didn’t go into detail on how Beowulf became who he was today.
Animated version: In the beginning of the animate version of Beowulf it just goes straight into how hrothgar the king and how in Hrothgar place is where they would party and fest. Then this creature named Grendel came and started to torment the people of the Denmark. 30 warriors was killed one night, the people Denmark lived in fear for 12 winters. When Beowulf heard of this news he ask to have his father’s blessings to go off and fight this monsters beast. He goes to Denmark to propose to fight this beast. Unferth was jealous of Beowulf and believed that he couldn’t kill this horrendous beast. Grendel comes to hrothgar place to fight Beowulf. Grendel is this big swampy monster. Beowulf jumps inside of him and rips Grendel’s limp and sent him away. The people of Denmark was so happy and praised Beowulf. They hung the limp on the wall. The people of Denmark then had to call Beowulf back to kill Grendel’s mother. Grendel was given a sword and then swims down in a hole and finds Grendel’s mother. He then cuts her head off with the sword, and then does the same to Grendel. Later on in the cartoon there is a thief and h falls into a cave where a dragon and he stole a piece of gold awaking a dragon. The dragon tormented the people and set the town on fire. Beowulf and his men sought out to fight and kill this dragon. Beowulf ends up stabbing himself while he tries to kill this dragon. His men are so terrified they run off except one named Wiglaf who goes in to help Beowulf. Beowulf dies after the death of the dragon and gives his necklace to Wiglaf for being a brave warrior.

Book: the book version is much more detailed about the story of Beowulf. In the beginning the book talks about how Grendel came about and how he is descents of Cain sent from the heavens. Grendel then kills people that was resting after a party. He continued to kill not reasoning with the Hrothgar with a death penalty. Beowulf heard of this news he sails to Denmark to kill the demon named Grendel. Wulfgar, a herald who was jealous of Beowulf and believe that he could not defeat this monstrous demon. Hrothgar tell Wulfgar about the tales of Beowulf, and states how Beowulf holds great powers. Then begins to explain on the swimming match Beowulf lost because he had to fight a sea monster. Then the people begins to party, and Beowulf drinks and parties with them. Once night falls he removes all his armor, for he will fight Grendel unarmed; for Grendel does not have any weapons. When Grendel arrives they began to fight he reaches to grab Beowulf but is surprised by the strength of Beowulf. Beowulf places Grendel in a tight head lock. As Grendel tries to escape he ends up ripping off his own limp. When Hrothgar returns to see the limp he began to praise Beowulf for his victorious battle against the demon. He gives Beowulf these wonderful gifts. Wealhtheow then ask Beowulf would he protect them even after Hrothgar dies than gives Beowulf a torque. The men then sleep in heorot not knowing of the dangers that was in front of them. Grendel’s mother finds what happens and seeks revenge, then men are awoken and tries to fight her. She kills king Hrothgar right hand man Asechere, and stole Grendel’s arm as she fled the city. The king runs and tells Beowulf what happens and tells him he has to kill this demon also. As Beowulf prepares himself for battle with his armor Unferth gives him the great seasoned sword Hrunting. Beowulf gives unferth his sword in case he dies. Beowulf dives into the swap and swims for a whole day until he reaches the lair of Grendel and his mother. She charges him and Beowulf tries to fight this monster off trying cut her head off the Hrunting, but it was not powerful enough. Grendel’s mother than drags Beowulf into a mass of sea-monsters and they began biting him. There is when Beowulf notice a huge sword for giants grabs it and cuts the head of Grendel’s mother off. Then he sees Grendel’s body lying in a corner and cuts his head off also. The town people begins to loss hope once they see blood. The sword used to kill these beast begins to melt from their blood. He then returns with the heads of both demons and the people of Denmark are so pleased with Beowulf. Hrothgar then presents Beowulf with the twelve treasures. Beowulf then returns to the great land, he tells Hygelac what happens with the battle of Grendel and his mother. Beowulf is then praised and then has land of his own to rule given by Hygelac. Then Hygelac is then killed in the battle with shylfings, then the kingdom is ruled by Beowulf now. One day the great land hears about this dragon under the earth guarding treasure and how a thief slips in and steal a gem covered goblet. Unleashing the terror of the dragon onto the town’s people. Once this happens Beowulf gathers 11 men to kill this monster. He then enters the cave of the dragon and only one of his men followed him Wiglaf due to his loyalty to Beowulf. Beowulf tries to stab the dragon but his sword breaks. The dragon then bites Beowulf in the neck and blood begins pouring from Beowulf. Wiglaf stab the dragon in the stomach, the dragon then burns wiglaf hand. Beowulf then stabs the dragon with a pock knife and kills him. Wiglaf notices how Beowulf’s wounds is swell and he is going to die from the venom from the dragon. The town people was so happy about the treasure there almighty king won for them in a battle that caused him his own life. They then made a tomb for Beowulf and named it Beowulf’s Barrow.
The animated version is the short, condensed version on the book and doesn’t add as much detail as the book does. The animated version changed the look of Grendel and his mother. How Beowulf returned home and became the ruler of the great land. The animated version also left out how king Hygelac died.

