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November 15, 2012

Buzzing about William Golding's _Lord of the Flies_


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Golding, William. Lord of the Flies. 1954. British. Novel.

Class,

In the comment box below,

. . . the note-taker/scribe from each group should retype the question your group discussed today in class and provide an answer with quotations from the text to support your answers. You MUST put the page number (or, paragraph number if there are no page numbers) in parentheses after any quotation used.

Enter your work on this text as prescribed in class. For example:

Remember: I have to "approve" all comments so you won't see it immediately after posting. After hitting submit, you should see a screen that confirms this.

We are beginning to use some concepts in our discussions that you may or may have had practice using before. I want to be sure that you have a clear understanding of the words we use in class (no more blank stares!) so be sure you are looking up words you don't feel you yet "own" (means, making it a part of your personal vocabulary) by utilizing your dictionaries to the fullest.

Dr. Hobbs

_____________________________________

To see other English-Blog entries on the subject of Literature, please click HERE.

Posted by lhobbs at November 15, 2012 07:51 PM

Readers' Comments:

Emmanuel Cruz
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 435
February 20, 2012
Discussion Questions
“Structures aren’t physical entities; they are conceptual frameworks that we use to organize and understand physical entities” (211). What are the three conceptual frameworks within Structuralist criticism?
Would we still have a language without a structural system? (210) Agree or disagree with textual support. Hint: A structural system to govern communication.

Posted by: Emmanuel Cruz at February 20, 2012 06:41 AM

Travis N. Rathbone
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 435
2 April 2012

For the Sake of Swimming: Capturing Displacement in the Lord of the Flies

Sometimes, certain stories seem tailored for specific literary theories; as such, William Golding’s novel Lord of the Flies lends itself superbly to a psychological reading of the text. The book is rife with subtle yet deep undertones, and a quick glance at the text will find the characters of Jack, Piggy, and Ralph as representations of the id, ego, and superego respectively. However, for the immediate purpose here, great interest lies in Sigmund Freud’s notion of displacement as it applies to actions taken by Ralph after crash landing on a deserted island.

When defining displacement, Freud states that “a psychical force is operating which on the one hand strips the elements which have a high psychical value of their intensity, and on the other hand, by means of overdetermination, creates from elements of low psychical value new values” (Freud 412). His notion here was intended to be applied to and make sense of dreams, but this process works suitably well in the realm of wakefulness also, and this type of theorizing can be seen in application as early as the first chapter of Lord of the Flies. Directly following the plane crash and Ralph and Piggy’s initial encounter, the two boys discover a lagoon, and at a moment when one might weigh the horrifying significance of being marooned on an island and attempt to create a plan of action, Ralph seems alarmingly unconcerned about his situation and decides to go for a swim: “He picked his way to the seaward edge of the platform and stood looking down into the water . . . Ralph spoke to himself, sounding the bass strings of delight. ‘Whizzoh!’ . . . Ralph paddled backwards down the slope, immersed his mouth and blew a jet of water into the air” (Golding 6 - 7). Ralph’s exclamation as he dives into the water along illustrates his ease of mind. The carefree nature a quick swim does not seem characteristic of someone dealing with an immediate tragedy.

Ralph’s listless dip in the pool is an indicator that he has not fully realized his current situation. Indeed, the high level of intensity that characterizes the boys’ predicament is being replaced, at least for Ralph, with the low level of intensity that dictates going for a swim. In essence, old, more intense, values (e.g. a near death experience and the fight for survival) are being subdued and new values (e.g. a carefree nature in relation to tragic events) are being created. The meaning of such an occurrence can only by hypothesized, but one can assume the gravity of recent events proved to be intense enough to force Ralph to subdue them if only for a brief amount of time. This denial only lasts for a brief time, however, for the true and wise Piggy grounds Ralph by insisting action be taken to preserve the lives of all the boys on the island. Ultimately, Ralph comes to terms with the intensity of his situation, and his brief bout of displacement comes to an end.

Works Cited
Freud, Sigmund. “The Interpretation of Dreams.” 1900. Literary Theory: An Anthology. 2nd Ed. Eds. Julie Rivkin and Michael Ryan. Malden, MA: Blackwell, 2004. 396-414. Print.
Golding, William. Lord of the Flies. New York: Penguin Books, 1954. Print.

Posted by: Travis N. Rathbone at April 2, 2012 05:46 PM

Timothy Delay
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
11, November 6, 2012
Question: 15. How do they start the fire?

Answers: They start the fire by using piggy glasses. After thinking of varies ways to start a fire, Jack point out that they can use piggy glasses to do the job. “ Jack pointed suddenly. His specs-use them as burning glasses!” (pg 55)

Posted by: Timothy Delay at November 6, 2012 11:34 AM

Shyenne Price
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
November 5, 2012

Quotation: “Why is Ralph elected chief?”
Answers: Ralph is elected chief because he was the one that called all the boys together with the conch shell. Some of the boys shouted, “’Him with the shell.’ ‘Ralph! Ralph!’ ‘Let him be chief with the trumpet thing.’”

Taken from Golding novel PDF version pg. 29

Posted by: Shyenne Price at November 6, 2012 02:13 PM

Bryan Baldwin
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
06 November 2012

Question: "How is Jack presented to the reader?"

Jack is presented to the reader as a boy who is used to wielding authority and enjoys it. He has no time to spare for anyone for whom he has no respect.

Posted by: Bryan Baldwin at November 6, 2012 06:49 PM

Leah Hollingsworth
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
7 November 2012

Question: What do Piggy, Simon, and the littlun with the birthmark have in common?

Answer: All three are laughed at by the group due to their timid nature which is exploited by others. “’He’s not Fatty,’ cried Ralph, ‘his real name’s Piggy!’ …A storm of laughter arose and even the tiniest child joined in” (Golding 27). “The boys round Simon giggled, and he stood up, laughing a little. Now that the pallor of his faint was over, he was a skinny, vivid little boy, with a glance coming up from under a hut of straight hair that hung down, black and coarse” (Golding 31). The littlun, too, is laughed at. “The small boy held out his hands for the conch and the assembly shouted with laughter; at once he snatched back his hands and started to cry” (Golding 48).
Page numbers were taken from the PDF version.

Posted by: Leah Hollingsworth at November 7, 2012 12:25 AM

Jason Anderson
Dr.Hobbs
ENG311 CA05
Lord of the Flies Pt.1

Question:What are two books that are mentioned that remind the boys about the adventure they hope to have on the island?

Answer: In chapter 2 the boys mention 3 books that remind them of the adventures they will face: Blantyne's Coral Island, Ransome's Swallows and Amazons, Stevenson's Treasure Island. All these tales of adventure involve happy endings and idyllic scenes. In contrast the adventures of the boys in Lord of the Flies quickly descend into chaos.

Posted by: Jason Anderson at November 7, 2012 10:01 AM

Sherman Milton
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311: Survey of Major 20th Century Writers
7 November 2012

Question:
Why, do you think, did Golding use British schoolboys?

Answer:
I think that part of the reason he choose British school boys is because he is British himself. In writing you use different cultures to make a point. In this case he wrote what he knew. It was easier for him to use British schoolboys rather than American schoolboys just because he’s experienced things. With using schoolboys it shows that kids must be taught to do the right thing. I think he almost wanted to show how civilized the British were. The kids had their own political system in a way (32).

Posted by: Sherman Milton at November 7, 2012 10:11 AM

De’Nisha Butler
English 311 CA05
Dr. Hobbs
November 7th, 2012

Question: Who is the only one who can interrupt someone speaking?

Answer: The only one who can interrupt someone speaking is Ralph. Ralph said on page 44 of the text, ““And another thing. We can’t have everybody talking at once.” Ralph continued on in page 45 saying “And he won’t be interrupted: Except by me.”

Page 44-45

Posted by: De'Nisha Butler at November 7, 2012 10:48 AM

Delia Mulvihill
Dr. Hobbs
ENG311 CA05
Lord of the Flies Homework #1

Question: What is the “scar” that is repeatedly mentioned?

Answer:
The scar repeatedly mentioned is the place on the island where the plane crashed into. “He looked up and down the scar. ‘And this is what the cabin done.’ The fair boy reached out and touched the jagged end of a trunk” (Golding 3).

Posted by: Delia Mulvihill at November 7, 2012 10:56 AM

Madison Grabow
Hobbs
ENG 311 Survey of Major 20th Century Writers
7 November 2012

HW Q 5: What is the "scar" that is repeatedly mentioned?

A: The scar refers to the area on the island that the boys plane had crashed. The book explains the first moments of Ralph and Piggy after the plane crashes. "He looked up and down the scar" (8). There are many quotations simply saying that the scar is the path used.

pdf

Posted by: madison grabow at November 7, 2012 11:06 AM


Summer Taylor
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
7 November 2012

Question: 1. Why is the chapter entitled “The Sound of the Shell”?

Answer: The first chapter is titled “The Sound of the Shell” because a shell is what Ralph uses to call to the other little boys and have all of them meet up in the same place to see how many of them are on the island. “We can use this to call the others. Have a meeting. They’ll come when
they hear us—” He beamed at Ralph.
“That was what you meant, didn’t you? That’s why you got the conch out of the water?” Ralph pushed back his fair hair. “How did your friend blow the conch?” “He kind of spat......" "Ralph grasped the idea and hit the shell with air from his diaphragm. Immediately the thing sounded. A deep, harsh note boomed under the palms, spread through the intricacies of the forest and echoed back from
the pink granite of the mountain" (Golding 20-21).

Posted by: Summer Taylor at November 7, 2012 01:27 PM

Sarah Winans
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
7 November 2012

Question: What question does the littlun with the birthmark raise?

Answer: First of all, the others find it very strange to see the mulberry colored birthmark because they had only seen it once before. The birthmark makes the littlun noticed, which is different than other littluns before. He asks the question if the snake will be returning. “And what about the beast?” (Page 123).

Posted by: Sarah Winans at November 7, 2012 01:38 PM

Kasey McDearis
Dr Hobbs
ENG311 CA05
7 November 2013

Question: How is Piggy revealed as most closely tied to the world of adults?

Answer: Piggy tries to have order among the boys. He is smart, helping the Boys survive and helping them to be rescued. His looks and beliefs resemble an adult. He always asks, "what would grown ups do?" In situations that children cannot handle.

Posted by: Kasey McDearis at November 7, 2012 02:16 PM

Madison Grabow
Hobbs
ENG 311 Survey of Major 20th Century Writers
8 November 2012

HW Q 6: How are the boys collecting drinking water?

A: The boys are using the resources around them. The island has much to offer. "Jack took up a coconut shell that brimmed with fresh water from among a group that was arranged in the shade, and drank" (Golding 65).

festoon = a decorative chain or strip hanging between two points

Posted by: madison grabow at November 8, 2012 08:30 AM

Timothy Delay
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
11, November 6, 2012
Question: 16. What substance and colors does Jack use to paint his face? Why? Explain.

Answers: Jack use white and red clay with some charcoal to hide is face from the pigs. Jack is afraid that the pigs do not smell him but run away from his pink face. “They don’t smell me. They see me, I think. Something pink, under the trees”(pg 88).

Vocabulary: Barb- A small sharp protrusion that is hard to remove since it angled away from the central point.
I was walking down the river when I step on a fishhook, and it took me hours to remove because of the barbs that were in the way.

Posted by: Timothy Delay at November 8, 2012 11:52 AM

Leah Hollingsworth
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
9 November 2012

Question: What sort of weapon is Jack using to hunt pigs? How does Jack know there is a pig in the creepers ahead of him?

Answer: “A sharpened stick about five feet long trailed from his hand, and except for a pair of tattered shorts held up by his knife-belt he was naked” (Golding 66-67). He is using a long spear to hunt pigs. “The droppings were warm. They lay piled among turned earth. They were olive green, smooth, and they steamed a little” (Golding 67-68). He knows that there is a pig ahead because he has just found its fresh scat.
Myriad: “Like a myriad of tiny teeth in a saw, the transparencies came scavenging over the beach” (Golding 85). A myriad is a number too high to count. A synonym in this case is multitude.
Page numbers were taken from the PDF version.

Posted by: Leah Hollingsworth at November 9, 2012 07:36 AM

Summer Taylor
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
9 November 2012

Question: 19. Why is the signal fire out? Explain.

Answer: The fire went out because Jack had told the boys watching the fire to go with him to try to kill the pig that he had been trying to kill because without the fire watching boys, Jack said they would not have been able to make a full circle to catch the pig. "Ralph spoke. “You let the fire go out.” Jack checked, vaguely irritated by this irrelevance but too happy to let
it worry him. “We can light the fire again. You should have been with us, Ralph. We had a smashing time. The twins got knocked over—" (Golding 97). “There was a ship. Out there. You said you’d keep the fire going and you let it out!” He took a step toward Jack, who turned and faced him. “They might have seen us. We might have gone home—” (Goulding 99)

Posted by: Summer Taylor at November 9, 2012 10:47 AM

De’Nisha Butler
Dr. Hobbs
English 311 CA05
November 9th, 2012

Question: Why does Ralph reproach Jack? Explain.

Answer: Ralph reproaches Jack because he is spending all of his time trying to catch a pig, never catches one and still uses everyday as a pursuit only to catch pigs. Ralph is upset because after all the continuous hunting their still isn’t any food and Jack is not lending a helping hand in building the shelters.
Excerpt from text: “All you can talk about is pig, pig, pig!” “But we want meat!” “And I work all day with nothing but Simon and you come back and don’t even notice the huts!” “I was working too—” “But you like it!” shouted Ralph. “You want to hunt! While I—”
Page 75

Vocabulary Word: Furtive

Definition: Secretive. Attempting to be invisible, to avoid being noticed; being noticed may cause trouble.

Sentence: As I snuck through my bedroom window, I tip-toed in a furtive manner to avoid the robbers.

Posted by: De'Nisha Butler at November 9, 2012 12:16 PM

Summer Taylor
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
9 November 2012

Vocab word: flaunt

Definition: To show off, display yourself boldly.
Sentence: Jack liked to flaunt his athletic ability to Piggy, who was overweight.

Posted by: Summer Taylor at November 9, 2012 12:57 PM

Marcus Chisholm
Dr. Hobbs
ENG-311-CA05
9 November 2012
4. Why does Simon go to his bower? Explain.
Simon is the scared, sensitive one out of the group. While everyone else loves the adventure, Simon is constantly frightened and scared. Simon goes to his bower to get a break from the other boys. He wants solitude and peace, which he cannot achieve while he’s around the other boys. The other boys don’t understand Simon and his feelings.
Belligerence- Aggressive or warlike behavior.

Posted by: Marcus Chisholm at November 9, 2012 02:20 PM

Madison Grabow
Hobbs
ENG 311 Survey of Major 20th Century Writers
9 October 2012

HW Q 17: In chapter 6, who says, "We don't need the conch anymore. We know who ought to say things"? What is the significance of the passage? What is going on now?

A: Jack makes the statement listed above. Jack is saying "What good did Simon do speaking, or
Bill, or Walter? It’s time some people knew they’ve got to keep quiet and leave deciding things to the rest of us" (Golding 145). Jack is fed up with Ralph being the leading chief and angered that Piggy is talking. Ralph follows up Jack's interlude by saying things need to be done and things need to be prioritized.

opaque: not transparent or translucent; impenetrable to light; not allowing light to pass through.

pdf and google dictionary

Posted by: madison grabow at November 9, 2012 03:49 PM

Shyenne Price
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
November 10, 2012

Quotation: “In Chapter 6, how does Jack react to Sam and Eric’s account?”
Answers: Jack wants to go after the beast the twins have seen and hunt it down and kill it. He says, “This will be a real hunt! Who’ll come?”

Taken from Golding novel PDF version pg. 143

Vocabulary: Guano→ excrement of seabirds and bats

Posted by: Shyenne Price at November 10, 2012 02:05 PM

Timothy Delay
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
11, November 11, 2012
Question: 20. In Chapter 6, what do the majority of the boys want to do instead of relighting the signal fire or searching for the beast?

Answers: The boys want to make a fort near the rocks. They keep rolling rocks around and avoid the subject of the beast. Other wanted to go back to the shore where their shelter were at. This can be expressed by Ralph telling the other boys “We want smoke. And you go wasting your time. You roll rocks” (pg154). This can also be seen by “Some of the boys wanted to go back to the beach. Some wanted to roll more rocks. The sun was bright and danger had faded with the darkness.” (pg 154). Most of the boys just wanted to leave the beast alone and continue on with their lives.
Vocabulary: Interminable- Having or seeming to have no end. Waiting for my English test score is interminable.

Posted by: Timothy Delay at November 11, 2012 01:52 PM

Leah Hollingsworth
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
11 November 2012

Question: Why does Percival cry out “a lamentation loud and sustained as the conch”?

Answer: He cries because he remembers home and is very homesick. They say “‘Now tell us. What’s your name?’” (Golding 122). He responds “‘Percival Wemys Madison. The Vicarage, Harcourt St. Anthony, Hants, telephone, telephone, tele—’ As if this information was rooted far down in the springs of sorrow, the littlun wept” (Golding 122-123).

Mimicry: “Jack’s voice sounded in bitter mimicry” (Golding 129). Mimicry is imitating someone else in order to ridicule as used in this sentence. Example: I hugged Madi grandiosely in mimicry.
Page numbers were taken from the PDF version.

Posted by: Leah Hollingsworth at November 11, 2012 06:35 PM

De’Nisha Butler
Dr. Hobbs
English 311 CA05
November 12, 2012

Question: There is one thing that Ralph cannot explain. What is it and why might this be significant? Explain.

Answer: Ralph cannot explain life itself and the fear involved in understanding fear, fear of the unknown. On page 107, Ralph is “Suddenly, pacing by the water, he was overcome with astonishment. He found himself understanding the wearisomeness of this life, where every path was an improvisation and a considerable part of one’s waking life was spent watching one’s feet”. It is significant because all of the boys except for Jack are scared and frightened. It is significant to Ralph to persuade the boys aware from fear because they are spending all of their time being fearful of a monster that doesn’t exist and not carrying out their duties of gathering water, building shelters, keeping the fire going etc.

Vocabulary: Lavatory

Definition: A sink or basin in a bathroom.

Sentence: As the blood dripped off my fingertips I ran into the bathroom to the lavatory to wash it away.

Posted by: De'Nisha Butler at November 11, 2012 07:40 PM


Sherman Milton III
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311: Survey of Major 20th Century Writers
9 November 2012

Question: #8.What does Jack claim to feel behind him when he hunts? Why? Explain.
Answer: Jack is just scared. He wants to be a leader but doesn’t have what it takes to do it on his own, and that’s why he turns the others on Ralph. He feels behind because he feels like he’s the one actually being hunted. He is afraid of the beastie.
Vocabulary Word: TENDRIL- Plant organ used to anchor and support vining stems.

Posted by: Sherman Milton at November 13, 2012 09:12 PM

Summer Taylor
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
14 November 2012


Question: 4. At the assembly in chapter 5, what is Jack’s contribution? Explain.

Answer:Jack speaks about fear and says that it can't hurt you. He says, “So this is a meeting to find out what’s what. I’ll tell you what’s what...... “The thing is—fear can’t hurt you any more than a dream. There aren’t any beasts to be afraid of on this island” (Golding 116).Jack calms down the boys about their fear of the beast by saying that there isn't any beast and that he knows this for a fact because he has been all over the island by himself, and he is a great hunter, and he has not seen anything besides pigs. Jack's little speech in the book is important because hin and Ralph agree on the point about there being no beast, and this is one of the few times that they agree on anything. Also, Jack tries to put the younger boys' minds at rest about the beast.

Posted by: Summer Taylor at November 14, 2012 10:55 AM

Matt Lynch
ENG 311 Survey of Major Writers 20th Century
Dr. Hobbs
November 8, 2012
Lord of the Flies Chapter 3&4 Homework with Vocabulary word
3) What two groups with different goals are emerging? Explain.
The two groups that begin to emerge in chapter 3 is Ralph’s groups and Jack’s group. Ralph’s group wants to build shelter, fire, and work together as one unit. He believes that their escape relies upon the fire on top of the hill. They just want to find a way to survive and become as civilized as possible so all can live. Jack’s group on the other hand isn’t too concerned about escaping the island, they are caught up on the fact there are no rules and they want to be hunters. They become extremely wild and kill anything they can to have as food.


Embroil:
•(Verb)
• Definition: To bring into state of confusion; to throw into disorder or confusion.
• Sentence:The two men became soon embroiled with alcohol and women.

Posted by: Matt Lynch at November 14, 2012 01:37 PM

Marcus Chisholm
Dr. Hobbs
ENG-311-CA05
14 November 2012
1. Describe Ralph’s mood at the beginning of chapter 5. What is his new attitude toward Piggy? Explain.
In the beginning of chapter 5, Golding shows us that Ralph is frustrated and ready to go home. He leaves the group for a while to compose his thoughts. As he walks along the beach, he realizes how important it is to watch ones feet while one is walking. Ralph chose the firm strip as a path because he needed to think, andonly here could he allow his feet to move without having to watch them. Suddenly, pacing by the water, he was overcome with astonishment. He found himself understanding the wearisomeness of this life, where every path was an improvisation and a considerable part of one’s waking life was spent watching one’s feet. During the late assembly, Ralph realized that no matter how sensitive Piggy was, he had brains. He could help Ralph as Chief, and give him guidance if needed. Piggy’s opinion became much more validated.

