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October 10, 2012

Reading the Temperature of Bradbury's _Fahrenheit 451_


Image Source: http://johncr8on.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/10/Fahrenheit-451-300x200.jpg

Bradbury, Ray. Fahrenheit 451. 1953. American. Novel.

Class,

In the comment box below,

. . . the note-taker/scribe from each group should retype the question your group discussed today in class and provide an answer with quotations from the text to support your answers. You MUST put the page number (or, paragraph number if there are no page numbers) in parentheses after any quotation used.

Enter your work on this text as prescribed in class. For example:

Remember: I have to "approve" all comments so you won't see it immediately after posting. After hitting submit, you should see a screen that confirms this.

We are beginning to use some concepts in our discussions that you may or may have had practice using before. I want to be sure that you have a clear understanding of the words we use in class (no more blank stares!) so be sure you are looking up words you don't feel you yet "own" (means, making it a part of your personal vocabulary) by utilizing your dictionaries to the fullest.

Dr. Hobbs

_____________________________________

To see other English-Blog entries on the subject of Literature, please click HERE.

Posted by lhobbs at October 10, 2012 03:31 PM

Readers' Comments:

Madison Grabow
Hobbs
ENG 311 Survey of Major 20th Century Writers
30 October 2012

HW Part I # 8: Describe the bedroom that Montag enters. Whom does the setting characterize?

Answer: The bedroom that Montag enters is fire resistant just as ever other house is. Montag says the bedroom of his house is "like coming into the cold marbled room of a mausoleum after the moon had set. Complete darkness, not a hint of the silver world outside, the windows tightly shut, the chamber a tomb-world where no sound from the great city could penetrate" (Bradbury 5). The bedroom is cold. The bedroom could characterize every person alive at this time. Clarisse asks Montag "are you happy?" (Bradbury 3). This quote is so influential because he is not happy. The cold bedroom is his inner self just as everyone else. People go day to day without expressing themselves and becoming happy.

Part II #4: What does Faber tell Montag about books?

Answer: Faber tells Montagu that "books smell like nutmeg or some spice from a foreign land" (bradbury 37). Faber goes on to tell Montag that "there were a lot of lovely books once, before we let them go" (Bradbury 37). Faber continues to let Montag know that books offered so much insight years ago.

PDF

Posted by: madison grabow at October 30, 2012 10:48 AM

Timothy Delay
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
10, October 30, 2012
Question: 22. What does Montag think about the old woman and all the books he has destroyed?
9. Part II Interpret the following passage from this part of the novella: “Maybe the books can get us half out of the cave”.

Answers: 22. This is the turning point for Montag. After witnessing this old woman die for her books he start to wonder what book bring to a person. Montag wanted to know what about books that would possess a person to die for them. Montag even ask his wife this question be saying "There must be something in books, things we can't imagine, to make a woman stay in a burning house; there must be something there. You don't stay for nothing" (pg 24). He felt sorry not for the woman but for himself because, he never understood why he burned all this books.

9. Montag states this line “Maybe the books can get us half out of the cave”. He just like other philosophers wonders if books can shed more light about life than any other media that available to them. Montag feels that books can show them the truth about the world. He hopes that books can give a voice what going in the world and to explain why no one talk about why they are going to war. Montag state this after bomb go over his house again by saying “Why doesn't
someone want to talk about it”(pg 33).

Posted by: Timothy Delay at October 30, 2012 02:12 PM

Shyenne Price
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
October 30, 2012

Quotation: “Why does Montag go to see Faber?”

Answers: Montag goes to see Faber to try and have him teach what the meaning is behind what he reads. Montag hopes that Faber can return meaning to his life. “The numbness will go away, he thought. It will take time, but I’ll do it, or Faber will do it for me. Someone somewhere will give me back the old face and the old hands the way they were.”

Taken from Bradbury novel PDF version pg. 35

Posted by: Shyenne Price at October 30, 2012 03:58 PM

Shyenne Price
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
October 30, 2012

Quotation: “What test of love does Clarisse give Montag, and how does he respond to it?”

Answers: Clarisse give Montag the test of the dandelion. “I guess it’s the last of the dandelions this year… Have you ever heard of rubbing it under your chin? … If it rubs off it means I’m in love…” Montag says, “It won’t work for me.” He denies the test works, and when Clarisse rubs the dandelion under his chin and no dust is left he becomes angry because he believes he is in love.

Taken from Bradbury novel PDF version pgs. 9 and 10

Posted by: Shyenne Price at October 30, 2012 04:06 PM

Bryan Baldwin
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
30 October 2012

Part One Question: "What does 'antisocial' mean? What does it mean in the society of Fahrenheit 451? To Whom is the term applied?"

Being antisocial is when someone refuses or is unwilling to participate in normal social activities with other people. The society considers antisocial people to be outcasts and defying the government. The term is applied to Clarisse since she does not participate in the activities that are deemed socially acceptable by the government.


Part Two Question: "Describe how long the women estimated the war to last"

The women mention that the Army stated that the war would be a quick one, about 48 hours and then everyone would be home within the week.

Posted by: Bryan Baldwin at October 30, 2012 06:15 PM

Sarah Winans
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
31 October 2012

Question: During the card game at the fire station, what question does Montag ask? What does it contribute to the plot?

Answer: Montag asks what happened to the man whose library they burned the week before, and then thinks out loud and says he wonders what it would be like to be in that man's position. This contributes to the plot because he nearly revealed himself and how he read a line of the book! Montag looked at the cards in his own hands. "I-I've been thinking. About the fire last
week. About the man whose library we fixed. What happened to him?" (Page 15).

Posted by: Sarah Winans at October 31, 2012 12:23 AM

Sarah Winans
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
31 October 2012

Question: Why do you think Beatty responded the way he did when the alarm sounded?

Answer: I think Beatty responded the way he did when the alarm sounded because he had a bad feeling about Montag...it almost seemed like he was trying to distract the both of them with the card game. "There was a tacking-tacking sound as the alarm-report telephone typed out the address
across the room. Captain Beatty, his poker cards in one pink hand, walked with exaggerated slowness to the phone and ripped out the address when the report was finished" (Paragraph 1 Page 51).

Posted by: Sarah Winans at October 31, 2012 01:04 AM

Leah Hollingsworth
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
31 October 2012

Homework Question Part 1: What final question does Clarisse ask Montag on the night of their first encounter? Why is the question important to the plot?

Answer: She asks if he is happy. “Then she seemed to remember something and came back to look at him with wonder and curiosity. "Are you happy?" she said” (Bradbury 4). It is important to the plot because he is not happy. “He was not happy. He was not happy. He said the words to himself. He recognized this as the true state of affairs. He wore his happiness like a mask and the girl had run off across the lawn with the mask and there was no way of going to knock on her door and ask for it back” (Bradbury 5). She had him pinpointed with that question.
Page numbers were taken from the PDF version.

Posted by: Leah Hollingsworth at October 31, 2012 09:08 AM

Jason Anderson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG311 CA05
10/31/12
Fahrenheit 451

1.What is the significance of Montag seeing his reflection in Clarisse’s eyes?
Answer: The reflection of oneself in another’s eyes has many meanings. Most popularly it shows oneself as seen by others; therefore it is a metaphor for how we are viewed by others. In this case Clarisse’s eyes seem to capture all of him. Similarly this may foreshadow Montag becoming an aficionado of books like Clarisse and suffering a fate similar to hers.

1.What is the meaning of the title of Part II?
Answer: The title of part 2 is The Sieve and the Sand. A sieve has two definitions: 1) an instrument for separating coarse and fine rocks, 2) a person who cannot keep a secret. This second definition makes sense for this work. Montag now has books and must keep them a secret; he is ultimately unable to and must run for his life.

Posted by: Jason Anderson at October 31, 2012 10:19 AM

Sherman Milton III
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 Survey of Major 20th Century Writers

Question:
When Montag enters his home, he stares at a blank wall, but in memory, sees Clarisse. What extended smile describes how he sees her?

Answer:
“She had a very thin face like the dial of a small clock seen faintly in a dark room in the middle of a night when you waken to see the time and see the clock telling you the hour and the minute and the second, with a white silence and a glowing, all certainty and knowing what it has to tell of the night passing swiftly on toward further darknesses but moving also toward a new sun.” (Bradbury 4). Montag is comparing her to a small clock.

Posted by: Sherman Milton at October 31, 2012 10:47 AM

Sherman Milton III
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 Survey of Major 20th Century Writers
31 November 2012

Question:
Describe the bedroom that Montag enters. Whom does the setting characterize?

Answer:
The bedroom is silent and dark. The setting characterizes his wife she’s like a dead corpse on the bed and the room is like a tomb. The two are having problems (5).

Posted by: Sherman Milton at October 31, 2012 11:52 AM

Summer Taylor
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311
31 October 2012

Question: 13)Describe Clarisse's personality. 6)Describe the parlor women, their views, and their conversational concerns.

Answer: 13) Clarisse's personality seems very odd. She acts older than she is and also speaks of things that she is too young to know about; such as that fireman used to put fires out and not start them. She seems to have a wisdom that is beyong her years, and has a deeper understanding than most people. "Strange. I heard once that a long time ago houses used to burn by accident and
they needed firemen to stop the flames."
He laughed.
She glanced quickly over. "Why are you laughing?"
"I don't know." He started to laugh again and stopped "Why?"
"You laugh when I haven't been funny and you answer right off. You never stop to
think what I've asked you."
He stopped walking, "You are an odd one," he said, looking at her. "Haven't you any
respect" (Bradbury 3)? "You sound so very old."
"Sometimes I'm ancient. I'm afraid of children my own age. They kill each other. Did it always used to be that way? My uncle says no. Six of my friends have been shot in the last year alone. Ten of them died in car wrecks. I'm afraid of them and they don't like me because I'm afraid. My uncle says his grandfather remembered when
children didn't kill each other. But that was a long time ago when they had things different" Bradbury 14).

6)The women speak about the war and they believe it should be a quick 48hour war and that the Army said that all of the men will be back home soon. "Oh, they come and go, come and go," said Mrs. Phelps. "In again out again Finnegan, the Army called Pete yesterday. He'll be back next week. The Army said so. Quick war. Forty-eight hours they said, and everyone home. That's what the Army said. Quick war. Pete was called yesterday and they said he'd be, back next week. Quick..." (Bradbury 44) The women also talk about death and sucide. ""It's always someone else's husband dies, they say." "I've heard that, too. I've never known any dead man killed in a war. Killed jumping off buildings, yes, like Gloria's husband last week, but from wars? No."
"Not from wars," said Mrs. Phelps. "Anyway, Pete and I always said, no tears, nothing like that. It's our third marriage each and we're independent. Be independent, we always said. He said, if I get killed off, you just go right ahead and don't cry, but get married again, and don't think of me" (Bradbury 44).

Posted by: Summer Taylor at October 31, 2012 12:36 PM

De’Nisha Butler
Dr. Hobbs
English 311 CA05
October 31, 2012

Question: When Montag enters his home, he stares at the blank wall, but, in memory, sees Clarisse. What extended simile describes how he sees her?

Answer: In the extended simile that describes how Montag sees Clarisse, he says “She had a very thin face like the dial of a small clock seen faintly in a dark room in the middle of a night when you waken to
see the time and see the clock telling you the hour and the minute and the second,
with a white silence and a glowing, all certainty and knowing what it has to tell of the
night passing swiftly on toward further darknesses but moving also toward a new sun.

Page 4

Question: Who, does this part of the story reveal, did not want books anymore?

Answer: Montag did not want books anymore.

Page 40


In-Class question
Group 3
Group member #2

Question: Santiago considered the fish his __________?

Answer: Brother.
Example: “I wish I could feed the fish, he thought. He is my brother.”

Page 22

Posted by: De'Nisha Butler at October 31, 2012 01:21 PM

Marcus Chisholm
Dr. Hobbs
ENG-311-CA05
31 October 2012
Part I: The Hearth and the Salamander
4. What things do the McClellans do that cause them to be classified as peculiar?
The McClellans have a very crazy history. At the beginning of the novel, Clarisse McClellan tells Guy that she’s “a seventeen year old and crazy” (2), she constantly calls herself crazy. On page 9, she states that she’s still crazy and the rain tastes good. On page 3 she says, "I rarely watch the 'parlour walls' or go to races or Fun Parks. So I've lots of time for crazy thoughts, I guess. However on page 4, she states, "Oh, just my mother and father and uncle sitting around, talking. It's like being a
pedestrian, only rarer. My uncle was arrested another time-did I tell you?-for being a pedestrian. Oh, we're most peculiar." Hence showing that her and her family are most peculiar and weird.
Part II: The Sieve and the Sand
4. What does Faber tell Montag about books?
Faber tells Montag that his life and motivation is similar to what usually happens in books. "That's the good part of dying; when you've nothing to lose, you run any risk you want." "There, you've said an interesting thing," laughed Faber, "without having read it!" "Are things like that in books. But it came off the top of my mind!"
"All the better. You didn't fancy it up for me or anyone, even yourself."(39)

Posted by: Marcus Chisholm at October 31, 2012 02:16 PM

Shyenne Price
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
October 31, 2012

Quotation: “What are some of the books that Montag asks Faber about when he calls him on the phone?”
Answers: Montag asks about three books when talking to Faber. “How many copies of the Bible are left in this country? … How many copies of Shakespeare and Plato?” He asks about the Bible, Shakespeare’s works and Plato’s works.

Taken from Bradbury novel PDF version pgs. 34 and 35

Posted by: Shyenne Price at October 31, 2012 02:54 PM

Madison Grabow
Delia Mulvihill
Hobbs
ENG 311 Survey of Major 20th Century Writers
31 October 2012

Class Part 1 Question 6: What does Clarisse say people talk about? Find some examples of representative conversation?

Answer 6: During discussion with Montag, Clarisse says "People don't talk about anything" (Bradbury 14). Clarisse goes on to say "they name a lot of cars or clothes or swimming-pools mostly and
say how swell! But they all say the same things and nobody says anything different
from anyone else" (Bradbury 14). Basically, Clarisse says that people today hold pointless conversations.

Class Part 2 Question 6: What does Faber mean by "I don't talk things, sir. I talk the meaning of things. I sit here and know I'm alive"?

Answer 6: The statement from Faber is basically an opening to get Montag to think and investigate the written work and wonder as well as ponder the inevitable. Faber stating this philosophy opens Montag's mind. After Faber said that he sits here and knows he is alive, the text says "that was all there was to it, really. An hour of monologue, a poem, a comment, and then without even acknowledging the fact that Montag was a fireman, Faber with a certain trembling, wrote his address on a slip of paper. "For your file," he said, "in case you decide to be angry with me"(Bradbury 34).

PDF

Posted by: madison grabow at October 31, 2012 02:56 PM

Marcus Chisholm
Dr. Hobbs
ENG-311-CA05
31 October 2012
Part II: The Sieve and the Sand
3. What is a rumor Montag has heard? (He asks Mildred questions about this rumor.) Why is this “rumor” only a “rumor” and not common knowledge?
On page 33 of Part II: The Sieve and the Sand we are show that, Montag has heard that his country is extremely rich and that they are so entertained that they have forgotten about the rest of the world and it’s struggles. They only care about themselves. Montag asks, Is it because we're so rich and the rest of the world's so poor and we just don't care if they are? (33). He states that he has heard rumors that “we” are well fed and the rest of the world is starving. Montag doesn’t understand, therefore he questions Mildred about this subject. Is true that the rest of the world works hard and we play? Is that why we are hated so much? Montag continuously questions these rumors to find out their validity. While questioning Mildred, he constantly states that he has, “heard these rumors” stating that this is rumor and not common knowledge.

Posted by: Marcus Chisholm at October 31, 2012 02:57 PM

Leah Hollingsworth
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
31 October 2012

Question Part 1: We have talked about metaphors. Now, let’s talk about similes. Now, lets talk about similes. Find two further similes Montag uses to describe Clarisse. Do the similes serve any purpose other than to characterize Clarisse?

Answer: “There was only the girl walking with him now, her face bright as snow in the moonlight, and he knew she was working his questions around, seeking the best answers she could possibly give” (Bradbury 2). “He saw himself in her eyes, suspended in two shining drops of bright water, himself dark and tiny, in fine detail, the lines about his mouth, everything there, as if her eyes were two miraculous bits of violet amber that might capture and hold him intact” (Bradbury 3). The similes characterize Clarisse, but they also tell you about Montag and how he sees things. He sees in snow and amber, representative of fire and water, two things so connected to his work. It also shows how observant and thoughtful he is.
Page numbers were taken from the PDF version.

Posted by: Leah Hollingsworth at October 31, 2012 02:59 PM

Sherman Milton III
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 Survey of Major 20th Century Writers
31 October 2012

Question:
Montag and Mildred think someone is at the door. Why doesn’t the door-voice tell them if someone was there? Why is this significant? Also, what does Mildred think is at the door? What is at the door?

Answer:
The door-voice doesn’t tell them that someone is at the door because Montag turned it off right before they started to read. I take it that they did not want any distractions when they were reading the books. Mildred thought that the Mechanical Hound was at the door and that is what it actually was(33).

Posted by: Sherman Milton at October 31, 2012 03:03 PM

Madison Grabow
Hobbs
ENG 311 Survey of Major 20th Century Writers
1 November 2012

HW Q 3: Why does Montag say that Beatty wanted to die?

A: Beatty said to Montag "go ahead now, you secondhand litterateur, pull the trigger" (Bradbury54). "Beatty had wanted to die. He
had just stood there, not really trying to save himself, just stood there, joking,
needling" (Bradbury 55). Beatty was making a show, he did not care otherwise or so his actions said.

PDF

Posted by: madison grabow at November 1, 2012 08:41 AM

Timothy Delay
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
10, October 30, 2012
Question: 7. Why does this society need everything to be a game. Describe the new game of “finding Montag.”

Answers: Society need everything to be a game because, it keeps them preoccupied from imported matters like the war. This game of finding Montag is used half way through the night, and is played be opening the door when the host tells the audience to open their door and look for Montag. “Everyone in every house in every street open a front or rear door or look from the windows. The fugitive cannot escape if everyone in the next minute looks from his house” (pg 63).

Posted by: Timothy Delay at November 1, 2012 12:27 PM

Kasey McDearis
Dr. Hobbs
ENG311 CA05
1 November 2012

Question: #5 Part One: What observations does Clarisse make about how Montag differs from the other firemen?