Posted by: re-chia.jackson at March 5, 2014 10:54 AM

Daniella Zacarias
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
Journeys Of Transformation In Narrative Literature (220CL)
4.3.2014
Based on the Animated Adaptation of Beowulf
QUESTION.
What is missing from this version? What has been added to this version? How is this adaptation different from how you imagined it (characters, setting, etc.)?
ANSWER.
One of the first things the animated version of Beowulf fails to mention is Hrothgar’s ancestry, which seems to be very important mentioning in the beginning of the epic. In addition, in the animated version, Beowulf seems to be a pacifistic warrior, while in the text he is described as an archetypal warrior who faces challenges in order to prove his strength. Something that was added to the cartoon version is the extravagance of the fight scenes; such as the fight with Grendel was artistically adapted in an underwater place, when in the epic is it not. I had imagined the setting of Beowulf to be more like the TV show Vikings, and not so much knights in shining armour as it was portrayed in the animated version. The cartoon version also had a sense of doom, in contrast to what I had imagined, which was a tone of enthusiasm when it came to Beowulf’s adventures.

Posted by: Daniella Zacarias at March 5, 2014 11:53 AM

Jack Constant
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng220CL Journey into Narrative CA01
5 March 2014

Questions: What is missing from this version? What has been added to this version? How is this adaptation different from how you imagined it?

Answer: In the book, when Beowulf fight's Grendel he is naked, in the movie he is fully clothed. In the book he is bitten by the dragon and dies of its venom, in the movie it seems that he is killed by being burned by fire. The dragon seemed to be used a lot more in the movie than the book. There is no Cain referenced in this movie. There was no back story of Grendel either. I think its close to what I imagined. I have only seen bits and pieces of the CGI version of Beowulf, so those images are present in my mind when I think of this movie. I think Grendel could have been depicted differently and not as a swamp monster.

Posted by: jonathan constant at March 5, 2014 12:23 PM

Antonio De Niz
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
5th March 2014

Question(s):
1) What is missing from this version?
2) What has been added to this version?
3) How is this adaption different from how you imagined it (characters, setting, etc.)

Answer(s):
There are some specific details from the story and the animation video. When Beowulf went to fight Grendel’s mother there were many demons trying to keep him from entering, in the story that is very clear and detailed, and in the animation, they just show Beowulf swimming and fighting her. Many things were added to the animation, one thing that was added was how Beowulf went into the stomach of Grendel. Another example is when he fought the dragon, Beowulf did not die from the fire, he died by poison because he was bit. This adaptation was way different from how I imagined it because they focused on both of them. I thought they were going to put more emphasis on Grendel’s action and how he got there. In the animation they focus on both of them, in the story, Grendel’s action is longer, and his return along with the action of the dragon is shorter.

Posted by: Antonio De Niz at March 5, 2014 12:39 PM

Brittany C. Davis
March 5, 2014
Eng 220
Beowulf
After watching the animated adaptation of Beowulf there are several differences and similarities that appear in the original story.
a) What is missing from this version?
I noticed several things that were missing in the animated story, however, in the biggest missing thing I noticed were the absence of the character Unferth. This character is relevant because he questions Beowulf and makes him give a back-story and explain many of his adventures. He is also relevant because he brings doubt to the story.
b) What has been added to the story?
I noticed something weird that had been added to the story. In the animation after the swamp woman is destroyed, and Beowulf has both of their heads, it shows how they are evaporated and appear to dissolve. In the original story, it makes no mention to this act.
c) How is this adaptation different from how you imagined it? (Characters, settings, ECT?)
I found the characters of Grendel and his mother to appear differently. I imagined them to look almost human and not just shadows that take no particular form. The setting was also imagined differently, not to have such shadow over everyone, I am aware that the story is set in a dark time, just not as shadow-y.