Posted by: Marcus Chisholm at November 14, 2012 02:24 PM

Matt Lynch
ENG 311 Survey of Major Writers 20th Century
Dr. Hobbs
November 13, 2012
Lord of the Flies Chapter 5&6 Homework question and Vocabulary Word
11) In chapter 6, what happens ten miles above the island? Why does this chapter have the name that it does?
In chapter 6 while the boys are asleep there is a military battle in the sky. A parachutist falls from the sky, due to the battle. The parachutist is dead however, the chute gets caught in a tree. Since it is dark the shadows from the man in the chute suck in the tree frighten the boys. The boys run to the camp and tell the others there is a monster on the island. The boys gather together and Ralph allows Jack to lead a search party for more monsters in the island. The name of the chapter 6, “Beast from Air”, comes from the fact that the boys believed the parachutist was a monster and they do not know where he came from.
Bewilder:
•(Verb)
•Definition: To become perplexed and confused; to lose one’s bearings
•Sentence from the book: “Ralph gazed bewildered at his rapt face”(Golding, 54).
•Sentence: The old man sat there bewildered gazing at the sight of how complex computer have become.

Posted by: Matt Lynch at November 14, 2012 03:00 PM

Timothy Delay
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
11, November 11, 2012
Question: 14. What does Jack tell his new tribe?

Answers: Before Jack leave to make his own tribe he tell the other that Ralph is “He’s not a hunter. He’d never have got us meat. He isn’t a prefect and we don’t know anything about him. He just gives orders and expects people to obey for nothing. All this talk” (pg 182). Jack is referring to Ralph and his lack of leadership. Jack then tries to get the other boys to come with him by saying “I’m going off by myself. He can catch his own pigs. Anyone who wants to hunt when I do can come too” (pg 183).

Vocabulary: Daunting- An action that seems overwhelming or intimidating at first.
Andrew Ryan had the daunting task of building a city under water where it would not be affect by parasites.

Posted by: Timothy Delay at November 15, 2012 03:52 PM

Leah Hollingsworth
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
15 November 2012

Question: What is foreshadowed in the scene where Robert insists that they’ll need a real pig and Jack says to “use a littluns’?
Answer: Simon’s murder is foreshadowed in this scene. The boys are talking about playing pig hunt when Jack suggests using a littlun as a pig. ““You could get someone to dress up as a pig and then he could act—you know, pretend to knock me over and all that’” (Golding 165). Later on, the boys play and begin chanting. They say, “‘Kill the beast! Cut his throat! Spill his blood!’” (Golding 219). Then, Simon enters the scene. “Simon was crying out something about a dead man on a hill” (Golding 219). They continue to chant. “‘Kill the beast! Cut his throat! Spill his blood! Do him in!’” (Golding 219). Then, the boys attack Simon, a littlun. “The sticks fell and the mouth of the new circle crunched and screamed” (Golding 219). They have killed him. “Only the beast lay still, a few yards from the sea. Even in the rain they could see how small a beast it was; and already its blood was staining the sand” (Golding 219). The boys have tragically confused play and real life.
Rebuke: “Piggy gave up the attempt to rebuke Ralph” (Golding 184). To rebuke is to scold, or show that you dislike the action taken by another. Example: I rebuked the woman for asking me for another check because she did not cash the first one within a year’s time.
Page numbers were taken from the PDF version.

Posted by: Leah Hollingsworth at November 15, 2012 08:18 PM

De’Nisha Butler
Dr. Hobbs
English 311 CA05
November 16, 2012

Question: Why is the killing of the sow discussed in such great detail?

Answer: I believe the killing of the sow is discussed in such great detail because the hunters spent quite some time chasing, torturing and tormenting her until she was killed and captured. The believe the author is trying to get his readers to understand how the boys who once seemed sweet, hopeless little kids now turned into cold-blooded killers. From page 192 through 261, the way the hunters tortured, killed and beheaded the pig is documented.

Vocabulary: Crestfallen

Definition: To be depressed, sad, or disappointed.

Sentence: My little sister is crestfallen because I took away her bag of candies.

Posted by: De'Nisha Butler at November 15, 2012 11:37 PM

Kasey McDearis
Dr. Hobbs
ENG311 CA05
16 November 2012

Question: What is role of religion, so far, in this novel? Do the boys appear to have any form of religious belief? What evidence is there of their attitude toward God? How has a new form of religious begun in this chapter? In what way could Golding be making a point about our own forms of religions today?

Answer: I think that the religious belief in this novel is complex. i do not know if it based of Christianity, but there is a God like character in the novel. Jack, he is the boy that everyone follows and looks up to, even if it was wrong. when they did the pig dance over and over it was almost a spiritual and ritual thing. Simon is looked at, as the Christ like figure, because he cared for the sick, and respected life. Once they killed Simon, it was almost that he was sacrificed for the other boy's sins.

Fervor: Intense emotion, and warmth.

The Results of the election brought an end to much fervor.

Posted by: Kasey McDearis at November 16, 2012 12:27 AM

Kasey McDearis
Dr. Hobbs
ENG311 CA05
14 November 2012

Question: In Chapter 5, ow does the assembly break down, and why? What will happen to Ralph if the rules are not followed?

Answer: On page 30 it says "I believe that the boys’ society was doomed from the beginning. The greatest mistake the boys’ made from the start, is to try to replicate adult society as it would be back home. There are no adults on the island, and the boys are used to having order, and rules, so they try to make things like they were at home. This could never work, because they are not adults, they are children, and children don’t think and act like adults do." The boys tried to hard to have a civilized adult group, and when they were to get on each others nerves and not agree with one another, they turned on each other. one group being rational and the other group being what to seems like "barbarians".

Ludicrous: Unseasonable, and foolish.
There is nothing shocking to me, when it comes to this ludicrous event.

Posted by: Kasey McDearis at November 16, 2012 12:37 AM

Jason Anderson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG311 CA05
Lord of the Flies 7-8

Question: What is the significance of the chapter's title ("Gift for the darkness")? Explain.

Answer: Jack's tribe kills a sow and places the head on a spike as a sacrifice to the beast. (p.137)The Beast is not actually real, but rather is a manifestation of the barbaric tendencies and fears within all men. The title refers to this pig's head as a Gift for the darkness, because it is a gift to the dark tendencies within us all.

Posted by: Jason Anderson at November 16, 2012 11:20 AM

Madison Grabow
Hobbs
ENG 311 Survey of Major 20th Century Writers
16 November 2012

illusive (Webster) :based on or having the nature of an illusion; "illusive hopes of finding a better job"; "Secret activities offer presidents the alluring but often illusory promise that they can achieve foreign policy goals without the bothersome debate and open decision that are staples of democracy"

HW Q 9: What is the major conflict in this chapter?

A: The major conflict of this chapter is the beast. They had decided to go up the mountain and try to find the beast. Ralph "led the way and set himself as by right to hack at the tangles. Jack brought up the rear, displaced and brooding" (170). After finding the part of the mountain which they thought the beast dwelt in, Ralph and the others had to enter the cave and go against the beast. "In front of them, only three or four yards away, was a rock-like hump where no rock should be. Ralph could hear a tiny chattering noise coming from somewhere— perhaps from his own mouth. He bound himself together with his will, fused his fear and loathing into a hatred, and stoodup. He took two leaden steps forward" (177). The beast terrified them and they left.

pdf

Posted by: madison grabow at November 16, 2012 12:14 PM

Sarah Winans
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
16 November 2012

Question: What has changed since the beginning of the novel, besides the boys' appearance? What is the underlying threat in this chapter?

Answer: I believe that the boys' morale has greatly changed since the beginning of the story. They seem to be more down and reverting to violence than they have in the beginning when they seemed to be working together and having fun. Ralph was down but Simon assures him they are going to make it when he states, "“You’ll get back to where you came from” (159). At this point, the threat seems to be for power as Ralph and Jack do not get along because Jack wants violent actions while Ralph does not. “I’m going up the mountain.” The words came from Jack viciously, as
though they were a curse. He looked at Ralph, his thin body tensed, his spear held as if he threatened him" (171).

Posted by: Sarah Winans at November 16, 2012 02:11 PM

Sarah Winans
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
16 November 2012

Vocab Word: Obtuseness

Definition: Lacking perception or intelligence.

Sentence: The idea of the boy to copy his homework in front of the teacher shows his obtuseness.

Posted by: Sarah Winans at November 16, 2012 02:14 PM

Marcus Chisholm
Dr. Hobbs
ENG-311-CA05
16 November 2012
3. Why does Simon tell Ralph that “you” will get back all right? Explain.
In Chapter 7, as the boys look out on the water they get discouraged that they will never get home. Simon decides to lift up Ralph’s spirits by assuring him that they will make it home. “You’ll get back to where you came from.” Simon nodded as he spoke. He was kneeling on one knee, looking down from a higher rock which he held with both hands; his other leg stretched down to Ralph’s level.
Cynicism- An attitude of scornful or jaded negativity, especially a general distrust of the integrity or professed motives of others

Posted by: Marcus Chisholm at November 16, 2012 02:15 PM

Summer Taylor
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
16 November 2012

Question: 12. Who doesn’t want to be rescued? Why? What would be lost if the boys were rescued? What would be lost if they remain on the island?

Answer: Jack does not want to be rescued because he would lose his new found power that he has on the island. “Who thinks Ralph oughtn’t to be chief?”He looked expectantly at the boys ranged round, who had frozen. Underthe palms there was deadly silence.“Hands up,” said Jack strongly, “whoever wants Ralph not to be chief" (Golding 182) If the boys left the island, then they would lose thier "freedom" and loose the dictatorship that they are creating. If the boys remained on the island they would loose their humanity and democracy.

Posted by: Summer Taylor at November 16, 2012 02:16 PM

Sherman Milton III
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311: Survey of Major 20th Century Writers
16 November 2012

Question: Why do the boys run from the dead "chutist"? Explain.

Answer: The reason why the boys run is because they are terrified when they see him. They did not realize that he was an actual person, instead they though that it was the beast. They are under the impression that there is a beast living in the forest, so once they saw the dead parachutist that was the first thing that came to mind.

Vocabulary Word- Demure- Looking shyly modest.

Posted by: Sherman Milton at November 16, 2012 02:44 PM

Madison Grabow
Hobbs
ENG 311 Survey of Major 20th Century Writers
16 November 2012

sauntered (Google dictionary): Walk in a slow, relaxed manner, without hurry or effort

HW Q 13: What is the major conflict in this chapter?

A: Jack and his crew are now separated from Ralph and his crew. Simon was just murdered and now Ralph and Piggy are trying to cope with the loss and figure out the next plans. Late in the night Jack and the hunters attack Ralph's group. As Jack walked back from Ralph's side of the island "From his left hand dangled Piggy’s
broken glasses" (242). Piggy has lost his sight.

pdf

Posted by: madison grabow at November 16, 2012 04:03 PM

Leah Hollingsworth
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
18 November 2012

Question: Why is Roger so excited at the prospect of punishing Wilfred? How is Wilfred punished? Explain.

Answer: Roger is excited to punish Wilfred because it is a demonstration of his newly found power. He has just heard that Wilfred is going to be punished without reason. “Sitting on the tremendous rock in the torrid sun, Roger received this news as an illumination. He ceased to work at his tooth and sat still, assimilating the possibilities of irresponsible authority” (Golding 229). Wilfred is tied up and beaten as his punishment. “The newly beaten and untied Wilfred was sniffing noisily in the background” (Golding 229). Not only was he tied, but he was left tied up for quite some time. Robert says, “‘He… made us tie Wilfred up. He’s been’—he giggled excitedly—‘he’s been tied for hours, waiting—’” (Golding 229).

Corpulent: To be corpulent is to be overweight. Ex: Santa Claus is a jolly and corpulent man.

Page numbers were taken from the PDF version.

Posted by: Leah Hollingsworth at November 18, 2012 12:35 PM

Matt Lynch
ENG 311 Survey of Major Writer 20th Century
Dr. Hobbs
November 23, 2012
Lord of the Flies Homework Chapters 9 & 10 and vocabulary
Chapter 9
3) In Simon’s secret place, what source of food do the flies prefer? Explain.
The flies preferred the pigs blood compared to the blood rushing from Simon’s nose. The pigs blood had more flavor to it compared to the blood from Simon, so the flies went for the sweeter blood.
“Nothing prospered but the flies who blackened their lord and made the spilt guts look like a heap of glistening coal. Even when the vessel broke in Simon’s nose and the blood gushed out they left him alone, preferring the pig’s high flavor.”(Golding 208). PDF format from Primary Readings

Tremulous:
Definition: (adj) Shaking or quivering, Timid, nervous
Sentence: The boys were tremulous when the major storm blew over the island and they had no shelter to hide in.
“The twins, holding tremulously to each other, dared the few yards to the next shelter and spread the dreadful news.”(Golding 141). PDF format from Primary Readings

Posted by: Matt Lynch at November 23, 2012 06:16 PM

Sherman Milton III
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311: Survey of Major 20th Century Writers
24 November 2012

Question: 6. What kind of leader is Jack? Explain.

Answer: Jack is a punk in my book. If I had to choose a leadership style for him I would have to say that he is an autocratic dictator. Everything is kind of like his way or the highway and he expects everyone to listen to him. He makes the rules and expects everyone to follow him.
Phosphorescence- Persistent emission of light following exposure to and removal of incident radiation.

Posted by: Sherman Milton at November 24, 2012 12:47 PM

Timothy Delay
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
11, November 11, 2012
Question: 20. In this chapter, how has Ralphs’s position of leadership and authority changed since the beginning of the story? Explain.

Answers: In this Chapter Ralphs’s position of leadership and authority no longer hold any weight like it did in the beginning. After the change in leadership from Ralph to Jack and the death of Simon Ralph feels like he can no longer control the group. He express this by telling piggy “Don’t you understand, Piggy? The things we did” ( pg 255). Ralph no longer has the will to keep his groups is going. When Jack steal Piggy glass all hope and power Ralph had no longer exist.

Vocabulary: Abominable- An object that is disagreeable or unpleasant. The weather outside is very abominable today.

Posted by: Timothy Delay at November 24, 2012 05:08 PM

Bryan Baldwin
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
25 November 2012

Question: "In chapter 5, Phil says that he saw something at night. What or how did he see?"

Phil is talking about a terrible dream that he had is which he saw the beast.

Vocab word: Lamentation-an expression of sorrow

Posted by: Bryan Baldwin at November 25, 2012 03:36 PM

Bryan Baldwin
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
25 November 2012

Question: "After the raid, why is Piggy suddenly unable to figure out what to do? Why doesn't Jack try to steal the conch?"

Piggy is left in a state of shock, because the attack was so sudden. Jack does not steal the conch because most of the boys have joined his tribe anyway, and it is no longer needed.

Vocab word: Sanctity-something that is considered sacred; example: the sanctity of marriage

Posted by: Bryan Baldwin at November 25, 2012 03:53 PM

Shyenne Price
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
November 15, 2012

Question: “Why is Ralph so insistent about protecting Piggy? What might Golding be trying to tell us?”
Answers: If Ralph wasn’t protecting Piggy then no one would. He also does it I think because he wants Piggy to feel apart of the group. The only thing he has to offer t them are his glasses and because of this the boys feel as though they could just take his glasses and leave Piggy to fend for himself. I think that Golding could be telling us that Piggy is the voice of reason. He continuously tries keeping the boys together as one group and making them think clearly. Without Piggy, the boys could be come lost.

Vocabulary: Impervious→ unable to be affected by

Posted by: Shyenne Price at November 26, 2012 10:05 PM

Shyenne Price
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
November 18, 2012

Question: “How does Jack account for the death of Simon? Explain.”
Answer: Jack justifies Simon’s death by saying that he was the Beast on the island. “I expect the beast disguised itself.” Jack believes that the beast took hold of Simon and made them kill him.

Taken from Golding novel PDF version pg. 231

Vocabulary: Shudder→ tremble convulsively due to fear or revulsion

Posted by: Shyenne Price at November 26, 2012 10:21 PM

Sarah Winans
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
28 November 2012

Question: What reason does Ralph give for the boys' defections to Jack? Explain.

Answer: As Jack is trying to persuade the group to join his tribe, Ralph warns them that they are not prepared and when conditions worsen they will not know what to do. He states, "“Going to be a storm,” said Ralph, “and you’ll have rain like when we dropped here. Who’s clever now? Where are your shelters? What are you going to do about that?” (page 217 paragraph 6).

Vocabulary Term: Gesticulate

Definition: Excitedly using hand motions or signals in place of words to communicate something.

Sentence: Because the intruder was in the house, the girl had to gesticulate the message for her brother to keep quiet.

Posted by: Sarah Winans at November 28, 2012 10:06 PM

Sherman Milton III
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311: Survey of Major 20th Century Writers
9 November 2012
Question: #8.What does Jack claim to feel behind him when he hunts? Why? Explain.
Answer: Jack is just scared. He wants to be a leader but doesn’t have what it takes to do it on his own, and that’s why he turns the others on Ralph. He feels behind because he feels like he’s the one actually being hunted. He is afraid of the beastie (73).
Vocabulary Word: TENDRIL- Plant organ used to anchor and support vining stems.

Posted by: Sherman Milton III at November 29, 2012 11:59 PM

Sherman Milton III
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311: Survey of Major 20th Century Writers
16 November 2012
Question: Why do the boys run from the dead "chutist"? Explain.
Answer: The reason why the boys run is because they are terrified when they see him. They did not realize that he was an actual person, instead they though that it was the beast. They are under the impression that there is a beast living in the forest, so once they saw the dead parachutist that was the first thing that came to mind (136).
Vocabulary Word- Demure- Looking shyly modest.

Posted by: Sherman Milton at November 30, 2012 12:00 AM

Sherman Milton III
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311: Survey of Major 20th Century Writers
24 November 2012
Question: 6. What kind of leader is Jack? Explain.
Answer: Jack is a punk in my book. If I had to choose a leadership style for him I would have to say that he is an autocratic dictator. Everything is kind of like his way or the highway and he expects everyone to listen to him. He makes the rules and expects everyone to follow him (104).

Phosphorescence- Persistent emission of light following exposure to and removal of incident radiation.

Posted by: Sherman Milton at November 30, 2012 12:00 AM

Wollinsky Mendez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
December 4, 2012

Question: How is Piggy indirectly responsible for the blowing of the conch?

Answer: "Ralph had stopped smiling and was pointing into the lagoon. Something
creamy lay among the ferny weeds.
“A stone.”
“No. A shell.’ ’ Suddenly Piggy was a-bubble with decorous excitement.
“S’right. It’s a shell! I seen one like that before. On someone’s back
wall. A conch he called it. He used to blow it and then his mum would
come. It’s ever so valuable—” (Golding, 18)This is when they found the shell and Piggy told a story of how to blow it. Then after trying over and over again, he finally blew the shell loudly.

Posted by: Wollinsky Mendez at December 4, 2012 11:45 AM

Wollinsky Mendez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
December 4, 2012

Question: Who destroys the littluns’ sandcastles? Why? Explain

Answer: "They had built castles in the sand at the bar of the little river. These
castles were about one foot high and were decorated with shells, withered
flowers, and interesting stones. Round the castles was a complex
of marks, tracks, walls, railway lines, that were of significance only if
inspected with the eye at beach-level. The littluns played here, if not
happily at least with absorbed attention; and often as many as three of
them would play the same game together."(Golding, 83) "Roger led the way
straight through the castles, kicking them over, burying the flowers, scattering
the chosen stones. Maurice followed, laughing, and added to the
destruction."(Golding, 84) They wanted to show that there were no rules so they could do whatever they wanted. Although they destroyed the castle, one of the boys felt guilty and made up an excuse. He did not want to be responsible for someone getting hurt.

Posted by: Wollinsky Mendez at December 4, 2012 11:53 AM

Question: tacit

Answer: adjective
1.
understood without being openly expressed; implied: tacit approval.
2.
silent; saying nothing: a tacit partner.
3.
unvoiced or unspoken: a tacit prayer.

Exmaple: In the group there was a tacit student who did not express any of his ideas to us.

Posted by: Wollinsky Mendez at December 4, 2012 11:55 AM

Wollinsky Mendez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
December 4, 2012

Question: tacit

Answer: adjective
1.
understood without being openly expressed; implied: tacit approval.
2.
silent; saying nothing: a tacit partner.
3.
unvoiced or unspoken: a tacit prayer.

Exmaple: In the group there was a tacit student who did not express any of his ideas to us.

Posted by: Wollinsky Mendez at December 4, 2012 11:56 AM

Wollinsky Mendez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
December 4, 2012

Question: . At the end of this chapter, Ralph, Simon, and Piggy are the only ones left. What is Ralph’s attitude at the end of chapter 5 and what does he ask from the world of grownups?

Answer: “Grown-ups know things,” said Piggy. “They ain’t afraid of the dark.
They’d meet and have tea and discuss. Then things ’ud be all right—”
“They wouldn’t set fire to the island. Or lose—”
“They’d build a ship—”
The three boys stood in the darkness, striving unsuccessfully to convey
the majesty of adult life."(Golding, 133) They want a message from the grown ups. They know that they cannot act like them and they are lost to all of the events that happen on the island. They do want to be managed by the grown ups even though they don't come out and say it. They fell as though they need structure because they are falling apart.

Posted by: Wollinsky Mendez at December 4, 2012 12:03 PM

Wollinsky Mendez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
December 4, 2012

Question: Plinth

Answer: noun, Architecture .
1.
a slablike member beneath the base of a column or pier. See diag. under column.
2.
a square base or a lower block, as of a pedestal.
3.
Also called plinth course. a projecting course of stones at the base of a wall; earth table.
4.
(in joinery) a flat member at the bottom of an architrave, dado, baseboard, or the like.