Answer: Clarisse noticed that even when she would ask a crazy and insane question, or tell him to do something she wants him to do, that he would do it, with no questions asked. For example, she told him to look up at the moon and find the man in it, and he did. Knowing that the other men would never do the things that he does, she finds him different.

Posted by: Kasey McDearis at November 1, 2012 08:14 PM

Kasey McDearis
Dr. Hobbs
ENG311 CA05
1 November 2012

Question: #20. What is the promise at the end of the novel?

Answer: The promise that is made at the end of this novel is that, there will be peace, and promise of a better world. A new era will begin. It will be a world where people can speak and have their own ideas. That books will not be destroyed, but read instead.

Posted by: Kasey McDearis at November 1, 2012 08:20 PM

Leah Hollingsworth
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
1 November 2012

Homework Question Part II: Why does Montag read “Dover Beach” aloud to the ladies?

Answer: Montag is infuriated by the ladies’ ignorance. "’Scare hell out of them, that's what, scare the living daylights out!’" (Bradbury 46). He wants to read from the book out of spite, but in his anger he accidentally speaks to Faber aloud in front of everyone. He is convinced by Faber and his wife to cover up his faux pas at the last minute. “’Ladies, once a year, every fireman's allowed to bring one book home, from the old days, to show his family how silly it all was, how nervous that sort of thing can make you, how crazy. Guy's surprise tonight is to read you one sample to show how mixed-up things were, so none of us will ever have to bother our little old heads about that junk again, isn't that right, darling?’" says Millie (Bradbury 46). He then reads it to show them how ‘silly’ it is.
Page numbers were taken from the PDF version.

Posted by: Leah Hollingsworth at November 1, 2012 09:33 PM

Leah Hollingsworth
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
2 November 2012

Question Part III: Beatty’s last words were, “Hand it over, Guy.” Reflect upon Montag’s last words to Beatty, “We never burned right.” What does it all mean?

Answer: Earlier Beatty says “…’Its real beauty is that [fire] destroys responsibility and consequences. A problem gets too burdensome, then into the furnace with it. Now, Montag, you're a burden. And fire will lift you off my shoulders, clean, quick, sure; nothing to rot later. Antibiotic, aesthetic, practical” (Bradbury 53). I think Montag’s last words to Beatty are referring to this. Burning is supposed to get rid of responsibility, consequences, and burdens according to Beatty, but Montag sees that the way they burned books, houses, and people did not have that effect, so he concludes that they did not do it correctly.
Page numbers were taken from the PDF version.

Posted by: Leah Hollingsworth at November 2, 2012 01:33 AM

De’Nisha Butler
English 311 CA05
Dr. Hobbs
October 31st, 2012

In-Class Question

Question: What does Montag remember when he is wondering where to get a teacher to help him understand books? Who is the English Professor? (Provide more than his name).

Answer: The English Professor is Faber. Montag remembers once again the thought of the man he met in the green park a year ago. This thought was with him quite a lot recently. He thought about meeting a man who was afraid of him and timid at first. And how the man was a retired English Professor, and during their conversation the Professor Faber said "I don't talk things, sir," said Faber. "I talk the meaning of things. I sit here and know I'm alive." Montag sought after Professor Faber to help him understand books.
Page 34

Homework Question

Question: What is Mildred’s main concern as she runs out of the house?

Answer: Mildred’s main concern as she runs out the house is that Beatty will find out that they are keeping books in their house and reading them.

Posted by: De'Nisha Butler at November 2, 2012 10:22 AM

Sherman Milton III
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311: Survey of Major 20th Century Writers
2 November 2012

Question:
Why does Montag say that Beatty wanted to die?

Answer:
The reason why Montag said that Beatty wanted to die is because of the way he was acting. It was hurtful for Montag, but it was the truth. Instead of trying to save himself Beatty just stood there (56). Beatty is just one of those people who do not really care about things and does things to irritate people.

Posted by: Sherman Milton at November 2, 2012 10:25 AM

Summer Taylor
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311

In Class part 2: question 9. Montag does not know which book he should turn in to Beatty. What are some of his concerns in deciding which book to turn in?

Answer: Montag has many concers in deciding which book to turn in to Beatty. He does not know what books are more important and which are more rare to find. Also he does not know if Beatty knows which book he stole, and if he turns in the wrong book, then Beatty may think that he has stolen many books. "It might be the last copy in this part of the world."
"You've got to hand it back tonight, don't you know? Captain Beatty knows you've got
it, doesn't he?"
"I don't think he knows which book I stole. But how do I choose a substitute? Do I
turn in Mr. Jefferson? Mr. Thoreau? Which is least valuable? If I pick a substitute and
Beatty does know which book I stole, he'll guess we've an entire library here" (Bradbury 35)!

Posted by: Summer Taylor at November 2, 2012 11:21 AM

Jason Anderson/Marcus Chisholm
Dr.Hobbs
ENG311 CA05
Fahrenheit 451
10/31/12

Question: What event occurs that night which provides Montag with an impression of the state of society? What is that impression?

Answer: Mildred commits suicide by taking over 30 pills at once. She is brought back to life by a pair of impersonal workers who use machines to remove her blood and replace it with fresh blood. The impersonal nature of the event shows that everything in society is robotic and impersonal, and that some people are unhappy.(p.14)

Posted by: Jason/Marcus at November 2, 2012 11:56 AM

Summer Taylor
Dr Hobbs
ENG 311 Survey of Major 20th Century Writers
2 November 2012

Question: 12. What is Mildred’s main concern as she runs out of the house?

Mildred's main concern concern as she leaves the house is for her "family" and for her things, not her husband or their saftey. "She shoved the valise in the waiting beetle, climbed in, and sat mumbling, "Poor family, poor family, oh everything gone, everything, everything gone now ...." (Bradbury 52).

Posted by: Summer Taylor at November 2, 2012 12:10 PM

Jason Anderson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG311 CA05
Fahrenheit 451
11/2/12
Question 19: Describe the effects of war as Montag imagined them.

Answer:"...and then the city rolled over and fell down dead. The sound of its death came after." (p.153) Montag sees the destruction of the city as though the city and bombs are in opposite places: down is up and up is down. The resulting image is that of chaos. Granger describes the destruction as part of a cycle of a phoenix: death and rebirth. Granger also calls the destroyed city a patch of baking powder: everything is reduced to dust. This brings about an image from the bible of ashes to ashes and dust to dust.

Posted by: Jason Anderson at November 2, 2012 12:33 PM

Sarah Winans
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
2 November 2012

Question: (#8) What does Montag think his feelings would be if his wife were to die?

Answer: Montag seems to accept this and would rather have her die than live as a robot. She has lost her personality and her want to live, which makes him sad. "For it would be the
dying of an unknown, a street face, a newspaper image, and it was suddenly so very
wrong that he had begun to cry, not at death but at the thought of not crying at death,
a silly empty man near a silly empty woman, while the hungry snake made her still
more empty" (Page 20).

Posted by: Sarah Winans at November 2, 2012 02:35 PM

Leah Hollingsworth
Timothy Delay
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
2 November 2012

Question: Beatty tells Montag that firement are “custodians of peace of mind” and that they stand against “those who want to make everyone unhappy with conflicting theory and thought.” How well are the firemen accomplishing these objectives? Are conflicting ideas the only source of unhappiness in their society? What other sources might there be? Can conflicting ideas exist even without books that have been destroyed and outlawed?

Answer: The firemen are not very successful at being “custodians of peace of mind.” People are still very unhappy, which we know because a high suicide rate is hinted at. “’I've heard that, too. I've never known any dead man killed in a war. Killed jumping off buildings, yes, like Gloria's husband last week, but from wars? No’” (Bradbury 44). Conflicting ideas are not the only source of unhappiness. People are still bothered deep down when they treat each other like objects. “’Go home.’ Montag fixed his eyes upon her, quietly. "Go home and think of your first husband divorced and your second husband killed in a jet and your third husband blowing his brains out, go home and think of the dozen abortions you've had, go home and think of that and your damn Caesarian sections, too, and your children who hate your guts!’ he yelled” (Bradbury 47). It is clear that Mrs. Bowles is bothered when she starts crying over the poem. Conflicting ideas can exist through spoken word, body language, and other outlets of expression, if books are all destroyed.
Page numbers were taken from the PDF version.

Posted by: Leah Hollingsworth at November 2, 2012 02:53 PM

Sherman Milton & Delia Mulvihill
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311: Survey of Major 20th Century Writers
2 November 2012

Question:
One suicide and one near-suicide occur in this book. One woman, who shuns books but loves TV and driving fast in her car, anesthetizes herself,; "We get these cases nine or ten a night," says the medical technician. Another woman, who cherishes her books, sets herself on fire with them; "These fanatics always try suicide," says the fire captain. Why would two people who seem to be so different from each other try to take their own lives? Why does suicide happen so frequently in Montag's society?"

Answer:
The reason why suicide is so big in Montag’s society is because of all the rules and regulations. The people are unhappy and they all are dying for attention. All they do is go by what they must and follow the rules of the society. The people in the society cannot think for themselves they do everything that they are told so they really aren’t living. They are just doing what they are told.

An example of this being frequent is, “Beatty raised his hand in which was concealed the igniter. We're due back at the house. Besides, these fanatics always try suicide; the pattern's familiar" (18).

Posted by: Sherman Milton at November 2, 2012 02:53 PM

Sarah Winans, Joe May, Joey Lontrato, Denishe Butler
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
2 November 2012

Question: Why would society make "being a pedestrian" a crime?

Answer: Society would make "being a pedestrian" a crime because the people are supposed to be controlled by robotic technology. Being a pedestrian would involve being human--which includes being independent and having the ability to think for yourself and make your own decisions. That is something the society would not accept. "It's like being a pedestrian, only rarer. My uncle was arrested another time did I tell you? For being pedestrian. Oh, we're most peculiar" (page 4).

Posted by: Sarah Winans at November 2, 2012 02:55 PM

Sarah Winans
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
2 November 2012

Question: What are Montag's impressions of the land across the river?

Answer: Montag’s impressions of the land across the river was that it was beautiful and much different than his city that he lived in. It seemed peaceful and free, which is something his society does not experience. “Now there was only the cold river and Montag floating in a sudden peacefulness, away from the city and the lights and the chase, away from everything” (64).

Posted by: Sarah Winans at November 2, 2012 02:57 PM

Bryan Baldwin
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
02 November 2012

Question: "Explain the significance of the phoenix."

The phoenix is a symbol of rebirth from destruction and a sign of strength to rise and rebuild. The phoenix symbolizes the rebirth of mankind in the story as well as Montag's spiritual resurrection.

Posted by: Bryan Baldwin at November 2, 2012 04:02 PM

Jason Anderson
Shaina McSweeney
Dr. Hobbs
ENG311 CA05
Fahrenheit 451

Question: Why does Beatty program the hound to track Montag even before Montag stole the book? Do you believe Beatty had seen him steal books before? Or is it that Beatty had detected a change in Montag's attitude or behavior? Cite incidents from the book that support your answer.

Answer: There is no evidence that Montag stole books or thought independently before he met Clarisse. Beatty realizes that Montag is changing in behavior and attitude.(p.25) We also learn that Clarisse and her family was under surveillance long before her death. Therefore it is likely that Montag was seen with Clarisse, and was therefore already under suspicion. (p.57, 107)

Posted by: Jason/Shaina at November 4, 2012 01:18 PM

Jason Anderson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG311 CA05
Fahrenheit 451

Question: Once Montag becomes a violent revolutionary, why does the government purposely capture an innocent man in his place instead of tracking down the real Montag? Might the government believe that Montag is no longer a threat?

Answer: "They're faking. You threw them off at the river. They can't admit it. They know they can hold their audience only so long. The show's got to have a snap ending, quick!"(p.141) Granger states that the government must remain in control and give an illusion of order and power. The people in that society have no patience and must be kept calm if the government wishes to remain in control.
Montag is no longer a threat because he is outside of society and can no longer influence others. The government is destroyed in the war and people like Montag are the only survivors so a new society will someday be built that will have books.

Posted by: Jason Anderson at November 4, 2012 03:09 PM

Leah Hollingsworth
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
5 November 2012

Question: Trace the steps that lead to Montag’s decision to preserve books rather than destroy them.

Answer: His conversation with Clarisse first sparked his interest in reading books. “’Do you ever read any of the books you burn?’ He laughed. ‘That's against the law!’” (Bradbury 3). Then, when he sees the woman in her house when they are preparing it for burning, he really thinks burning books is a bad idea. “She made the empty rooms roar with accusation and shake down a fine dust of guilt that was sucked in their nostrils as they plunged about” (Bradbury 17).
Page numbers were taken from the PDF version.

Posted by: Leah Hollingsworth at November 5, 2012 01:16 AM

Sherman Milton III
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311: Survey of Major 20th Century Writers
5 November 2012

Question: Discuss how Montag's changing perception of fire mirrors his personal development.

Answer: Different things throughout the book changed the way Montag thought and aided his personal development. Clarisse was one who started him thinking outside the box in my opinion. She brought up different points in their first meeting that juggled his brain a little. For example, she brought up how firemen use to put out fires instead of creating them (3).

Even though being a fireman was his profession and it afforded him his lifestyle he started to look at it differently. He stopped loving it because it hurt people. After he started experiencing the hurt himself he started to change into a better person. The lady who burned herself because they burned her home really affected him (18).

Posted by: Sherman Milton at November 5, 2012 08:00 AM

Kasey McDearis Summer Taylor
Dr. Hobbs
ENG311 CA05
5 November 2012

Question: why do you think the fireman's rule book credited Benjamin Franklin, writer, publisher, political leader, inventor, ambassador, as being the first fireman?

Answer: Benjamin Franklin opened the first fire station in PA. This is why the fireman's rule book credited him.

Posted by: Kasey McDearis at November 5, 2012 10:02 AM

Kasey McDearis
Dr. Hobbs
ENG311 CA05
5 November 2012

Question: Discuss the dual image of fire in the novel.

Answer: it shows dual symbols, one of destruction and one of warmth. Also it shows goodness and rebirth. Bradbury uses a lot of symbolism in this novel to show how powerful the idea of anti censorship is.

Posted by: Kasey McDearis at November 5, 2012 10:42 AM

Summer Taylor
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 Survey of Major 20th Century Writers
5 November 2012


Question) 15. Describe Clarisse’s effect on Montag and her function in the novel. How and why does she change him? Why does she vanish from the novel?

Clarisse's main effect on Montag, is that she makes him think. "But my uncle says that was merely rationalizing it; the real reason, hidden underneath, might be they didn't want people sitting like that, doing nothing, rocking, talking; that was the wrong kind of social life. People talked too much. And they had time to think" (Bradbury 30). Clarisse wakes Montag up and makes him think about "real" things; things that matter. She vanishes early on in the novel in order to give Montag a chance to figure things out on his own. Clarisse may have started him down this path of awakenment, but Montag is the one who needs to finish it. Her main function in this novel is to be that "ever present, ever absent, something to strive for." If the reader thinks of Clarisse in this way, then she seems more like an idea or a goal. Montag see's Clarisse's ideas and even her way of life as a goal he wants o attain. He wants to learn her wisdom, like how firefighters used to put out fires and not start them, and Montag also wants to be able to study people and understand people like she does; not just look at the pretty colors on the screen. "But most of all," she said, "I like to watch people. Sometimes I ride the subway all day and look at them and listen to them. I just want to figure out who they are and what they want and where they're going. Sometimes I even go to the Fun Parks and ride in the jet cars when they race on the edge of town at midnight and the police don't care as long as they're insured. As long as everyone has ten thousand insurance everyone's happy. Sometimes I sneak around and listen in subways. Or I listen at soda fountains, and do you know what?"
"What?"
"People don't talk about anything" (Bradbury 14). Clarisse is able to change Montag, because Montag wants a change in his life because he was already unhappy. He realized he was unhappy; unlike the rest of the nation that were deluding themselves into thinking that they were happy.

Posted by: Summer Taylor at November 5, 2012 11:21 AM

Sarah Winans
Dr. Hobbs
5 November 2012
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers

Question: Discuss the blurred distinction between life and death in Fahrenheit 451,
referring to Mildred, Clarisse, and the life-like machines that dominate society.

Answer: I think that there is a blurred distinction between life and death because I think it is backwards in this book. I believe that neither Mildred nor the life-like machines are actually living, I think they might as well be dead since they have no personalities and no individuality. I believe that Clarisse's life was cut short because she was truly living, and she questioned her society around her. "That's what I thought." She chewed her toast. "Sore stomach, but I'm hungry as allget-out. Hope I didn't do anything foolish at the party" (page 8). This is what Mildred says the morning after she almost killed herself. She can't remember that she even attempted, and believes that there was a party. She's not really even living her own true life!

Posted by: Sarah Winans at November 5, 2012 01:49 PM

De’Nisha Butler
Dr. Hobbs
English 311 CA05
November 5th, 2012

Question: How does Faber define the value of books? Does his definition of “quality” apply to media other than printed books? Do you think his definitions are accurate or not? Explain.

Answer: Professor Faber describes books on page 38 saying, “They show the pores in the face of life”. No his definition does not apply to media other than printed books; Faber asked Montag the question “Do you know why books such as this are so important? ……..And what does the word quality mean? To me it means texture. This book has pores. It has features.” I think his definitions are accurate because books are extremely valuable; it is how humans acquire knowledge. School was created to educate people, during this process of being educated books are used.

Posted by: De'Nisha Butler at November 5, 2012 01:57 PM

Timothy Delay
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
11, November 4, 2012
Question: 10. Granger, spokesperson for the group on the rail road tracks, tells Montag, “right now we have a horrible job; we’re waiting for the war to begin and , as quickly, end.. when the war’s over, perhaps we can be of some use in the world.” Based in what you’ve read of the world these men live in, do you believe that the books they carry inside themselves will make a difference? Might this difference be positive or negative? Point out episodes in Fahrenheit to support your response.

Answers: No, I do not think that these men can make a difference. It not the fact that Granger group carry the books inside themselves that will make the difference. It if Grander group can change the mind of the survivor that have lived in fear of books all their lives. Most of what people thought about book can be summed up by Beatty rant to Monatag “You think you can walk on water with your books. Well, the world can get by just fine without them.” (pg 54) This is going to be the great challenges to the group, not retelling the story but convening people that books are not bad.