Posted by: Brittany Davis at March 5, 2014 12:40 PM

Paola Vasquez
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
5 March 2014

QUESTIONS:

What is missing from this version?

ANSWER: I feel like Beowulf was acting like an unreliable narrator in the book where he describes his battle with Grendel’s mother and it the animated it did not seem like this. In addition, Unferth in the animation does not get in Beowulf’s business. For example, in the animated version the people are willing to accept Beowulf’s help and he is more welcomed, while in the book they are concerned and stop him before going in. When Beowulf arrives to Heorot, the jealousy between the two is not as important as it was in the book.

What has been added to this version?

ANSWER: The animation was a little bit like I imagined it, they did a good job and there was some accuracy to the story itself. For example, I feel like they emphasized the atmosphere compared to the books script. In addition, I was not sure if Beowulf died in the animation, but in the book he did.

How is this adaptation different from how you imagined it?

ANSWER: When reading the book I imaged Beowulf looking like a big hairy monster but in the animation he was a human with blonde hair. Also, I imagined the story taking place inside a castle but in the animation it was mostly outside. And Beowulf was breathing and talking under water. Lastly, I pictured Grendel with half-human characteristics instead he was a bunch of leafs.

Posted by: Paola Vasquez at March 5, 2014 12:45 PM

Diana Berthil
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
5 March 2014

QUESTION:
# 1. What is missing from this version?

ANSWER:
This version misses the overall concern and hesitation of the people especially Unferth, towards Beowulf when he arrives to Herot. In the animated version Beowulf is more welcomed overall and is only given a hard time by Unferth in a small portion. Beowulf's presence is deemed more important in the book.

#2. What has been added to this version?

ANSWER:
Grendel's swap-like are added to the animated version for they are much more prevalent. In the book, it seems as if Grendel has much more human-like characteristics. Grendel's appearance and characteristics are added much more in the animated version.

#3. How is the adaption different from how you imagined it (characters, setting, etc.)?

ANSWER:
The adaption was different in the depiction of characters and the setting. For the characters, the book in my opinion depicts Beowulf in a grizzly and brute man with beast like strength. While the animated version gives him attractive characteristics. The setting of Herot was deemed much more lively in the book but in the animated version was more nature based, without much around and be Mead Hall feeling very dingy.

Posted by: Diana Berthil at March 5, 2014 12:53 PM

Kelsey Stevens
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
5 March 2014

Beowulf Screening

The biggest part I noticed missing from the Beowulf movie was the scene where Unferth and Beowulf discuss the swimming match with Breca. This scene was important in the book because it revealed Unferth's envy toward Beowulf. A part that was added to the movie version was how the slave that stole the gold tried selling it to someone. In the book he does not try to sell this gold. The movie did a good job in portraying the book. The colors were gloomy and foggy which is exactly how I pictured the book to be. I think the movies adaptation of Grendel was accurate.

Posted by: Kelsey Stevens at March 5, 2014 01:03 PM

Marssiel Mena
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 Journeys in Narrative CA02
28 February 2014
Questions: What is missing from this version? What has been added to this version? How is this adaptation different from how you imagined it?
Answer:
In the animated adaptations of the story of Beowulf many things were not included that was in the story. For starters, it’s missing the way Gendel and Beowulf fought,. Compared to the story, there us not a lot of emphasize on Grendel’s ripped off arm. The one things emphasized on a lot is Grendel’s and his mother’s head. The animation, was not really how I pictured things to look, I thought Beowulf was going to look stronger with dark hair. I also thought the inside of the heorot hall looked exactly how I imagined it but the outside looked did not for me. I felt like the surrounds looked too gloomy. Grendel and his mother kind of looked how I imagined, they both looked like monsters but, I felt they looked more slimy then I imagined they would.I also didn't think that every time Grendel went into the halls that there would be wind or even blood the story depicted Grendel as going in at night and just killing those men there was no real description that was similar to how it was in the animation. There is also the fighting scene with Grendel that looked weird because Beowulf went inside of Grendel, this part was not shown in the animation. Then there is the other fighting scene where Beowulf is fighting the dragon and it looks like he is fighting himself. The part with the slave was also different because he tried to sell the gold in the animation but not in the story.