Example: The plinth was used to reach the top of the pilar.

Posted by: Wollinsky Mendez at December 4, 2012 12:06 PM

Wollinsky Mendez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
December 4, 2012

Question: What does Ralph ask Jack? Why? Explain?

Answer: "Now it was Ralph’s turn to flush but he spoke despairingly, out of the
new understanding that Piggy had given him.
“Why do you hate me?”
The boys stirred uneasily, as though something indecent had been said.
The silence lengthened.
Ralph, still hot and hurt, turned away first." (Golding, 170) Nothing is said and he walks away. This shows there there is no real reason why he hates Ralph. He is just trying to take control and be the better leader. They fight all the time and both of them cannot stand one another at some times.

Posted by: Wollinsky Mendez at December 4, 2012 12:15 PM

Wollinsky Mendez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
December 4, 2012

Question: Sagely

Answer: noun
1.
a profoundly wise person; a person famed for wisdom.
2.
someone venerated for the possession of wisdom, judgment, and experience.

Example: My grandfather is sagely because he teaches me about life lessons and lets me live my own life.

Posted by: Wollinsky Mendez at December 4, 2012 12:17 PM

Delia Mulvihill
Dr. Hobbs
ENG311 CA05
Lord of the Flies Homework 2

Question 3: 3. What two groups with differing goals are emerging? Explain.

Answer: The two groups emerging are Ralph’s group and Jack’s group. Jack’s group started out with just being in charge of hunting for the food, but now he has gained some power and is voicing his opinion about how things should be run around the camp. Ralph’s group consists of Piggy, the twins, and most of the “littluns” and is following rules that Ralph has come up with. ““And they keep running off. You remember the meeting? How everyone was going to work hard until the shelters were finished?”
“Except me and my hunters—” (Golding 70).

Posted by: Delia Mulvihill at December 5, 2012 11:57 AM

Delia Mulvihill
Dr. Hobbs
ENG311 CA05
Lord of the Flies Homework 3

Question 1: Describe Ralph’s mood at the beginning of chapter 5. What is his new attitude toward Piggy? Explain.

Answer: Ralph’s mood at the beginning of chapter 5 is irritated. He is tired of everyone fooling around and not taking anything seriously, especially at the meetings. “This meeting must not be fun, but business” (Golding 108). His new attitude towards Piggy is respect because he realizes that Piggy was saying all along the stuff that they needed to be doing in the first place instead of horsing around.

Posted by: Delia Mulvihill at December 5, 2012 12:04 PM

Delia Mulvihill
Dr. Hobbs
ENG311 CA05
Lord of the Flies Homework 4

Question 13: After the raid why is Piggy suddenly unable to figure out what to do? Wh doesn’t Jack try to steal the conch?

Answer: Piggy is unable to figure out what to do because he cannot understand why the others do not see the importance of the fire for them to escape the island. “Not of the beast. I mean I’m scared of that too. But nobody else understands about the fire. If someone threw you a rope when you were drowning. If a doctor said take this because if you don’t take it you’ll die—you would, wouldn’t you? I mean?” “’Course I would.” “Can’t they see? Can’t they understand? Without the smoke signal we’ll
die here?” (Golding 200). Jack doesn’t try to steal the conch because to Jack the conch does not mean anything and it is not important to him.

Posted by: Delia Mulvihill at December 5, 2012 12:19 PM

Joe May

16. What rule does Ralph establish?
Throughout chapter two Ralph emphasizes to all the boys that they need to keep the fire going on top of the mountain. When the fire starts that sets the woods on fire there is no one manning the fire and the fire spreads out of control. To keep a happy medium of not burning the forrest down and keeping the fire lit Ralph makes a rule to have someone manning the fire at all times.

Posted by: Joe May at December 5, 2012 01:04 PM

Joe May

7. Who helps Ralph with the hut building? How many
huts have the boys managed to build?

Most of the boys partially helped to complete the first two huts but their attention deviated to having fun and swimming. Ralph knew there was a need to complete the huts so he recruited Simon to help him complete the thrid and fourth hut.

Posted by: Joe May at December 5, 2012 01:06 PM

Joe May

20. In chapter 6, what do the majority of the boys
want to do instead of relighting the signal fire or searching for the beast?

There seems to be a trend in lord of the flies that when something needs to be done the boys tend to do something else. Previously when Ralph needed help building huts, the boys wanted to play. Now as they have evolved the boys also want to play but they would rather go through the jungle, explore and hunt.

Posted by: Joe May at December 5, 2012 01:12 PM

Joe May

4. What happens when Ralph wounds the boar? How do you interpret his interest in the hunt after his spear hits the boar? Why might this be important? Explain?

Ralph comes very close to capturing, killing and eating the boar after his spear penetrates and wounds the animal but it gets away after the spear falls out. Jack becomes obsessed with the idea of hunting devoting every second of his life on the island to do so. This can be seen when he adds a bar to his spear so if the spear does penetrate and wound the animal. He also spends his time in the woods trying to find pig trails.

Posted by: Joe May at December 5, 2012 01:15 PM

Sherman Milton III
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 311: Survey of Major 20th Century Writers
5 December 2012
Respect and its Impact on Society
At Saint Leo University, there are core values that the university pushes to help follow the mission of the institution. The third core value, respect is a very important piece. One may ask, “What does respect mean?” A simple definition of respect in the university sense is to have a positive feeling towards someone or thing; that one may look up to or think highly of because of the qualities that they possess. Respect plays a substantial role in the books, “Fahrenheit 451” and “Lord of the Flies,” for there was not much. The lack of respect in both societies was the reason why they both were failing. One may gain respect through a variety of methods, but a few simple ways are to respect others, be ethical, and be a role model.

Respect is a two way street in many cases. If one wants others to respect them, they must respect others first. In the books “Fahrenheit 451” and “Lord of the Flies,” respect is clearly something that the main characters do not receive from others. Captain Beatty in “Fahrenheit 451,” is a captain who does not show respect towards other individuals; therefore, he is not respected. His problem is that he hates books so much that anyone who reads them, he transfers that same hatred towards them. He states, “I want you to do this job all by your lonesome, Montag” (Bradbury 53). Beatty made him burn down his own home for reading books. Jack’s actions in “Lord of the Flies” were also negative. He did not gain a lot of respect because he does not respect others. Golding writes, “…Jack smacked Piggy’s head. Piggy’s glasses flew off and tinkled on the rocks. Piggy cried out in terror” (Golding 100). That is a great example of why Piggy and some others do not respect him.

Being ethical is another factor that plays into the concept of respect. Many times people misunderstand the two words ethical and legal. Slavery was not ethical, but it was legal back in the day. In “Fahrenheit 451,” reading books were illegal and were burned. It was not ethical to burn books just for the fact that people were reading them. Montag is respected towards the end of the story because he put the law aside side and started being ethical. That is why the hobo camp accepted him. One of the hobos said to him, "You're welcome here" (Bradbury 67). Ralph is ethical throughout “Lord of the Flies” even though many of the kids stop following him. A great example of him being ethical is when he sticks up for Piggy. Ralphs confronts the others about Piggy glasses and states, “You’ve got to give them back” (Golding 254). Being ethical is all about doing the right thing and that is why many people respect people for doing it.

Being a role model is another way one can gain respect from others. When others look up to someone, they typically want to be like that person. The two books showed that by being a role model, one could gain respect. In “Fahrenheit 451,” Montag was the role model and people looked up to him, especially the old man. Bradbury writes, “"I feel alive for the first time in years," said Faber. “ I feel I'm doing what I should have done a lifetime ago. For a little while I'm not afraid” (Bradbury 60). He has respect for Montag and hope, just for the fact that he was a great role model. In “Lord of the Flies,” Ralph is the role model because he does the right thing. In the beginning, when he was elected leader he put Jack in charge of the choir. Ralph states, “The choir belongs to you, of course. They could be the army- Or the hunters-” (Golding 29). The fact that he saw Jack a little uneasy when he became leader and did something about it shows that he is a role model.

The overall concept of respect in both “Fahrenheit 451” and “Lord of the Flies” can be viewed from many different angles. It plays an important role in the books and here at Saint Leo University just because it is a valuable concept in the world. Throughout my college career, here at Saint Leo University I learned that respect gets you a long way. In both stories, there was a lack of respect and there was a lot of chaos. Between Beatty and Jack, they did not have respect for others, were not ethical, and were not role models for others.

Works Cited
Golding, William. Lord of the Flies. London. Faber and Faber, 1954. Print.
Bradbury, Ray. Fahrenheit 451. New York: Ballatine Books, 1991. Print.

Posted by: Sherman Milton III at December 5, 2012 02:48 PM

Joseph May
Dr. Hobbs
ENG-311
3 November 2012

The Quest for Power: Methods Used in the Struggle for Superiority in Animal Farm and Lord of the Flies

Saint Leo students are taught to follow the University’s Benedictine core values, but if students were stranded on an island as the boys in Lord of the Flies, or forced to live under a corrupt government as the animals in Animal Farm, could they maintain those values? There are numerous instances throughout Lord of the Flies by William Goulding and Animal Farm by George Orwell that display conflict in the quest for power. Struggle can be defined as difficulty faced during the journey to accomplish a goal, while power can be defined as authority over an outside force. The various methodologies used in the struggle for power can be compared and contrasted using the methods leaders used to gain power, how the leadership/governmental structure transformed, and how characters changed after leaders obtained power will be used as criteria.
While the struggle for power or control is similar throughout both works of literature, the leaders used different methods in their struggle to secure and maintain power. In Animal Farm, Napoleon used methods such as defamation to turn the animals against Snowball and support him. Defamation is witnessed when Napoleon releases the statement, “[. . .] it appears that Snowball had not attempted to lose the Battle of the Cowshed by means of a stratagem, but had been fighting on Jones's side. In fact, he had been the leader of the human forces, and had charged into battle screaming the words `Long live Humanity'” (Orwell 45). This defamation caused the animals to despise Snowball and support Napoleon. In comparison, Jack in Lord of the Flies used propaganda to lure boys from Ralph’s camp to his hunting tribe. The biggest use of propaganda was the “beastie,” with the staking of the pig head in front of the cave where the monster allegedly lived by the hunters to show the “littluns” the hunters were powerful. Jack used the imagery of the beast to support the statement, “I gave you food, said Jack, and my hunters will protect you from the beast. Who will join my tribe?” (Goulding 150) By using this propaganda, Jack put himself in a position to gain the support and control of the boys on the island. Although leaders in both novels used different methods in their quest to secure power, their goal of achieving power was the same.
In both Lord of the Flies and Animal Farm, the leadership structure transformed as time progressed and the leaders deviated from their original principles. The governing body of Animal Farm began as a democratic republic; however, when Napoleon seized power, the structure resembled more of a totalitarian state. This observation is supported by evidence in a statement made by Squealer, “Do not imagine, comrades, that leadership is a pleasure, it is a heavy responsibility. No one believes more firmly than Comrade Napoleon that all animals are equal. He would be only too happy to let you make your decisions for yourselves. But sometimes you might make the wrong decisions, comrades, and then where would we be” (Orwell 14). In comparison, the governing body in Lord of the Flies also morphed as time went on and deviated from the original goals established by all of the boys on the island. The narrator depicted their government as a democracy with the electing of Chief Ralph and the use of the conch with the observation, “They obeyed the summons of the conch, partly because Ralph blew it, and he was big enough to be a link with the adult world of authority” (Goulding 50). The power structure changed into a dictatorship when Jack began to defy all of the established rules and stated, “Bollocks to the rules! We are strong we hunt! If there is a beast, we will hunt it down! We’ll close in and beat and beat and beat” (Golding 131). This symbolized their transformation during the struggle for power. Both works included potential leaders who sought power, a rival also struggling for that power and a transformation of government structure when Napoleon ruled his population like a communist, and Jack like a dictator.
Though both works are similar in many ways, one striking difference between the two is seen in characters after power was secured. The pigs that controlled the government transformed over time to act like humans when they began learning to talk, write, read, and obtain modern technology like telephones. The pigs began doing business with the humans so they could make money to run the farm and buy building materials to build a windmill for the farm. Evidence that supports the claim that the pigs were transforming to be like humans is shown with the quotation “It was a pig walking on his hind legs, [. . .] and a moment later came a long line of pigs walking on their hind legs. [. . .] Napoleon came out carrying a whip in his trotter” (Orwell 52). In contrast, Jack’s hunters in Lord of the Flies began to de-evolve and act like cave dwellers and this is best seen in the situation when, “Jack lowered his chin and stared at the traces as though he would force them to speak to him. Then dog-like, uncomfortably on all fours yet unheeding his discomfort, he stole forward five yards and stopped” (Goulding 66). The boys and the pigs both changed in ways they thought would maintain their position of power and end the struggle.
In conclusion, leaders in Lord of the Flies and Animal Farm both faced great difficulty in their struggle to maintain power. While on the rise to the top, the methods they used to gain and maintain power contradicted their morals, but they felt what they were doing was necessary. The animals and the boys changed the shape of the government to suit their needs because they were struggling to maintain power. The leaders and subjects alike changed under the leaders rule because it was a key to their survival. Even though the boys started out as choirboys, their struggle turned them into savages with Jack resembling a dictator and the power turned the pigs into human-like dictators.


Posted by: Joe May at December 5, 2012 02:53 PM

Delia Mulvihill
Dr. Hobbs
ENG311 CA05
Final Exam Paper
Compare and contrast the significance or the methodologies used for the struggle for power/ultimate control in the following two works read in this course: Animal Farm and The Lord of the Flies. You will need to include a working definition of “struggle” and “power” or “control” that you will stick to throughout the paper. The criteria that ou will use to compare and contrast these two works must all be aspects of the topics as you have defined it. This paper should NOT be a neutral, “for your consideration only” type of paper. It must begin with a thesis that clearly indicates a reason for the comparison that can be proved.
There is a struggle for power every day in this world. Whether it be over who has control of the television at a certain time or over an entire nation, this is not a new concept. In the two works Animal Farm and The Lord of the Flies, both represent struggle for power. What is a struggle? A struggle is having a hard time against an opposing force. What is power? Power is having the ability to control or be in charge of a group. Although both of these works have numerous similarities and differences, there is a significant similarity between the characters Jack and Napoleon’s use of fear to maintain control in their struggle to power.
In Lord of the Flies, Jack is jealous of Ralph from the very beginning when he is not appointed as the leader. Ralph mistakenly puts Jack in charge of the hunting, to give him something to do and keep him happy. This is how Jack starts to gain his followers. He shows violent tendencies when he is hunting for the pig in the beginning. “He snatched his knife out of the sheath and slammed it into a tree truck. Next time there would be no mercy. He looked round fiercely, daring them to contradict” (Golding 42). Jack and Napoleon similarly both have sidekicks to help with their dirty work. Roger is known as a terror and will go about hurting the “littluns” just for fun. “’You don’t know Roger. He’s a terror.’ ‘And the chief—they’re both –‘ ‘—terrors – ‘ ‘—only Roger – ‘” (Golding 272). Napoleon has Squealer, who goes about talking to all of the other animals because he is a much more eloquent speaker and does a better job of persuading the animals. For example, “Afterwards Squealer made a round of the farm and set the animals' minds at rest. He assured them that the resolution against engaging in trade and using money had never been passed, or even suggested. It was pure imagination, probably traceable in the beginning to lies circulated about Snowball” (Orwell 26). Both Animal Farm and The Lord of the Flies each have a character that uses fear and tricks in order to control the other characters.
Although there were similarities in how Jack an Napoleon used fear in the struggle to power, there are also differences that are significant. One of the main differences is in the type of game either Jack or Napoleon uses. Jack is all about being physical, after he kills the pig for the first time and with help from Roger, he does not hesitate to use physical violence in order to get his way. "Bollocks to the rules! We're strong — we hunt! If there's a beast, we'll hunt it down! We'll close in and beat and beat and beat — !" (Golding 130). Napoleon on the other hand plays a mental game. He takes advantage of the fact that most of the other animals cannot read and changes the Seven Commandments throughout the story in order to accommodate him better. Since most of the animals cannot read when they find a rule is different than how they remember it, they all just assume that since the wall says so that they must have just remembered it wrong. He also uses the fact that most of the animals are not the brightest bulbs in the batch and turns them all against Snowball, saying that everything bad that happens is Snowball’s doing or fault. “Comrades, do you know who is responsible for this? Do you know the enemy who has come in the night and overthrown our windmill? SNOWBALL!” (Orwell 28). Not only do Jack and Napoleon differ in the way they instill fear and control their respective groups, but in the end Jack maintains control of his group all the way to the end and Napoleon loses the respect of his fellow animals and ultimately loses control of them.
People go to different extremes in order to gain power. No person ever gets into a position of power without a little struggle. If there was no struggle then power would not be regarded as what it is. Animal Farm and Lord of the Flies are two completely different stories about completely different ideas and morals. Jack in Lord of the Flies uses violence and brute force in his struggle to power, while Napoleon uses words and mind games in order for him to gain control. Although they are very different, the idea of struggle for power or control is prevalent throughout both.

Bibliography
Golding, William. Lord of the Flies. New York: Coward-McCann, 1962. Print.
Orwell, George. Animal Farm;. New York: Harcourt, Brace, 1954. Print.

Posted by: Delia Mulvihill at December 5, 2012 03:03 PM

Madison Grabow
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
2 December 2012
Violence in Animal Farm and Lord of the Flies

When society is disrupted and there is a cause for change in governance, violence tends to take over any rational decisions. As defined by the Merriam-Webster Dictionary, violence is an exertion of physical force so as to injure or abuse, an instance of violent treatment through power, and strength or destruction of language. These three forms of violence are represented in Orwell’s text of Animal Farm and Golding’s text of Lord of the Flies.
An exertion of physical force as to injure or abuse is present several times throughout Animal Farm and Lord of the Flies. In Animal Farm, the major conflict of animals versus humans creates violence throughout the text. When the animals are placed under stress and harsh conditions, the animals retaliate and gain control of the farm in the process: “Jones and his men suddenly found themselves being butted and kicked from all sides. The situation was quite out of their control” (Orwell 8). In Lord of the Flies, a lack of governance and fear of a beast causes savagery to take flight while civilization disappears. Jack and his hunters notice the “beast” one night and “at once the crowd surged after it, poured down the rock, leapt on to the beast, screamed, struck, bit, tore. There were no words, and no movements but the tearing of teeth and claws” (Golding 219). The hunters’ animalistic behavior took over and the hope of a return to order was lost in the death of Simon.
An instance of violent treatment through power is represented in Animal Farm when Napoleon decides that negotiating and working together is not an option he desires. Just as Snowball is winning over the animals vote to build the windmill, Napoleon takes action and emits a high-pitched whimper. “At this there was a terrible baying sound outside, and nine enormous dogs wearing brass-studded collars came bounding into the barn. They dashed straight for Snowball” (Orwell 22). Napoleon’s drive to be in control forces him to take violent measures to obtain his desired power. The desire for power which causes violence can also be seen in Lord of the Flies. Jack is not pleased with the outcome of the boys placing Ralph in charge. After many tiny abruptions, Jack is fed up with following Ralph’s rules and takes control of his hunters. This new tribe results in violent uprisings. Jack’s hunters attack Ralph and his boys to gain control of Piggy’s glasses: “Ralph hit out; then he and what seemed like a dozen others were rolling over and over, hitting, biting, scratching. He was torn and jolted, found fingers in his mouth and bit them” (Golding 241). The reign towards tyranny brought out the darkest colors in Napoleon and Jack.
Physical force is a very quick way to implement violence upon a group; however, strength or destruction of language can do just as much damage. Language is used as a technique of control and violence in Animal Farm and Lord of the Flies. In Animal Farm Major’s Seven Commandments start out as a socialist revolution, but are quickly twisted and distorted to keep Napoleon in power. The commandments first symbolized what was necessary and equal for the farm. The commandments quickly changed into what was necessary for Napoleon. By the end of the text the only commandment to remain was the equality commandment; however, this statement had changed. The new and final commandment read “ALL ANIMALS ARE EQUAL BUT SOME ANIMALS ARE MORE EQUAL THAN OTHERS” (Orwell 52). “After that it did not seem strange when next day the pigs who were supervising the work of the farm all carried whips in their trotters” (Orwell 53). Lord of the Flies uses language to express the control that Jack contains over the young ones and stir-up a sense of violence. The hunters’ motto of “Kill the beast! Cut his throat! Spill his blood!” (Golding 218) is expressed at first for the death of the pigs. These statements soon turn into words used to attack the “beast”. Violent language implants itself into followers and becomes ritual to recite; therefore, removing any logic and processing necessary to remain civilized.
Animal Farm and Lord of the Flies are two texts built off of the lack of governance. That lack of governance turns the most civilized and well developed societies into savages, power-hungry members, and violent followers. Physical force, violent treatment, and destructive language are the three ways Orwell and Golding use violence to disturb a balance. Power can bring out the worst sides of juvenile animals and people.


Works Cited

Golding, William. Lord of the Flies. New York: Coward-McCann, 1962. Print.
Orwell, George. Animal Farm;. New York: Harcourt, Brace, 1954. Print.