Posted by: Timothy Delay at November 5, 2012 04:05 PM

-----------------


*NOTE* The deadline for this particular assignment has now passed. Any comments listed below are *ONLY* for the reposting of comments that I specifically asked to be revised or are ones from non-student posters. Any 'student' posts below that missed the assignment deadline will not get credit for the assignment.


~ Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: Dr. Hobbs at November 6, 2012 08:03 PM

Wollinsky Mendez
Hobbs
ENG 311 Survey of Major 20th Century Writers
December 4, 2012

Question: Describe the mechanical hound.

Answer: "That's sad," said Montag, quietly, "because all we put into it is hunting and finding
and killing. What a shame if that's all it can ever know."'
Beatty snorted, gently. "Hell! It's a fine bit of craftsmanship, a good rifle that can fetch
its own target and guarantees the bull's-eye every time."
"That's why," said Montag. "I wouldn't want to be its next victim." (Bradbury, 12) The mechanical hound is scary to Montag because it is so high tech and accurate that it is an unstoppable machine. "The Hound half rose in its kennel and looked at him with green-blue neon light
flickering in its suddenly activated eyebulbs. It growled again, a strange rasping
combination of electrical sizzle, a frying sound, a scraping of metal, a turning of cogs
that seemed rusty and ancient with suspicion"(Bradbury, 11) Monntag is curious about the hound but also keeps his distance. He knows what it is capable of and is nervous around it.

Posted by: Wollinsky Mendez at December 4, 2012 11:06 AM

Wollinsky Mendez
Hobbs
ENG 311 Survey of Major 20th Century Writers
December 4, 2012

Question: How do the women react?

Answer: When the women are read the book, there is a mixture of emotions. One woman starts crying and the others feel that it is highly inappropriate. They are all scared and do not want to be apart of the reading. "Mrs. Phelps was crying.
The others in the middle of the desert watched her crying grow very loud as her face
squeezed itself out of shape. They sat, not touching her, bewildered by her display.
She sobbed uncontrollably. Montag himself was stunned and shaken.
"Sh, sh," said Mildred. "You're all right, Clara, now, Clara, snap out of it! Clara, what's
wrong?"
"I-I,", sobbed Mrs. Phelps, "don't know, don't know, I just don't know, oh oh..."
Mrs. Bowles stood up and glared at Montag. "You see? I knew it, that's what I wanted
to prove! I knew it would happen! I've always said, poetry and tears, poetry and
suicide and crying and awful feelings, poetry and sickness; all that mush! Now I've
had it proved to me. You're nasty, Mr. Montag, you're nasty!"(Bradbury, 47) Montag's reading was not very successful. In a way, he hurt the ladies that he was reading to. Clara swore to never come into their house again.

Posted by: Wollinsky Mendez at December 4, 2012 11:15 AM

Wollinsky Mendez
Hobbs
ENG 311 Survey of Major 20th Century Writers
December 4, 2012

Question: Interpret the following passage: “Mildred, you didn’t put in the alarm?”

Answer: "The front door opened; Mildred came down the steps, running, one suitcase held with
a dream-like clenching rigidity in her fist, as a beetle-taxi hissed to the curb.
"Mildred! "
She ran past with her body stiff, her face floured with powder, her mouth gone,
without lipstick." Mildred could not believe that he had read the books in front of her friends. She was leaving him because she could not deal with his difference anymore. She called and also did her friends. They wanted Montag to die because he read books. ""Was it my wife turned in the alarm?"
Beatty nodded. "But her friends turned in an alarm earlier, that I let ride. One way or
the other, you'd have got it. It was pretty silly, quoting poetry around free and easy
like that. It was the act of a silly damn snob." Beatty wanted Montag to feel the pain of what he did. In the end, Montag killed Beatty with the flamethrower and then started the chase.

Posted by: Wollinsky Mendez at December 4, 2012 11:23 AM

Wollinsky Mendez
Hobbs
ENG 311 Survey of Major 20th Century Writers
December 4, 2012

Question: Discuss the idea of conformity versus individuality as presented in Fahrenheit 45.

Answer: In this novel, Montag suffers to be an individual. He wants to be his own person and not be in this endless loop like eveyone else. He meets this little girl who starts to open his mind to the things around him. "I sometimes think drivers don't know what grass is, or flowers, because they never
see them slowly," she said. "If you showed a driver a green blur, Oh yes! he'd say,
that's grass! A pink blur? That's a rose-garden! White blurs are houses. Brown blurs
are cows. My uncle drove slowly on a highway once. He drove forty miles an hour
and they jailed him for two days. Isn't that funny, and sad, too?"(Bradbury, 3) People not knowing what grass looks like makes Montag wonder about his life. Even though later in the book we find that he has been collecting books, we also see that he is conflicted internally with what he does everyday. He burns people and books because they are against the law. He rely's on Faber for guidance and when he is trying to escape the dog."About what? Me? My house? I deserve everything. Run, for God's sake. Perhaps I
can delay them here--"(Bradbury, 62) Faber believes in Montag and knows that he wants to escape from the prism of everyday life. He helps him to escape and in turn helps him find his individuality.

Posted by: Wollinsky Mendez at December 4, 2012 11:34 AM

Shaina McSweeney
Dr. Hobbs
ENG311CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
15. Describe the mechanical hound.
“The mechanical Hound slept but did not sleep, lived but did not live in its gently humming, gently vibrating, softly illuminated kennel back in a dark corner of the fire house. The dim light of one in the morning, the moonlight from the open sky framed through the great window, touched here and there on the brass and copper and the steel of the faintly trembling beast. Light flickered on bits of ruby glass and on sensitive capillary hairs in the nylon-brushed nostrils of the creature that quivered gently, its eight legs spidered under it on rubber padded paws” (11).

PDF

Posted by: Shaina McSweeney at December 5, 2012 02:59 AM

Kasey McDearis Summer Taylor
Dr. Hobbs
ENG311 CA05
5 November 2012

Question: why do you think the fireman's rule book credited Benjamin Franklin, writer, publisher, political leader, inventor, ambassador, as being the first fireman?

Answer: Benjamin Franklin opened the first fire station in PA. This is why the fireman's rule book credited him. ""Established, 1790, to burn English-influenced books in the Colonies. First Fireman: Benjamin Franklin."
RULE 1. Answer the alarm swiftly.
2. Start the fire swiftly.
3. Burn everything.
4. Report back to firehouse immediately.
5. Stand alert for other alarms" (Bradbury 16).

Posted by: Summer Taylor at December 5, 2012 11:07 AM

Delia Mulvihill
Dr. Hobbs
ENG311 CA05
Farenheit 451 Homework 1

Question 5: What final question does Clarisse ask Montag on the night of their first encounter? Why is
the question important to the plot?

Answer: The final question Clarisse asks Montag on the night of their first encounter is if Montag was happy. “Then she seemed to remember something and came back to look at him with wonder and curiosity. "Are you happy?" she said.” (Bradbury 4). This question is important to the plot because it makes him start to think about his life and question things.

Posted by: Delia Mulvihill at December 5, 2012 12:46 PM

Delia Mulvihill
Dr. Hobbs
ENG311 CA05
Fareneheit 451 Homework 2

Question: Why does Montag say that Beatty wanted to die?
Answer: Montag says that Beatty wanted to die because he didn’t even defend himself against him and just let him burn him. “In the middle of the crying Montag knew it for the truth. Beatty had wanted to die. He had just stood there, not really trying to save himself, just stood there, joking, needling, thought Montag, and the thought was enough to stifle his sobbing and let him pause for air. How strange, strange, to want to die so much that you let a man walk around armed and then instead of shutting up and staying alive, you go on yelling at people and making fun of them until you get them mad, and then…” (Bradbury 56).

Posted by: Delia Mulvihill at December 5, 2012 12:52 PM

Joe May

16. What does “antisocial” mean? What does it mean in the society of Fahrenheit 451? To
whom is the term applied?

Clarisse is considered anti social because she enjoys to physically engage people, talk, go on adventures and think for herself. In this post apocalytic world opinions and free spirited people are considered anti-social which is the opposite of the world today. Social beings dont talk and stare at the TV all day.

Posted by: Joe May at December 5, 2012 01:01 PM

Delia Mulvihill
Dr. Hobbs
ENG311 CA05
Farenheit 451 Whole Book Discussion Homework

Question: Once Montag becomes a violent revolutionary, why does the government purposely capture an innocent man in his place instead of tracking down the real Montag? Might the government believe that Montag is no longer a threat?
Answer: The government purposely captures an innocent man in his place because they want to show society that they are not messing around with any rule breakers and there are immediate consequences to breaking the rules. If they went on a man hunt and Montag got away it could possibly spark a revolution and people would see that they could get away with breaking the rules. By killing an innocent man, that no one knows is not the real Montag, it kind of prevents people from thinking they can get away with it and the government is willing to kill even a Fireman to keep the rules in order.

Posted by: Delia Mulvihill at December 5, 2012 01:03 PM

Wollinsky Mendez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
December 4, 2012
Animal Farm vs. Fahrenheit 451
During the course of the semester, there were 10 novels and plays that were assigned to read. There are two novels that were assigned and show strong similarities but also show differences in how the ideas were unfolded. The first novel was George Orwell’s, Animal Farm, which showed how the common animals revolted against a tyrant. The second novel was Bradbury’s Fahrenheit 451 which showed the progression of Guy Montag’s curiosity and opposition to the current law. Even though both novels show the ideas of the public taking back control, the stray from everyday life, and the final outcomes are similar, Fahrenheit 451 presents a better solution for dealing with their tyrant.
In Animal Farm, the animals of Manor Farm have had enough of their farmer. They believe that they are being mistreated and do not find that he cares about the wellbeing of the animals. One night, the farmer goes out drinking and passes out before he is able to feed the animals. This upsets the animals to the point of a rebellion. Old Major had foreseen this happening before his death and he put the idea of rebellion in the heads of the animals. “I do not know when that Rebellion will come, it might be in a week or in a hundred years, but I know, as surely as I see this straw beneath my feet, that sooner or later justice will be done. Fix your eyes on that, comrades, throughout the short remainder of your lives!” (Orwell, 4) When the rebellion occurred, the animals stood together as Major predicted and they won the farm for themselves. “With one accord, though nothing of the kind had been planned beforehand, they ung themselves upon their tormentors. Jones and his men suddenly found themselves being butted and kicked from all sides.” (Orwell, 8) In Fahrenheit 451, Guy Montag is a firefighter that burns books for a living. He lives in a world where it is the law to burn any books. Although it is illegal to read books, he is curious about the content of books and he starts to read them. The captain knows that he has books in his possession and so warns Montag about the consequences. "We don't get overanxious or mad. We let the fireman keep the book twenty-four hours. If he hasn't burned it by then, we simply come and burn it for him." (Bradbury, 29) In both books, there is the law of the land that the main character does not like. In Animal Farm, the animals are ruled by the farmer and then by their fellow pig, Napoleon. Even though Napoleons rule is strict, there is still hope for the animals. They believe that there is a better life for them and they want to feel that security. In Fahrenheit 451, Montag feels no security because he is stuck in the world of the firefighters. He finds someone who can help him reach his goals and they make an effort to explore books, Faber, who becomes his mentor. Montag’s mind is opened to a whole new reality, one where he feels in control of his thoughts and actions. Animal Farm ends very differently from Fahrenheit 451 in that the animals fought for something different and ended up in the same situation. They ended up being ruled by the pigs and all of their ideas of freedom were crushed. “Twelve voices were shouting in anger, and they were all alike. No question, now, what had happened to the faces of the pigs. The creatures outside looked from pig to man, and from man to pig, and from pig to man again; but already it was impossible to say which was which.”(Orwell, 55) The animals feel betrayed and do not feel the same unity as they did in the beginning. In the beginning of Fahrenheit, Montag feels trapped and during the novel he develops his ideas of escaping. Being a firefighter is not what he wants to do because of certain situations that occurred. When he burned the woman in her house because she did not want to give up the books, he came to realize that he needed a drastic change in what he believed in and in his everyday life. His curiosity was peeked and he began reading books more and more. Over the years he collected 20 books and then started to read them. “When he was done he looked down upon some twenty books lying at his wife's feet.
"I'm sorry," he said. "I didn't really think. But now it looks as if we're in this together."(Bradbury, 31) When he got caught with the books Beatty was killed and he was chased out of the city by a mechanical hound. This is interesting because in Animal Farm, dogs played an important role in showing authority in the farm. The animals did not come out of line or else the dogs would kill the animals. “At this there was a terrible baying sound outside, and nine enormous dogs
wearing brass-studded collars came bounding into the barn. They dashed straight for Snowball, who only sprang from his place just in time to escape their snapping jaws.” (Orwell, 22) In Montag’s situation, he was chased and he escaped by running into the lake. The hound that came after him lost his scent and he was free to join the other people on the railroads. He finds freedom with the group of people that also enjoy knowledge and reading. “To everything there is a season. Yes. A time to break down, and a time to build up. Yes. A time to keep silence and a time to speak. Yes, all that. But what else. What else? Something, something . . .” (Bradbury, 76) He finds what he is looking for even though he had to leave everything he knew behind unlike the animals that were stuck in an endless loop of being reined forcefully.

References
Bradbury, Ray. Fahrenheit 451. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1967. Print.
Orwell, George. Animal Farm;. New York: Harcourt, Brace, 1954. Print.

Posted by: Wollinsky Mendez at December 5, 2012 02:41 PM

Sherman Milton III
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 311: Survey of Major 20th Century Writers
5 December 2012
Respect and its Impact on Society
At Saint Leo University, there are core values that the university pushes to help follow the mission of the institution. The third core value, respect is a very important piece. One may ask, “What does respect mean?” A simple definition of respect in the university sense is to have a positive feeling towards someone or thing; that one may look up to or think highly of because of the qualities that they possess. Respect plays a substantial role in the books, “Fahrenheit 451” and “Lord of the Flies,” for there was not much. The lack of respect in both societies was the reason why they both were failing. One may gain respect through a variety of methods, but a few simple ways are to respect others, be ethical, and be a role model.

Respect is a two way street in many cases. If one wants others to respect them, they must respect others first. In the books “Fahrenheit 451” and “Lord of the Flies,” respect is clearly something that the main characters do not receive from others. Captain Beatty in “Fahrenheit 451,” is a captain who does not show respect towards other individuals; therefore, he is not respected. His problem is that he hates books so much that anyone who reads them, he transfers that same hatred towards them. He states, “I want you to do this job all by your lonesome, Montag” (Bradbury 53). Beatty made him burn down his own home for reading books. Jack’s actions in “Lord of the Flies” were also negative. He did not gain a lot of respect because he does not respect others. Golding writes, “…Jack smacked Piggy’s head. Piggy’s glasses flew off and tinkled on the rocks. Piggy cried out in terror” (Golding 100). That is a great example of why Piggy and some others do not respect him.

Being ethical is another factor that plays into the concept of respect. Many times people misunderstand the two words ethical and legal. Slavery was not ethical, but it was legal back in the day. In “Fahrenheit 451,” reading books were illegal and were burned. It was not ethical to burn books just for the fact that people were reading them. Montag is respected towards the end of the story because he put the law aside side and started being ethical. That is why the hobo camp accepted him. One of the hobos said to him, "You're welcome here" (Bradbury 67). Ralph is ethical throughout “Lord of the Flies” even though many of the kids stop following him. A great example of him being ethical is when he sticks up for Piggy. Ralphs confronts the others about Piggy glasses and states, “You’ve got to give them back” (Golding 254). Being ethical is all about doing the right thing and that is why many people respect people for doing it.

Being a role model is another way one can gain respect from others. When others look up to someone, they typically want to be like that person. The two books showed that by being a role model, one could gain respect. In “Fahrenheit 451,” Montag was the role model and people looked up to him, especially the old man. Bradbury writes, “"I feel alive for the first time in years," said Faber. “ I feel I'm doing what I should have done a lifetime ago. For a little while I'm not afraid” (Bradbury 60). He has respect for Montag and hope, just for the fact that he was a great role model. In “Lord of the Flies,” Ralph is the role model because he does the right thing. In the beginning, when he was elected leader he put Jack in charge of the choir. Ralph states, “The choir belongs to you, of course. They could be the army- Or the hunters-” (Golding 29). The fact that he saw Jack a little uneasy when he became leader and did something about it shows that he is a role model.

The overall concept of respect in both “Fahrenheit 451” and “Lord of the Flies” can be viewed from many different angles. It plays an important role in the books and here at Saint Leo University just because it is a valuable concept in the world. Throughout my college career, here at Saint Leo University I learned that respect gets you a long way. In both stories, there was a lack of respect and there was a lot of chaos. Between Beatty and Jack, they did not have respect for others, were not ethical, and were not role models for others.

Works Cited
Golding, William. Lord of the Flies. London. Faber and Faber, 1954. Print.
Bradbury, Ray. Fahrenheit 451. New York: Ballatine Books, 1991. Print.

Posted by: Sherman Milton III at December 5, 2012 02:49 PM

Bryan Baldwin
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311
02 December 2012

Technology as a Help or Hindrance

Technology is an ever-evolving part of modern life today. It always being improved upon in some way, shape, or form. Technology is a process or product that is created to help ease the life of its user. Today it is all about having the newest, biggest, brightest, or best ‘thing’. With technology playing key roles in Fahrenheit 451 and Animal Farm, it can be seen as a great help or a terrible hindrance.
The role of technology in Fahrenheit 451 is so overwhelming that it seems the characters in the book can never escape it. The amounts of advanced technological systems in the story provide the characters with an almost meaningless existence. They are provided for and aided by some machine or gadget. People are afraid of some of the technology in the story, such as the mechanical hound. Millie is so depressed with the world that she lives in, that she tries to take her own life. She is actually saved by a piece of technology. The characters in the story At the end of the story, the city and all of the technology is destroyed. “"It's flat," he said, a long time later. "City looks like a heap of baking-powder. It's gone." And a long time after that. "I wonder how many knew it was coming? I wonder how many were surprised?"” (Bradbury 75) Montag then begins to rebuild a simple life and society free from the bounds of technology.
The role of technology in Animal Farm is very underwhelming at first and almost primitive at best. The technology that is utilized in the story is built by the working animals and used only by the animals that govern the workers. The ones that build the windmill are essentially mindless workers that the pigs control and can use to their advantage. They are even forced into the work under the Commandments set forth by the pigs. The animals also become more and more depressed as the story goes on, and the pigs become more and more powerful. The technology used becomes such a big issue that neighboring farm animals go to war over its use. In the end, the pigs become the ‘rulers’ in a sense and the farm returns to the way that it started, with all of the animals living their normal lives again. “Henceforward the farm was to be known as ‘The Manor Farm’ which, he believed, was its correct and original name.” (Orwell 54) Technology and advancement had contributed to the rise of the pigs’ power and ultimately to the demise of their grand vision.
In both works, it appears that technology is a great asset to the societies. It is seen as this great ‘thing’ that will improve the lives of its users or make everything easier or better. However, when a closer look is taken, it is glaringly obvious that technology is indeed a great hindrance. Both societies ended up falling apart or failing in some way because of technology. Both ended up without wanting it or feeling like they needed it. Technology can be great, but it should not be allowed to take over a person’s life. Likewise, a person should not live their life around obtaining the latest and greatest ‘thing’.