Posted by: marssiel mena at March 5, 2014 01:26 PM

Jose Parra
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative
March 5, 2014

Question:
What is missing from this version? What has been added to this version? How is this adaptation different from how you imagined it?

Answer:
There was a few things missing from the animated version or that I feel were different, one of them being was Beowulf’s battle with Grendel. In the movie it was shown as a battle within Grendel and not physically with him. All of the fights or battles in the movie was more internal than physical. There’s a few things that make it different from how I imagined it. The kingdom of Heorot was not at all how I imagined it. When I hear the word kingdom I imagine palaces and castles, in the movie Heorot looks like a wooden cabin. Another was the appearance of Grendel and his mother. According to the book they were described as demons not swamp monsters or the creature from the black lagoon covered in seaweed.

Posted by: Jose Parra at March 5, 2014 01:26 PM

Jasmine Cedeno
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220Cl CA02 Journeys to Narrative
4 March 2014
During the Animated Adaption of Beowulf there is a part represented in the story that is not presented in the animation. In the beginning of Beowulf, the story, Beowulf is introduced by inheritance and the land of both Geats and Danes are introduced. Beowulf is introduced as a nephew of King Hyglec and friend to King Hrothgar by favor. The land of the Geats in introduced in the story as a foreign place that Beowulf sails from to the Danes. The Danish land is introduced as a place where King Hrothgar reigns and is being attacked by the monster, Grendel. In the animation, the description of both lands are vague in animation and less in oral description. There were animated cartoons that simply showed the audience how the characters appear in the story.
In the animation, the illustration of blazing flames around the dragon and his treasure where exaggerated. In the story, there is no mention of blazing fire that surround the dragon or his treasure. Also, there are blazing flames from the dragon’s breath all over the city of Geatland. These descriptions were not as vivid in the story as in the animation. At that moment in the story, the man discovering the cave and the treasure seems to have found a dark and cold place. “To the spot where he knew of the notable cavern, the cave under earth, not far from the ocean, the anger of eddies, which inward was full of jewels and wires: a warden uncanny, warrior weaponed, wardered the treasure, old under earth; no easy possession for any of earth-folk access to get to.” In the animation, the dragon’s cave is illustrated as brightly lit with flames. The dragon also appears not as difficult to slay in the animation as in the story. When Beowulf dies, the description of how he dies in the story is not described in the animation. In the story, the description of a dragon bite is expressed in which Beowulf becomes sick as dies. In the animation, the description of his death is expressed as a simple wound in which he can no longer survive.
In the adaption, the storyline differs because the story illustrates the adventure through literature while the adaption is expressed through animation. In the story, Beowulf speaks to other characters and the description of the mead-hall are told literally. For example, the description of Beowulf and the mead-hall were told through descriptive literature. In the story, the animation allows the audience to see the description without expressing it literally. There are pictures that show what Beowulf looks like and how the mead-hall is set up for festivities in the animation.

Posted by: Jasmine Cedeno at March 5, 2014 01:27 PM

Joe D Sears
Dr. B. L.Hobbs
ENG 220 CL Journeys into Narratives CAO2
5 Marchh 2014

QUESTION: What is missing? What's been added? How does the video differ from what you imagined?
ANSWER: I feel from reading the story of Beowolf that alot is missing. In the book there is more to the story of Beowolf, his exploits what made him so famous. The video leaves most of that back-story out. The video also uses alot of visual metaphors to condense the story line, such as the boat filed with men sailing off on a sea of blood to show their death at the hands of Grendal, and when he is surrounded by fire or battling himself with thedragon towards the end. From the text version I imagine a much longer more heroic depiction of Beowolf. I visualize the telling of Beowolf's prior heroic tales in more detail. I also would like to see a more realistic depiction of his battle with Grendal and the dragon.