Posted by: madison grabow at December 5, 2012 03:06 PM

Jason Anderson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG311 CA05
“Freedom vs. Control” in Animal Farm and Lord of the Flies
The struggle for power is a common theme in many novels throughout history. Two novels in particular share a similar power struggle: Animal Farm, and Lord of the Flies. In these novels the struggle for power occurs for different reasons, but both sides in each novel have their own methodologies, and ultimately in both books the more militant groups are victorious. Power in this case is quite simply political control. How each side develops political control reveals a great deal about themselves and society as a whole.
In Lord of the Flies the ‘’good” or protagonist side is led by Ralph. Ralph as a leader focuses on emulating adult society back in England. As a result he promotes democracy in which everyone has freedom to say and do as they like. This freedom, however, ultimately results in his downfall. He has no force or power to compel the others to work, and as a result nothing is accomplished. (Golding, p.50) He is also unable to keep power because of his lack of physical force to compel others to follow him; thus Jack is able to rebel and take control. Ultimately Ralph’s government collapses and he is alone against the others, and he survives because of the arrival of the rescue party at the end of the novel.
In Animal Farm Snowball represents the protagonist or “good” side with his views of government. Snowball promotes council meetings and democratic ideas of having the animals vote on various resolutions. Snowball also promotes technology and improvements so as to make life for all of the animals easier. Snowball is easily displaced by Napoleon because the other animals are easily frightened and are not very intelligent; and therefore easily swayed. When Napoleon’s dogs chase Snowball out the other animals are easily cowed into submission. Snowball’s fate is unclear, although we know he escaped the farm.
The antagonist of Lord of the Flies is Jack, a young man who becomes leader of the children. Jack is an interesting antagonist because he is driven largely by his own primal desires. Jack gradually descends into primal savagery and bases his rule on being stronger than the other children. “The madness came into his eyes again.” (Golding, p.51)He manages to convince the others to leave Ralph because he offers them protection, meat, and is able to intimidate with his greater size and combat skill. Jack also plays upon the children’s fear of the beast, and argues that the beast is real and that he will be able to protect them. Jack becomes mad with power and attempts to kill Ralph, who represents the only resistance to his rule, simply because he resists. Jack is able to keep order better than Ralph because he has force and fear to back him up; he also unites them against Ralph which creates a common enemy.
Napoleon in Animal Farm becomes leader of the animals by the ruthless elimination of all dissent by use of his brainwashed followers. Although he himself is a coward in battle, his dogs are able to put down all resistance. (Orwell, p.104) Unlike Jack who rules by virtue of personal strength and persuasion, Napoleon relies on the powers of his subordinates. Napoleon creates an ordered society with a delineated hierarchy that is based on the subordination of all others to himself. Napoleon’s motivations are more obscure than Jack who is driven by primal forces. Napoleon seems driven by his own ego as he consistently declares himself above any rules, and above all the others. Napoleon is essentially a stereotypical dictator, whereas Jack is a representation of the barbarous chaos of primal man.
In conclusion, the methodologies of the characters in each novel are quite different particularly on the part of the antagonist. Even so the protagonists share an appreciation of democratic ideals, which contrasts with the dictatorial regimes of the antagonists. The motivations of both Ralph and Snowball are quite similar in that both promote the greater good and survival of the group as a whole. Jack and Napoleon on the other hand promote themselves at the expense of others, but with different methods of violence and for different reasons. The struggle for power therefore occurs for different reasons despite similar violent means of conflict.

Posted by: Jason Anderson at December 5, 2012 05:12 PM

Joseph Lontrato
ENG-311
Dr. Hobbs
12-5-12

Control and Information

In the world today, control and the freedom of information have a significant impact on people’s actions. Control can be defined as a person or groups ability to assume leadership roles, while at the same time gaining power over a certain group or situation. Information on the other hand can be defined as knowledge or experience that an individual has or has obtained over time. In addition, throughout years these two aspects of control and information have been introduced into works literature. Two works that these aspects both play a role in are “Animal Farm” and “Lord of the Flies.”
In these two works of literature, the idea of control and information is very similar in the aspect that the idea of age and knowledge equates to leadership. In the novel written by Orwell, there seems to be the idea that the older, smarter, or knowledgeable individuals assume leadership. In Orwell’s Animal Farm it is stated, “Four legs good, two legs bad.” (Orwell, p. 29). This phrase was said by Snowball when he came to the conclusion that this concept contained the essential principle of Animalism. He then decided it should be written on the end wall for all the animals to see. This being said, Snowball and the other pigs were far more advanced than other animals on the farm. Unlike others, the pigs could read, write, as well as were educated in trades. Throughout the text, these pigs used this idea as a sense of control and power against other animals on the farm. Noticing that animals such as birds, hens, and ducks were very poorly educated, it created more advantage for the animals in leadership positions. Furthermore, the novel “Lord of the Flies”also portrays the importance of maturity and knowledge in assuming leadership. In Lord of the Flies, two of the older boys both assume a leadership role throughout the novel. Although Ralph was voted into the position of chief, he offers control to another older boy named Jack. Following the vote Jack says to Ralph,“Ralph, I’ll split up the choir—my hunters, that is—into groups, and we’ll be responsible for keeping the fire going” (Golding, p. 42-43). This is a great example in the novel when the advantage of being older and having more knowledge can provide an important advantage over others.
The next point in these two works is the idea of limiting information, and how it can pertain to the idea of gaining or keeping control. This idea is expressed in the novel when Ralph and Piggy discover the conch. Piggy says to Ralph, “S’right. It’s a shell! I seen one like that before. On someone’s back wall. A conch he called it. He used to blow it and then his mum would come. It’s ever so valuable—” (Golding, p. 15). The idea of limited knowledge plays an important role here in the fact that piggy is the only boy on the island that knows not only what the shell is called, but how and can be used to call meetings on the island. Overall, the conch symbolizes a sense of order and control. Although the same idea applies throughout Animal Farm in the essence that limited knowledge of others can provide power and control, it is portrayed slightly different. In the book Animal Farm, it is stated, “All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others” (Orwell, p. 112). This is simply stating that overall; all animals are still animals, but some animal species possess higher levels of equality. These can refer to how the pigs in the book only allowed other animals on the farm to learn to a certain degree. In addition, the idea of filtering certain information to gain an advantage over others also arises when the pigs do not attempt to teach the others about blacksmithing, carpentering, and other necessary arts they had learned from books they took from the farmhouse.
In conclusion, the principles of control and information are greatly portrayed throughout these two works. With these overall ideas that age and knowledge as well as the limiting of knowledge play a significant role in leadership, it is very simple to see how throughout Orwell and Golding’s novel how both authors were able to implement the importance of this relationship and show how it could be used in literature.

Posted by: Joseph Lontrato at December 5, 2012 08:23 PM

Dalton Hart
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351: The Contemporary World View
8 April 2015

Question: What is Ralph’s attitude toward Piggy in the first chapter? Why is this significant? Explain.
Answer: Throughout chapter one, Ralph seems to be indifferent towards Piggy and could almost be viewed as a bully toward Piggy. When first meeting each other, Piggy asks Ralph his name and expects to be asked the same, but Ralph seems to feel that Piggy is not important. When first finding the conch shell near the lagoon, Golding writes, “the vivid phantoms of [Ralph’s] day-dream still interposed between him and Piggy, who in this context was an irrelevance,” (Golding 11). This shows that Ralph views Piggy to be insignificant to him, and of no help. This becomes significant because as the boys are alone by themselves on the island, they all become important to each other.

Posted by: Dalton Hart at April 7, 2015 08:23 PM

Glen Pringle
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary Worldview CA01
7 April 2015

"His specs-Use them as burning glasses!"(Golding 36)

How do they start the fire? Why is this significant? Explain.

Using the convex lenses of Piggy's glasses to concentrate the rays of the sun, Ralph and the boys that are stranded on the island in Lord of the Flies successfully create fire. Piggy does not surrender his glasses voluntarily, however. They must be wrestled from him "Give me my specs!" (Golding 36) This is foreshadowing for the rest of the novel, as the glasses become a symbol of power, control, and civilization along with the fire that accompanies it. They are later stolen by Jack's tribe in chapter 10.

Posted by: Glen Pringle at April 8, 2015 01:15 AM

Annie Hays
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary Worldview CA01
8 April 2015

Question: What is the “scar” that is repeatedly mentioned? Why is this significant? Explain.

Answer: The "scar" is the trail that the plane left in the brush when it landed. When the boys look out over the island, they see, "'That's where we landed.' Beyond the falls and cliffs, there was a gash visible in the trees; there were the splintered trunks and then the drag, leaving only a fringe of palm between the scar and the sea" (Golding 21). The fact that they call it "the scar" is significant because it is the only visible sign the boys have that they came from the civilized world. The boys are trying to create some kind of civilized order while they are there, but considering the mark of civilization is a "scar," and Jack is being cruel to the others, the boys may have brought the bad parts of civilization to the island.

Posted by: Annie Hays at April 8, 2015 10:36 AM

Mekayla Davila
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary World View CA01
8 March 2015

Question:
Why is the chapter titled “The Sound of the Shell”? Why is this significant? Explain.

Answer:
It is called The Sound of the Shell because all of the boys on the island gather together after hearing a noise that comes from the blowing of a conch shell made by Ralph. It is significant because the boys eventually use the conch shell as a symbol of authority and attention. The boys use the conch in the group as a means of knowing who is talking. Whenever a boy is holding the conch only he is allowed to talk to the rest of the group and with no interruptions (Golding 35-37). This shell may become an important aspect to the boys’ survival on the island.

Posted by: Mekayla Davila at April 8, 2015 11:21 AM

Lyndsey Pospisil
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 The Contemporary World View
8 April 2015

Question Chapter One: Why is Jack unable to kill the pig? Why is this significant? Explain.

Answer: In chapter one of Lord of the Flies, Jack is unable to kill the pig because he cannot bring himself to kill a live animal. After Jack fails to stab and kill the pig, the other boys ask him why he did not do anything. The text states, “They knew very well why he hadn’t: because of the enormity of the knife descending and cutting into living flesh; because of the unbearable blood” (Golding 41-42). Hunting and having to kill live creatures is new to all of the boys in this first chapter of the novel. Although the boys, such as Jack, are eager to show dominance and be the leader, the thought of actually harming and ultimately killing a live creature is something that Jack could not fathom at this beginning point of the novel.

Posted by: Lyndsey Pospisil at April 8, 2015 01:06 PM

Rachel Cunio
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary Worldview CA01
08 April 2015

Question: What two groups with different goals are emerging? Why is this significant? Explain.

Answer: During chapter three, two groups with different goals emerge. One group, led by the officially elected leader Ralph, is working hard to survive by maintaining some sense of order and preparing to be rescued. Besides Ralph, this group consists of Piggy and Simon, who have “been working for days” (Golding 49) while the other group of boys is off being reckless and attempting to hunt. This second group is led by Jack, who “disappeared under a blush of mortification” (Golding 21) after losing the initial vote to be leader of the boys. Jack incites violence in the boys and encourages them to be careless about the shelters and the fire, instead becoming obsessed about hunting. Although all the boys originally agreed that “everyone was going to work hard until the shelters were finished” (Golding 49), all the boys besides Ralph, Piggy, and Simon are following Jack and are “off bathing, eating, or playing” (Golding 49). The emerging of these two groups is significant because Ralph begins to realize that despite his official position as chief, he is losing control of the boys. The carelessness and hunting obsession that Jack encourages is just the initial problem that foreshadows how the division of the boys eventually leads to violence among all the boys.

Posted by: Rachel Cunio at April 8, 2015 03:08 PM

Racheljoy Capitola
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary Worldview CA01
8 April 2015

How is Jack presented to the reader? Why is this significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

When Jack is introduced in the novel, he is the leader of a group of boys who approach Ralph in an orderly, almost army-like formation. He is introduced as a power figure from the beginning: “The boy who controlled them was dressed in the same way though his cap badge was golden. When his party was ten yards from the platform he shouted an order and they halted, gasping, sweating, swaying in the fierce light.” (Golding 19-20) Furthermore, when the protagonist questions the new group of boys, Jack claims his name is “Merridew” because it sounds older: “’Kids’ names,’ said Merridew. ‘Why should I be Jack? I’m Merridew.” (Golding 21) The way Jack presents himself is important because, immediately, the audience is given clues that Jack may be a dissenter or someone who might cause controversy within the group of stranded boys.

Posted by: Racheljoy Capitola at April 8, 2015 03:10 PM


Kenna Dieffenwierth
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 - Contemporary World View CA01
8 April 2015

Question: 13.CHAPTER TWO: How do Ralph and Jack answer the question about the beast? Why is this significant? Explain.

Answer: First Ralph says that large beasts are only found in big countries not on tiny islands (Golding 49). When the boy insists on what he saw, Ralph tries to ease the tension with logic and insist that the creature does not exist. If it was dark, then the boy couldn't have seen it. He continues to reassure the other boys that it was only a nightmare (Golding 50). Jack pipes in that there is not a beast, but if there was they would kill it. Ralph is angry at Jack supporting the notion that there might be a beast and keeps loudly denying the beasts existence before finally changing the subject (Golding 50). Ralph was concerned because the existence of a beast was a challenge to his authority that he could not control. This lead him to change the subject to being rescued. He hid away an unfounded claim with another unfounded claim that would work to his advantage in maintaining his popularity with the boys. "We want to be rescued; and of course we shall be rescued.' Voices babbled. The simple statement, not backed by any proof but the weight of Ralph’s new authority, brought light and happiness" (Golding 51). The "beast" put him at risk of being exposed as not having all the answers and possibly being challenged. Jack proposing a solution before him and not denying the beast's existence as adamantly as him also posed a threat to his authority.

Posted by: Kenna Dieffenwierth at April 8, 2015 03:19 PM

Craig Graves
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary World View CA01
8 April 2015

Question #19
.CHAPTER THREE: Why does Simon go to the bower? Why is this significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer
While it is not expressly stated why Simon goes to the bower, it can be inferred that he just needed time alone away from the unrest and tension between Ralph and Jack. It is possible that Simon was known to be an outcast of sorts back wherever these stranded boys are from. Some often refer to Simon as “queer” or “funny (Golding 55),” though this may be because he acts differently than the other children. He is much kinder than the other boys, but is prone to fainting as revealed in the first chapter. These fainting spells could be attributed to deep introversion where immense conflict or interaction with other people and society drains him emotionally and spiritually. For this reason, he would go to the glade to refresh himself from the craziness of the makeshift society that Ralph and Jack seem to be trying to run. The glade that Simon finds seems to have drawn him to it, that there was a “just perceptible path (Golding 56)” that led him. The glade is also a very peaceful place and is perfect for Simon to relax in. This scene is significant because it shows how one of the denizens of this budding society copes with the turmoil of the foreshadowing dystopia.

Posted by: Craig Graves at April 8, 2015 03:46 PM

"In chapter one of The Lord of the Flies, the dynamic characters are Piggy, Ralph, Jack, Simon, and the twins Sam and Eric. The flat characters in the novel are all the rest of the boys. Ralph is the protagonist. Jack is the shapeshifter. Piggy is considered the loyal follower. The perspective of the chapter is third person omniscient. The setting of the novel takes place on an unknown island off the coast of England sometime in the 1930s or 1940s. After crashing on an unknown island, while being evacuated from an atomic war in England, Piggy and Ralph find each other on the island. They then find a conch shell that they use as a makeshift horn to call the other boys. They elect Ralph, instead of Jack, as their leader. Jack and Simon then explore the island for civilization and end up finding nothing but a good view on top of a mountain. They then find a pig and Jack fails to kill it but i foreshadows his potential to be savage. A theme within this chapter is rise to power in a democratic way. In this chapter the conch shell is a symbol of power and order. An epiphany that occurs is when they are on the mountain and realize they are on an island and because of this they have freedom and need to be organized in order to survive."

Posted by: Mekayla Davila at April 8, 2015 04:25 PM

Heading to my previous submission:

Mekayla Davila
Rachel Cunio
Stephen Pinol
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary World View CA01
8 March 2015

Group 1- Chapter 1 Lord of the Flies

Posted by: Mekayla Davila at April 8, 2015 04:38 PM

Racheljoy Capitola
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary Worldview CA01
12 April 2015

28) What five main points does Ralph address in his speech? What does he say about each one of these things? Cite a passage that summarizes Ralph’s view of the fear. Why is this significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

In the beginning of Chapter 5, Ralph explains that an assembly is needed in order to keep the peace within the boys’ makeshift society. He gives a speech that addresses five main problems—or a lack of responsibilities—that the boys have shown over time: a lack of motivation to collect water, a lack of motivation to build shelter, an unsanitary habit to not use the predesignated lavatories, an irresponsible habit to not keep up the fires, and a growing paranoia brought about by fear. Because the boys have been drinking water from the river and not from conchs, nobody has been bringing water back to the camp (79). Because the boys did not help Ralph and Simon build the last hut, the “shelter might fall down if the rain comes back” (80). Because the boys have not used the rocks designated as their bathrooms, the fruit and water they have been using is threatened to be “dirty” and unsanitary (80). Because the boys have not been keeping up the mountain fire, they are less like to be rescued; and because the boys have been building fires wherever they please, they have nearly caught the forest on fire (81) Lastly, because the boys have been consumed with fear, they have been muttering in their sleep about a “beast” and creating restlessness within the group (82-83).

The discussion about the “beast” leads to a conversation about fear. Ralph describes fear as something that is in dreams, that is related to superstition and thought: “We’ve got to talk about this fear and decide there’s nothing in it. I’m frightened myself, sometimes; only that’s nonsense! Like bogies. Then, when we’ve decided, we can start again and be careful about things like fire.” (82) This is a significant passage because it shows how much fear can skew people’s perceptions and how it parallels danger (such as the relationship between fire worship/sacrifice and the beast by the end of the novel). Although the children know that fear can be irrational, it does not prevent them from being consumed by it.

Posted by: Racheljoy Capitola at April 12, 2015 02:06 PM

Mekayla Davila
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary World View CA01
12 April 2015

Question:
How is sanity defined? How does this novel contribute to an understanding of
sanity and of madness? What are some other instances of madness in the novel?
Why is this significant? Explain.


Answer:
In this chapter sanity is realized as a relative term. Solely defined by the society in which it is being evaluated. We see this with the followers of both Jack and Ralph. The boys in jack's tribe justify their violence because they see Ralph as a monster and Ralph decides to run thinking it will keep himself sane and from panicking. In our society we would see Ralph as the sane one because of his rational decisions but in their's since it is a different lifestyle they see it differently. A depiction of madness is when one of the littluns claims he has seen a beast (Golding 53-55). This is significant because it shows the events that occur to lead to such madness and how it is classified by them and then to us. They may not see it as madness because they are clouded by what is real by being on this isolated island. However, to us as outsiders we can clearly see the process of each of them slowly losing their minds while trying to survive in this isolated.

Posted by: Mekayla Davila at April 12, 2015 05:42 PM

Lyndsey Pospisil, Annie Hays, Dalton Hart
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 CA01 The Contemporary World View
12 April 2015
Chapter 4 Summary- Lord of the Flies
The characters that are present in Chapter 4 of Lord of the Flies include all characters previously introduced in other chapters. These characters include Piggy, Ralph, Simon, Jack, Roger, Maurice, and the young boys. Piggy, Simon, Ralph, and Jack are dynamic characters, whereas Roger, Maurice, and the young boys seem to be flat characters. There are no new characters introduced in this chapter. This chapter is told in the third person omniscient point of view. The readers know the thoughts and feelings of all characters. The setting of this chapter remains the same as the previous chapters, a deserted island in the pacific. This island is jungle like and tropical with mountains and vegetation. The setting deals with the present life of the protagonist, Ralph. The spaces used in this chapter are all public spaces. This chapter has conflicts that deal with man vs. man and conflicts that deal with man vs. nature. The man vs. man conflict that can be found in Chapter 4 deals with the conflict between Ralph and Jack, who do not see eye to eye. In addition to this conflict, there is also the conflict of man vs. nature that each boy on the island ultimately has to face. The novel mentions that, for example, the mornings are cool, the afternoon unbearably hot, and the evenings comfortable. This an example of just one the issues nature causes for the boys in this novel. There does not seem to be any new themes that emerge in this chapter. The themes that continue from previous chapters include the themes of survival and teamwork. The boys, as a whole group, need to work together to survive on the island. Jack and the hunters are responsible for having the signal fire always burning, in hopes to be found by a plane or ship. In this chapter, as a ship can be seen in the distance, the boys realize that the signal fire is out, showing a lack of teamwork and a shared feeling of no hope for survival. A symbol that emerges in this chapter is the pigs head. Jack and his hunters return from the jungle with a pig head on a spear. This becomes an important symbol in later chapters. Some reoccurring symbols that can be found in this chapter include the beast, the conch shell, and Piggy’s glasses. There does not seem to be any obvious irony or epiphanies in this chapter.

Posted by: Lyndsey Pospisil at April 12, 2015 07:29 PM

Lyndsey Pospisil
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 CA01 The Contemporary World Vie
12 April 12, 2015

Question Chapter 6: What are Jack’s and Ralph’s priorities in relation to what the boys should do about the beast? What’s Jack’s main goal? What’s Ralph’s main goal? Why is this significant?

Answer: Jack and Ralph have different priorities in relation to what the boys should do about the beast. Jack wants to grab the other hunters, a few spears, and head out to find and conquer the beast. While at the assembly, right after the twins claim to have spotted the beast, Jack states, “Let’s be moving… we’re wasting time” (Golding 144). In contrast to Jack’s priorities, Ralph is more concerned with keeping the signal fire bright in hopes of being rescued. The text states that Ralph turned to the assembly and said, “don’t you all want to be rescued… I said before, the fire is the main thing… Now the fire must be out… Hasn’t anyone got any sense? We’ve got to relight that fire” (Golding 144). This difference in priorities in relation to what the boys should do about the beast is significant because it shows the difference in character between Ralph and Jack. This difference is also significant because it shows how the two boys continue to butt heads and not see eye to eye on the island.

