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October 03, 2012

"Holden On" to J.D. Salinger's _Catcher in the Rye_


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Salinger, J. D. Catcher in the Rye.. 1951. American. Novel.

ENG 311 Students,

Below, please . . .

. . . enter your work on this text as prescribed in class.

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Posted by lhobbs at October 3, 2012 01:16 PM

Readers' Comments:

Joseph Lontrato
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
October 15, 2012

Q: Why did Holden write Mr. Spencer a note at the end of his examination paper?

A: Holden wrote the note to Mr. Spencer so that he would not feel bad about flunking him in the class. “In the first place, I'd only written that damn note so that he wouldn't feel too bad about flunking me” (Chapter 2, Page 7).

Posted by: Joseph Lontrato at October 15, 2012 07:57 PM

Kasey McDearis
Dr. Hobbs
ENG311 CA05
15 October 2012

Question: Why does Holden watch the game from the hill?

Answer: Holden watches from the hill because he does not want to go down, so that the other students in the stands do not see him. the previous time he had forgotten the equipment and the team couldn't compete. he felt guilty for it, and scare that the other students will ignore him, or be mean to him, so he just stays away to avoid the situation.

Posted by: Kasey McDearis at October 16, 2012 12:03 AM

Shyenne Price
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
October 16, 2012

Quotation: “Who is Ossenburger?”

Answers: Ossenburger is a man that made it big for himself in the undertaking business. “ he gave Pencey a big pile of dough…” (Salinger,9). He is a sponsor for Pencey Prep and comes to the school often to give speeches and for events.

Posted by: Shyenne Price at October 16, 2012 04:53 PM

Madison Grabow
Hobbs
ENG 311 Survey of Major 20th Century Writers
16 October 2012

HW Q 8: What does Holden think about the other students who attend Pencey?

A 8: Holden has never perceived an of the other students at Pencey as splendid and clear-thinking as Pencey says. Also, "Pencey was full of crooks" (2). The jocks all looked out for each other. The coach would even allow some students to use his car. There were students like Ackley who was peculiar and then students like Stradlater who "walked around in his bare torso" (6).

pdf

Posted by: madison grabow at October 16, 2012 06:07 PM

De’Nisha Butler
Dr.Hobbs
ENG311 CA05
October 16, 2012

Quotation: What had Mr. Spencer bought and shown the boys when they were visiting him one Sunday?

Answer: He had bought an old beat-up Navajo blanket from an Indian in Yellowstone Park.
Quote: “For instance, one Sunday when some other guys and I were over there for hot chocolate, he showed us this old beat-up Navajo blanket that he and Mrs. Spencer'd bought off some Indian in Yellowstone Park.”
Page 4.

Posted by: De'Nisha Butler at October 16, 2012 09:37 PM

Sherman Milton III
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311: Survey of Major 20thCentury Writers
October 16, 2012

Question:
Was Penny Prep really the fourth school from which Holden was asked to leave? Explain your answer.

Answer:
Penny Prey was definitely the fourth school that Holden had attended, but the story did not state that it was the fourth that he was asked to leave (5). Being that he is asked to leave because of academics if I had to guess he was having the same problems at the other schools.

Posted by: Sherman Milton III at October 16, 2012 10:07 PM

Leah Hollingsworth
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
17 October 2012

Homework Question 3: What is the reality of Pencey Prep in contrast to the advertisements, as seen by Holden?

Answer: The advertisements make Pencey seem high class and luxurious. “They advertise in about a thousand magazines, always showing some hotshot guy on a horse jumping over a fence. Like as if all you ever did at Pencey was play polo all the time” (Salinger 1). Holden sees Pencey in less enchanting, more negative light. “And underneath the guy on the horse's picture, it always says: ‘Since 1888 we have been molding boys into splendid, clear-thinking young men.’ Strictly for the birds. They don't do any damn more molding at Pencey than they do at any other school” (Salinger 1).
Page numbers were taken from the PDF version.

Posted by: Leah Hollingsworth at October 17, 2012 01:18 AM

Matt Lynch
ENG 311 Survey of Major Writers of 20th century
Dr. Hobbs
October 16, 2012
Catcher In The Rye Chapters 1-13
13) What did Holden think about Mr. Spencer’s description of his parents as “grand people”?
Spencer tells Holden that he had the opportunity to meet his parents, and he describes them as “grand people”. Holden is not pleased with the phrase “grand people”, he say that the word is phony meaning not genuine or real. So he believes that phony is a bad description since he thinks the word is fake.
“Then he said, "I had the privilege of meeting your mother and dad when they had their little chat with Dr. Thurmer some weeks ago. They're grand people." "Yes, they are. They're very nice." Grand. There's a word I really hate. It's a phony. I could puke every time I hear it.” (Salinger, Chapter 2, pg.5, PDF).