Posted by: Bryan Baldwin at December 5, 2012 05:20 PM

Annie Hays
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary Worldview CA01
28 March 2015

Question: What two observations does Clarisse make about Montag’s conversational mannerisms? Why is this significant?

Answer: Clarisse notes that Montag looks at her when she speaks and he humors her chattering (Bradbury 21). This is significant because it shows Montag is not like other people. Clarisse even says, "That's why I think it's so strange you're a fireman, it just doesn't seem right for you, somehow (Bradbury 21). Montag is interested in the world just like Clarisse, he just has not taken the time to examine things until she came along. Montag loves being a fireman, and to learn that he is not the right kind of guy for the job is a huge revelation. After Clarisse started appearing, Montag began examining his life, and he must continue to discover things about his true self as the book continues (15).

Posted by: Annie Hays at March 28, 2015 05:13 PM

Racheljoy Capitola
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary Worldview CA01
29 March 2015

13. What test of love does Clarisse give Montag, and how does he respond to it? Why is this significant?

The test of love Clarisse gives Montag is to rub a dandelion under his chin because “if it rubs off, it means I’m in love. Has it?” (Bradbury 19). When Clarisse rubs the dandelion on her face, the fuzz rubs off on her chin. But when she rubs the dandelion on Montag’s face, the fuzz doesn’t rub off on his chin, and Clarisse makes the tactless comment: “‘What a shame,’ she said. ‘You’re not in love with anyone.’” (Bradbury 19) In response to Clarrise’s test, Montag becomes defensive and claims that he is in love. However, he fails to “conjure up a face that fits the words” (Bradbury 20) and ends up upset by the conversation.

The scene is significant because it reflects the emptiness the protagonist feels. His relationship with his wife is not romantic and he is bothered by Clarisse’s insightful questions and reflective thoughts. Although he tries to deny his inner feelings, he cannot completely hide them, which speaks a lot about his conflicted and confused character.

Posted by: Racheljoy Capitola at March 29, 2015 06:45 PM

Kenna Dieffenwierth
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 - Contemporary World View CA01
30 March 2015

Question: 15 .Describe and explain the mechanical hound. What is its purpose, who controls and maintains it, and why is it important to the story? Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: The mechanical hound is made from brass, copper, and steel. It has eight legs, rubber pads under its feet, green-blue neon eyes, and a needle that it uses to drug its prey before throwing it into the incinerator (Bradbury 24, 25). The hound is controlled and maintained by the firemen and their technicians (Bradbury 26, 27). It is used by some of the firemen to kill rats and other animals. They take bets on who it will kill first (Bradbury 25). It targets whatever they set it to target. A firehouse dog was once used to find and save people. Now it is used as an assassin to find and kill things. This goes along with the same idea that firemen now start fires instead of putting them out. This dog also shows Montag's guilty conscious and paranoia. "I wouldn't want to be its next victim.' 'Why? You got a guilty conscience about something?" (Bradbury 27). The hound's reaction to him tips him off that someone might know his secret. "If someone here in the firehouse knew about the ventilator then mightn't they 'tell' the Hound?" (Bradbury 27).

Posted by: Kenna Dieffenwierth at March 30, 2015 10:30 AM

Mekayla Davila
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary World View CA01
30 March 2015

Question:
Look up and then define, in your own words, the concept of “antisocial” What does it mean to be “antisocial” in the society of Fahrenheit 451? To whom is the term usually applied? Why is this significant and how is it different from OUR society?

Answer:
Antisocial in the society of Fahrenheit 451 is to actually be the normal way of social. Clarisse enjoys talking to others about worldly concepts and ideas. She does not believe social to be just in the same presence as others but not talking to each other. She believes conversations should be had, questions asked, thoughts provoked. This is why the society deems her antisocial because she does not agree with its ways. “I’m antisocial they say. I don’t mix. It’s so strange. I’m very social indeed. It all depends on what you mean by social doesn’t it? Social to me means talking to you about things like this” (Bradbury 29). This term is being applied to Clarisse but would normally be applied to anyone in the society that doesn’t agree with the norms. It is significant because it is such a switch from the normal “antisocial” that we know in our society. To us, antisocial means not engaging in any activity with others whatsoever (talking, hanging out, etc.) but in their society it means just the opposite.

Posted by: Mekayla Davila at March 30, 2015 11:28 AM

Craig Graves
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary World View CA01
29 March 2015

Question Part 1 #5:
At Montag’s point of realization when he enters the bedroom, what happens to the smile on his face, and what is his answer to Clarisse’s question? Why is this significant? Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words

Answer:
When Montag entered the bedroom, “he felt his smile slide away, melt, fold over and down on itself like tallow skin, like the stuff of a fantastic candle burning too low and now collapsing and now blown out (Bradbury 10).” Montag realized then that he was not happy as he had told Clarisse. This realization is significant because it means he is not following along with the mainstream social attitude of complacent happiness. In other words, Montag is living a lie. As the narrator puts it, “[Montag] wore his happiness like a mask (Bradbury 10).” Montag’s lack of happiness could cause problems for him in the future.

Posted by: Craig Graves at March 30, 2015 12:48 PM

Madison Brunk
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 The Contemporary World View CAO1
30 March 2015

Question: What final question does Clarisse ask Montag on the night of their first encounter? Why is the
question important to the plot? Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses)
to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words

Answer: As Montag and Clarisse reach the outside of her house, she runs away before suddenly turning, with a look of "wonder and curiosity. 'Are you happy?' she said." (Bradbury, 7) This question, though sudden and dismissed by Montag initially, begins to unravel his security in his identity, role in the community and his occupation. Clarisse's question. It gives him access to a vision he was blind to before, in which he sees that he does not gain fulfillment or happiness from burning books, living with his wife, or further: within the bounds of his community.

Posted by: Madison Brunk at March 30, 2015 12:52 PM

Stephen Pinol
Dr. Hobbs
HON-351 The Contemporary World View CA01
29 March 2015

Question: What event occurs the night of Montag’s encounter with Clarisse which provides him with an impression of the state of society? What is that impression? Why is it significant?

Answer: The event that occurs that night which provides Montag with an impression of the state of society is when he finds his wife lying on the bed because she had for gotten that she already had taken her pills. The impression was that she was dead. This is significant because the wife needs to have a transport of blood which in the end changes her character completely. The wife now acts like the rest of society and is more like a robot than anything else.

Posted by: Stephen Pinol at March 30, 2015 01:21 PM

Dalton Hart
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351: The Contemporary World View
30 March 2015

Question: Clarisse causes Montag to recall a childhood memory in which a wish was embedded. What was the significance of the memory and the wish?

Answer: While walking with Clarisse, Montag recalls a time, as a child, when the power in his house went out. Montag recalls, “One time, as a child, in a power failure, his mother had found and lit a last candle and there had been a brief hour of rediscovery, of such illumination that space lost its vast dimensions and drew comfortably around them,” (Bradbury 111). This memory illuminates the idea that Montag has been blinded by the world around him into believing he is happy. During the time with his mother, he was truly happy, and his wish was that the electricity would not come back too quickly, so that he could savor that moment of a “new” type of knowledge. Montag seemingly wishes to regain that sort of “rediscovery” that he felt when the power was off and he was with his mother.

Posted by: Dalton Hart at March 30, 2015 02:34 PM

Lyndsey Pospisil
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 The Contemporary World View CA01
30 March 2015

Question: Describe Clarisse’s personality. How is she different from/similar to Montag and/or other characters in the story, thus far?
Answer: Clarisse describes herself as “seventeen and crazy” (Bradbury 5). After Montag and Clarisse’s first encounter, Montag describes Clarisse of having an “incredible power of identification… [she is] an immense figure on the stage before him” (Bradbury 9). In the second encounter that Montag has with Clarisse, he tells her that she is “peculiar, aggravating, yet easy to forgive (Bradbury 21). Clarisse is different from Montag and most characters in this story. Clarisse is curious about everything, questions everything, and tries everything twice. Clarisse accepts and appreciates things that this society does not seem to take much notice of, such as nature. Clarisse notices the dew on the morning grass, catches raindrops in her mouth, and plays with dandelions. Although Clarisse is different from Montag and the other characters in this book, she brings out a different side of Montag that he did not realize was there.

Posted by: Lyndsey Pospisil at March 30, 2015 02:49 PM

Rachel Cunio
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary Worldview CA01
30 March 2015

Question: What things do the McClellans do that cause them to be classified as peculiar? Why is this significant?

Answer: There are many things that cause Montag to think of the McClellans as peculiar, even describing Clarisse as “’an odd one’” (Bradbury 6). Clarisse’s habit of thinking “’too many things’” (Bradbury 6) is the least odd thing about the McClellans. Clarisse comments on the “blazing” (Bradbury 7) lights in her house, admitting that her family is “’most peculiar’” (Bradbury 7). The fact that the McClellans not only sit around just to talk, but also walk places (Clarisse’s uncle even having been arrested for being a pedestrian twice), singles the family out as “strange” (Bradbury 8). All these peculiarities about the McClellans are significant because they not only juxtapose the cultural norms of the society in which Montag lives, but they (Clarisse’s oddness in particular) cause Montag to reconsider his own happiness and his way of life in general, which sets the precedent for the rest of the book.

Posted by: Rachel Cunio at March 30, 2015 03:01 PM

Bethanee V Reynolds
HON 351 The Contemporary World View CA01
Dr. Hobbs
30 March 2015

Question:
What is the significance of Montag seeing his reflection in Clarisse’s eyes? Why? Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer:
“He saw himself in her eyes, suspended in two shining drops of bright water, himself dark and tiny, in fine detail, the lines about his mouth, everything there, as if her eyes were two miraculous bits of violet amber that might capture and hold him intact.” (Bradbury, Fahrenheit 451, page 5). The significance of Montag seeing himself in Clarisse’s eyes is that he saw truth. He was able to see himself in a reflection of what he was, every detail. Seeing himself in her eyes, in that way, made him recall a different him. When you see yourself as someone else sees you, you begin to question everything and at that moment when Montag saw himself in Clarisse’s eyes, he began to question everything.

Posted by: Bethanee Reynolds at March 30, 2015 03:03 PM

Glen Pringle
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary Worldview CA01
30th March 2015

"Are you happy?" (4)

Question: At Montag’s point of realization
when he enters the bedroom, what happens to the smile on his face, and what is his answer to Clarisse’s question? Why is this significant?

Answer: When Mountag enters the bedroom, the smile on his face disappears. His mask of happiness that he has worn has been taken. Clarisse "had run off across the lawn with the mask and there was no way of going to knock on her door and ask for it back." (5) He is not happy.

Posted by: Glen Pringle at March 30, 2015 03:14 PM

Jacob Gates
Glen Pringle
Dr. Hobbs
Contemporary Worldview HON 323 CA014
30 March 2014

Fahrenheit 451
12.) What observations does Clarisse make about how Montag differs from other firemen? Why is this significant? Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Clarissa notes Montag's differences from other firemen when she says "when you I talk to you I can tell you're actually looking at me." She knows he's different from the way he talks to her, and from how they interact with each other. Bradbury makes it known to the reader that Montag is different from other firemen by showing how he chooses to ask about the firemen's history and what they did before burning books. Montag is different because of his need to question why things are the way they are.

Posted by: Jacob.gates at March 30, 2015 03:26 PM

Dalton Hart
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351: Contemporary World View
1 April 2015

Question: Discuss your understanding of the following passage: “Plant the books, turn in an alarm, and see the firemen’s houses burn, is that what you mean?” Why is this significant?

Answer: In the aforementioned passage, Montag and Faber are attempting to come up with ways to make books more accessible to the public. Faber sees no way of this happening because the public has readily accepted the idea that books are evil and useless. When contemplating Montag’s idea of somehow getting books back in the hands of the people, Faber states, “Now if you suggest that we print extra books and arrange to have them hidden in firemen’s houses all over the country, so that seeds of suspicion would be sown among these arsonists, bravo, I’d say,” (Bradbury 85). The conversation between the two suggests that they must go to extremes in order to have society accept books as a way to find deeper meaning in life. In order to do so the two must somehow figure out how to make it appear as if it is the firemen who are wrong and not the actual books, and planting books in the houses of the firemen could be the first step in doing so.

Posted by: Dalton Hart at April 1, 2015 09:18 AM

Mekayla Davila
Madison Brunk
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary World View CA01
1 April 2015

Fahrenheit 451 Part 2- Group 5

“In part two of Fahrenheit 451, Mildred (Linda) and her friends become the focus. In the novel, Mildred and her friends are forced by Montag to read poetry. One leaves in disgust after another one (Mrs. Phelps) of them begins to cry. From the movie adaptation, Faber is the one character that has been omitted within this part of the book. In the book, Montag has an ear piece where he hears Faber but in the movie he does not so this changes a lot about the plot of the story. Aside from this change, no additional characters were added into the movie adaptation. The point of views are the same for both the movie and novel which is omniscient. The setting also remains the same, Montag’s house, for both the film and novel as well. Between the adaptation and the book there are several things that are different. Since Faber does not exist in the film, it does not all for the playing off of poetry as the fireman’s one-time to bring a book home. He still criticizes the women, making one cry, but leaving many in disgust. This happens directly after the martyred woman and bring new conflict to the movie. The themes did not differ from each, they still remain frivolous happiness vs. knowledge, and society vs. individual. And epiphany that occurred in the movie is the same as the book when Mrs. Phelps has an epiphany from the book that was read and this further separates Mildred and Montag.”

Posted by: Mekayla Davila at April 1, 2015 11:44 AM

Mekayla Davila
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary World View CA01
1 April 2015

Question:
What is the meaning of the title of Part II? Why is this significant?

Answer:
The title of part two is “The Sieve in the Sand”. This comes from a childhood memory Montag has from being at the beach and trying to fill a sieve with sand in order to receive a dime from his cousin. He comes to realize just how hard this task is. “And the faster he poured the faster it sifted through with a hot whispering” (Bradbury, 78). He compares this memory to his attempt at trying to read the bible really fast in hopes that he will retain some of its contents. This title is important because the sand represents the truth Montag seeks, and the sieve represents the human mind seeking an elusive truth, impossible to grasp in anyway.

Posted by: Mekayla Davila at April 1, 2015 11:58 AM

Annie Hays and Craig Graves
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary World View CA01
1 April 2015

Group Work pages 83-88
Summarize the section and compare it to the movie adaptation counterpart.

Answer:
In our section spanning pages 83-85, Montag is meeting with Faber, a professor and supporter of books. After some debate, they decide to work together and plot to burn down firemen’s homes among other things. Unfortunately, this scene does not exist in the movie. The same is true for Faber; he was omitted. We think that the movie attempted to merge Clarisse and Faber into one character. The book and movie are told from a third person limited perspective with Guy Montag as the focal point. Since this scene from the book is not in the movie, we can only comment about the book. This scene in the book takes place in Faber’s home. The plot of this scene in the book was to provide exposition, the movie gave a lackluster expository speech to Beaty. The plot also introduces the Seashell as a means of communication for Montag and Faber. The themes and symbolism in this section revolve around books having power. The tone of this scene is hopeful for Montag since he found someone to help him with his newfound love for reading and books. The main epiphany Montag has in this scene is that it will take time to get done everything that needs to be done to revive books to their place in society.

Posted by: Craig Graves at April 1, 2015 12:28 PM

Madison Brunk
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 The Contemporary World View CA01
1 April 2015

Question: How do the women react to Montag's reading? Why is this significant?

Answer: After Montag's reading of Dover Beach, the vapid women that hear it are emotionally wrenched with anger and sadness, respectively. Mrs. Phelps becomes overwhelmed with sadness and is about to cry while Mrs. Bowles feels angry and tricked. While the poem made them feel something, Mrs. Bowles, and the women would rather feel nothing. "Poetry and tears, poetry and suicide and crying and awful feelings" Mrs. Bowles exclaims after it is read, displaying how happiness and ignorance are what the general public wants and Montag wishes to rebel from.

Posted by: Madison Brunk at April 1, 2015 12:47 PM

Glen Pringle
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary World View CA01
1 April 2015

"Now read in a nice clear voice and go slow." (96)

Question: Explain why Montag reads “Dover
Beach” aloud to the ladies. Why might this be significant to the story, as a whole?

Answer: Montag reads Dover Beach to the women simply because he is frustrated with them. He desires to goad them into showing the extent of their emotional immaturity. "Did you hear these monsters talking about monsters?" (94) This is important to the story as a whole because it really cements the idea of dead emotions in the regular populace. "Silly words, silly words, silly awful hurting words." The women simply do not know that do do with their emotions.

Posted by: Glen Pringle at April 1, 2015 01:03 PM

Glen Pringle & Rachel Cunio
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary World View CA01
30 March 2015

While no major characters have been omitted from the movie adaption, the name Mildred is replaced with the name Linda. Faber, the professor in the novel who teachers Montag how to understand books and how their value, is not present at all in the movie. No character even replaces him. The only things that are added into the movie are names, which have been substituted. Mildred's is previously mentioned, and the captain is simply referred to as the Captain, instead of captain B. The perspective of the work is written from the limited third person omniscient viewpoint, much like 1984. Themes in the movie closely mirror that of the novel. The idea of anti-government establishment, censorship and the desire and danger of knowledge are present in both and essentially makes up the plot of Fahrenheit 451.

Posted by: Glen Pringle and Rachel Cunio at April 1, 2015 01:07 PM

Annie Hays
Dr. Hobbes
HON 351 Contemporary Worldview CA01
1 April 2015

Question: What does Faber tell Montag about books? Why is this significant?