Posted by: Lyndsey Pospisil at April 12, 2015 07:51 PM

"There isn't anyone to help you. Only me. and I'm the Beast." (Golding 132)

Question: When Simon sees the Lord of the Flies, Golding writes that his “gaze was held by that ancient inescapable recognition.” What recognition is Golding referring to? Why is this significant? Explain.

Answer: The Lord of the Flies exists as an entity outside of the novel. In 2 Kings 1 2-3, the god of Ekron is referred to as "Baal-Zebub", which translated from Hebrew, means "Lord of the Flies". When Simon meets the head on a stick, he is met with an ancient, unknown force. It is that of a demon. He worms his way into Simon's mind with a powerful statement: "Fancy thinking the Beast was something that you could hunt and kill!" (Golding 133) It shows him the inhumanity that is present in all of them and overwhelms him, causing him to faint.

Posted by: Glen Pringle at April 12, 2015 10:10 PM

Annie Hays
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary Worldview CA01
13 April 2015

Question: What was the main conflict in the novel, at the end of chapter five? How has the main conflict shifted in chapter six? Why is this shift in conflict so important? Explain.

Answer: At the end of chapter five, the children have worked themselves into a frenzy about whether or not monsters live on the island. This conflict has been going on for awhile, but now the kids seem to be getting more homesick than ever, and it is dark, so their fears are magnified (Golding 75). The other issue is that Jack is actively trying to sabotage Ralph as chief. Jack yells at Ralph, "'And you shut up! Who are you, anyway? Sitting there telling people what to do. You can't hunt, you can't sing--'" (79)! The only reason anything has been getting done on the island is because of Ralph's leadership, so if he loses his authority everything will fall apart. Piggy is especially concerned that he will be hurt if Jack takes over since, "if [Ralph] stand[s] out of the way, [Jack] would hurt the next thing, [Piggy]" (Golding 81).

The conflict at the end of chapter six is between having fun on the island and getting rescued. Jack seems to have deferred to Ralph for the moment since he was afraid to look for the beast (Golding 92). However, when Jack came up with the idea for a fort, the kids would rather build the fort than find the beast and relight the signal fire (95). Ralph keeps telling the boys the signal fire is, "all we've got" (94). If that fire goes out, they will never be seen by ships. But Jack and the boys just want to have fun. They could care less about being found since they have food and games. This will be a major problem later in the story if the fire keeps going out and they keep missing ships. It does not matter who the leader is if they are never found.

Posted by: Annie Hays at April 13, 2015 11:57 AM

Kenna Dieffenwierth, Racheljoy Capitola, and Craig Graves
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 - Contemporary World View CA01
12 April 2015

Summary: "Huts on the Beach:" In chapter 3 of Lord of the Flies, the round characters are Jack, Ralph, and Simon. These boys had already been introduced in prior chapters. The main protagonist is Ralph. Simon is his ally. Jack's loyalties are still in questions. He is currently an ally, but his thirst for power makes him Ralph's rival and a potential troublemaker. The perspective of this chapter is third person omniscient. The setting is the present on the island in the jungle and on the beach. The beach is public, while the jungle is both public and private. The chapter begins with Jack obsessively trying to track down a pig. He fails to spear the pig and then makes his way to the beach where Ralph and Simon are building a shelter. Ralph expressed frustration that no one would work except for him and Simon. Jack took offense because he viewed his hunt as valuable work even though he was failing to produce results. This lead to an argument over what was more important: meat or shelter. The argument cooled down, and they began to talk about how the island was not a good island. They talked about maintaining the fire and being rescued before Jack went back to obsessing over hunting pigs again. During this time, Simon slipped away into the jungle to be alone. A continuing conflict is man vs. nature with the boys struggling to survive and Jack's obsession with hunting the pig. Another conflict is man vs. man. This is seen in Ralph struggling to get the boys to work and arguing about priorities with Jack. A primary theme is the hunt. The boys hunt while feeling hunted themselves. "But you can feel as if you're not hunting, but--being hunted, as if something's behind you all the time in the jungle" (Golding 53). Some other themes include: politics, power, and hope. Politics and power deal with the attempt to control the group and the power struggle between Ralph and Jack. The fire gives hope of rescue to Ralph. The pig gives hope of meat and survival to Jack. The pig is also symbolic of the animalistic nature within the boys. The mood is tense with the arguing and conflicts. Ralph has an epiphany that people are not who he thought they were and that only one person would really help him.

Posted by: Kenna Dieffenwierth at April 13, 2015 12:10 PM


Kenna Dieffenwierth
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 - Contemporary World View CA01
13 April 2015

Question: 35.CHAPTER SEVEN: Briefly describe the incident in which Ralph wounds the boar. What emotions does Ralph feel during and after this incident? Why is this significant? Explain.

Answer: When he first hit the boar, "Ralph was full of fright and apprehension and pride" (Golding 113). He began to think that hunting was not so bad after all because of how good it made him feel and how he earned more respect with all of the hunting boys except for Jack (Golding 114). The boys became distracted with Jack's wound so Ralph began to whine for their attention again. When Roger snarled at him, they began to act out the boar hunt with Roger as the boar. Ralph was caught up in the murderous energy of the mob and was compelled to kill Roger like a pig as the others held him down. He hesitated and Jack pretended to finish the kill (Golding 114-115). Ralph then felt uneasy at what might have occurred and the other boys talked of having a proper mock pig kill with a pretend pig (Golding 115). This scene was significant because it was foreshadowing for Simon's murder. It also helped Ralph to realize the danger of mob mentality and the beast within his own soul. The group originally targeted their murderous intent toward the pig, but now it was shifting to one another. They even joked about sacrificing a "littlun" to satisfy their blood lust.
"You want a real pig,' said Robert, still caressing his rump, 'because you've got to kill him.'
'Use a littlun,' said Jack, and everybody laughed" (Golding 115).

Posted by: Kenna Dieffenwierth at April 13, 2015 02:01 PM

Dalton Hart
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351: The Contemporary World View
13 April 2015

Question: How is there a conflict between Jack, Ralph, and Piggy on page 91? Cite a passage that reflects each of their points of view. (If you have a different edition of the book, the conflict takes place during the meeting when Ralph, Jack, and Piggy express their different opinions/views). Why is this significant? Explain.
Answer: While meeting with the whole group, Jack, Ralph, and Piggy all discuss the idea of how to best keep the group morale up and keep fear out of the littluns’ minds. Ralph’s belief is that any fear is best conquered through physical prowess, asking the group, “Am I a hunter or am I not?” (Golding 91). This shows Ralph’s belief that the best way to go about things is to physically dominate anything; exhibiting his savage attitude. Piggy, on the other hand, believes that things should be dealt with in a more civilized fashion, claiming, “Life… is scientific, that’s what it is,” (Golding 92). This shows that unlike Ralph, Piggy views the world in a more methodical and scientific approach. Jack, the leader of the group, is less focused on worrying about a “beast” and is more concerned with being saved, constantly claiming that the fire must be kept at all times. This conflict between the three shows that the group is slowly beginning to break apart because of the different ways that each views the world. All three boys bring a valuable asset to the table, but if they can’t work together, they are doomed to fail, and this conflict seems to be the beginning of the group’s descent.

Posted by: Dalton Hart at April 13, 2015 02:36 PM

Rachel Cunio
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary Worldview CA01
13 April 2015

Question: What’s occurring “at ten miles’ height” above the island? According to Golding, what’s the sign given to the boys from the world of grownups? What is the deeper meaning of this sign? Try to ascertain what it could symbolize/represent. Why is this significant? Explain.

Answer: When the twins fall asleep while they are supposed to be attending to the fire, a battle takes place in the air above the island. The twins are woken up and were “terrified” (Golding 99) to see what they thought was “the beast” (Golding 100). The sign that “came down from the world of grownups” (Golding 96), was a dead man in a parachute with “dangling limbs” (Golding 96). This sign is significant because it reflects that the war that the boys were evacuated from is still going on and therefore the world is not yet ready to have the boys returned to it. This is significant because while the world is indeed in war, the boys on the island are also becoming increasingly savage, creating their own war zone even in their isolation, reflecting the inevitability of savagery in the human condition.

Posted by: Rachel Cunio at April 13, 2015 03:16 PM

Craig Graves
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary World View CA01
13 April 2015

Question #39
CHAPTER EIGHT: When Simon’s talking to the Lord of the Flies, it says, “‘Fancy thinking the Beast was something you could hunt and kill. . . You knew, didn’t you? I’m a part of you? Close, close, close! I’m the reason why it’s no go? Why things are the way they are” (143). What’s the importance of this passage? Make an educated guess as to what the beast might be. Why is this significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer:
The beast is the Lord of the Flies, otherwise called Beelzebub. In this passage, Beelzebub is revealing to Simon that the problems the boys are facing are the results of their own inner demons. He chides Simon by saying, “I’m a part of you; close, close, close! (Golding 143).” This means that no matter what the boys would try to do, be it kill the beast or seek rescue from the island, they will be unable to because their own follies would get in the way. In the previous chapters, we find out that Jack and his hunters are becoming more blood-crazed for meat and are shirking their duties at maintaining the signal fire. The younger boys are getting led astray and are conflicted over what they want more: fun and freedom or rescue. Ralph and Piggy are trying to maintain some kind of order to better their chances at being rescued, but they are being antagonized for it. All of these examples of turmoil arise from the boys’ own decisions and actions, not the beast that they constantly blame. But, as the Lord of the Flies says, he is the beast and he is a part of them. This means that the boys are self-destructing and pushing blame elsewhere. While the other boys are unaware of their own destruction, Simon is aware, for the most part, about what is happening and tries to reach a stasis of logic by saying “pig’s head on a stick (Golding 143)” when referring to Beelzebub. During his conversation with the Lord of the Flies, however, Simon is slowly becoming ill as he seems to be having issues fully communicating and staying awake. Ultimately, he collapses only to awake dazed and with a nosebleed. This passage is also significant because it sets into motion Simon’s death at the hands of the crazed tribe of hunters. They mistake him for the beast and slaughter him like a pig, just like the pig on the stake.

Posted by: Craig Graves at April 13, 2015 03:22 PM

Glen Pringle
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary World View CA01
13 April 2015

"I'm not going to play any longer. Not with you." (Golding 127)

What does Ralph say that angers Jack? How does Jack express his anger? How does Jack respond to his failure to get support from the group, and what does this response suggest about the boys' future? Why is this significant? Explain.

When Jack calls a meeting on the beach to discuss the monster in their midst, he tries to seize the leadership role from Ralph. When Ralph asks Jack who called the meeting, "Jack turned, red in the face, his chin sunk back." (Golding 127) When he asks the group for his support, he is rebuffed by them. Tears streaming down his face, he runs into the jungle. This suggests that the boys future is run off of emotions, and not based of reason. Jack will undoubtedly want to take his revenge on Ralph.

Posted by: Glen Pringle and Jacob Gates at April 13, 2015 04:32 PM

Stephen Pinol and Rachel Cunio
Dr. Hobbs
HON-351 The Contemporary World View CA01
13 April 2015

Question: Who goes with Ralph and Jack to the top of the mountain? Highlight where they see the supposed beast. What is their reaction? What is the importance of their discovery? Explain.

Answer: Everyone goes to the top of the mountain except for Piggy and the little ones. The beast was “like a great ape … sitting asleep with its head between its knees.” When they see the beast, they were horrified and hurried down the mountain to warn the rest of the group. The importance of the discovery is that they think it proves that Jack is right about the beast. In addition, having the boys think that the beast is real proves that their savage instincts have taken over their minds and is running their imagination.

Posted by: Stephen Pinol at April 13, 2015 04:36 PM

Dalton Hart, Annie Hayes, Craig Graves
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351: The Contemporary World View
13 April 2015

Question: What’s the mood like during Jack’s first meeting as chief of his own group? What does Jack decide to leave for the beast? What’s the importance of this? Explain.

Answer: During the first meeting of Jack’s new group, where Jack has assumed the role of chief, the mood is very focused within them. Before speaking, Golding writes of the mood, “[Jack] sized them up. Each of them wore the remains of a black cap and ages ago they had stood in two demure rows and their voices had been the song of angels” (Golding 151). The whole group has decided that hunting is the most necessary thing on the island and they have fully committed themselves to this under Jack’s rule. The group has also fully committed themselves to listening to Jack’s commands. Jack decides to leave the beast a pig’s head. This becomes important because it is the group’s first kill and they are giving an offering to the beast in the hopes that it holds them in higher regards than the others on the island.

Posted by: Dalton Hart, Annie Hayes, Craig Graves at April 13, 2015 04:48 PM

Dalton Hart
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351: The Contemporary World View
15 April 2015

Question: Why do you think Roger pushes the rock off the cliff? Why is this significant? Explain.

Answer: Roger pushes the rock off the cliff in an attempt to kill Piggy. Golding writes, “The rock struck Piggy a glancing blow from chin to knee; the conch exploded into a thousand white fragments and ceased to exist,” showing that Roger had succeeded in his attempt to kill Piggy, but while doing so he also destroyed the conch (Golding 209). This scene becomes important because it shows Jack’s tribe, consisting now of almost every boy on the island, has turned its back on any sense of civilization and has reverted to the primeval and savage tactics that Roger and Jack have displayed throughout the novel. This scene also becomes significant because it shows that Ralph is now isolated on the island. Losing Piggy and the two boys that were with them to Jack’s tribe has left Ralph alone on the island with no true chance of being saved.

Posted by: Dalton Hart at April 14, 2015 01:24 PM

Madison Brunk & Mekayla Davila
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 The Contemporary World View CA01
12 April 2015

Question: How does Piggy show “intellectual daring”? Why is this so
significant to the boys? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page
numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own
words.

Answer: Shortly after the boys see what they believe is the beast, the group factions off leaving the main group in crisis. Without Jack and the Hunters, Ralph feels helpless and without a plan, which leaves Piggy to have the "intellectual daring to suggest moving the fire from the mountain" (Golding, 115). This is important because Piggy acts as the rational and logical one of the group, the only boy that maintains a sense of civilization and logic. He fights for his survival, unlike Ralph and Jack, with logic and rationality.

Posted by: Madison Brunk at April 14, 2015 09:52 PM

Mekayla Davila
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary World View CA01
15 April 2015

Question:
Why does Ralph think that the boy he sees is “not Bill”? Why is this significant? Explain.

Answer:
Ralph claims this is “not Bill” anymore because the boy he sees is not a savage whose image was no longer than of a boy in shorts and a shirt (Golding, 183). This is significant because it truly shows how the isolation has changed the boys. They have become completely different beings with Ralph being the only sane one. He hasn’t fallen into the savageness of the others. The fact that he is able to tell how far off Bill has gone proves that Ralph has not let that lifestyle get to him like the others.

Posted by: Mekayla Davila at April 15, 2015 11:32 AM

Annie Hays
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary Worldview CA01
15 April 2015

Question: Identify both the purpose and the effect of Jack’s generosity with the meat he and the hunters obtained. What might his decision to give meat to even Ralph and Piggy be meant to show? Why is this significant? Explain.

Answer: Jack invited everyone on the island to the feast in order to sway everyone to his side. Jack gave the boys meat, dancing, and supposed protection from the beast (Golding 134). After everyone had eaten, Jack asked, "Who's going to join my tribe" (134)? Jack's whole body and demeanor pulse with power and authority; even Piggy and Ralph feel swayed. But Jack also tears down Ralph's authority by insinuating the conch has no power, and since Jack gave everyone the meat he holds the real power (134). Now everyone wants to join Jack's fun, safe new tribe.

Posted by: Annie Hays at April 15, 2015 11:43 AM

Madison Brunk
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 The Contemporary World View CA01
15 April 2015

Question: What does Jack do that causes Roger to have doubts about his
leadership? Why is this significant? Explain

Answer: Since beginning his role as chief of his tribe, Jack has become sadistic and tyrannical, planning the violence of those that enter his camp and tieing up an innocent boy that has joined his tribe. Roger, a cruel older boy, begins questioning the "irresponsible authority" that is in place (Golding, 142). This is significant because the leadership held by Jack is being doubted and lost, even by those closest to him.

Posted by: Madison Brunk at April 15, 2015 02:05 PM

Bethanee Victoria Reynolds
HON 351 The Contemporary World View CA01
Dr. Hobbs
8 April 2015

Question:
What do Piggy, Simon, and the littlun with the birthmark have in common?
Answer:
Piggy, Simon and the littlun with the birthmark are three characters that have defects. “The fat boy stood by him, breathing hard. ‘My auntie told me not to run,’ he explained, ‘on account of my asthma.’”(Golding, The Lord of The Flies, page 9) This quote shows that Piggy’s defect is that he is overweight, out of shape, and has asthma. “ Then one of the boys flopped on his face in the sand…’he’s always throwing a faint’ said Merridew.”(Golding, The Lord of the Flies, page 19) This quote is about Simon. Simon’s defect or flaw is that he faints often. “Now that the pallor of his faint was over he was a skinny, vivid little boy…” (Golding, The Lord of the Flies, page 22) Simon was also very skinny and week looking. “He was a shrimp of a boy, about six years old, and one side of his face was blotted out by a mulberry-colored birthmark.” The littlun with the birthmark’s defect is his size and birthmark. He is very shy, timid, and small in size and very easy to pick on. He also has a very distinctive birthmark that makes him look weird. Besides their own person, defects these character are similar because they are easy targets for bullying and exclusion. They are the outcast of this little society that is forming. They are the weaklings and the ones that are easily targeted.

Posted by: Bethanee Reynolds at April 15, 2015 02:57 PM

Stephen Pinol
Dr. Hobbs
HON-351 The Contemporary World View Ca01
15 April 2015

Question: How do the biguns seem to define a “proper chief”? What does this criterion suggest about human psychology? Why is this significant?

Answer: They seem to define a “proper chief” by showing that one must rule with fear. The chief takes charge and gives orders to beat those that don’t follow the rules or if he just feels like doing it for no reason. For example, he beat Wilfred but never had a proper reason why. This suggests that they have all become savages and simply act on fear of getting hurt. This is significant because it shows how weak this side is. If the leader is taken out, then the rest of the faction is going to fall and there is no morale to keep it going forward.

Posted by: Stephen Pinol at April 15, 2015 02:59 PM

Stephen Pinol
Dr. Hobbs
HON-351 The Contemporary World View
15 April 2015

Question: Why is Ralph elected chief? Why is this significant? Explain.

Answer: While the novel does not give an explicit reason for why Ralph is made the leader, we can make a few educated guesses. First, we can say that Ralph is the first one who shows leadership qualities. We can see this when he urges people to build huts and the like, while the other boys are simply playing. Second, we can say that Ralph is also the one with the best ideas. For example, it is his idea to make a fire, so that ships that pass by can rescue them. Ralph also has the conch that brought everyone together in the first place and is liked by the group.

Posted by: Stephen Pinol at April 15, 2015 03:03 PM

Rachel Cunio
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary Worldview CA01
15 April 2015

Question: Where does Ralph decide to hide? What does this hiding place symbolize? Why is this significant? Explain.

Answer: Ralph hides “in a covert” (Golding 188) in the jungle. Because he is hiding in the untamed jungle, the hiding place symbolizes everything he is hiding from (primarily the savagery of Jack and the other boys), lending to the irony of the situation. The hiding place is also significant because it causes Ralph to become more like a savage (an consequently more like Jack) because “his hair was full of dirt” and “he was scratched and bruised” (Golding 188), just like Jack and the other boys in their carelessness, which is exactly what Ralph was trying to avoid all along.

Posted by: Rachel Cunio at April 15, 2015 03:08 PM


Kenna Dieffenwierth and Racheljoy Capitola
Dr. Hobbs
Hon 351: The Contemporary World View
4/15/15

Question: 43.CHAPTER EIGHT: For what reason did the biguns wait until the other boys were occupied to leave instead of supporting Jack’s challenge during the meeting? Why is this significant? Explain.

Answer: "I seen them stealing off when we was gathering wood. They went that way. The same way he went himself" (Golding 131). They most likely wished to avoid major conflict, and felt that sneaking away would be easier. Ralph and Jack could get pretty heated in their arguments. If they snuck away, they could leave without Ralph or the others trying to stop them.
Many of the other boys were also loyal to Jack because they were his hunters, and, before the island, Jack had been their choir leader. They were accustomed to following his lead and his mission appealed to them. Jack wanted to hunt, have fun, and truly live on the island. This appealed to the older boys more than Ralph's scheduled work with the goal of being rescued (Golding 128-130). The older boys had never really pulled their weight in prior chapters. They mostly hunted without success and played, while Ralph and Simon did the bulk of the chores. Whenever Ralph tried to crack down on them, they would resist and were irritated. However, the boys sneaking away in opposed to openly supporting Jack in the meeting, showed that they still recognized Ralph's authority.

Posted by: Kenna Dieffenwierth at April 15, 2015 03:14 PM

Glen Pringle
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary Worldview CA01
15 April 2015

"See? I told you— he’s dangerous.” (Golding 279)

Question: What foolish method do the boys use to ensure that they find Ralph? What does this decision suggest about the power of hatred and violence versus the power of reason? Why is this significant? Explain.

Answer: In Lord of the Flies, the savages on the island use fire to try and force Ralph out of his hiding position. "Smoke was seeping through the branches in white and yellow wisps, the patch of blue sky overhead turned to the color of a storm cloud, and then the smoke billowed round him." (Golding 280) This is ironic, because they had been using fire before as a symbol of civilization through a signal fire. Now, it is a tool of the savages, utilized to flush out prey from the underbrush. Hatred has overtaken reason.