Posted by: Matt Lynch at October 17, 2012 03:39 AM

Summer Taylor
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
October 17, 2012

Question: Who is Selma Thurmer, and why did Holden like her?

Answer: Selma Thurmer was a girl that showed up at the football games. Holden like to see several girls in a place, even if they "weren't doing anything." Old Selma Thurmer--she was the headmaster's daughter--showed up at the
games quite often, but she wasn't exactly the type that drove you mad with desire. She
was a pretty nice girl, though. I sat next to her once in the bus from Agerstown and we
sort of struck up a conversation. I liked her. She had a big nose and her nails were all
bitten down and bleedy-looking and she had on those damn falsies that point all over the
place, but you felt sort of sorry for her. What I liked about her, she didn't give you a lot of
horse manure about what a great guy her father was. She probably knew what a phony slob he was" (Salinger 2). I believe Holden like Selma just because she was there, there weren't many girls at the football games, and she did not make out her father to be a great guy because he wasn't. She was real and seemed down to earth about people, and also Holden felt bad for her.

Posted by: Summer Taylor at October 17, 2012 11:04 AM

Jason Anderson
Dr.Hobbs
ENG311 CA05
The Catcher in the Rye

Question 21: Give an example of something which Ackley considered very funny.

Answer: Ackley laughs when Holden gets hit on the head by Stradlater's tennis racket when he gets a pair of scissors out of his closet. Holden describes how Ackley finds pain funny.
"Something like that- a guy getting hit on the head with a rock or something- tickled the pants off Ackley."(Back Bay Books edition,p.31)

Posted by: Jason Anderson at October 17, 2012 11:33 AM

Timothy Delay
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
10, October 17, 2012
Question: 11. Did Holden agree with Dr. Thurmer description of life as a game? Explain your answer.

Answers: Holden does not agree with Dr. Thurmer Description of life being a game. Holden thought that “Game, my ass. Some game” (pg 5). He felt that life is far from being a game and it only similar if “you get on the side where all the hot-shots are, then it's a game, all right--I'll admit that (pg 5). For the rest of the world that are not “hot-shots” there is no game since their no star to compete with.

Posted by: Timothy Delay at October 17, 2012 12:09 PM

Sarah Winans
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
17 October 2012

Question: Why does Holden watch the game from the hill?

Answer: He watches the game from the hill because the team was angry at him for getting back so late because it was his fault for forgetting the equipment. The text says, "We'd gone in to New York that morning for
this fencing meet with McBurney School. Only, we didn't have the meet. I left all the
foils and equipment and stuff on the goddam subway. It wasn't all my fault. I had to keep
getting up to look at this map, so we'd know where to get off. So we got back to Pencey around two-thirty instead of around dinnertime. The whole team ostracized me the whole way back on the train" (Page 2 Paragraph 3).

Posted by: Sarah Winans at October 17, 2012 01:50 PM

Joe May and Shermin Milton
Dr. Hobbs
Eng-311
17 October 2012

Catcher in the Rye Group 6
6. In Chapter 6 there is a lot of rising tension between Stradlatter and Holden. Stradlatter comes back from a date with Jane and the hostility builds when Holden asks him about it. A physical altercation occurs between Stradlatter and Holden and Stadlatter punches him in the face. Holden is interested in the girl Jane because she is one of the only girls at the Prep school that he can relate to, respects and finds attractive. They had spent a lot of time together during previious summers and i think he likes her. I think the tension is rising between the two roomates because they both like her and holden knows how Stradlatter really can be. He is very sexually active to the point where he is dirty.

Posted by: Joe May at October 17, 2012 03:15 PM

Sarah Winans and Timothy Delay
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
17 October 2012

Question: Choose two passages from your assigned chapter that BEST encapsulate what we need to remember from it. Does the passage foreshadow any event that happens later in the book? Is there anything about the passage that might contain symbolism?