Answer: Montag believes that books are what society needs in order to be happy. However, Faber explains that, "It's not the books you need, it's some of the things that were once in books" (Bradbury 78). All kinds of media can be thought-provoking. Even the telescreens could make people happy if they could broadcast anything with substance (79). The problem is, all the life has been sucked out of entertainment. Books are "magical" because of how they were written, not because they are magical things (79). If telescreens got people thinking and remembering, they could be good for society as well.

Posted by: Annie Hays at April 1, 2015 01:37 PM

Lyndsey Pospisil and Dalton Hart
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 The Contemporary World View CA01
1 April 2015

Literary Text vs. Film Adaptation Pages 89-95
1. In this section of the novel, Mildred and two of her friends, Mrs. Phelps and Mrs. Bowles, come over to Mildred and Montag’s house to watch television with Mildred. Montag, after a little bit of time, walks over to the television and turns it off. He tries to engage the three women in conversation, asking them about when they think the war will start. The women know nothing really about the war, and Mildred attempts to change the conversation to politics. Again, the women show that they know nothing of importance about politics or the candidates that ran during the election. Montag then goes and gets a book of poetry to read to the women, scaring and confusing Mildred, and her friends. Throughout this whole section, Faber is also speaking to Montag in his ear about his actions.
2. In the movie adaptation, Faber is admitted from movie all together. Additionally, three friends of Mildred’s are at her house, whereas the book only mentions Mrs. Bowles and Mrs. Phelps. The friends of Linda, in the movie adaptation, are named Jackie, Doris, and Helen.
3. The setting of the adaptation and the setting of this section of the novel are the same, Montag’s home. In both the adaptation and the novel, the women are watching television together in the living room of Montag’s home.
4. The conflict of the war plays a major role in the novel, and is mentioned several times in this section. In the movie adaptation, the war is more of a background idea that is not mentioned often and is not mentioned much in this section of the movie adaptation.
5. In the adaptation, Montag is trying to get the attention of Linda and her friends that are watching the television. This same thing is occurring in the novel. The theme of technology as a form of control is the same in this section as it is in the adaptation. In both the adaptation and the novel, Montag’s wife and her friends are distracted by the television, and Montag tries to engage the women. He tries to talk to them about what is going on in the world and then tries to get their attention by reading a passage from a book to them.
6. The symbols of a book and the television can be found in both the adaptation and the novel.
7. The tone in the adaptation and the novel seem nearly the same. Montag is frustrated and angry with the women for being so willfully ignorant and the women are afraid when Montag begins to read to them.

Posted by: Lyndsey Pospisil at April 1, 2015 02:56 PM

Racheljoy Capitola
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary Worldview CA01
1 April 2015

32. Interpret the following passage from this part of the novella: “Maybe the books can get us half out of the cave.” Why is this significant?

In the novel, Montag defends his reading of books to Mildred by explaining how he’s heard rumors of war and hate, but their society is protected from the truth: “I’ve heard rumors; the world is starving, but we’re well fed.” The quote referencing the cave is important in his argument because it possibly alludes to Plato’s Allegory of the Cave. The burning of books, hence forth, is on par with the burning of truth. The walls act as shadows that chain and control society. Montag, by reading, has broken away from the spell and lies society has placed on him: “They [books] just might stop us from making the same damn insane mistakes.” (70)

Posted by: Racheljoy Capitola at April 1, 2015 03:04 PM

Stephen Pinol and Bethanee Reynolds
Dr. Hobbs
HON-351 The Contemporary World View CA01
30 March 2015
Pgs. 98-102

1. Guy has been caught with taking a book from the library of the women whose house burned down. He knows that another co-worker knows that he has it and decides to return it. Unlike the movie, Guy simply returns the book to his boss and convinces them that he has not changed although he has read a novel.

2. Professor Faber has been Mildred.

3. Instead of added characters, the wife is called Linda in the movie.

4. The point of view for the story and the movie are the same. It tells the story from Guy’s perspective.

5. The setting is the same because he returns the book at his workplace and in both stories; they go to his house either to burn his house down or to confront him.

6. In the movie, Guy goes to his job and returns the book to his boss. He resigns at that moment but requests to go on one last call, which is to burn his own house. In the book, Guy goes to return the book and simply convinces them that he was not influenced by reading the books and keeps his job.

7. Knowledge versus ignorance is somewhat omitted from the movie because of the fact that they omit Professor Faber and his ability to want to make a copy of the book. His and Guy’s seek for knowledge is where the conflict first arises and getting rid of a character takes that away from the story.

8. Symbolism is similar in both versions.

9. Tone/mood is the same in both versions.

10. Nothing has been added or changed.

Posted by: Stephen Pinol and Bethanee Reynolds at April 1, 2015 03:08 PM

Lyndsey Pospisil
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 The Contemporary World View CA01
1 April 2015

Question: What are some of the books that Montag asks Faber about when he calls him on the phone? Explain. Why is this significant?
Answer: When Montag calls Faber on the phone, he asks Faber about three different books. Montag calls Faber and first asks, “How many copies of the Bible are left in this country” (Bradbury 71). Montag then asks, “How many copies of Shakespeare and Plato” (Bradbury 72). This is significant because both Montag and Faber both know that the answer to this question is “none.” The text states that Montag knew the answer to his questions were “none,” however, “he wanted to hear it from Faber himself” (Bradbury 72). Additionally, this is significant because Montag believes that he has, what might be, “the last copy [of the old and new testament] in this part of the world” (Bradbury 72).

Posted by: Lyndsey Pospisil at April 1, 2015 03:09 PM

Craig Graves
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary World View CA01
1 April 2015

Question #40
Describe how you felt at the end of “The Sieve and the Sand” part of the novel when they pulled up to Montag’s house. What was going on? Explain. Why is this significant? Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer:
When I was reading the end of “The Sieve and the Sand,” I was not really surprised by the firemen’s arrival at Montag’s house. Based upon the discomfort and unrest Montag was feeling only moments before, the irony of the situation would call for him to have to burn his own house. This discomfort is made evident by Montag thinking how he “can’t do it (Bradbury 108),” referring to burning things. It can be inferred by Mildred’s distrust and hatred for the books Montag showed her that she called in the alarm that sent Montag and his squadron to his own house to burn books. This is significant because it now marks Montag as a criminal in the society and forces him to decide how much he values his books.

Posted by: Craig Graves at April 1, 2015 03:10 PM

Rachel Cunio
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary Worldview CA01
01 April 2015

Question: What are the three things that Faber says are missing from society? Why is this significant?

Answer: Faber claims that “’three things are missing’” (Bradbury 79) from society because of its lack of books. The first missing thing is quality, which Faber also refers to as “texture” and having “features” (Bradbury 79) because books have a special kind of “truth” and quality of knowledge that no other source of information has. The second necessary thing that is lacking from society is the “leisure to digest [the quality of information]” (Bradbury 81), because, as Faber explains it allows for the third missing thing, “the right to carry out actions based on what we learn from the interaction of the first two [things]” (Bradbury 81). The fact that these things, which Faber deems “necessary” (Bradbury 81) are missing in society is significant because without these things, the society will never improve. This discussion about the lack of books basically leading to a lack of motivation and ability to change society shows the irony of the situation because it is this lack of motivation and books is the thing keeping society from books and therefore the motivation needed. It’s a vicious cycle that Faber understands will never change unless people are given authentic information, stop being distracted by meaningless thoughts, and actually want to change society.

Posted by: Rachel Cunio at April 1, 2015 03:12 PM


Kenna Dieffenwierth and Racheljoy Capitola
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 - Contemporary World View CA01
30 March 2015

The occurrences within pages 74-81 of Fahrenheit 451 were completely omitted from the movie adaptation. There is one character in particular, Faber, who is not even mentioned in movie. Because this scene in the book was not included in the movie, not new characters were added in the movie adaptation. In these pages, Montag is riding the suction train and trying to read the Bible. An advertisement repeats itself in the background breaking his focus. He begins screaming at the advertisement, frightening the people on the train. He gets off the train and goes to see Faber, a former English professor. He wants Faber to teach him, but Faber refuses. Montag then proceeds to rip the Bible, so that Faber will give in to him. The conflicts are man vs. society and man vs. man. Montag is pursuing knowledge through books and in doing so going against society and the powers in control. Montag is also going against Faber by ripping the Bible in order to get Faber's help. The themes are the pursuit of knowledge and censorship. The tone is desperate because Montag feels cornered with nowhere to go, but he cannot give up on books. The Bible is very symbolic. Faber talked about how the Bible was changed for telescreens. "Its as good as I remember. Lord, how they've changed it in our 'parlors' these days. Christ is one of the 'family' now. I often wonder if God recognizes His own son the way we've dressed him up, or is it dressed him down?" (Bradbury 81) He went on to mention that Christ was even used as an advertisement tool to sell products. This seen gives more of a feel for how society and religion changed. Important symbolic figures of a faith reduced to advertising tools. The Bible being ripped is more extreme than an ordinary text because it is a religious text. Something that is held sacred to people around the world in modern society was ripped like an ordinary book in a world where it would have been just as easily burned. The nature of the text made the effect on Faber greater even though he stated he was "not a religious man" (Bradbury 81). If a Bible had been ripped in the movie adaptation, it could have caused outrage among religious viewers and at the very least caused discomfort in the audience.

Posted by: Kenna Dieffenwierth at April 1, 2015 03:13 PM

Stephen Pinol
Dr. Hobbs
HON-351 The Contemporary World View CA01
1 April 2015

Question: Describe the parlor women, their views, and their conversational concerns. Why is this significant?

Answer: They are Mildred's friends who believe that books are bias and their views are materialistic and shallow. They pick who they vote for by their looks. They are very gossipy and talk about the latest romances and war. The parlor women also don’t care if their husbands die in war because they believe that they can simply move onto the next person whenever they please.

Posted by: Stephen Pinol at April 1, 2015 03:16 PM

Jacob Gates
Glen Pringle
Dr. Hobbs
Contemporary Worldview HON 323 CA014
1 April 2014

Fahrenheit 451

37.) Interpret the following passage: "I've never known any dead man killed in a war. Killed jumping off buildings, yes, like Gloria's husband last week, but from wars? No." Why is this significant?

This passage is significant for a number of reasons, because it tells a little bit about the kind of society Montag is living in. For one thing, this glib response simultaneously implies that wars happen all the time and that she's never known anyone who's died in one. This implies that she may be living in a militaristic state and that she is an upper class woman who has never had to face adversity like war head on. This passage also implies that suicide is very common way to die in their society because of how off-handed lay mentions Gloria's husband, implying they all know him. These people are living in an idealistic fantasy world where true human suffering is a distant nuisance, something suffered by other people not themselves.

Posted by: Jacob.gates at April 1, 2015 03:30 PM

Bethanee Victoria Reynolds
HON 351 The Contemporary World View CA01
Dr. Hobbs
1 April 2015
Question:
Explain why Montag goes to see Faber. Why is this significant?
Answer:
Montag went to see Faber to ask him to help him understanding. “The numbness will go away, he though. It’ll take time, but I’ll do it, or Faber will do it for me.” (Bradbury, Fahrenheit 451, page 74). He needs Faber to help him understand what he is reading. “I need you to teach me.” (Bradbury, Fahrenheit 451, page 85), If he cannot understand the words he reads then all the work he is doing to break the law, steal books, and read is all for nothing.

Posted by: Bethanee Reynolds at April 1, 2015 03:30 PM

Kenna Dieffenwierth
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 - Contemporary World View CA01
1 April 2015

Question: 36) Describe how long the women estimated the war to last. Why is this significant? Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: The women believe that the war would last forty-eight hours and that their husbands would be back in a week's time. They believed this because the army told them so and they believe whatever they are told by authority without actually thinking things out for themselves. "He'll be back next week. The army said so. Quick war. Forty-eight hours, they said, and everyone home. That's what the Army said. Quick war" (Bradbury 94). This is significant because it shows that they are like drones. They don't think for themselves, they just accept and repeat what they are told. Although they are unsettled because they do understand the reality, they refuse to accept it. After they began to talk about the war, they "fidgeted and looked nervously at the empty mud-colored walls" (Bradbury 94). Reality made them uncomfortable. They would rather divert themselves from it and live in ignorance.

Posted by: Kenna Dieffenwierth at April 1, 2015 03:31 PM

Dalton Hart & Lyndsey Pospisil
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351
1 April 2015

Question: Compare and contrast the characters of Mildred and Clarisse. How did each woman come to exist? What roles do they play in society? Can either truly survive? How is one a threat to the stability of the ideas presented in Fahrenheit 451 and the other an ideal example of a Fahrenheit 451 character? How have each of these characters been influenced? Explain.

Answer: Throughout Fahrenheit 451, the characters of Mildred and Clarisse are shown to be polar opposites in the way society views them and how they are viewed by society. Mildred is Montag’s wife, whereas Clarisse is the mysterious friend of Montag who he meets while walking home one day. In society’s view, Mildred is the ideal woman. Mildred conforms to the societal norms. She is obsessed with technology and becomes completely ignorant of the world around her because of this. Clarisse, on the other hand, loves nature and enjoys learning about others and the world around her. When speaking with Clarisse, Montag says, “You think too many things,” exhibiting the imaginative mind that Clarisse has, which goes against what society wants (Bradbury 6). Although they are quite different, both Mildred and Clarisse have a hard time surviving in society. Mildred cannot survive because she does not find any joy in life because of her conformity. Clarisse also has a hard time surviving in society because she rebels against the societal norms and has a hard time coping with the way society is set up. Mildred is greatly influenced by society, choosing to accept what those who govern have told her to accept. Conversely, Clarisse is not influenced by society; instead, her major influence is her family. Clarisse claims to have learned her ways from her family, mainly her Uncle.

Posted by: Dalton Hart & Lyndsey Pospisil at April 1, 2015 04:02 PM

Dalton Hart
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351: Contemporary World View
6 April 2015

Question: What feeling does Montag have about burning the house? Explain. Why is this significant?

Answer: After being made to burn down his own house by Beatty, Montag is left confused about the entire situation. Bradbury writes, “Montag could not move. A great earthquake had come with fire and levelled the house and Mildred was under there somewhere and his entire life under there and he could not move” (Bradbury 54). Montag seems to be greatly confused about his future, figuratively and literally preventing him from moving. Having just caused the destruction of his life up to that point, Montag is helpless, but he is also able to see that he did a good thing in the grand scheme of things, which leads to almost a sense of justification.

Posted by: Dalton Hart at April 3, 2015 11:13 AM

Racheljoy Capitola
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary Worldview CA01
6 April 2015

Question 59: Once the hound kills “Montag” the announcer states: “Montag is dead; a crime against society has been avenged.” What just happened? Explain. Why is this significant? Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

In “Burning Bright,” Montag’s “death” is staged. Society kills off someone who looks like Montag on television in order to strengthen the faith of its people. Granger explains, “They’re faking. You threw them off at the river. They can’t admit it. They know they can hold their audience only so long. The show’s got to have a snap ending, quick!” (141) The event is significant because it is an example of how distorted society is. Innocent people are expendable as long as it allows society to appease the people and continue its control.

Posted by: Racheljoy Capitola at April 6, 2015 12:49 AM

Racheljoy Capitola & Kenna Dieffenwierth
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary Worldview CA01
6 April 2015

Group Question 97: Why does Beatty program the Hound to track Montag even before Montag stole the book? Is there any evidence to suggest that Beatty had seen him steal books before? Or, might it be that Beatty had detected a change in Montag’s attitude or behavior (if so, what)? Explain. Why is this significant? Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Beatty programs the Hound because Montag doesn’t quite belong. Even from the beginning, before Montag steals his first book, he has an unfavorable relationship with the Hound: “‘This isn’t the first time it’s threatened me,’ said Montag. ‘Last month it happened twice.’” (24) Throughout the novel, as Montag gets more daring (even stealing a book from Mrs. Blake’s house), his behavior becomes suspicious. Although there is no direct evidence of Beatty witnessing Montag stealing books, there are tidbits of advice Beatty gives Montag that suggests Beatty knew Montag was breaking the rules. For example, Beatty explains what happens when firemen read books: “At least once in his career, every fireman gets an itch. What do the books say, he wonders. Oh, to scratch that itch, eh? … You come away lost.” (59) Shortly after the warning, Montag and Mildred head something outside of their house: “Outside the front door, in the rain, a faint scratching. … Under the doorsill, a slow, probing sniff, an exaltation of electric steam.” (68)

These events are significant because they lead to the final confrontation between Beatty and Montag. After Beatty admits to programming the Hound to follow Montag (107), he forces Montag into burning him alive by making Montag burn the books in Montag’s house. Montag realizes after killing Beatty: “Beatty wanted to die. In the middle of the crying Montag knew it was the truth.” Beatty is a very conflicted character: he programs the Hound to taunt Montag but doesn’t turn him in; he has read books but he shuns their information for the order of society: he wants to arrest Montag but he gives Montag a weapon. The Hound is a tool that Beatty works through.

Posted by: Racheljoy Capitola at April 6, 2015 12:52 AM

Annie Hays
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary Worldview CA01
6 April 2015

Question: In part III, Montag discusses the high risks of crossing a street. What might this mean and how is it relevant to anything? Explain. Why is this significant?

Answer: It is extremely dangerous to cross the street because people drive as fast as possible, and they love to run over pedestrians. Montag figures out that the people who almost ran him over were teenagers who were just out for a drive. "Coming home or not coming home, alive or not alive, that made the adventure" (Bradbury 122). This shows just how little disregard people have for life in this dystopia. No one cares if their children do not come home again, and it is a game to kill innocent people. If kids act this way on the road, it is no wonder that adults take suicide so lightly that they are constantly overdoing on pills, like Mildred, and jumping off buildings (94).

Posted by: Annie Hays at April 6, 2015 10:37 AM

Annie Hays and Craig Graves
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary Worldview CA01
6 April 2015

Question: One suicide and one near-suicide occur in this book. One woman, who shuns books but loves TV and driving fast in her car, anesthetizes herself, “We get these cases nine or ten a night,” says the medical technician. Another woman, who cherishes her books, sets herself on fire with them; “These fanatics always try suicide,” says the fire captain. Why would two people who seem to be so different from each other try to take their own lives? Why does suicide happen so frequently in Montag’s society?” Explain. Why is this significant?