Posted by: Glen Pringle at April 15, 2015 03:17 PM

Craig Graves
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary World View CA01
15 April 2015

Question 53
CHAPTER TEN: How do Ralph and Piggy view Simon’s death? How does each of them react to it? Why does Ralph laugh as he says, “I got the conch,” and why does Piggy react so strongly to his laughter? What explanations do they have for their behavior, and what excuses do they come up with? What do these reactions show about them and about human nature? Why is this significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer:
Both Ralph and Piggy are ashamed of the roles they played in Simon’s death to the point that neither of them wants to talk about the specifics in detail. Both refer to it vaguely and try to get their story straight. At first, Ralph calls the act murder, but then he and Piggy decide it was an accident. Of the two, Ralph feels more guilty than Piggy. Piggy tries to attribute the act to their fear, but Ralph says “I wasn’t scared; I was—I don’t know what I was (Golding 156).” That phrase shows how conflicted Ralph feels for Simon’s death being an accident or murder. Earlier, when Ralph laughs about having the conch, he is laughing at the empty power that it once had. The conch was once the symbol of power on the island for the boys, but that didn’t stop them from turning on each other. Ralph is laughing because the conch is a joke because the society he tried to form with it fell apart. Piggy’s reaction to this laughter shows how he still looks to Ralph for guidance and to lead those left behind. It is because of this that he is so emphatic that he and Ralph were not fully involved with what happened to Simon. If those left with Ralph thought that he was involved with Simon’s death, then they might turn on him, and there would be no hope of them ever getting rescued. Ralph is like a figurehead to the boys on the beach of the society that they originally came from and the society that they tried to keep afloat on the deserted island. This interaction shows how humans try to push themselves away from the blame of a major event. Neither Ralph nor Piggy wants to be involved in Simon's death, even though they both were. This is significant because it gives more information as to how the society was crumbling around them.

Posted by: Craig Graves at April 15, 2015 03:19 PM

Kenna DieffenwierthDr. Hobbs
Hon 351: The Contemporary World View
4/15/15

Question: 64.CHAPTER ELEVEN: How is the destruction of the conch symbolically significant? Explain.

Answer: The conch itself represented many things for the boys: order, unity, civilization, power, and authority. "The rock struck Piggy a glancing blow from chin to knee; the conch exploded into a thousand white fragments and ceased to exist" (Golding 181). The fact that the destruction of the conch coincided with Piggy's death, seemed to represent the death of reason and civilization. The boys were now free to fully give in to their carnal desires without being reminded of the rules and their past in civilization. In addition, Jack proceeded to jump around yelling at Ralph that the breaking of the conch was proof that he no longer had a tribe (Golding 181). Ralph had fallen. The old order was completely destroyed and replaced with a new order. He lost the symbol of his authority and his strongest supporter all at once. The other boys no longer held any respect for Ralph. They no longer recognized his power (Golding 181-182).

Posted by: Kenna Dieffenwierth at April 15, 2015 03:24 PM

Jacob Gates
Dr. Hobbs
Contemporary Worldview HON 323 CA014
15 April 2014

Lord of the Flies
12.) CHAPTER ELEVEN: At the end of this chapter, Roger pushes Jack aside to descend on the bound twins “as one who wielded a nameless authority.” Focusing on this quotation, discuss Roger’s actions in this chapter in relation to Jack’s power and political system. Why is this significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

This part is significant because it means that Roger has fully taken on the role as Jack’s “enforcer”. It could be argued that Roger holds a much greater degree of power than Jack, but Jack has the intelligence and the ability to manipulate others enough to wear Roger’s strength and Bloodlust are not something that Jack fears, but something that Jack uses to manipulate others.

Posted by: Jacob Gates at April 15, 2015 03:27 PM

Stephen and Jake
Dr. Hobbs
HON-351 The Contemporary World View
15 April 2015

Question: What is the role of religion in the lives of the boys? Is their “religion” based on Christianity, or does it seem more pagan? Explain.

Answer: Symbolism within the novel is similar to that of Christianity. For example, the title is “The Lord of the flies,” which in this religion is Satan in the Bible. This shows that there are ideas of Christianity throughout the novel but there actions are more pagan. Although there would still be murder and a struggle for power even if they were “Christians,” the fact that they do sacrifices and putting pigs on a stick is paganistic. Dancing around the fire and chanting is also another example of paganism. This type of behavior is done through witchcraft and other pagan religions that don’t match with Christianity.

Posted by: Stephen Pinol at April 15, 2015 04:36 PM

Lyndsey Pospisil
Bethanee Reynolds
HON 351 The Contemporary World View CA01
Dr. Hobbs
15 April 2015

Question:
Similarly—why does it matter that these are kids? Would adults in the same situation act any differently? Explain.

Answer:
It matters that the characters are kids because one of the themes of the book is civilization vs. savagery, and kids because they are still in the stage of learning social acceptability it is easier for a child to give into or adapt to primal instinct. For the most part adults are cultured into society and have years and years of learning what is acceptable in civilization and there are very few primordial instincts that adults give in to it would take a lot longer and more strenuous circumstances for adults to resort fully to their primal instincts of savagery. Adults crave civilization whereas children what chaos and freedom. In this situation, adults would tend to be more understanding and reasonable. In the book the only child that holds on to their civility longest is Piggy, this happens because Piggy has experienced more in his life than the others have. Piggy had to deal with the loss of his parents and being an orphan living with his aunt; he had to deal with bullying, and he had to deal with his health problems. All of those things that piggy had to deal with helped him hold on to his civility because he had more adult like experience at a young age that the other boys had.

Posted by: Bethanee Reynolds & Lyndsey Pospisil at April 15, 2015 04:47 PM


Glen Pringle and Rachel Cunio
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary Worldview CA01
15 April 2015

"Sucks to your auntie!" (Golding 11)

Question: Only one female voice is presented (very briefly, and in recap) in this novel, that of Piggy’s aunt. Would this story have been different in any important ways if there had been both boys and girls on the island? In other words, is this a story about the capacity of humans for violence, or is it a story about the male capacity for violence? Or is there simply not enough evidence to make an argument either way? Explain.

Answer: In Lord of the Flies, Piggy's auntie is the sole female voice presented in the novel, and only for a brief moment. The nurturing aspects of her character are the only aspects in the novel, and her concern carries forward with Piggy's thinking. "My auntie told me not to run..." (Golding 7) While violence is utterly prevalent in the novel, it is not about male violence. Golding did not include women in the novel because he did not want sexual tension to be a theme in the work.

Posted by: Glen Pringle and Rachel Cunio at April 15, 2015 04:51 PM

Madison Brunk
Mekayla Davila
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary World View CA01
18 April 2015

Question: Why does Golding end Lord of the Flies with the rescue of the boys? Does this
ending change the realistic nature of the novel? Explain.

Answer: Golding ends with the rescue of the boys to convey irony rather than realism. While it is unlikely that salvation would come so close to complete destruction and Ralph's demise, it comes when savagery has broken out. Ralph, who had been trying to construct order and logic into building a fire is defeated. However, the chaotic fire and hunt for Ralph is what ultimately saves them. The naval guards also, ironically and hypocritically, cast judgment on the boys, and felt "moved and a little embarrassed"(Golding, 182) by what had occurred on that island, despite their significant role in mass violence and war.

Posted by: Madison Brunk at April 18, 2015 11:35 PM

Racheljoy Capitola & Kenna Dieffenwierth
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary Worldview CA01
20 April 2015

81. Discuss the extensive use of symbolism in the novel. Examples of important symbols are the conch, the fire, the beast, Piggy’s glasses, and the “lord of the flies,” as well as Piggy, Ralph, Simon, and Jack themselves. Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

In Golding’s “Lord of the Flies,” symbolism is used to represent universal truths in a theoretical, uncontrolled setting where society’s laws are obsolete. The conch is a symbol that represents authority in the boys’ society and calls for discussion: “Piggy knelt by him, one hand on the great shell, listening and interpreting to the assembly.” (35) The fire represent destruction (because it can burn down the boat-shaped island) and safety. The beast represent fear since it is first scene in the boys’ nightmares and eventually grows into a myth: “Fear, beasts, no general agreement that the fire was all-important.” (88) Piggy’s glasses represent intellectualism and clarity; once the glasses are broken, all sense of logic is lost in the society. The “lord of the flies” is a pig head spear on a stick; he is the physical manifestation of the beast. Piggy is the intellectual representation of society, Ralph is the humanistic representation of society, Simon is the innately moral and “good” representation of society, and Jack is the savage and wild representation of society.

Posted by: Racheljoy Capitola at April 20, 2015 10:32 PM

Jasmine Daniels
Dr. Hobbs
Hon 351 Contemporary World View CA02
6 April 2016

Question #4: Why is Ralph elected chief? Why is this significant? Explain.

Ralph is elected to be chief because of his age, appearance, and the fact that he blew the conch. For instance, the text states that, “there was a stillness about Ralph as he sat that marked him out: there was his size, and attractive appearance; and most obscurely, yet most powerfully, there was the conch. The being that had blown that, had sat waiting for them on the platform with the delicate thing balanced on his knees, was set apart.” (Golding 22) This is significant because the conch was used to bring everyone together after the crash. In addition, the conch is used as a symbol for when a particular person is allowed to talk over the others.

Question #15: How do they start the fire? Why is this significant? Explain.

At first no one knew how to start the fire until Jack thought of the idea of using Piggy’s glasses to reflect the sun. The text states that, “Ralph moved the lenses back and forth, this way and that, till a glossy white image of the declining sun lay on a piece of rotten wood. Almost at once a thin trickle of smoke rose up and made him cough. Jack knelt too and blew gently, so that the smoke drifted away, thickening, and a tiny flame appeared.” (Golding 41) This is significant because it showed that even Piggy could be useful at times. It also shows the intelligence level of the boys in being able to think of using his glasses.

Posted by: Jasmine Daniels at April 6, 2016 11:47 AM

Andrew Thriffiley
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 The Contemporary World View CA02
6 April 2016

Question:
8.) How is Jack presented to the reader? Why is this significant?
19.) Why does Simon go to the bower? Why is this significant?

Answer:
8.) Jack is presented to the reader as a boy with control issues, and his self-esteem is relatively low he just tries not to show it. In the beginning, when Jack first comes in contact with Piggy he continues to make fun of him, so he can feel stronger and put down Piggy. An excellent example of Jack's attitude is summoned up when the boys are talking about fishing. Piggy says, "I can't swim. I wasn't allowed. My asthma" (Golding 13). Jack immediately replies, "Sucks to your ass-mar." (Golding 13). This shows that Jack doesn't care for others nor does he respect his peers when it comes to sensitive issues. This is significant because the way Jack acts now will probably foreshadow who he will be at the end of the novel to all of the boys.

19.) Simon goes to the bower in the story, so he can be away from all the other guys and have some alone time. This can be seen when he gets in the bower. "Holding his breath, he cocked a critical ear at the sounds of the island." (Golding 57). This shows that Simon was one to enjoy his surroundings and not get caught up in all of the problems that the other guys have. He does what he is supposed to by getting food for everyone, but he also makes sure to have time for himself and be alone. This is significant because it says a lot about Simon being the mature boy out of everyone else in the group.

Posted by: Andrew Thriffiley at April 6, 2016 02:30 PM

Dominique Bauer
Dr. Hobbs
HON – 351 The Contemporary Worldview CA02
6 April 2016
Question 18: What two groups with different goals are emerging? Why is this significant? Explain.
Answer: The two groups that are forming are those that want to try to remain as close to civilized as possible, and then there are those who want to just have fun and be less civilized. Those primarily in the first group are Piggy, Ralph, and Simon, and those in the latter group consist of Jack and just about everyone else. This is demonstrated by Ralph’s comment to Jack that the littluns are “hopeless [. . . and t]he older ones aren’t much better [. . .] all day [he’d] been working with Simon [on shelters, everyone else is] off bathing, or eating, or playing (Golding 50). This is significant because it starts to show a split in everyone on this island, which can ultimately affect his or her chances of survival and rescue.
Question 21: Why does Roger, throwing stones at the littluns, aim just to miss? Why is this significant? Explain.
Answer: Roger aims just to miss because he has bully like tendencies. In addition, there is no one on the island telling him not to, and there is no real punishment for him doing so. However, Roger does not hit the children because “round the squatting child was the protection of parents and school and policemen and the law [. . . and his] arm was conditioned by a civilization that knew nothing of him and was in ruins” (Golding 62). In other words, Roger wants to incite fear in the littluns, but he cannot bring himself to because of the conditioning that he had while growing up in a civilization. This is significant because it shows how much of an impact raising has had on these children.

Posted by: Dominique Bauer at April 6, 2016 03:12 PM

Grace Lederer
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 CA02 The Contemporary World View
6 April 2016
Question 1) Why is the chapter titled “The Sound of the Shell’? Why is this significant?
The chapter is titled “The Sound of the Shell” because Ralph and Piggy find a conch shell and Ralph blows into, summoning any others on the island to come forward. Although it was Piggy who knew the significance of the shell and had the idea of having a meeting, Ralph is ultimately chosen to be the leader of the newly gathered group. His collected demeanor and his action of blowing the shell made the others trust him as there was a “a stillness about ralph as he sat that marked him out: there was his size, and his attractive appearance, and most obscurely, and yet most powerfully, there was the conch,” (Golding 22).
This happening is significant because it shows a flaw in human nature that although Piggy is probably the smartest of the bunch, the group picks ralph instead. This could be foreshadowing of things that will go wrong later in the book.
Question 14) What is the significance of the chapter’s title “Fire on the Mountain”?
The chapter is titled “Fire on the Mountain because Ralph declares in the first meeting of the boys that they need to produce a fire on top of the mountain to send up smoke as an alert of their presence if anyone is near enough to see them. Once the boys set the fire, keeping, “a flame flying on the mountain was the immediate end and no one looked further,” (Golding 41).
This scene is significant because again, it shows that the group of boys is being short-sighted in their decisions and is foreshadowing that things may go wrong later.

Posted by: Grace Lederer at April 6, 2016 03:17 PM

Karra and Dominique
Dr. Hobbs
HON – 351 The Contemporary Worldview
6 April 2016
Questions: Using The Republic as theory, how is this society being formed? What are the building blocks/starting points? What new rules are introduced? How does any of this match with Plato? Huxley? Orwell? Bradbury?
Answers Chapter 3: In this chapter, the conflicts between the two main groups begin to develop. This is seen through the conversation between Jack and Ralph, in which it is mentioned, “you remember the meeting? How everyone was going to work hard until the shelters were finished?” (Golding 50). This group included everyone except Jack and his hunters. While Ralph was supposed to have a lot of support with building the shelters, he really was receiving no help. In addition, this adds to the development of how the society is being formed. This relates to Plato in that they tried to develop a separation of classes – those who hunt and those who build the huts. In The Republic, this is seen through how there are different classes within society, and it is difficult to change classes.
As for the building blocks/starting points, there really are not any added during this chapter. Ralph and Simon are struggling to get the support they need to build the shelters that everyone will benefit from.
In regards to new rules introduced, there are not really any. They are still basing it off the meeting they had to discuss hunting and shelter building.
In terms of how this chapter matches up with other authors we have discussed in class, it matches up with Huxley in terms of isolation. It would seem as though Simon begins to become more isolated, and Bernard, in Brave New World, is more isolated because of his differences and perceptions in society. This is demonstrated in Simon through Ralph’s comment of him of “he’s queer [and] he’s funny” (Golding 55).

Posted by: Karra and Dominique at April 6, 2016 04:52 PM

Ashlee English
HON-351
Dr. Burgsbee Hobbs
4 April 2016


QUESTIONS:

9. CHAPTER ONE: Why might Golding have used British schoolboys? Why is this significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.
20.CHAPTER FOUR: What is the significance of the title “Painted Faces and Long Hair”? Why is this significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

ANSWERS:
9. Golding using British School boys as the characters in Lord of the Flies as they are the epitome of rules and regulations. Consequently, it would be expected that the boys would be able to function without adults due to their ‘strong moral compass’. In the novel the boys try to establish some form of government and order, by creating some rules then deciding to “Let’s have a vote” (Golding 22). Indicative of some civility, however lies the irony of the boys becoming savage, which may be rebellion to the repressive confines of ‘polite, accepted and correct society’.

20. The significance of the title “Painted Faces and Long Hair” is indicative of the boys’ descent into savagery physically and metaphorically. This chapter points out a turning point in the novel where they were becoming more in tune with the island as they, “accepted the pleasures of the morning… therefore forgotten” (Golding 58) straying completely from civility. Consequently, as the above quote states they stopped hoping for rescue and began to revel in the freedom and no rules. But most importantly the degeneracy of their morals.


Work Cited
Golding, William. Lord of The Flies. New York: Perigee Literature, 1954. Paperback.


Posted by: Ashlee English at April 9, 2016 11:11 PM

Jasmine Daniels
Dr. Hobbs
Hon 351 Contemporary World View CA02
11 April 2016

Question #26: Golding writes, “In a moment the platform was full of arguing, gesticulating shadows. To Ralph, seated, this seemed the breaking up of sanity.” How is sanity defined? How does this novel contribute to an understanding of sanity and of madness? What are some other instances of madness in the novel? Why is this significant? Explain.

Sanity can be attributed to the upholding of the rules that they were taught as students. In school, breaking out into arguments and fighting with one another would be the breaking of the school rules. As an upholder of these rules Ralph attributes this to the loss of sanity or the presence of madness. Madness can be attributed to the basic instinct of man to be like Jack, which is to be ruthless and brutal. Some other instances of madness include how the boys acted after the pig had been killed. For instance, the text states, “Right up her ass!” “Did you hear?” “Did you hear what he said?” “Right up her ass!” This time Robert and Maurice acted the two parts; and Maurice’s acting of the pig’s efforts to avoid the advancing spear was so funny that the boys cried with laughter.” (Golding 135-36) This can be seen as madness because they do not feel any remorse for what they had done.

Question #48: What happens to Simon after the hunters leave his clearing? What is the “lord of the flies?” What does it represent? How does it talk to Simon—what does its speech really indicate? Why is this significant? Explain.

When the hunters leave Simon in the clearing he is left alone with the pig’s head on a stick that is covered in flies. Due to fear from the sight of the beast, Simon begins to have an epileptic episode and faints. The head is named the Lord of the Flies and it represents the innate darkness within all human beings. The text states, “You knew, didn’t you? I’m part of you? Close, close, close! I’m the reason why it’s no go? Why things are what they are?” (Golding 143) This quote shows how the darkness is a part of human beings and the boys are becoming more and more influenced by that darkness. The Lord of the Flies speaks in the voice of a Schoolmaster, which is significant because in many cases the words from the Schoolmaster cannot be doubted or questioned.
The Lord of the Flies spoke in the voice of a schoolmaster. The text states that, “This has gone quite far enough. My poor, misguided child, do you think you know better than I do?” (Golding 143) From this quote we can see that The Lord of the Flies belittles Simon continuously like a schoolmaster might do when a student is not doing anything correctly.

Posted by: Jasmine Daniels at April 11, 2016 02:22 AM

Grace Lederer
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351
11 April 2016
Lord of the Flies Questions

Question 33) What was the main conflict in the novel, at the end of chapter five? How has the main conflicted shifted in chapter six? Why is this shift in conflict so important? Explain.

The main conflict of the novel at the end of chapter five is that the group of boys has decended in chaos. No one is carrying out the rule of order and the meeting that Ralph calls is riddled with interruptions and littluns voicing their fears of beasts, further inducing a chaotic, panicky climate. Jack is also beginning to undermine Ralph’s authority. Ralph questions if he should concede his chiefhood to Jack but Piggy voices his fear of that happening pointing out, “He can’t hurt you: but if you stand out of the way he’d hurt the next thing. And that’s me,” (Golding 93).
The conflict has shifted by the end of chapter six because the problem is now not just the fear of beasts but the (false) confirmation via the twins that there is indeed a beast on the island. The boys focus then shifts from regular survival to thwarting the beast, and the issue of Jack undermining Ralph’s authority remains.

Question 37) How does Jack try to manipulate this meeting? Cite two passages in which Jack criticizes Ralph. What do you think Jack’s implying when he tells the others that Ralph’s like Piggy? Why is this significant? Explain.

Jack tries to manipulate the meeting by undermining Ralph’s authority by first calling the meeting even though that is clearly Ralph’s job as chief. Jack then puts words in Ralph’s mouth saying that, “Ralph thinks you’re cowards, running away from the boar and the beast,” (Golding 126). When Jack says Ralph is “like Piggy” he is implying that Ralph is a coward. This is significant because he is essentially telling the boys not to trust Ralph and further contributing to the disarray and division of the group.

Posted by: Grace Lederer at April 11, 2016 02:16 PM

Dominique Bauer
Dr. Hobbs
HON – 351 The Contemporary Worldview CA02
11 April 2016
Question 30: How does Jack influence the boys at the end of this chapter? Why is this significant? Explain.
Answer: Jack influences the boys at the end of chapter 5 by stating “bollocks to the rule! We’re strong – we hunt! If there’s a beast, we’ll hunt it down! We’ll close in and beat and beat and beat –!” (Golding 91). In other words, he influences the boys by appealing to their animalistic side because just prior to this statement from Jack, Ralph had talked about the rules. This is significant because it is the start of the downfall for the boys. Ralph, Piggy, and Simon all tried to keep everyone somewhat civilized, but this demonstrates how that will likely be impossible.
Question 42: How does Piggy show “intellectual daring”? Why is this so significant to the boys? Explain.
Answer: Piggy shows “intellectual daring” through his suggestion of “moving the fire from the mountain” (Golding 129). What is meant by this is that Piggy is willing to challenge the ideas of the others on the island with his intellect, instead of brute strength. This is significant to the boys because it showed them that there is more than one person on the island that can come up with ideas that can benefit them all. It also shows them that the simplest ideas are sometimes the best ideas.