Posted by: Joe Sears at March 5, 2014 01:37 PM

Allie Clemons
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA01
5 March 2014

Questions:
What is missing from this version?
What has been added to this version?
How is this adaptation different from how you imagined it? (Characters, setting, etc)

Answers:
In regards of the text, there were a few differences in what was portrayed in the film and what actually happened; Grendel’s back story and history was left out in the sense that in the film we just see this big seaweed looking monster who just wants to terrorize, but in the book we see more of him and how he is very human like and is sort of like this misunderstood person who is perceived as a monster due to a few differences. This animated version just did not do well on creating an image for the back story of the characters because Beowulf was not introduced as having the strength of thirty men. The character of Unferth was also not present much in the animated version, but he is Beowulf’s best friend.

In the animated version some odd things were added that were not present in the book; one that can be spotted is that Lilith was being banished and we did not see this happen in the text. One of the biggest issues that I had with the animated version is the fight with Grendel and Beowulf. During the fight with Grendel and Beowulf the movie depicted as if Beowulf went inside Grendel during their fight, but this is not what the text illustrates. The last issue I had with this animated version was Beowulf’s fight with the dragon. The dragon seemed to be much more emphasized and focused on in the animated version. I also noticed that in the movie when Beowulf went to stab the dragon, it was himself. The animated film tried to use an artsy metaphor, and the film also tries to show that fire was present during this battle and it was not mentioned in the text. The fire is what seems to kill Beowulf because he jumps through it to stab the dragon, but in the text Beowulf is bitten by the dragon and the bacteria is what kills him.

The movie animation is very much different than I imagined, especially with the character of Grendel. In the text Grendel is subjected as a human like creature with just a few differences that would depict him as a sea monster, but in the animated film, Grendel is this seaweed large looking creature. The setting did not seem to be that off to me in the animated film, although It did cut short on Beowulf’s back story so we did not see much of the land that he was from even though it was more emphasized in the text and also the same with the character of Grendel.

Posted by: Allie Clemons at March 5, 2014 02:07 PM

Andrew Sherlock
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL - On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
5 March 2014

Question:
What is missing from this version? What has been added to this version? How is this adaptation different from how you imagined it?

Answer:
There are a few things different from the book to the animation we watched in class. The backstory of Beowulf is left out in the animated version as well as the backstory to Grendel. The battles are different too. In the battle with the serpent/dragon in the book, Beowulf is bitten and then dies from the poison (Puchner 951). However, in the animated version he just seems do die from exhaustion. In the movie, Grendel and his mother are portrayed as a seaweed blob type things where as in the book they are more of deformed people. I find the animation did not include much of the blood and gore that is portrayed in the book because it was intended for a younger audience.
Works Cited
"Beowulf." Puchner, Martin. The Norton Anthology World Liturature Vol. 1. New York: W. W. Norton & Comany, 2013. 891-960.

Posted by: Andrew Sherlock at March 5, 2014 02:10 PM

Wilfred Ras
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220 CL
3 March 2014

Class assignment Beowulf

The differences between the movie and the book were a little simple and obvious. In the book I felt like it was way broader. In the movie they shortened the story a lot. Beowulf was described a little different in the book. In the book Beowulf was described naked when he was fighting the dragon. In the movie, Beowulf had clothes on. That is one of the differences. Also, when he killed the dragon in the book there was not any fire. When he killed the dragon in the movie there was fire everywhere.

Posted by: Wilfred Ras at March 5, 2014 02:48 PM

Becca Orden
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG220CL Journey in Narrative CA01
5 March 2014

QUESTION #21:
Find an example of a simile in the poem. Explain the comparison that is being made.
ANSWER:
The simile I found in the poem is “blind eyes could blaze like meteors and be gay…” (Thomas). I think he is comparing the old men’s eyes to the meteors because when you die you see the light and when meteors fly thru the sky they cast a bright light.

Posted by: Becca Orden at March 5, 2014 08:55 PM

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*NOTE* The deadline for this particular assignment has now passed. Any comments listed below are *ONLY* for the reposting of comments that I specifically asked to be revised or are ones from non-student posters. Any 'student' posts below that missed the assignment deadline will not get credit for the assignment. ~ Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: Dr. Hobbs at March 6, 2014 08:28 PM

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