Answer: The reason suicide happens so often to such a variety of people is because no one has anything to live for in this society. Mildred just sits in front of the TV all day, and she pretends to be happy, but really she is hollow inside. Faber explained that books, "stitched the patches of the universe into one garment for us" (Bradbury 79). Books contain something of substance, but the parlor families have no substance. They are pure, shallow entertainment, and people cannot survive on that. "The whole culture's shot through" (83), and unless people start caring about life again, suicide will continue to be rampant. On the flip side, the reason the old woman committed suicide is because she realized that without her books, her holding cells of life and knowledge, she has nothing to live for. Books gave her life meaning, and just like Mildred, if her life has no meaning anymore, she must die too. This is significant because after these two incidents, Guy starts to realize that there may be something special about these books, and he no longer wants to be a fireman (48-9).

Posted by: Annie Hays and Craig Graves at April 6, 2015 10:54 AM

Lyndsey Pospisil
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 The Contemporary World View CA 01
6 April 2015

Question: What is the promise at the end of the novella? What does it mean? Explain. Why is this significant?
Answer: The promise at the end of the novella is to learn from past mistakes, always remember, and to help rebuild the new era. After the bombs from the war blew up the whole city and its inhabitants, Montag, Granger, and the others begin to head upstream. While walking, Granger states the following, “One day the load we are carrying may help someone. But even when we had books on hand… we didn't use what we got out of them… we went right on insulting the dead” (Bradbury 156). This quote reflects the part of the promise made to learn from past mistakes. Granger then states, “We’re going to meet a lot of lonely people in the next week, month, year… and when they ask us what we are doing, you can say, we’re remembering” (Bradbury 157). This quote reflects the part of the promise about always remembering. These promises are significant because following through with them will ultimately help build the new era that will now be forming. Montag, Granger, and the other intellectuals now have a chance to bring books, knowledge, information, and freedom back into society.

Posted by: Lyndsey Pospisil at April 6, 2015 11:58 AM

Kenna Dieffenwierth
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 - Contemporary World View CA01
6 April 2015

Question: When Montag complained about being unable to remember Mildred, what explanation did Granger give him? Explain. Why is this significant?

Answer: Granger made the point that people are remembered by what they did and what they changed during their life. He uses his grandfather as an example of someone that did so many things to the world around him that it was impossible to forget him (Bradbury 155-157). "The lawn cutter might just as well not have been there at all; the gardener will be there a lifetime" (Bradbury 157). Mildred was a lawn cutter not a gardener. She did not change anything or add anything to the world. She merely existed and went through the expected motions of life. This made her very forgettable in the grand scheme of things. For the most part, her life was pointless and purposeless; however, everyone leaves something behind allowing Montag to grasp onto some memory of her.

Posted by: Kenna Dieffenwierth at April 6, 2015 01:35 PM

Glen Pringle and Rachel Cunio
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary World View CA01
1 April 2015

Question: Analyze Mildred Montag. Is she truly happy leading a life blind to reality? Explain. Why is this significant?

Answer: Mildred lives a peculiar life over the entire work of Fahrenheit 451. She is completely controlled by her TV family. The interaction with the television dictates her entire existence. Mildred has no desire to talk to her husband other than necessity "I'm tired of listening to this junk." (62) Cold and unreadable, her cognitive dissonance is evident in her attempt for happiness. She chooses to fall back into her television family after tasting freedom within books. She is not happy.

Posted by: Glen Pringle and Rachel Cunio at April 6, 2015 02:33 PM

Craig Graves
Dr. Hobbs
HON351 Contemporary World View CA01
6 April 2015

Question #50:
.Interpret the following passage: “Mildred, you didn’t put in the alarm!” Explain. Why is this significant? Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer:
In this passage, Montag is surprised to see that Mildred is leaving the house in a hurry, almost like she was caught off-guard by the arrival of the firemen. More than likely, Montag believed that Mildred had betrayed him and sounded the alarm, thus why he says, “Mildred, you didn’t put in the alarm (Bradbury 112).” This scene is significant because it was a small glimmer of hope for Montag that his wife didn’t betray him and that she might have actually cared about him to some degree. It is hard to tell exactly what emotion Montag feels when he is saying that quote as the word “didn’t” is italicized for emphasis and it ends with an exclamation mark, which can be either an indication of anger or surprise. The matter of how Montag says that line is also muddled by how hastily Mildred leaves the house and pay no mind to Montag while repeatedly mumbling “poor family, everything gone (Bradbury 112).”

Posted by: Craig Graves at April 6, 2015 02:33 PM

Glen Pringle and Rachel Cunio
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary World View CA01
1 April 2015

Question: Analyze Mildred Montag. Is she truly happy leading a life blind to reality? Explain. Why is this significant?

Answer: Mildred lives a peculiar life over the entire work of Fahrenheit 451. She is completely controlled by her TV family. The interaction with the television dictates her entire existence. Mildred has no desire to talk to her husband other than necessity "I'm tired of listening to this junk." (62) Cold and unreadable, her cognitive dissonance is evident in her attempt for happiness. She chooses to fall back into her television family after tasting freedom within books. She is not happy.

Posted by: Glen Pringle and Rachel Cunio at April 6, 2015 02:33 PM

Bethanee V Reynolds
HON 351 The Contemporary World View
Dr. Hobbs
6 April 2015

Question:
51. Beatty’s last words were, “Hand it over, Guy.” Reflect upon Montag’s last words to Beatty, “We never burned right.” What does it all mean? Explain. Why is this significant?
Answer:
“We never burned right....” (Bradbury, Fahrenheit 451, page 113) These were Montag’s last words to Beatty and what he meant by them was that, burning the books was not the answer. They as firemen should have been burning the things and the people that replaced or took away books. “And then he was a shrieking blaze, a jumping, sprawling gibbering manikin, no longer human or known, all writhing flame on the lawn as Montag shot one continuous pulse of liquid fire on him.” (Bradbury, Fahrenheit 451, page 113) Beatty was one of those people who needed to be burned because he helped take away books, so Montag burned him. Montag decided it was time to light the right things on fire, not the things that should be protected, like books. I also find that this is an allusion to the Bible, fire and brimstone will smite those who live in sin and do not accept the Savior, which makes it significant considering that the Bible was the book that Montag and Faber have been working to get copied and preserve.

Posted by: Bethanee Reynolds at April 6, 2015 02:41 PM

Rachel Cunio
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary Worldview CA01
06 April 2015

Question: While Montag was in flight from the scene of Beatty’s murder, what thought occurred to him about Beatty? Explain. Why is this significant?

Answer: While Montag is fleeing from the scene of Beatty’s murder, Montag realizes that he “knew it for the truth” (Bradbury 116) that “Beatty wanted to die” (Bradbury 116). Montag is sure of this because he knows that Beatty did not attempt to save himself and “just stood there” (Bradbury 116). This is significant because in a way this is similar to the two suicide attempts of the woman who successfully dies as a martyr with her books and Mildred who overdoses on sleeping pills unsuccessfully, giving a different perspective on the unhappiness of the society. Those who followed the policies (like Mildred) were just as unhappy as those who enforced the policies (like Beatty). At the end of each of the three characters’ lives, the only difference is the circumstance and dignity of the death, with the woman dying courageously for her books, showing what truly matters in her life.

Posted by: Rachel Cunio at April 6, 2015 03:16 PM

Kaelyn Cardona
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 The Contemporary World View CA02
9 March 2016

Question 8: What final question does Clarisse ask Montag on the night of their first encounter? Why is the question important to the plot?

Answer: The last question Clarisse asks Montag is: “are you happy?” (Bradbury 4). It is a pivotal moment in Fahrenheit-451 because it presents the internal conflict the protagonist is dealing with, which is finding happiness. After Clarisse returned home, Montag contemplates his state of affairs, reaching the conclusion that he is not happy. He realizes, “he wore his happiness like a mask,” and his thoughts snowball into the acknowledgement of his dismal existence, which he will try to reverse as his story develops (Bradbury 5).


Question 10: .Simile is TYPE of metaphor a type of metaphor in which the comparison is made with the use of the word like or its equivalent, e.g, “My love is like a red, red rose.”When Montag enters his home, he stares at the blank wall, but, in memory, sees Clarisse. What extended simile describes how he sees her? Why is this significant?

Answer: Upon entering his home and staring at the wall, Montag initially used a simile to compare Clarisse to the “dial of a small clock,” for her disposition had the certainty of time passed and the promise of a lighter day to come (Bradbury 4). In Montag’s recollection of Clarisse, he also compares her to a mirror. Clarisse, like the mirror, had “refracted your own light onto you” (Bradbury 4). In other words, her deep, incessant questions prompted intuitive introspection in Montag, and he realized what he was capable of, and what he still needed to achieve. This was a result of her uncanny expressions, which had the ability to “throw back to you your own expression, your innermost trembling thought” (Bradbury 4).

Posted by: Kaelyn Cardona at March 9, 2016 02:21 PM

Andrew Thriffiley
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 The Contemporary World View CA02
9 March 2016

Question:
2.) Clarisse causes Montag to recall a childhood memory in which a wish was embedded. What was the significance of the memory and the wish?
6.) What things do the McClellans do that cause them to be classified as peculiar? Why is this significant?

Answer:
2.) Montag recalls a childhood memory of when he was with his mother, and only a candle lit the room. "There had been a brief hour of rediscovery, of such illumination that space lost its vast dimensions, and drew comfortably around them." (Bradbury 5). Montag wishes he could go back to that moment where he could be with his mother because this is where he felt the most understanding. His wish was for the moment to last forever.

6.) The things that make the McClellans peculiar is that they enjoy to sit around to think and converse with each other. Montag was curious about Clarisse's house, and she responds saying, "Oh, just my mother and father and uncle sitting around, talking. It's like being a pedestrian, only rarer." (Bradbury 7). This statement shows that they don't mind be different because she is ok with talking with her family and getting to think and discuss. This is entirely different from Montag because society doesn't usually talk too much to each other, and he doesn't even understand what they would discuss. Another peculiar thing is the fact the house always has lights on because most people don't use lights commonly.

Posted by: Andrew Thriffiley at March 9, 2016 02:33 PM

Jasmine Daniels
Dr. Hobbs
Hon 351 Contemporary World View CA02
9 March 2016

Question #13: What test of love does Clarisse give Montag, and how does he respond to it? Why is this significant?

The test of love that Clarisse provides to Montag involves the use of the dandelion. After finding a lone dandelion Clarisse plucks and states that if you rub it under your chin and it rubs off than you are in love. During this test Clarisse succeeds and Montag fails. However, Montag is displeased with failing the test so he reacts angrily be he wants it to be acknowledged that he does love his wife. For instance, "I am very much in love!" He tried to conjure up a face to fit the words, but there was no face. "I am!" "Oh please don't look that way." "It's that dandelion," he said. "You've used it all up on yourself. That's why it won't work for me." "Of course, that must be it. Oh, now I've upset you, I can see I have; I'm sorry, really I am." She touched his elbow. "No, no," he said, quickly, "I'm all right." "I've got to be going, so say you forgive me. I don't want you angry with me." "I'm not angry. Upset, yes." (Bradbury 10)

Question #16: Look up and then define, in your own words, the concept of “antisocial” What does it mean to be “antisocial” in the society of Fahrenheit 451? To whom is the term usually applied? Why is this significant and how is it different from OUR society?

The natural term antisocial is described to be not wanting to be sociable to others or an act that is contrary to the norms or laws within a form of society. Clarisse is considered to be antisocial in the society within Fahrenheit 451 because she is too social. In fact, Clarisses’ definition of social within the text is quite relative to what we describe social to be within our society. “Social to me means talking about things like this." She rattled some chestnuts that had fallen off the tree in the front yard. "Or talking about how strange the world is. Being with people is nice. But I don't think it's social to get a bunch of people together and then not let them talk, do you? An hour of TV class, an hour of basketball or baseball or running, another hour of transcription history or painting pictures, and more sports, but do you know, we never ask questions, or at least most don't; they just run the answers at you, bing, bing, bing, and us sitting there for four more hours of filmteacher. That's not social to me at all.” (Bradbury 13) This is significant because it lets us see that talking with one another and having relationships is not really important to society as a whole.

Posted by: Jasmine Daniels at March 9, 2016 02:59 PM

Karra Rutherford
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351: Contemporary World View CA02
9 March 2016

Question: Clarisse causes Montag to recall a childhood memory in which a wish was embedded. What was the significance of the memory and the wish? At Montag’s point of realization when he enters the bedroom, what happens to the smile on his face, and what is his answer to Clarisse’s question?

Answer: Montag recalls a time in his childhood when the power was out, “there had been a brief hour of rediscover, of such illumination that space lost its vast dimensions and drew comfortably around them, and they, mother and son, alone, transformed, hoping that the power might not come on again too soon…” (Bradbury 5) Montag’s memory and wish are significant because it represents the value of personal relationships, the realization of their absence and humans beings natural tendency to want to form those bonds. Shortly after it is mentioned by Clarisse that her family spends time sitting around and talking to each other, and that this is apparently an unusual occurrence in society. (Bradbury 7) The superficial relationships and exchanges that exist in this society are exemplified in Montag’s attempt to have a conversation with his wife after she overdoses on sleeping pills, “She was quite obviously waiting for him to go. ‘I didn’t do that,’ she said ‘never in a billion years.’” (Bradbury 17)
As Montag enters the dark room he feels his smile fall, he describes it as “like the stuff of a fantastic candle burning too long and now collapsing and now blown out.” It is at that moment that he answers Clarisse’s question, “He was not happy. He was not happy. He said the words to himself.” (Bradbury 9) His sentiment is paralleled by him finding Mildred nonresponsive from her over dose, indicating that she is also unhappy. (Bradbury 11) Mildred when confronted about overdosing states that she would never do something of the sort. (Bradbury 17) These events seem to suggest that both characters have been leading lives that they are unsatisfied without realizing it, however when confronted with the signs Montag is more willing to accept this than Mildred.

Posted by: Karra Rutherford at March 9, 2016 03:09 PM

Dominique Bauer
Dr. Hobbs
HON – 351 The Contemporary Worldview CA02
8 March 2016

Question 14: Describe Clarisse’s personality. How is she different from/similar to Montag and/or other characters in the story, thus far?
Answer: Clarisse is much different from everyone else in society. She asks many questions and she likes to do things that most people do not. In addition, she is interested in many things that most other people are not. For example, to her, social is “talking about how strange the world is,” while everyone else believes social includes “an hour of TV class, an hour of basketball or baseball or running, another hour of transcription history or painting pictures, and more sports” (Bradbury 13). She is different from Montag in the sense that she is comfortable asking these questions and wondering why things are the way they are, whereas Montag has a harder time with it. It seems as though he is more willing to just accept how things are than try and understand why. However, it seems as though she is similar to Montag in that Montag does not seem to fit in with everyone all the time either. Take, for example, when everyone was playing with the Hound, Montag “stayed upstairs most nights when this went on” (Bradbury 11). From this, it can be inferred that he may not have all the same interests that are expected in society.
Question 22: What does Montag think about the old woman and all the books he has destroyed? Why is this significant?
Answer: He is curious about the old woman and all the books he has destroyed. After the incident with the old woman, Montag realizes that “a man was behind each one of the books. A man had to think them up. A man had to take a long time to put them down on paper” (Bradbury 24). In other words, Montag realizes that each book is not just words on paper, but rather someone else’s thoughts and ideas and time. This is significant because it is the first time Montag really questions his job or how society works. He begins to question why things are done.

Posted by: Dominique Bauer at March 9, 2016 03:15 PM

Melissa Bryan
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary World View CA02
March 9 2016

Questions:

7. What event occurs the night of Montag’s encounter with Clarisse which provides him with an impression of the state of society? What is that impression? Why is it significant? Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

9. Montag is aware of an event on the night of his encounter with Clarisse that provides him with an impression of the state of society. In contrast to that impression, what does Montag next hear and long for? Why is this significant? Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer:
The event that occurred that night was Mildred was passed out. According to Bradbury, “The small crystal bottle of sleeping tablets which earlier today had been filled with thirty capsules and which now lay uncapped and empty in the light of the tiny flare” (11). Mildred overdosed on sleeping pills. The impression was that she was dead, and she might have committed suicide. It is significant because “"We get these cases nine or ten a night. Got so many, starting a few years ago, we had the special machines built. With the optical lens, of course, that was new; the rest is ancient. You don't need an M.D., case like this; all you need is two handymen, clean up the problem in half an hour. Look"-he started for the door-"we gotta go. Just had another call on the old earthimble. Ten blocks from here. Someone else just jumped off the cap of a pillbox” (Bradbury 13). This goes to show that it was a common thing for people in this society to try to commit suicide. Hence, might be as a result of the population in that society being depressed and sad.

Montag heard “laughter bl[owing] across the moon-coloured lawn from the house of Clarisse and her father and mother and the uncle who smiled so quietly and so earnestly. Above all, their laughter was relaxed and hearty and not forced in any way, coming from the house that was so brightly lit this late at night while all the other houses were kept to themselves in darkness” (Bradbury 14). Montag longed for someone actually to listen to him, and make him happy. He wants someone to love him. It is significant because it shows that Montag is not happy no matter how much he has been trying to convince himself.

Translation Used
Farenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury and introduction by Neil Gaiman, Simon and Schuster Paperbacks (2013).

Posted by: Melissa Bryan at March 11, 2016 03:24 AM

Ashlee English
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
HON 351 The Contemporary World View CA02
19 March 2016

Question # 11: Describe the bedroom that Montag enters. Whom does the setting characterize, and how, and why? Why is this significant? Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words
Question # 17: What does Clarisse say that people talk about? Find some examples of representative conversations. Why is any of this important to the development of the story? Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer # 11: The bedroom Montag enters is described as “the cold marbled room of a mausoleum after the moon has set” (Bradbury 9). This description of the bedroom is significant as it represents Montag’s inner feelings and revelations about himself. Montag knew “He was not happy…true state of affairs” (Bradbury 9) and the bedroom’s description personifies the reality of his unhappiness as “darkness” (Bradbury 9).

Answer #17: Clarisse said “people don’t talk about anything” (Bradbury 28) as there is no individuality to their conversations. Consequently, the society has become completely generic as “they all say the same thing” (Bradbury 28) indicative of a lack of free will. Moreover, this development caused the story to be framed as a dystopia.