Posted by: Dominique Bauer at April 11, 2016 02:59 PM

Ashley Reynolds
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary World View CA02
11 April 2016

Question 36: CHAPTER SEVEN: Who goes with Ralph and Jack to the top of the mountain? Highlight where they see the supposed beast. What’s their reaction? What’s the importance of their discovery? Explain.

Answer: Simon, Ralph, and Jack go together to the top of the mountain. At the summit, they see the “beast” in the shadows: “Before them, something like a great ape was sitting asleep with its head between its knees. Then the wind roared in the forest, there was confusion in the darkness and the creature lifted its head, holding toward them the ruin of a face” (Golding 123). Because of the darkness, parachute, and mangled body, the boys cannot recognize that the “beast” is actually a man.

Once they see the beast, all three boys scream and run away. Ralph describes the screams of the other boys as “creatures crying out and leaping” (Golding 123). This language, describing Jack and Simon as creatures instead of other humans, is interesting. By doing so, the dichotomy between human and creature is blurred.


Question 39: CHAPTER EIGHT: When Simon’s talking to the Lord of the Flies, it says, “‘Fancy thinking the Beast was something you could hunt and kill. . . You knew, didn’t you? I’m a part of the you? Close, close, close! I’m the reason why it’s no go? Why things are what they are” (143). What’s the importance of this passage? Make an educated guess as to what the beast might be.

Answer: This passage is important because it shows the beast is internal, not external. The beast that the boys are afraid of isn’t something physical that they can “hunt and kill”; it is something within them (Golding 143). There are several things that the Lord of the Flies could represent: fear, savagery, hatred, greed, pride. The Lord of the Flies is the baser nature of humankind. Because of these flaws, humankind has had a continual history of violence and warfare. Even on an isolated island populated only by children, the beast exists. This suggests that human savagery is an innate part of mankind, not something learned or taught.

Posted by: Ashley Reynolds at April 11, 2016 04:50 PM

Grace Lederer
Dr. Hobbs
Honors 351
12 April 2016

Question 68) Why do you think Samneric decide to join Jack’s tribe? Why do they tell Jack where Ralph is hidden? Why is this significant? Explain.

Answer: Samneric decide to join Jack’s tribe because Jack essentially kidnapped them and coerced them into it, the two boys explaining, “They made us,—they hurt us,” (Golding 188). Samneric show loyalty to Ralph when he appears to them and they do not rat him out. However, they do end up telling Jack where Ralph is hidden, once again due to Jack’s manipulative tactics. Someone catches them not really on guard and saying, “Roger sharpened a stick at both ends,” (Golding 190). When whoever was joining Samneric on the rock heard them utter these words, it became obvious that they had been conversing with an outsider up there. This is significant because it shows that even though there may be people who want to support Ralph, Jack has now united everyone through fear of disobedience to him.

Question 71) Where does Ralph decide to hide? What does this hiding place symbolize? Why is this significant? Explain.

Answer: Ralph decides to hide in a “wild tangle of creeper that made a mat that kept out all the light of the sun,” (Golding 197). This is significant because in a sense, it resembles Plato’s allegory of the cave in which their society has reached a point where they are back in the cave, devoid of logic, completing the decomposition of society that the story has followed throughout.

Posted by: Grace Lederer at April 12, 2016 08:48 PM

Jasmine Daniels, Karra Rutherford, Michael Barbee
Dr. Hobbs
Hon 351 Contemporary World View CA02
13 April 2016

Chapter 8: Any new characters? New conflicts? Resolved conflicts? What parallels or connections are there to previous works?

In this chapter the only new character that was introduced was the Lord of the Flies. Some new conflicts that were introduced include creating a new fire and Jack’s group splitting off with his hunters. Neither of these conflicts were resolved during this chapter. “I’m not going to play any longer. Not with you. Most of the boys were looking down now, at the grass at their feet. Jack cleared his throat again. I’m not going to be a part of Ralph’s lot. He looked along the right-hand logs, numbering the hunters that had been a choir.” (Golding 127) Overall, there were no parallels or connections that could be thought of compared to previous works.

Posted by: Jasmine Daniels, Karra Rutherford, Michael Barbee at April 13, 2016 12:02 PM

Jasmine Daniels
Dr. Hobbs
Hon 351 Contemporary World View CA02
13 April 2016

Chapter 9: # 50 Why does Jack command the boys to dance and chant, and why is this an effective leadership tactic? What psychological effect does dancing and chanting have on the boys? Think back to the effect that putting on makeup had on them in Chapter 4. Why is this significant? Explain.

Jack commands the boys to dance and chant as a way to distract them from Ralph’s words and to unite them together for a common purpose. In the text, “Going to be a storm,” said Ralph, “and you’ll have rain like when we dropped here. Who’s clever now? Where are your shelters? What are you going to do about that?” The hunters were looking uneasily at the sky, flinching from the stroke of the drops. A wave of restlessness set the boys swaying and moving aimlessly. The flickering light became brighter and the blows of the thunder were only just bearable. The littluns began to run about, screaming. Jack leapt on to the sand. “Do our dance! Come on! Dance!” He ran stumbling through the thick sand to the open space of rock beyond the fire. Between the flashes of lightning the air was dark and terrible; and the boys followed him, clamorously. Roger became the pig, grunting and charging at Jack, who side-stepped. The hunters took their spears, the cooks took spits, and the rest clubs of firewood. A circling movement developed and a chant. While Roger mimed the terror of the pig, the littluns ran and jumped on the outside of the circle. Piggy and Ralph, under the threat of the sky, found themselves eager to take a place in this demented but partly secure society. They were glad to touch the brown backs of the fence that hemmed in the terror and made it governable.” (Golding 151-52) This was an effective leadership tactic because it distracted the boys and allowed them to act together.

Chapter 12: # 69: What do Samneric mean when they tell Ralph that Jack has “sharpened a stick at both ends”? What might be the reason for Jack’s hatred? Why is this significant? Explain.

When Samneric mention a stick sharpened at both ends it means that Jack intends to do the same thing to Ralph that he had done to the pig’s head. Jack intends to put Ralph’s head on a stick and offer it to the beast like the pig’s head. When Ralph spoke again his voice was low, and seemed breathless. “What have I done? I liked him—and I wanted us to be rescued—” Again the stars spilled about the sky. Eric shook his head, earnestly. “Listen, Ralph. Never mind what’s sense. That’s gone—” “Never mind about the chief—” “—you got to go for your own good.” “The chief and Roger—” “—yes, Roger—” “They hate you, Ralph. They’re going to do you.” “They’re going to hunt you tomorrow.” “But why?” “I dunno. And Ralph, Jack, the chief, says it’ll be dangerous—” “—and we’ve got to be careful and throw our spears like at a pig.” “We’re going to spread out in a line across the island—” “—we’re going forward from this end—” “—until we find you.” “We’ve got to give signals like this.” Eric raised his head and achieved a faint ululation by beating on his open mouth. Then he glanced behind him nervously. “Like that—” “—only louder, of course.” “But I’ve done nothing,” whispered Ralph, urgently. “I only wanted to keep up a fire!” He paused for a moment, thinking miserably of the morrow. A matter of overwhelming importance occurred to him. “What are you—?” He could not bring himself to be specific at first; but then fear and loneliness goaded him.” (Golding 188-89) Their hatred for Ralph comes from his defiance against their choices and rules.

Posted by: Jasmine Daniels at April 13, 2016 01:46 PM

Andrew Thriffiley
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 The Contemporary World View CA02
13 April 2016

Questions:
61.) In what way are the twins “seeing Ralph for the first time” before they all set off for Castle Rock? Why is this significant?
67.) Why does Ralph hit the pig’s head? Why is this significant?

Answers:
61.) The twins are seeing Ralph for the first time because he is starting to act like the leader of the group, and he is taking responsibility for everyone that is in the group. Piggy even goes on to say about Ralph, "He's the only one who ever got anything done." (Golding 170). Piggy shows that the whole tribe has confidence in Ralph, and this is what the twins are seeing in Ralph as well. This is significant because the group has been looking for a leader who they can trust, and it has finally come where Ralph has shown that he is ready for the role.

67.) Ralph is hitting the pig's head for many reasons whether it be stress about his tribe and also getting at Jack for something that he loves. The angry is shown what Ralph does, "The skull regarded Ralph like one who knows the answers and won't tell. A sick fear and rage swept him. Fiercely he hit out at the filthy thing in front of him." (Golding 185). Ralph has a ton of pent up stress because he doesn't know how safe he is on the island, especially since his tribe is falling apart right now. Ralph is letting out all of the emotion he has inside of him. The vast significance of this encounter with the pig head is that Ralph has seemed to awaken an inner beast inside of him that can come back to haunt him in the end.

Posted by: Andrew Thriffiley at April 13, 2016 02:00 PM

Jamee, Kaelyn, and Dominique
Dr. Hobbs
HON – 351 The Contemporary Worldview CA02
11 April 2016
Questions: What new characters are introduced? What new conflicts are introduced? What conflicts are resolved, if any? What parallels or connections are there in response to Plato, Huxley, Orwell, and/or Bradbury?
Answers from chapter 7: In this chapter, Robert is introduced. His introduction came when it was decided to re-enact the hunt, and he is selected to be the pig. In terms of conflicts introduced in chapter 7, the disagreements between Ralph and Jack become more obvious. This can be seen through the passage discussing the beast. This conflict is seen most by Ralph’s comment to Jack “[w]hy do you hate me?” (Golding 118). Another conflict that is presented is the assertion of dominance from Jack over Ralph. This is seen through Jack continually trying to go up the mountain at night, despite everyone else wanting to go check on Piggy and the littluns (Golding 119). Also the savage coming out in each of them. Their ability to remain civilized is becoming more and more challenging.
As far as conflicts that are resolved in this chapter, Ralph finds the beast. This is shown through the narration “before them, something like a great ape was sitting asleep with its head between its knees” (Golding 123). This is significant because it confirms that the beast is a real thing, and not just a figment of their imaginations.
There is a connection to The Republic in the title – Shadows and Tall Trees. This is similar to the Allegory of the Cave and the shadows signify lies.

Posted by: Jamee, Kaelyn, Dominique at April 13, 2016 02:08 PM

Andrew Thriffiley, Ashlee English, Melissa Bryan
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 The Contemporary World View CA02
13 April 2016

Chapter 5 Questions:
What new characters are introduced?
What new conflicts are introduced?
What conflicts are resolved if any?
What parallels or connections are there about Plato, Huxley, Orwell, &/or Bradbury
Extra: Significance of chapter title?

Answers:
1.) There are no new characters presented in this section of the novel.
2.) The new conflicts that are introduced include the boys getting yelled at because no one is doing the jobs that they have been assigned. The importance of the meeting is shown when it is said, "This meeting must not be fun, but business." (Golding 76). Also, the idea of the beast has been brought up, and the fact that the beast may live in the water during the day puts fear into the boys. The proposition is taken seriously when one boy says, "Daddy stated that they haven't found all the animals in the sea yet." (Golding 89). The unknown starts to make the kids nervous about the situation.
3.) The problem of doing the jobs are resolved in part by the beast because since the kids think the beast is out there, they will have a bigger reason to stay a part of the tribe. The boys have a belief they can take care of the beast, so it somewhat brings them together, "We're strong- we hunt! If there's a beast we'll hunt it down!" (Golding 91). The beast helps the boys to see they need each other.
4.) The connections to this chapter and Huxley are similar with wars in Brave New World, and the beast in Lord of the Flies. They both set up as a way to get people to cooperate with the leaders whenever something needs to be done. The proposition is a way to rule with fear in both of the books. Another similarity is with Plato trying to set up the classes. The boys try to set up some classes, but no one is willing to do the work of their class because they think they should be higher up.
5.) The significance of the chapter title is that the idea of a beast in the water is terrifying to the boys. The scary idea isn't just because it is a possible solution to where the beast goes, but it is also saying that something horrible can be in something that is so necessary for them to survive on the island. The water is supposed to be a safe place for the boys, but it has turned into the worst place for them to be.

Posted by: Andrew Thriffiley, Ashlee English, Melissa Bryan at April 13, 2016 02:22 PM

Jamee Townsend
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 The Contemporary World View CA02
13 April 2016

Questions 49 and 62:
1. CHAPTER NINE: Identify both the purpose and the effect of Jack’s generosity with the meat he and the hunters obtained. What might his decision to give meat to even Ralph and Piggy be meant to show? Why is this significant? Explain.

2. CHAPTER ELEVEN: Why is the boys’ attempt to get back Piggy’s specs and get the other boys to maintain a signal fire bound to fail? Why is this significant? Explain.

Answer:
1. Jack strategically decides to be generous with the meat that he and the hunters obtained, in order to show that he is the leader and can provide for the boys. He even gives meat to Ralph and Piggy to show that he is their provider as well. While handing out the meat he tells the boys, “I gave you food and my hunters will protect you from the beast. Who will join my tribe (Golding 150)?” Therefore, he is appealing to the boys’ desire for health and security.

2. They must get the specs from Jack in order to make the signal fire, but this whole plan is bound to fail due to the immature and conflicted relationship between Jack and Ralph. When Ralph and his boys go to Jack’s camp it turns into a head on climatic battle between the two. Upon their arrival Jack is immediately uncooperative, “You go away, Ralph. You keep to your end. This is my end and my tribe. You leave me alone (Golding 176).”

Posted by: Jamee Townsend at April 13, 2016 02:29 PM

Dominique Bauer
Dr. Hobbs
HON – 351 The Contemporary Worldview CA02
13 April 2016
Question 58: What signs of stress and fear can we see in Ralph, Piggy, and Samneric’s behavior in this chapter? Why is this significant? Explain.
Answer: In regards to Samneric, one sign of stress and fear that can be seen is through their combined comment of being “taken prisoner by the Reds [. . . would] be better than –” (Golding 162). While this sentence is not finished, it is implied that he is referring to the fact that being captured by the Reds, the enemy before they all landed on the island, would be better than being captured by Jack’s tribe. This is significant because it shows just how bad everything is getting on the island.
As for Ralph and Piggy, in this chapter one sign of stress and fear is through their conversation about going insane if they do not get off the island soon (Golding 165). This shows fear and stress, despite it being a small joke, because the reality of the situation is what prompted it. They do actually fear losing their minds if they do not get the chance to leave the island.
Question 66: Why does Ralph think that the boy he sees is “not Bill”? Why is this significant? Explain
Answer: Ralph thinks that the boy he sees is “not Bill” because the boy he sees in front of him is “a savage whose image refused to blend with that of an ancient picture of a boy in shorts and shirt” (Golding 183). This is significant because it demonstrates how all civilization has been lost on the boys at this point. Ralph no longer sees the boys the way he did when he first met them because they no longer are. It seems as though a majority of the boys have become very animalistic and savage and do not really think through decisions anymore.

Posted by: Dominique Bauer at April 13, 2016 03:15 PM

Melissa Bryan
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary World View CA02
6 April 2016

Questions:
2. Chapter 1: What is Ralph’s attitude toward Piggy in the first chapter? Why is this significant? Explain.

23. Chapter 4: Why does Jack refuse to give Piggy meat? Why is this significant? Explain.

Answer:
In the novel Ralph views Piggy as a nuisance, and “Ralph was faintly interested” (Golding 11) in whatever Piggy had to say. Also, Ralph constantly tries to walk away from Piggy and ignores Piggy’s questions when he first met Piggy (Golding 8). Ralph seems to be a very independent person who likes to be by himself so when Piggy intrude his moment of solitude. When Piggy told Ralph his name, Ralph teased Piggy about his name and told the rest of the group. However, Ralph said, “Better Piggy than Fatty” (Golding 25) to make Piggy feel a little better when Jack started to call Piggy Fatty. Ralph’s attitude is significant because even though Ralph was not always kind to Piggy. Piggy always ensure to have Ralph’s back, and it was even slightly shown that Ralph understood that Piggy was indeed useful.

Jack refuse to give Piggy meat because he does not like the relationship Piggy has with Ralph., and he viewed Piggy as the outcast in the group. Jack said, “You didn’t hunt” as the reason why he refused to give Piggy any meat, but he really wanted to treat Piggy poorly (Golding 74). It is significant because Jack feels like he is powerful among the boys, and he thinks that everyone would enjoy watching piggy suffer since Piggy was easy to pick on him.

Translation Used:
Lord of the Flies by William Golding Translated by Perigee (2006).

Posted by: Melissa Bryan at April 13, 2016 04:43 PM

Melissa Bryan
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary World View CA02
April 11, 2016

Questions:
Q# 44 Chapter 8: What unusual thing happens to Ralph after Jack leaves and after he realizes most of the biguns have left? What is the significance of his reaction? Explain.

Q# 47 Chapter 8: What foolish decision does Jack make during the hunt, and why is it foolish? Why is this significant? Explain.

Answer:

After Jack leaves with most of the biguns, Ralph felt abandoned and betrayed because he now realizes that he is left all alone to deal with the littleuns and Piggy. He felt like he could not have managed without them until he tried to reassure himself by saying “We can do without Jack Merridew. There're others besides him on this island” (Golding 128). It is significant because even though Jack feels like he can do without Jack, it is evident that he now feels pressured and a bit lost without Jack.
The foolish decision Jack makes during the hunting was that he left the sow’s guts on a rock to be eaten by the flies. Then, when Simon was left alone with the head of the Pig and the guts on the rock. “The pile of guts [became] a black blob of flies that buzzed like a saw. After a while, these flies found Simon” (Golding 137). It is foolish because it attracted the Lord of the Flies which made it appear, and it is significant because it provoked the beast. Hence, it could have led to the immediate death of Simon at the time.

Translation Used:
Golding, William. Lord of the Flies: A Novel. New York: Perigee, 2006. Print.

Posted by: Melissa Bryan at April 17, 2016 02:50 AM

Melissa Bryan
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary World View CA02
April 13, 2016

Questions:
Q# 56 Chapter 10: What does Jack do that causes Roger to have doubts about his leadership? Why is this significant? Explain.

Q# 63 Chapter 63: Why do you think Roger pushes the rock off the cliff? Why is this significant? Explain.

Answer:

Jack ordered some of the boys to be guards at Castle Rock to challenge anyone that was approaching the area, and Roger was challenged. It is said that Jack did so because he was angry at what happened the night before, so “He got angry and made [the guards] tie Wilfred up” (Golding 159). Jack wanted to take his anger out on someone and Roger did not find it fascinating as Jack did not tell them why he did so as they said, “They never heard him [give a reason for doing so]” (Golding 159). It is significant because one may now consider Jack to be a tyrant and engaging in violent behaviors because he ordered the others around without any reasoning and Roger finds that suspicious.

Roger probably was not thinking in his right mind as the novel stated, “Roger, with a sense of delirious abandonment, leaned all his weight on the lever” (Golding 180). Thus, when he pushed the rock off the cliff, he was not thinking straight, panicked and did not think of the consequences of his actions. It is significant because when he pushed the rock off the cliff, the rock killed Piggy (Golding 181).

Translation Used:
Golding, William. Lord of the Flies: A Novel. New York: Perigee, 2006. Print.

Posted by: Melissa Bryan at April 17, 2016 03:25 AM

Jamee and Dominique
Dr. Hobbs
HON – 351 The Contemporary Worldview CA02
13 April 2016
Question 80: Discuss the deterioration of the “society” on the island. What circumstances, events, and psychological forces cause this deterioration? Explain
Answer: The circumstances that led to the deterioration of the society on the island include the fact that they were stranded on an island, none of the boys were over the age 12, and they struggled to successfully implement the same aspects that they had in their previous civilization.
The events that led up to the deterioration of the society started with who became the leader, initially, of all the boys. Since Jack was “chapter chorister and head boy” (Golding 22), he believed that he should be the leader, but the group picked Ralph instead. This decision by the group began the conflicts between Jack and Ralph, and part of this conflict is what leads to the key deterioration events. Once the two groups split (Jack and Ralph’s), one is more vicious and cruel, while the other is still trying to come up with a way to be saved.
One psychological force that causes this deterioration is the idea that the beast is a self-fulfilling concept. In other words, the boys believe there is a beast on the island, but it is really just themselves reverting to their primal ways of life.

Posted by: Jamee and Dominique at April 17, 2016 11:28 PM

Kaelyn Cardona
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 CA02 Contemporary World View
18 April 2016

Question: How is Jack presented to the reader? Why is this significant?
Answer: Jack Merridew is first introduced as the leader of the choir boys with "uniformed superiority and off-hand authority" (Golding 21). As the commander of the boys in uniform, Jack is perceived as militant, addressing his peers and himself by surname; from the start, Jack and Ralph are at ends in their perception of one another, for Jack is unsatisfied with his first impression of Ralph as "the fiar-haired boy with a creamy shell on his knees" (Golding 20). When there is demand for a chief to be named among the stranded school boys, Jack is first to nominate himself, for he is the head boy of the choir (Golding 22). However, Ralph is chosen because of his command of the conch shell, which summoned the boys to congregation in the first place. Though Jack is crestfallen at the results, Ralph permits him to command the choir boys, and Jack dubs them the hunters (Golding 24).