Answer: The first passage we think is crucial to the story is when Holden recounts his reaction from Allie's death. Holden says, "I was only thirteen, and they were going to have me psychoanalyzed and all, because I broke all the windows in the garage. I don't blame them. I really don't. I slept in the garage the night he died, and I broke all the goddam windows with my fist, just for the hell of it" (Chapter 5 page 21). This shows that Holden is emotionally unstable, and we think this is why he is so jaded and will probably make poor decisions later in the story. The second passage is when Holden states, "I wasn't too crazy about doing it, but I
couldn't think of anything else descriptive. Besides, I sort of liked writing about it" (Chapter 5 Page 21). We think this is important because Holden might discuss his true feelings through writing. Later in the story, he may reveal something about himself through writing because that could be how he best expresses himself.

Posted by: Sarah Winans and Timothy Delay at October 17, 2012 03:17 PM

Leah Hollingsworth
Delia Mulvihill
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
17 October 2012

Question: Summary of Chapter 2.

Answer: In chapter two Holden visits his old teacher Mr. Spencer, who gives him a hard time about focusing on his studies. He reminds him that even though he cares for Holden, he did flunk him. Mr. Spenser encourages him to think about his future. "Life is a game, boy. Life is a game that one plays according to the rules" (Salinger 5). This quote summarizes the gist of the chapter.

Posted by: Leah Hollingsworth at October 17, 2012 03:18 PM

Wolly Mendez, Shyenne Price, Matt Lynch
ENG 311 Survey of Major Writer of the 20th century
Dr. Hobbs
October, 17 2012
In-Class Discussion/ Study Questions Chapters 1-9
In chapter 1 the characters that are introduced are Holden, Mr. Spencer, and Mr. Spencer’s wife, Mrs. Spencer. Holden is the main character and the one telling the story.
The general summery of the chapter is that Holden is talking about his school life a Pencey Prep, where he is on the fencing team, he speaks about football games and that everyone is expected to have tons of school spirit. “Where I want to start telling is the day I left Pencey Prep. Pencey Prep is this school that's in Agerstown, Pennsylvania.” (Chapter 1, Salinger, pg. 1, PDF). He doesn’t really like Pencey Prep, he feels like it’s for the birds.
“What I was really hanging around for, I was trying to feel some kind of a good-by. I mean I've left schools and places I didn't even know I was leaving them. I hate that. I don't care if it's a sad good-by or a bad goodby, but when I leave a place I like to know I'm leaving it. If you don't, you feel even worse.” (Chapter 1, Salinger, pg. 2, PDF). It’s basically foreshadowing him leaving school, when eventually he moves away from school and lives in a hotel. Possibly could be foreshadowing further more in the book to him having to leave suddenly from something else.

Posted by: Matt Lynch at October 17, 2012 03:21 PM

Timothy Delay
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
10, October 17, 2012
Question: 21. “She was laying there asleep, with her face sort of on the side of the pillow. She had her mouth way open. It's funny. You take adults, they look lousy when they're asleep and they have their mouths way open, but kids don't. Kids look all right.” What is the context of the passage?

Answers: This is when Holden comes back home to see his sister after the crazy night he is having. He notice Phoebe sleep and remarks about how it okay for kids to have their mouths open when they sleep and she looks peaceful when she asleep. This is the first time that Holden does not consider someone else a fake. He can find no real reason to hate Phoebe even after she scolds him for getting kick out of another school. “Then she hit me on the leg with her fist. She gets very fisty when she feels like it” (Ch 21 pg 89). Even after this event he show no sign of being angry with his little sister and even tries to appease her by reassuring that their dad was not going to kill him “Cut it out, now," I said. "Nobody's gonna kill me. Nobody's gonna even--C'mon, Phoeb, take that goddam thing off your head. Nobody's gonna kill me” (Ch 21 pg 89).

Posted by: Timothy Delay at October 18, 2012 02:48 PM

Shyenne Price
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
October 18, 2012

Quotation: “What is Holden’s idea about other peoples suitcases?”

Answers: “It sounds terrible to say it, but I can even get to hate somebody, just looking at them, if they have cheap suitcases with them.” (Salinger, p. 58) Holden feels that people cannot get a long if they have different types of suitcases. If one person has genuine leather and the other has cheap material, there is a different social level between the two of them and they will never be able to get a long. “You think if they’re intelligent and all, the other person, and have a good sense of humor, that they don’t give a damn about whose suitcases are better, but they do. They really do.” (Salinger, p. 59)

Quotes taken from full text version of novel online.

Posted by: Shyenne Price at October 18, 2012 04:19 PM

Sarah Winans
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
19 October 2012

Question: Design your own question. (Chapter 5)
Do you think that Holden is still deeply affected by Allie's death, do you think he has been able to move on at all? Explain.