Posted by: Ashlee English at March 19, 2016 12:02 PM

Ashlee English
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
HON 351 The Contemporary World View CA02
19 March 2016

Question # 25: Describe and explain the dentifrice commercial Why is this significant? Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Question # 29: Describe the parlor women, their views, and their conversational concerns. Why is this significant? Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer # 25: The Deham’s Dentifrice commercial is a little jingle which was playing in the subway car which interrupted Montag’s train of thought. The internal and external monologue “Denham’s … shut up!” (Bradbury 74-75) illustrates the conflict Montag has with the jingle while he was trying to memorize his Bible verse. This is significant as it shows how one cannot think on their own, and are conditioned not to think. Consequently, any external stimuli influence their thoughts.

Answer # 29: The parlor women are the equivalent of ignorant, frivolous, and rich wives. Ignorance being the ideal word to describe them as they are unfeeling towards their own husbands. Moreover, they lack the nurturing quality “When do you suppose the war will start…nothing” (Bradbury 90-91) this shows that the women could careless what happen to their husbands in the war. Also, they see having children as a chore, something to continue the race than actually a joyous milestone. Consequently, it is significant as women are the homemakers, therefore if they have a warped view of love, and care then society will adopt these views as the home is the first institution.

Posted by: Ashlee English at March 19, 2016 06:38 PM

Dominique Bauer
Dr. Hobbs
HON – 351 The Contemporary Worldview CA02
10 March 2016

Question 27: What does Faber tell Montag about books? Why is this significant?
Answer: Faber tells Montag that books “show the pores in the face of life” (Bradbury 39). This is significant because it shows that in this society, they only focus on the positives, and everything seems to be perfect to them. They do not like to consider the fact that there are imperfections in life. Moreover, since books help demonstrate some of these imperfections and sorrows that occur in real life, the society does not like to accept them.
Question 31: Explain how the women react to Montag’s reading. Why is this significant?
Answer: As a result of Montag’s reading, the women become very emotional. This is demonstrated by Mrs. Bowles standing up and stating “I've always said, poetry and tears, poetry and suicide and crying and awful feelings, poetry and sickness; all that mush!” (Bradbury 48). Furthermore, at the completion of the reading, “Mrs. Phelps was crying” (Bradbury 48). This is significant because it shows how much people in this society do not like to face reality. The conversation leading up to the reading was challenging on the women, and the reading only made them think more.

Posted by: Dominique Bauer at March 20, 2016 02:52 PM

Andrew Thriffiley
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 The Contemporary World View CA02
20 March 2016

Questions
26: Explain why Montag goes to see Faber. Why is this significant?
42: How many wars have “we started and won since 1990”? What kind of wars were they? What does this tell you about the society in this novella? Explain. Why is this significant?

Answers:
26:Montag visits Faber so that he can finally understand what he is reading, so he knows better comprehension all help tremendously. Faber says, "I don't talk things sir, I talk the meaning of things. I sit here and know I am alive." (Bradbury 71). This is teaching Montag that isn't isn't just about reading the books even though they are banned it is being able to understand them, and this is what will truly lead to being free and fully alive.

42: Since 1990 there had been two wars that Montag's society got out of with very little damage. The wars were atomic wars, so they were very destructive to a lot of the world.The significance of these wars is that they have led the society to be numb on the issue of war. On of the women's husbands said, "If I get killed off, just go right ahead and don't cry, but get married again and don't think of me." (Bradbury 91). This shows just how common death in war has become that they just want their spouses to move on because they are ready for the inevitable. This is significant in regards to the burning of books because people don't even worry about the books because they know they will just be destroyed anyway, so they don't even try to learn what is in the books. The wars have led to a very sad society that isn't too worried about the future just the present in front of them.

Posted by: Andrew Thriffiley at March 20, 2016 08:37 PM

Melissa Bryan
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary World View CA02
March 21 2016

Questions:

26. Explain why Montag goes to see Faber. Why is this significant?

41. Montag and Mildred think someone is at the door. Why doesn’t the door-voice tell them if someone is there? Why is this significant? Also, what does Mildred think is at the door? What is at the door? Why is this also significant?

Answer:

Montag goes to see Faber because he wanted Faber to help him to read and understand the Bible. He said, “And I want you to teach me to understand what I read” (Bradbury 78). It is significant because Faber thought it was the only way to relieve himself of his unhappiness. Also, he wanted to find a way to make a copy of the Bible before he returned it to Captain Beatty.

The door voice does not tell them that someone is at the door because Montag “shut it off” (Bradbury 68). This is significant because Montag did so before they started to read the books. Mildred thought it was a dog that was at the door as the book stated, “It’s only a dog” (Bradbury 68). It is significant because it was a mechanical hound tracking Montag.

Translation Used
Farenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury and introduction by Neil Gaiman, Simon and Schuster Paperbacks (2013).

Posted by: Melissa Bryan at March 21, 2016 02:43 AM

Jasmine Daniels
Dr. Hobbs
Hon 351 Contemporary World View CA02
21 March 2016

Question #30: Explain why Montag reads “Dover Beach” aloud to the ladies. Why might this be significant to the story, as a whole?

Montag was asked by the women to read Dover Beach as a way to show the uselessness of books and how they evoke unnecessary emotions. However, as a result, Mrs. Phelps began to cry during the reading because it was sad and poetic enough to evoke sad emotions. "Sh, sh," said Mildred. "You're all right, Clara, now, Clara, snap out of it! Clara, what's wrong?" "I-I,", sobbed Mrs. Phelps, "don't know, don't know, I just don't know, oh oh..." Mrs. Bowles stood up and glared at Montag. "You see? I knew it, that's what I wanted to prove! I knew it would happen! I've always said, poetry and tears, poetry and suicide and crying and awful feelings, poetry and sickness; all that mush! Now I've had it proved to me. You're nasty, Mr. Montag, you're nasty!" (Bradbury 48)

Question #34: .Who, does this part of the story reveal, did not want books anymore? Why is this significant?

In this part of the story, it is revealed that Mildred Montag did not want books anymore. This mentality shows us that she is different from her husband in that she completely disagrees with the reading of books or any unnecessary feelings that one may get from them. In addition, Mildred did not like the idea of books because it was hard for her to understand them in the first place. “Mildred snatched the book with a laugh. "Here! Read this one. No, I take it back. Here's that real funny one you read out loud today. Ladies, you won't understand a word. It goes umpty-tumptyump. Go ahead, Guy, that page, dear." (Bradbury 47)

Posted by: Jasmine Daniels at March 21, 2016 02:04 PM

Jamee Townsend
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 The Contemporary World View CA02
9 March 2016

Questions:
1. Describe and explain the mechanical hound. What is its purpose, who controls and maintains it, and why is it important to the story?
2. What are Montag’s comments about the people in the walls? Why is this significant?

Answer:
1. The mechanical hound is a robot, dog-like creature that can be programmed to attack as well as inject their victims with a paralytic serum. This is also one of Bradbury’s paradoxical phrases, which in this case he is using to continue the theme of living but not really living. Each fireman division has their own hound, which they can program to recognize the chemical composition of their target and according to Montag the beast is designed for “hunting and finding and killing (Bradbury 25).” At this point in the story, Bradbury seems to foreshadow a conflict because his department’s hound does not like Montag and tends to growl or show aggression towards him.

2. Montag’s wife Mildred is constantly watching her programs and interacting with the people in the virtual television walls, whom she calls her family. This upsets Montag because he considers her relationship with them to be so synthetic and immaterial. He cries out to Mildred, “Who are these people? Who’s that man and who’s that woman? […] Good God, nothing’s connected up (Bradbury 43).” He has a very annoyed attitude about it all and comments about how the walls and other synthetic entertainment such as driving too fast have no meaning and act as barriers to real communication.

Posted by: Jamee Townsend at March 21, 2016 02:24 PM

Jamee Townsend
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 The Contemporary World View CA02
21 March 2016

Questions 40 and 45:
1. Describe how you felt at the end of “The Sieve and the Sand” part of the novel when they pulled up to Montag’s house. What was going on? Explain. Why is this significant?
2. When Faber was about to leave Montag, he said some things. What did Montag think he was reciting? Why is this important? Explain.

Answer:
1. Montag had just turned in one of his books to the Fire Captain in order to appear dedicated to their rules and beliefs, and then the alarm is sounded to head to a new house to burn books and a house based upon a tip from a citizen. When they get to the house Montag realizes, “Why, we’ve stopped in front of my house (Bradbury 106).” This means that Mildred turned him in for having books, and his house, as well as the valuable books, will be burned. During this part of the novel, I felt very panicked as a reader because I knew that he would most likely be jailed for his crimes and his efforts to have a book revolution of sorts would die.

2. Montag thought he was reciting a poem, which is significant because poetry is illegal is to read. This signifies Faber’s willingness to support books and literature as well as Montag’s cause, which is supported by Faber during their first meeting, “I don’t talk things, sir. I talk the meaning of things (Bradbury 71).”

Posted by: Jamee Townsend at March 21, 2016 03:22 PM

Karra Rutherford
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351: Contemporary World View CA02
21 March, 2016
Questions: What is the meaning of the title of Part II? Why is this significant?
Why do you think Beatty responded the way he did when the alarm sounded? (“He glanced perfunctorily at it and shoved it in his pocket.”) Why is this significant?

Answers: The section is titled “The Sieve and the Sand”. As he rides the subway on his way to meet Farber, Montag recalls a childhood memory, “Once as a child he had sat upon a yellow dune by the sea in the middle of the blue and hot summer day, trying to fill a sieve with sand, because some cruel cousin had said, ‘Fill this sieve and you'll get a dime!’ `And the faster he poured, the faster it sifted through with a hot whispering.” (Bradbury 74) The memory serves as a juxtaposition to his current situation as he sits on the train trying to memorize the Bible before he must turn it over to Beatty. Montag has realized the value of books and how they can aid in resolving the trifling state of society, “Maybe books can get us half out the cave.” (Bradbury 70) He wants to save the contents of these books but his memory is insufficient to do so, “’I’ve tried to remember,’ said Montag, ‘But hell, it’s gone when I turn my head.’”, as a result, he proposes to Farber that they have copies of the books printed. (Bradbury 81 - 85)
Once the team responds to the alarm, they pull up to Montag’s house. From Beatty’s behavior, it appears that he had already anticipated Montag being reported, “’Here we go to make the world happy, Montag!’ Beatty’s pink phosphorescent cheeks glimmered in the high darkness, and he was smiling furiously. ‘Here we are!’” Also, once Montag realizes that they’ve pulled in front of his own house Beatty responds with condescending feigned ignorance which suggests he knew all along that Montag would be reported, “At last Montag raised his eyes and turned. Beatty was watching his face. ‘Something the matter, Montag?’ ‘Why,’ said Montag slowly, ‘we've stopped in front of my house.’" (Bradbury 106) This is the climax of the tension created by Beatty between himself and Montag as he recounted his dream in which he and Montag debated the merit of books” (Bradbury 103 – 104)

Posted by: Karra Rutherford at March 21, 2016 03:54 PM

Melissa Bryan, Andrew Thriffiley and Ashlee English
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary World View CA02
March 21 2016

Question:

32. Interpret the following passage from this part of the novella: “Maybe the books can get us half out of the cave.” Why is this significant?


Answer:

At the first glance of the question the first thing, we thought that it was an allusion of the Allegory of the Cave from The Republic by Plato. The slave that came out of the cave from the Allegory of the cave became enlightened when he left the cave. The slave understood the true reality of the outside world, but the slaves in the cave refused to believe what was outside of the cave. In this case, Montag thought that the books would have enlightened Mildred and himself. Hence, Montag said, “Maybe the books can get us half out of the cave” (Bradbury 70). Montag saw the books as a means to understand the actual reality of the world they live in, but Mildred is trying to keep him from understanding reality because of fear of what might happen if they do. Thus, Montag wanted to read the books to help them get out of the darkness of the cave that they were in.

Translation Used
Farenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury and introduction by Neil Gaiman, Simon and Schuster Paperbacks (2013).

Posted by: Melissa Bryan, Andrew Thriffiley and Ashlee English at March 21, 2016 04:27 PM

Jamee and Dominique
Dr. Hobbs
HON – 351 The Contemporary Worldview CA02
21 March 2016

Question 37: Interpret the following passage: “I’ve never known any dead man killed in a war. Killed jumping off buildings, yes, like Gloria’s husband last week, but from wars? No.” Why is this significant?
Answer: What this passage can be interpreted to mean is that everyday life is more depressing than being in a war. People are more willing to end their own lives than die in a war. Furthermore, it makes the reader questions how the wars are being fought. This interpretation can also be seen through the remark that “the Army said so. Quick war. Forty-eight hours” (Bradbury 44). This demonstrates our interpretation because in our current society, having a war like that is very uncommon. This passage begs the questions “is the war even real?” It makes the reader wonder if it is more a means of control or an illusion? It also demonstrates how comfortable society is with discussing death. This is significant because it shows how desensitized society is, as well as how much the society is lacking emotion.

Posted by: Jamee and Dominique at March 21, 2016 04:52 PM

Ashlee English
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
HON 351 The Contemporary World View CA02
21 March 2016

Question # 51: Beatty’s last words were, “Hand it over, Guy.” Reflect upon Montag’s last words to Beatty, “We never burned right.” What does it all mean? Explain. Why is this significant? Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Question # 60: What is the phoenix and explain its significance to this part of the story and, if relevant, to the novella, as a whole. Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer # 51: The above quotes frame the raid of Montag’s house. However, when Montag said, “We never burned right” (Bradbury 113) is significant as it a turning point in the novel. At this point Montag has an epiphany after reading books that destroying the knowledge contained in them isn’t right. Instead of burning books they should burn the vain and frivolous society they have created.

Answer # 60: The phoenix is a mythical creature that bursts into flames and is reborn from the ashes. Comparatively, Fahrenheit 451 by Bradbury emulates the phoenix as the city burns. Granger says “There was a silly… every generation” (Bradbury 156) explaining the story of the phoenix and how humans are doing the same thing. However, the humans aren’t learning from their mistakes according to Granger, but he hopes it will get better with each generation.

Posted by: Ashlee English at March 22, 2016 11:23 PM

Melissa Bryan
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary World View CA02
March 23 2016

Questions:
52.Why does Montag say that Beatty wanted to die? Explain. Why is this significant?

63.While Montag was in flight from the scene of Beatty’s murder, what thought occurred to him
about Beatty? Explain. Why is this significant?


Answer:

Montag said that Beatty wanted to die because “He had just stood there, not really trying to save himself, just stood there, joking, needling,” (Bradbury 116). It is significant because if he had not wanted to die, he would have tried to defend himself.
While Montag was fleeing the scene of Beatty’s murder, it occurred to Montag that Beatty wanted to die. Montag said, “How strange, strange, to want to die so much that you let a man walk around armed and then instead of shutting up and staying alive, you go on yelling at people and making fun of them until you get them mad, and then ....” (Bradbury 116). Hence, Beatty started an argument with Montag about the books just to get Montag worked up so that Montag could kill him. It’s significant because it showed that Beatty really wanted to die.

Translation Used:
Farenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury and introduction by Neil Gaiman, Simon and Schuster Paperbacks (2013).

Posted by: Melissa Bryan at March 23, 2016 02:18 AM

Andrew Thriffiley
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 The Contemporary World View CA02
March 23, 2016

Questions:
64: What is the explanation that Montag and Faber arrive at for how so very much could have happened within one week?
69: What is the promise at the end of the novella? What does it mean? Explain. Why is this significant?

Answers:
64: Faber has a great way of answering this saying, "I feel alive for the first time in years, I feel I'm doing what I should've done a lifetime ago." (Bradbury 125). They both believe that what they are doing for the first time in their lives is the right thing. The two men see that reading these books and coming to their own understandings to think further has set them free. Montag and Faber begin to realize that for once they aren't afraid of what could happen to them because they are doing what is right. In a week, their vision of reality has changed whether for good or bad they are trying to understand, but both men feel they are making a difference.

69: The promise that is made at the end of the novel is to start a new era for everyone else to live a better reality than Montag had to during his life. Montag has a true belief that society isn't completely, and it can be restored in due time. He says at the end, "To everything there is a season. Yes. A time to break down, and a time to build up. Yes. A time to keep silence and a time to speak." (Bradbury 158). The quote is significant because it is showing that Montag is saying that everything has a purpose, and there is a reason for everything that has happened to him. He sees that there is a time for everything, and he needs realizing that it is now his time to bring forth a new era to make the rest of society at ease.

Posted by: Andrew Thriffiley at March 23, 2016 02:02 PM

Jamee Townsend
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 The Contemporary World View CA02
23 March 2016

Questions 58 and 67:
1. Describe what happened when Montag met the men for the first time. What did they tell him about the chase? Explain. Why is this significant?
2. What was Granger’s philosophy on life, taught to him by his grandfather, and handed on to Montag? Explain. Why is this significant?

Answer:
1. When Montag meets the men they already known who he is from the news, and have watched his entire police chase on the television. Granger explains to him that his chase is still in progress but headed back towards the city after they lost him at the river. Granger says, “They can know they can hold their audience only so long. The show’s got to have a snap ending (Bradbury 141),” to point out that hunting down Montag is a form of entertainment and proving control to the people.

2. Granger explains his philosophy on life to Montag, “Everyone must leave something behind when he dies, my grandfather said. […] Something your hand touched some way so your soul has somewhere to go (Bradbury 149).” This philosophy is significant because it’s consistent with Montag’s goals to make a difference in the city, and therefore, make a change for a lifetime. Montag reflects during this time about how he has already impacted the city and how he plans to do so in the future.

Posted by: Jamee Townsend at March 23, 2016 02:26 PM

Dominique Bauer
Dr. Hobbs
HON – 351 The contemporary Worldview CA02
23 March 2016

Question 61: What is Mildred’s main concern as she runs out of the house? Explain. Why is this significant?
Answer: Mildred’s main concern as she runs out of the house is the family on the screen. As she is leaving the house, she does not look at Montag, but rather as she is leaving, all she seems to care about is the “[p]oor family, poor family, oh everything gone” (Bradbury 52). This is significant because it shows how little Montag meant to her. Later in Part III, it is discovered that she turns him in, which only further shows how much she did not really care for him. Her main concern as she leaves the house is also significant because it shows how in that society, technology and artificial relationships mean more than anything to people.
Question 65: What are Montag’s impressions of the land across the river? Explain. Why is this significant?
Answer: The impression that Montag has of the land across the river is that it is overwhelming. This is seen by the narration that “[t]he land rushed at him, a tidal wave. He was crushed by darkness and the look of the country [. . . and h]e fell back under the breaking curve of darkness and sound and smell, his ears roaring. He whirled. The stars poured over his sight like flaming meteors” (Bradbury 66). This is significant because it demonstrates the vast difference between city life and what life is like outside of the main cities. It opens Montag’s eyes to what else is out there.