Posted by: Kaelyn Marie Cardona at April 18, 2016 09:51 AM

Kaelyn Cardona
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 CA02 Contemporary World View
18 April 2016

Question: Golding writes, “In a moment the platform was full of arguing,
gesticulating shadows. To Ralph, seated, this seemed the breaking up of sanity.”
How is sanity defined? How does this novel contribute to an understanding of sanity and of madness? What are some other instances of madness in the novel? Why is this significant? Explain.
Answer: Sanity's definition is slowly becoming unveiled to Ralph as he grows as a leader. Golding writes, "Ralph was a specialist in thought now, and could recognize thought in another," and the capacity to think rationally is a product of sanity (Golding 78). Coinciding with Ralph's ability to think is his capability of understanding what makes one sane and another insane. For instance, in his assembly, he tries to have his peers recognize their dissent from civility and order into primal chaos by addressing their abandonment of the coconut shell cups in favor of drinking straight from the river (Golding 79). Ralph is noticing the boys are reverting to madness, dispelling their need for basic human amenities such as shelter, which they no longer care to build, and hygiene, which they dismiss by relieving themselves by their fruit (Golding 80). The fire becomes the symbol of their sanity, which is dimming over time because of the boys' carelessness for tending to it, and by abandoning their duty to keeping the fire alive, they are abandoning their chances of returning to civilization, thus favoring a life in the wilds (Golding 80). Golding expresses the dissent to madness through the quote: "the world, that understandable and lawful world, was slipping away" (91).

Question: How is there a conflict between Jack, Ralph, and Piggy on page 91? Cite a passage that reflects each of their points of view. (If you have a different edition of the book, the conflict takes place during the meeting when Ralph, Jack, and Piggy express their different opinions/views). Why is this significant? Explain.
Answer: The conflict between Jack, Ralph, and Piggy is composed of the debate over the existence of ghosts on the island, but the umbrella conflict is the direction of their tribe under the opposing leadership styles. Ralph, the chief, states that he does not believe in ghosts, but also does not like the thought of them; his stance on the argument augments his perspective on their sanity, he is taking the middle-ground in hopes of appealing to both opposing opinions within his tribe (Golding 90-91). However, Ralph's inability to take a firm viewpoint one way or the other leads to chaos, for the chief is supposed to decide "what's what," instead, he allows Piggy and Jack to fight because of his passiveness (Golding 91). Piggy rigidly believes that there is no such thing as ghosts, for he takes pride in rational thought, which opposes the disorder of believing in the supernatural (Golding 92). Piggy remains the voice of reason and is able to recognize the boys will "soon be animals" if Jack is allowed to continue to prioritize his feral instincts and lack of rationality (Golding 92). Ralph looks to Piggy as his adviser, which is ironic because of his nickname being that of an animal, when confronted by Jack. Jack is the antagonist of the debate, for he says, "bollocks to the rules! We're strong--we hunt! If there's a beast,, we'll hunt it down!" (Golding 91). Critical thinking is trumped by physical strength in Jack's perspective, which results in the assembly dissolving into chaos (Golding 91). The debate foreshadows what is to come if Jack continues to dismiss Ralph's authority and rally for the importance of the hunt over the importance of thought.

Posted by: Kaelyn Marie Cardona at April 18, 2016 10:35 AM

Ashley Reynolds
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary World View CA02
6 April 2016

Question 11: CHAPTER ONE: How is Piggy indirectly responsible for the blowing of the conch? Why is this significant?

Answer: Even though Piggy does not blow the conch himself, he is indirectly responsible for Ralph blowing it. After Ralph picks up the conch, Piggy is the one who identifies what it is: “It’s a shell! I seen one like that before. On someone’s back
wall. A conch he called it. He used to blow it and then his mum would come. It’s ever so valuable—” (Golding 15). Ralph is entranced by the conch because of how beautiful it is. After a moment of thinking, Piggy has the idea to use the conch to call the other kids together. He says, “We can use this to call the others. Have a meeting. They’ll come when they hear us” (Golding 16). Piggy then instructs Ralph on how to blow into the conch to make noise. As a result, all of the other children come to the beach and gather around Ralph.

Posted by: Ashley Reynolds at April 18, 2016 11:16 AM

Ashley Reynolds
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary World View CA02
13 April 2016

Question 52: CHAPTER NINE: Speculate on why the author, Golding, decided to have the “figure” fly over the boys on the beach and into the sea. For what purpose might he have intended when he had Simon’s body get washed away, and what does this represent in a psychological sense? Why is this significant? Explain.

Answer: Simon and the parachutist’s disappearances are reminiscent of the titles of two previous chapters, “Beast from Water” and “Beast from Air.” The parachutist’s body flies into the air and Simon’s body washes into the water. This is fitting because the children believed that both the parachutist and Simon were the beast in different forms. They literally become the beast in the air and the beast in the water.

Traditionally in literature, water represents baptism the washing away of sins. The washing away of Simon, then, becomes cruelly ironic. The sins of the boys are escalating and becoming more violent to the point they are murdering one another. Despite this, Simon’s body is described with gentle imagery: “Softly, surrounded by a fringe of inquisitive bright creatures, itself a silver shape beneath the steadfast constellations, Simon’s dead body moved out toward the open sea” (Golding 154). This baptism and washing away of sins is not for the boys in the island’ it is a baptism for Simon.


Question 65: CHAPTER TWELVE: Ralph says, “there was that indefinable connection between himself and Jack; who therefore would never let him alone; never.” What is that connection? How does it develop and what does it signify? Why is this significant? Explain.

Answer: Ralph and Jack have an “indefinable connection” to one another. The nature of this relationship is complex. At the start of the novel, Ralph and Jack greatly admire one another. They are the only two leaders on the island and admire each other’s skills. However, resentment immediately builds when Ralph is elected leader instead of Jack. Jack sees himself as entitled to the job and is spiteful that Ralph was made leader instead. Tension builds even more as Jack and Ralph take wildly different stances on what the boys should do; Ralph emphasizes the importance of the signal fire, shelter, and order, while Jack desires to hunt, chant, and search for the beast. The two grow to hate each other as a result. Piggy is the one that first points out how Jack hates Ralph, saying, “If you’re scared of someone you hate him but you can’t stop thinking about him. You kid yourself he’s all right really, an’ then when you see him again; it’s like asthma an’ you can’t breathe. I tell you what. He hates you too, Ralph” (Golding 93). Jack particularly hates Ralph telling him what to do and eventually breaks off from the group to form his new tribe.

Even though Jack has his own group of boys to control, he cannot leave Ralph alone; he is obsessed with Ralph and wants Ralph to either submit to him or die. Ralph realizes this as he hides from Jack, thinking, “The breaking of the conch and the deaths of Piggy and Simon lay over the island like a vapor. These painted savages would go further and further. Then there was that indefinable connection between himself and Jack; who therefore would never let him alone; never” (Golding 184). Jack resents Ralph yet still seeks his approval and friendship. Since Jack is unable to reconcile these feelings, he decides to murder Ralph instead.

Posted by: Ashley Reynolds at April 18, 2016 11:21 AM

Ashley Reynolds & Grace Lederer
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary World View CA02
18 April 2016

Question 74: Of all the characters, it is Piggy who most often has useful ideas and sees the correct way for the boys to organize themselves. Yet the other boys rarely listen to him and frequently abuse him. Why might this be the case? In what ways does Golding use Piggy to advance the novel’s themes?

Answer: Although Piggy is easily the most intelligent of the group, he lacks what the boys seek in a leader. The boys seek someone who is physically strong, handsome, and charismatic. Piggy is none of these things. He is chubby, has asthma, isn’t charismatic, and is too weak to perform physical labor. Even Ralph, Piggy’s only friend, makes fun of him: “Piggy was a bore; his fat, his ass-mar and his matter-of-fact ideas were dull, but there was always a little pleasure to be got out of pulling his leg, even if one did it by accident […] Piggy was an outsider, not only by accent, which did not matter, but by fat, and ass-mar, and specs, and a certain disinclination for manual labor” (Golding 65). Furthermore, Piggy is ostracized because he takes on the mother role. Piggy is the only one that watches the littluns and ensures everyone is taken care of, traditionally a woman’s role in a society. There is a strong dichotomy of male and female where male is seen as strong and female is seen as weak. Piggy is dependent on the other boys for physical labor and food. Because of these perceived female characteristics, Piggy is even more of an outcast. Piggy is intelligent, clever, and has world knowledge. Unfortunately, these characteristics are not aspects that the boys admire.

The group’s failure to elect Piggy reflects the theme of disintegration of Plato’s society. Because the boys didn’t choose the philosopher-king, the smartest of them all, society fell apart. Piggy is the only character that represents reason. This failure of reason is why the boys’ society fell apart. This is shown most explicitly in Piggy’s death scene. When Piggy dies, the conch breaks at the exact same time: “The rock struck Piggy a glancing blow from chin to knee; the conch exploded into a thousand white fragments and ceased to exist. Piggy, saying nothing, with no time for even a grunt, traveled through the air sideways from the rock, turning over as he went” (Golding 181). Piggy represents reason, while the conch represents order and society. In the moment reason dies, society dies with it.

Posted by: Ashley Reynolds, Grace Lederer at April 18, 2016 11:26 AM

Karra Rutherford
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351: Contemporary World View CA02
6 April 2016

Question: What is Ralph’s attitude toward Piggy in the first chapter? Why is this significant? Explain. What question does the littlun with the birthmark raise? Why is this significant? Explain.
Answer: Ralph is very dismissive of Piggy in the first chapter, “He tried to be offhand and not too obviously uninterested, but the fat boy hurried after him.” (Golding 8) In fact, Ralph doesn’t even bother to ask his name, “The fat boy waited to be asked his name in turn but this proffer of acquaintance was not made” and then he later proceeds to call him “Piggy” the cruel nickname from school that he dislikes. (Golding 9-11) Despite his attempts to be helpful and his clever suggestions Piggy is treated abrasively. Piggy represents intelligence and the voice of reason, “what intelligence had been shown was traceable to Piggy”, his mistreatment could be equated to the return of the escaped prisoner to the cave in Plato’s Republic. (Golding 22) Despite the escaped prisoner’s attempt to show his friends the truth they brutally murder him.
The boy asks what will be done about a snake-like beast he claims to have seen in the woods. (Golding 35 – 36) The boys are attempting to create an ordered pseudo-society in an attempt to survive on the island now that they have learned that the island is uninhabited, and they must await rescue. While the boys are excited to be without adults, the possibility of not being rescued is unsettling. (Golding 34 – 35) The fear of a monster is another potential source of chaos that could threaten the ordered community they are trying to forge.

Posted by: Karra Rutherford at April 18, 2016 11:27 AM

Andrew Thriffiley and Melissa Bryan
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 The Contemporary World View
18 April 2016

Question:
81.) Discuss the extensive use of symbolism in the novel. Examples of important symbols are the conch, the fire, the beast, Piggy’s glasses, and the “lord of the flies,” as well as Piggy, Ralph, Simon, and Jack themselves. Explain.

Answer:
81.) The Conch symbolizes law and civilization because it is what is trying to keep order amongst the boys when they are trying to have meetings and unity. This is shown in the meetings, "Hands were reaching for the conch in the light of the setting sun." (Golding 81). The quote is emphasizing just how important the guys saw the conch to civilization.
The fire represents that chance of destruction from everything they built in the society up till then, and it also represents hope since they have a chance to get off the island because of the fire symbolizes savagery in the boys that can come out. "We don't want another night without fire." (Golding 162). The guys know how important the fire is to them being able to survive, and the hope to do so.
The beast is a symbol to the kids as a reason to stay together so the beast doesn’t get them and it represents evil and violence that can exists constant fear among the boys. Fear of the beast grows stronger as the text goes further. At first the boys don't know if the beast is real but as they go further they start to believe more. "May there is a beast. The assembly cried out savagely." (Golding 89). Just the idea of the beast can turn the boys into savages.
Piggy’s glasses represent man using the things that have to transform it into something that can help them survive represent the power of science and technology in society.
The Lord of the Flies represents the savage nature that is in all of us physical manifestation of the beast the boys have been thinking of
Piggy represents science and intellect of society through his personality and always being the voice of reason in the situations.
Ralph shows order leadership and civilization because he is the leader who is trying to keep the guys in line and make the right decisions.
Simon is natural human goodness because of his calm and warming nature to the other guys.
Jack represents the desire of power and savagery, and the evil that is in each of us because he brought out his evil in the whole novel even though the other guys had the evil in them as well.

Posted by: Andrew Thriffiley, Melissa Bryan at April 18, 2016 02:29 PM

Karra Rutherford
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351: Contemporary World View CA02
11 April 2016

Question: Explain Piggy’s point of view when he responds, “Course there aren’t [ghosts] . . . ‘Cos things wouldn’t make sense. Houses an’ streets, an’ — TV — they wouldn’t work.” What does Piggy mean when he says that technology couldn’t function if a supernatural beings existed? What was the main conflict in the novel, at the end of chapter five? How has the main conflicted shifted in chapter six? Why is this shift in conflict so important? Explain.
Answer: Piggy’s understanding of the world is based on logic, “’…Life’ Piggy said expansively, ‘is scientific, that’s what it is.” (Golding 84) He is trying to reason with the group that there is nothing to support the existence of the beast and that they are afraid without cause. I think what Piggy means is that science can’t coexist with science fiction, the existence of supernatural beings and monsters conflicts with what we know about life.
At the end of the chapter, the main conflict is increasing fear of the supposed beast and the increasing chaos that follows. “In the moment the platform was full of arguing, gesticulating shadows. To Ralph, seated, this seemed the breaking up of sanity. Fear, beasts, no general agreement that the fire was all important: and when one tried to get the thing straight the argument sheered off, bringing up fresh, unpleasant matter.” (Golding 88) This conflict has build building over the past few chapters and is now reaching a climax, the longer the kids are on the island, the more fearful they become and the more out of hand the situation becomes. There is also the issue of Jack challenging Ralph’s authority as chief, “’The rules!’ shouted Ralph. ‘You’re breaking the rules!’ ‘Bollocks to the rules! We’re strong—we hunt! If there’s a beast, we’ll hunt it down! We’ll close in and beat and beat and beat--!’” (Golding 91) At the end of chapter 6 the conflict has shifted to what the best course of action is now that they believe they have seen the beast. The boys argue amongst themselves about where to take up shelter, and the priority of maintaining the fire over hunting the beast. (Golding 107 – 108) This is significant because if the boys ever want to be rescued or even merely survive life on the island, a cohesive strategy is key. If they can not come to an agreement, as the novel continues they will likely continue to encounter problems as well as lower their chances of both rescue and survival.

Posted by: Karra Rutherford at April 18, 2016 06:55 PM

Ashlee English
HON- 351 CA02
Dr. B. Hobbs
10 April 2016

QUESTIONS:
28.CHAPTER FIVE: What five main points does Ralph address in his speech? What does he say about each one of these things? Cite a passage that summarizes Ralph’s view of the fear. Why is this significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

32.CHAPTER SIX: What are Jack’s and Ralph’s priorities in relation to what the boys should do about the beast? What’s Jack’s main goal? What’s Ralph’s main goal? Why is this significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words

ANSWERS:
28. The five main points Ralph addresses in his speech appeal to the more civilized nature of the boys, “We need an assembly. Not for fun….to put things straight” (Golding 79) and reestablish structure. The five points are regarding shelter, proper use of the lavatories, the location, and importance of the fire and the spreading of fear among the littluns in regards to the ‘beastie’. Ralph states that the shelter built by all the boys is the strongest of all the huts therefore they should work together. He also states that the designated place for the lavatory should be adhered to. But most importantly, he re discusses the importance of the fire and pointedly to the hunters that watch it that they must keep it burning above all else. Lastly, as a true leader he addresses the brewing fear of the beastie via admitting his own. Ralph says, “I’m frightened myself … bogies” (Golding 82), this statement is significant as it illustrates that Ralph is subjected to the same fears as all the other boys.

32. Jack’s and Ralph’s priorities differ considerably with regards to the beast as they are looking at things from two different perspectives. Jack’s main goal is to hunt the beast “a hunter’s job” (Golding 102) and have it as meat whereas Ralph’s main goal was to keep the fire going “more than a hunter’s job” (Golding 102) as a means of escape to be rescued. This is significant as hunting game on the island solidifies their position on the island as rulers whereas the fire acts as the possible link to society, escape, salvation and structure.

Work Cited
Golding, William. Lord of The Flies. New York: Perigee Literature, 1954. Paperback.

Posted by: Ashlee English at April 19, 2016 10:02 AM

Ashlee English
HON- 351 CA02
Dr. B. Hobbs
10 April 2016

QUESTIONS:
28.CHAPTER FIVE: What five main points does Ralph address in his speech? What does he say about each one of these things? Cite a passage that summarizes Ralph’s view of the fear. Why is this significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

32.CHAPTER SIX: What are Jack’s and Ralph’s priorities in relation to what the boys should do about the beast? What’s Jack’s main goal? What’s Ralph’s main goal? Why is this significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words

ANSWERS:
28. The five main points Ralph addresses in his speech appeal to the more civilized nature of the boys, “We need an assembly. Not for fun….to put things straight” (Golding 79) and reestablish structure. The five points are regarding shelter, proper use of the lavatories, the location, and importance of the fire and the spreading of fear among the littluns in regards to the ‘beastie’. Ralph states that the shelter built by all the boys is the strongest of all the huts therefore they should work together. He also states that the designated place for the lavatory should be adhered to. But most importantly, he re discusses the importance of the fire and pointedly to the hunters that watch it that they must keep it burning above all else. Lastly, as a true leader he addresses the brewing fear of the beastie via admitting his own. Ralph says, “I’m frightened myself … bogies” (Golding 82), this statement is significant as it illustrates that Ralph is subjected to the same fears as all the other boys.

32. Jack’s and Ralph’s priorities differ considerably with regards to the beast as they are looking at things from two different perspectives. Jack’s main goal is to hunt the beast “a hunter’s job” (Golding 102) and have it as meat whereas Ralph’s main goal was to keep the fire going “more than a hunter’s job” (Golding 102) as a means of escape to be rescued. This is significant as hunting game on the island solidifies their position on the island as rulers whereas the fire acts as the possible link to society, escape, salvation and structure.

Work Cited
Golding, William. Lord of The Flies. New York: Perigee Literature, 1954. Paperback.

Posted by: Ashlee English at April 19, 2016 11:25 AM

Ashlee English
HON-351
Dr. Burgsbee Hobbs
4 April 2016


QUESTIONS:

55. CHAPTER TEN: How do the biguns seem to define a “proper chief”? What does this criterion suggest about human psychology? Why is this significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words

64.CHAPTER ELEVEN: How is the destruction of the conch symbolically significant? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words

ANSWERS:
55. The biguns define Jack as a proper chief because he acts manly and provides a sense of security in his plan to protect their fort; castle rock and provide “exulting in his achievement… glasses” (Golding 168). This is significant as it gives insight into the human psyche as humans seek comfort and support in times of fear and emotional upheaval. Jack delivers this support and reassurance with his tribe and hunters making him seem like a proper chief.
64. The destruction of the conch is symbolically significant as it represented structure, order and democracy. Consequently, this is a pivotal point in the novel as anarchy will ensue due to the “ I got the conch…I’m chief” (Golding 180-181) destruction of the conch and Piggy. Without the conch there is no need for opinions or rules but just destruction and chaos of everyone doing what they like when they like.

Work Cited
Golding, William. Lord of The Flies. New York: Perigee Literature, 1954. Paperback.

Posted by: Ashlee English at April 19, 2016 11:26 AM

Karra Rutherford
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351: Contemporary World View CA02
13 April 2016

Question: When Ralph announces that he’s calling an assembly, he is greeted with silence. How do silence and speech function in this novel, and why is silence so threatening to the boys? Why is this significant? Explain. What foolish method do the boys use to ensure that they find Ralph? What does this decision suggest about the power of hatred and violence versus the power of reason? Why is this significant? Explain.
Answer: One of the major dichotomies of the novel is civilization versus savagery. Silence is often mentioned throughout the book, and it is usually associated with fear or reverting to savagery. “…the silence shattered and echoes set ringing by a harsh cry that seemed to come out of the abyss of ages. Jack himself shrank at this cry with a hiss of indrawn breath, and for a minute became less a hunter than a furtive thing, ape-like among the tangle of trees.” (Golding 49) In contrast the conch which is strongly associated with speech and discussion between the boys, and serves to impose order and civilization. “…I’ll give the conch to the next person to speak. He can hold it when he’s speaking.” (Golding 33) Speech and communication are arguably what separates us from animals and savagery. Civilization thrives on our ability to organize and articulate ourselves to one another. Silence represents the disintegration of this capability and any hope of civilization.
The boys attempt to use fire to smoke Ralph out of the thicket, “He heard a curious trickling sound and then a louder crepitation as if someone were unwrapping great sheets of cellophane. A stick snapped and he stifled a cough. Smoke was seeping through the branches in white and yellow wisps, the patch of blue sky overhead turned to the color of a storm cloud, and then the smoke billowed round him.” (Golding 194 -195) Smoke quickly builds around the boys, endangering all of their safety and wellbeings. One life has already been lost, the lil’un with the birthmark, due to the boy’s irresponsibility with fire. This fact has been disregarded by the savages as their hatred and violence have overtaken their reason.

Posted by: Karra Rutherford at April 19, 2016 03:15 PM

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