Answer: I don't think that Holden has really moved on from his brother's death. He was so upset when it happened, which is to be expected. But he uses Allie's old mitt for Stradlater's paper, when the paper was supposed to be about something simpler like a room. I think Holden is looking for someone to talk to about the death of his brother--he was psychoanalyzed but I'm not sure if anyone ever helped him to move forward with his life after the death of his brother. As he reminisces, he seems very sad as he describes his brother, "They really meant it. But it wasn't just that he was the most intelligent member in the family. He was also the nicest, in lots of ways. He never got mad at anybody" (Chapter 5 Page 21).

Posted by: Sarah Winans at October 19, 2012 12:15 AM

Sarah Winans
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
19 October 2012

Question: (Correct Chapter 12)
Why did Holden have to leave the night club?

Answer: Holden had to leave the night club because of Lillian Simmons, D.B.'s ex. Holden was irritated when he saw her, and told her he needed to go meet someone so he could avoid her. Holden states, "After I'd told her I had to meet somebody, I didn't have any goddam choice except
to leave. I couldn't even stick around to hear old Ernie play something halfway decent. But I certainly wasn't going to sit down at a table with old Lillian Simmons and that Navy guy and be bored to death. So I left (Chapter 12 Page 47). Holden was not happy, and later states that people are always ruining things.

Posted by: Sarah Winans at October 19, 2012 12:24 AM

Madison Grabow
Hobbs
ENG 311 Survey of Major 20th Century Writers
19 October 2012

HW Chapter 9

Due to Holden's sexual urges, what does he decide to do?

Holden claims that he is not obsessed with sexual encounters, but he has a craving that he wants to satisfy himself. Holden explains that "all of a sudden, I got this idea. I took out my wallet and started looking for this address a guy I met at a party last summer, that went to Princeton, gave me" (35). His sexual urges cause him to go "over to the phone and" give her a buzz. Unfortunately she did not agree to meeting him that night so the chapter ends with his urges not being fulfilled.

pdf

Posted by: madison grabow at October 19, 2012 11:46 AM

Jason Anderson
Madison Grabow
Dr.Hobbs
ENG311 CA05
The Catcher in the Rye

Activity Day 1- 10/17/12
Quote: "He didn't like it when you called him "Ackley Kid". He was always telling me I was a goddam kid, because I was sixteen and he was eighteen. It drove him mad when I called him "Ackley Kid". (p.28, Back Bay Books Edition)

Explanation: This quote shows that Holden doesn't care about other people. He is quite willing to anger others and do whatever he likes without regard for their feelings. It also shows that he is likely to get in trouble for his sharp tongue later in the novel.

Posted by: Jason/Madison at October 19, 2012 11:50 AM

Summer Taylor
Dr. Hobbs
ENG311 CA05
19 October 2012

Question: Design your own question. ch 13
Explain Holden's awkwardness with his encounter with Sunny and who was Sunny. Use quotes.

Answer: Sunny was a prostitute that Holden "ordered." An elevator boy named Maurice asked Holden if he wanted to have some fun and Holden said yes and got Sunny sent to his room. I believe that Holden acted very awkward because he stated earlier he was a virgin. One of the awkward things he did was that he wanted to just talk to Sunny, ""Don't you feel like talking for a while?" I asked her. It was a childish thing to say, but I was feeling so damn peculiar. "Are you in a very big hurry?"She looked at me like I was a madman. "What the heck ya wanna talk about?" she said" (Salinger 51). Another thing that I found very strange was that Holden started making up excuses not to do anything with Sunny, ""The thing is, I had an operation very recently."
"Yeah? Where?" "On my wuddayacallit--my clavichord."......
She made me so nervous, I just kept on lying my head off. "I'm still recuperating," I told her" (Salinger 52)

Posted by: Summer Taylor at October 19, 2012 12:51 PM

Jason Anderson
Dr.Hobbs
ENG311 CA05
The Catcher in the Rye

Make Your Own Question
Question: How does the final chapter show how Holden has matured emotionally, or not?Explain.

Answer: "About all I know is, I sort of miss everybody I told about." This shows that Holden has somewhat matured in that he now misses the people he interacted with. This shows that Holden actually felt some form of companionship or friendship to these people; he specifically mentions Stradlater, Ackley, and Maurice.