Posted by: Dominique Bauer at March 23, 2016 02:36 PM

Jasmine Daniels
Dr. Hobbs
Hon 351 Contemporary World View CA02
23 March 2016

Question #50: Interpret the following passage: “Mildred, you didn’t put in the alarm?” Explain. Why is this significant?

Answer: My interpretation of this passage is that Guy Montag is asking his wife if she called the fire department and reported her husband as a hoarder of books. As a result, an alarm was set off to burn their house. The passage suggests that Guy is asking this question in disbelief and horror. This also shows from the fact that Guy was in shock after seeing that they stopped in front of his house and saw his wife leaving their home. This is significant because it hints the betrayal of Mildred and the entrance of the betrayal from Beatty.

Question #70: Discuss how Montag's changing perception of fire mirrors his personal development. Explain. Why is this significant?

Answer: In this section of the book Montag perceives fire as a way of forgetting everything that has happened and everything that he has lost. He enjoys the fire because it is now viewed as a way to burn all of his problems. “He burnt the bedroom walls and the cosmetics chest because he wanted to change everything, the chairs, the tables, and in the dining-room the silverware and plastic dishes, everything that showed that he had lived here in this empty house with a strange woman who would forget him tomorrow, who had gone and quite forgotten him already, listening to her Seashell radio pour in on her and in on her as she rode across town, alone. And as before, it was good to burn, he felt himself gush out in the fire, snatch, rend, rip in half with flame, and put away the senseless problem. If there was no solution, well then now there was no problem, either. Fire was best for everything!” (Bradbury 54) He later compares humanity to a phoenix because when things are set aflame they are still able to be resurrected from the ashes. This shows his development because it is shown as a way to restart or cover up the existence of a problem rather than burning just for enjoyment.

Posted by: Jasmine Daniels at March 23, 2016 02:50 PM

Ashley Reynolds
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary World View CA02
9 March 2016

Question 3: Metaphor is a rhetorical device that transfers the sense or aspects of one word to another, e.g., “The moon was a ghostly galleon tossed upon cloudy seas.” Simile is TYPE of metaphor a type of metaphor in which the comparison is made with the use of the word like or its equivalent, e.g, “My love is like a red, red rose.” Find and explain two similes Montag uses to describe Clarisse. Do the similes serve any purpose other than to characterize Clarisse?

Answer: Montag compares Clarisse to nature imagery, including fresh snow and drops of water. He thinks that her face is “bright as snow in the moonlight,”
a sharp contrast from the dark, industrial setting of the story (Bradbury 4, Simon ed.). He is intrigued by her pure, fresh appearance. More than her beauty, Montag is entranced by her eyes. He says, “He saw himself in her eyes, suspended in two shining drops of bright water, himself dark and tiny, in fine detail, the lines about his mouth, everything there, as if her eyes were two miraculous bits of violet amber that might capture and hold him intact” (Bradbury 5, Simon ed.). Montag is fascinated by Clarisse because she is able to reveal parts of Montag that he didn’t know existed.


Question 11: Describe the bedroom that Montag enters. Whom does the setting characterize, and how, and why? Why is this significant?

Answer: The bedroom in Montag’s house is cold, dark, and lifeless. Montag describes it as “coming into the cold marbled room of a mausoleum after the moon had set. Complete darkness, not a hint of the silver world outside, the windows tightly shut, the chamber a tomb-world where no sound from the great city could penetrate” (Bradbury 9, Simon ed.). This setting characterizes Mildred, Montag’s wife. Mildred is not really alive—she spends her days interacting with TV screens and radio programs instead of living a true, authentic life. She is effectively dead to the outside world. The description of cold fits Mildred; she acts coldly towards Montag. Mildred is only subconsciously aware that her life is void of meaning, which causes her to try to kill herself. Montag finds her “uncovered and cold, like a body displayed on the lid of a tomb, her eyes fixed to the ceiling by invisible threads of steel, immovable” (Bradbury 10, Simon ed.). With Mildred’s suicide attempt, the transformation of the bedroom into a mausoleum is complete.

Posted by: Ashley Reynolds at March 23, 2016 03:11 PM

Ashley Reynolds, Grace Lederer
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary World View CA02
23 March 2016

Question 35: When you read the following passage for the first time, what did you think it was going to uncover?: “I’ve had this little item ready for months. But I almost let you go, I’m that afraid.” Explain what is actually meant. Why is this significant?

Answer: When I first read the previous passage, I was concerned that Faber had a weapon. In many of the novels we have previously read, deviants are harshly punished; in Nineteen Eighty-Four, for example, thought-criminals are tortured and beaten. Earlier in Fahrenheit 451, Montag is afraid that the Mechanical Hound is going to attack him. Since Montag has disobeyed the rules of society, he is in danger of betrayal.

However, Faber is not out to betray Montag. Instead, the device he has is meant to help Montag on his quest. The device is a “green bullet” that Montag can put in his ear to secretly communicate with Faber (Bradbury 87, Simon ed.). In this way, Faber can guide Montag and advise him on the best course of action.

When Faber says, “I’ve had this little item ready for months. But I almost let you go, I’m that afraid,” he is alluding to his own cowardice. Faber wants to rebel against the oppressive society, but is unable to bring himself to do so. Faber has “had this little item ready for months,” implying he has been planning a rebellion against society for some time. However, he has always been too scared to actually execute his plan, to the point he almost lets Montag leave without offering any help (Bradbury 87, Simon ed.).

Posted by: Ashley Reynolds, Grace Lederer at March 23, 2016 03:15 PM

Grace Lederer
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 CA02 The Contemporary World View

Question 54: When Montag was almost run over, what did that remind you of, concerning Clarisse? Explain. Why is this significant? Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.
Answer: When Montag is almost run over, it reminds me of when Clarisse was pondering if drivers even knew what the world outside of their cars actually looked like, saying, “if you showed a driver a green blur, Oh yes he’s say, that’s grass!” A pink blur? That’s a rose garden!” (Bradbury 6). This is significant because Montag nearly lost his life and to the driver of the vehichle, he was just another blur in the background. I think this can be a kind of metaphor for how the society views people’s lives as a whole—insignificant blurs that can be easily passed by if terminated.
Question 66: When Montag complained about being unable to remember Mildred, what explanation did Granger give him? Explain. Why is this significant?
Answer: Montag describes his feelings about his wife with much despair because he feels that there must be something wrong with him as he says, “It’s strange, I don’t miss her, it’s strange I don’t feel much of anything…even if she dies…I don’t think I’ll feel sad” (Bradbury 148). Granger illustrates to Montag that it may be okay to feel that way about his wife using the example of the death of his grandfather. Granger describes how people impart pieces of their souls into the things they leave behind, from the jokes they tell to the pictures they paint. In describing all the things his grandfather left behind, Granger is highlighting the fact that Mildred didn’t really offer the world much of her soul and it is therefore not that shameful if Montag can’t remember her for much.

Posted by: Grace Lederer at March 23, 2016 03:16 PM

Ashley Reynolds
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary World View CA02
21 March 2016

Question 28: What are the three things that Faber says are missing from society? Why is this significant?

Answer: Faber says the three things missing from society are quality of information, leisure to digest the information, and the ability to carry out one’s own conclusion based on these reflections. The first thing, quality of information, refers to the amount of realistic detail in a book. Faber claims, “The good writers touch life often. The mediocre ones run a quick hand over her. The bad ones rape her and leave her for the flies” (Bradbury 79-81, Simon ed.). The second thing, leisure, refers to time to reflect on new information. Montag at first objects that he has plenty of time off of work, but Faber states that this “free time” doesn’t truly provide the opportunity to think. Everyone is so busy with watching TV, driving fast, and playing games that they don’t actually take time for thoughtful consideration. The third thing, the right to make one’s decisions based on new information and reflection, is dependent on the first two things. In this society, information is hidden, all time is occupied, and individuals are not given the opportunity to make their own decisions (Bradbury 79, Simon ed.).

He continues to say that these things are present in books and that’s why Montag feels like books are so important. Faber explains, “It's not books you need, it's some of the things that once were in books. […] Books were only one type of receptacle where we stored a lot of things we were afraid we might forget. There is nothing magical in them at all. The magic is only in what books say, how they stitched the patches of the universe together into one garment for us” (Bradbury 78-9, Simon ed.). Books aren’t inherently valuable because they’re books; they’re valuable because of the three qualities Faber mentions.


Question 36: Describe how long the women estimated the war to last. Why is this significant?

Answer: The women estimate that the war will last less than a week. The Army confidently states that the war would be over in forty-eight hours. Mrs. Phelps, the wife of one of the soldiers, says, “the Army called Pete yesterday. He'll be back next week. The Army said so. Quick war. Forty-eight hours they said, and everyone home. That's what the Army said. Quick war. Pete was called yesterday and they said he'd be, back next week. Quick..." (Bradbury 90-1, Simon ed.). It’s doubtful that the war actually will be that quick. The society in which the novel takes place is obsessed with appearances and erases any negativity. The Army therefore puts on a positive face and claims the war will be short to avoid any negative feelings.

Posted by: Ashley Reynolds at March 23, 2016 04:17 PM

Ashlee English and Melissa Bryan
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
HON 351 The Contemporary World View CA02
23 March 2016

Question # 73: Once Montag becomes a violent revolutionary, why does the government purposely capture an innocent man in his place instead of tracking down the real Montag? Might the government believe that Montag is no longer a threat? Explain. Why is this significant? Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: Montag in becoming a violent revolutionary bent the fabric of the perfect society in Bradbury’s Fahrenheit 451. As such, the citizens bearing witness to Montag’s insubordination would believe that they would be able to commit the same crimes and have no repercussions. Consequently, to avoid a civil war, the ‘show’ (on behalf of the government) made, “some poor fellow” (Bradbury 141) a scapegoat for Montag’s capture. Ideally, the government knows that Montag is still alive, however, the thought of Montag has been erased from the minds of the people and an uprising averted. Therefore, Montag is no longer a threat to society. Consequently, after the ‘staged capture of Montag,’ the announcer says “The search is over, Montag is dead; a crime against society has been avenged” (Bradbury 142) affirming that justice was served. This act reaffirms the ‘appearance’ government’s ability to be the controlling power in the society.

Work Cited
Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury
Simon& Schuster Paperbacks

Posted by: Ashlee English and Melissa Bryan at March 23, 2016 04:40 PM

Andrew Thriffiley and Karra Rutherford
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 The Contemporary World View CA02
28 March 2016

Question:
72.) Analyze Captain Beatty. Is he truly an ideologue in support of censorship or is he hiding an allegiance to freedom of expression? Explain. Why is this significant?

Answer:
72.) Captain Beatty is certainly a very conflicted character in this work, and it shows throughout the whole novel by the way he discusses books, during the book. An example of this is when he is talking to Montag, "I'm full of bits and pieces, most fire captains have to be." (Bradbury 38). This is Beatty showing that he knows a thing or two about books even though he claims not to want anything to do with them. There is a sense in the story that Beatty knew the truth about books the same way Montag was, but he never had to courage to go out on a limb and make the case that books were good. Montag sees this when he kills Beatty, "Beatty wanted to die." (Bradbury 116). Montag sees that Beatty was ok with his death because he couldn't live with knowing that Montag stood up for what Beatty always sincerely believed himself. Beatty does still enforce the burning of books, and he tries to convince Montag that he hasn't accomplished anything, " Give a man a few lines of verse and he thinks he's the Lord of all Creation. You think you can walk on water with your books. Well, the world can get by just fine without them." (Bradbury 111). This is Captain Beatty's last chance to turn Montag against, but Montag stands firm in his belief, and this gets to Beatty that Montag can stay independent and think for himself.

Posted by: Andrew Thriffiley and Karra Rutherford at March 28, 2016 02:14 PM

Jamee and Dominique
Dr. Hobbs
HON – 351 The Contemporary Worldview CA02
23 March 2016

Question 75: Discuss the idea of conformity versus individuality as presented in Fahrenheit 451. Explain. Why is this significant?
Answer: One of the key ideas about the books is that when people read them, new ideas are presented and this goes against what society wants, so this is one was in which individuality is restricted.
The idea of conformity is much preferred over individuality. It also ties into how communication works in this society. The synthetic forms of communication keep society from being individualistic. If people were not controlled by synthetic communication, then perhaps society would not be as bland, and more of everyone’s personalities would show through.
The desire for the government to control everyone is seen through how, even after only just meeting her, Montag is “inclined to believe [Clarisse] need[s] the psychiatrist” (Bradbury 10). This shows how because Clarisse is slightly different from everyone else in society, they feel as though she needs medical help, rather than letting her embrace her differences.

Posted by: Jamee and Dominique at March 28, 2016 02:41 PM

Grace Lederer (scribe)
Ashley Reynolds (spokesperson)
HON 351 The Contemporary World View
Group Discussion Question
28 March 2016
Question74) Analyze Mildred Montag. Is she truly happy leading a life blind to reality? Explain. Why is this significant? Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.
Answer: Mildred Montag is shallow, cold, selfish and consumed with her technology. I do not think she is truly happy leading a life of blind reality. Mildred actually tried to kill herself, yet is so concerned with keeping up appearances that she denies the event even happened the morning after being resuscitated. Mildred also sells out her husband to the firemen about his book reading because it goes against what society favors. Mildred may be unhappy, but she is to weak to try to break away from what she knows and accept something as different as book reading to be the answer to her deeply seated emotional dissatisfaction. She would rather live in her fabricated reality of wall to wall televisions and the constant electronic buzz of the seashells in her ears. As Montag is trying to figure out his dilemma of making a copy of the last surviving text of the Old Testament before Beatty takes it back from him, Mildred has already dismissed the importance of the idea and is entirely focused on her friends coming over to watch television later that evening. As Montag leaves, he asks his wife, “Millie, does your ‘family’ love you, love you very much, love you with all their heart and soul, Millie?” (Bradbury 73). Mildred deflects the question with a response of “Why’d you ask a silly question like that?” (Bradbury 73), again dodging any opportunity to feel something that isn’t artificial because it scares her.

Posted by: Grace Lederer at March 28, 2016 02:49 PM

Karra Rutherford
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351: Contemporary World View CA02
23 March 2016

Question: Why does this society need everything to be a game? Describe and explain the new game of “finding Montag.” Why is this significant? Once the hound kills “Montag” the announcer states: “Montag is dead; a crime against society has been avenged.” What just happened? Explain. Why is this significant?
Answer: If we assume that Mildred is the archetype of the average citizen in this society, it is clear that entertainment is used to dissociate from reality. One of Beatty’s principle arguments and justifications for the abolishment of literature is the controversy and unrest that its contents can induce. Beatty implies that by getting rid of controversy and difference while appealing to the masses with simple entertainment, society is keeping everyone happy. “People want to be happy, isn't that right? Haven't you heard it all your life? I want to be happy, people say. Well, aren't they? Don't we keep them moving, don't we give them fun? That's all we live for, isn't it? For pleasure, for titillation? And you must admit our culture provides plenty of these." (Bradbury 56) The “game” of finding Montag is just another entertaining distraction from reality to keep the masses happy; this is supported by Montag’s response to his news coverage, “So they must have their game out, thought Montag. The circus must go on, even with war beginning within the hour....” (Bradbury 127)
Montag’s capture and death have been staged by the state in conjunction with the media, as a show that “a crime against society has been avenged.” (Bradbury 142) To keep up appearances, maintain control, and dissuade future dissent from societal norms it must be shown that enemies of the state are always caught and punished accordingly. This also ties into the entertainment factor, "They're faking. You threw them off at the river. They can't admit it. They know they can hold their audience only so long. The show's got to have a snap ending, quick!” (Bradbury 141) A chase with an inconclusive ending isn’t a suitable grand finale for the entertainment-junkie citizens nor does it support the unquestioned loyalty and support to the state and the status quo. Without a conclusive end, people may start to ask questions and be more prone to act unconventionally.

Posted by: Karra Rutherford at March 31, 2016 02:54 AM

Ashley Reynolds
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary World View CA02
23 March 2016

Question 53: In part III, Montag discusses the high risks of crossing a street.
What might this mean and how is it relevant—to anything? Explain. Why is this significant?

Answer: During the chase scene, Montag must cross the street in order to reach Faber’s house. The law requires drivers to speed since driving slow is illegal. Crossing any road, therefore, is highly dangerous. Crossing the street is significant because Clarisse was killed by a car. Montag even wonders if the drivers in the beetle that try to run him over are the same drivers that killed Clarisse (Bradbury 122, Simon ed.). By crossing the street, Montag is metaphorically following in Clarisse’s footsteps.

Crossing the street is also highly symbolic of change and embracing the unknown. Crossing the street corresponds to the “crossing of the threshold” stage in the hero’s journey. Once he crosses the street, he is “hidden in the safety of the dark alley for which he had set out on a long journey” (Bradbury 123, Simon ed.). Montag is leaving the known world and entering the unknown world.


Question 57: Provide meaning for the following passage: “One of them had to stop burning. The sun wouldn’t, certainly. So it looked as if it had to be Montag and the people he had worked with until a few hours ago.” Explain. Why is this significant?

Answer: In this passage, Montag is floating down the river reflecting on his life. The river “was very real; it held him comfortably and gave him the time at last, the leisure, to consider this month, this year, and a lifetime of years” (Bradbury 134, Simon ed.). In his reflections, Montag decides that the sun burns everything, but more than anything, it burns away time. He thinks, “The world rushed in a circle and turned on its axis and time was busy burning the years and the people anyway, without any help from him. So if he burnt things with the firemen, and the sun burnt Time, that meant that everything burned!” (Bradbury 134, Simon ed.). Montag acknowledges the destructive power of the sun and the firemen. The sun can’t be stopped, but the firemen can. In that moment, Montag decides to stop burning before the world is destroyed.

Posted by: Ashley Reynolds at April 1, 2016 01:16 PM

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