Even so he is still rather childish because he remarks that if you start talking to someone, or become friends, you will one day miss them. He says this in a way that shows he would rather not have become friends so he would not feel this emptiness of missing them. "It's funny. Don't ever tell anybody anything. If you do, you start missing everybody."

Quotes taken from Back Bay Books Edition page 277.

Posted by: Jason Anderson at October 19, 2012 01:03 PM

Sherman Milton & Matt Lynch
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311: Survey of Major 20th Century Writers
October 19, 2012

Question:
14. How does The Catcher in the Rye relate to current society? Is the novel still relevant? Why or why not? Where possible, cite exact passages from the text to support your position.

Answer:
This story has a few points where it relates to the current society which we live in today and it is definitely still relevant. We found that Holden is young and reckless just as teens are in the world today. He acts like many young boys in our world today; staying out, drinking, fighting, and calling girls. The fight scene was very relevant because that is something that happened all the time. Holden gets in a fight with Stradlater over Jane Gallagher because they went on a date and he tried to sleep with her (25). In today’s society, women are the number one reason why men fight.

Posted by: sherm at October 19, 2012 03:09 PM

Madison Grabow
Hobbs
ENG 311 Survey of Major 20th Century Writers
19 October 2012

HW Vocab : boisterous

As defined by google dictionary
(of a person, event, or behavior) Noisy, energetic, and cheerful; rowdy.

I am so tired of my neighbors being boisterous at night when I am trying to sleep.

Posted by: madison grabow at October 19, 2012 03:13 PM

Leah Hollingsworth
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
19 October 2012

In-class Question 6: Is Holden a strong or a weak character? Is he consistent in his actions? Is he mature/immature? Why or why not? Is he a fully developed (round) character? How? Why? Where possible, cite exact passages from the text to support your position.

Answer: Holden is a weak character. “I was too depressed to care whether I had a good view or not” (Salinger 33). He is very affected by situations. “But when I got inside this phone booth, I wasn't much in the mood any more to give old Jane a buzz. I was too drunk, I guess. So what I did, I gave old Sally Hayes a buzz” (Salinger 81). In a way he is consistent in that he does not follow through. Holden is definitely immature, and others notice. Old Luce says, “’Naturally. Your mind is immature’” (Salinger 79). His lack of follow through and bad attitude also show immaturity. He is not fully developed, either. “’Okay,’ I said. It was against my principles and all, but I was feeling so depressed I didn't even think. That's the whole trouble. When you're feeling very depressed, you can't even think” (Salinger 49). He cannot face his family like an adult, either. “I figured my parents probably wouldn't get old Thurmer's letter saying I'd been given the ax till maybe Tuesday or Wednesday. I didn't want to go home or anything till they got it and thoroughly digested it and all. I didn't want to be around when they first got it. My mother gets very hysterical” (Salinger 28).
Page numbers were taken from the PDF version.

Posted by: Leah Hollingsworth at October 19, 2012 03:14 PM

Kasey McDearis Joey Lontrato
Dr. Hobbs
ENG311 CA05
19 October 2012

Question: What are the conflicts in The Catcher in the Rye? What types of conflict (physical, moral, intellectual, or emotional) are in this novel? Where possible, cite exact passages from the text to support your position.

Answer:The conflicts in this novel are that Holden is a very negative person. He is against everyone, and everything they do. He thinks that everyone is phony. He has no drive in life, and constantly fails out of school. He cant transition into adulthood. in general it is Holden vs. Himself. I think that all types of conflicts occur. There is the physical, by his outer self. there is moral, he has none. there is also intellectual and emotional.

Posted by: Kasey McDearis Joey Lontrato at October 19, 2012 03:15 PM

Shaina McSweeney and De’Nisha Butler
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311
October 19, 2012

13. After reading the test, why, do you think, The Catcher in the Rye controversial? Why do you think it has been banned? Should it be? Is there any artistic merit? Where possible, cite exact passages from the text to support your position.

Catcher in the Rye is controversial due to the profane language and many depictions of sexual acts. For example, “one minute he'd be giving it to her in his cousin's Buick, the next minute he'd be giving it to her under some boardwalk” (Chapter 5). The book shouldn't be banned in high schools, because while the book does contain profanity and sexual acts, none of them are very descriptive or over the top.

Posted by: Shaina McSweeney at October 19, 2012 03:18 PM

Delia Mulvihill and Bryan Baldwin
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
19 October 2012

Question: "Themes are ideas that reoccur in a story. It can be as simple as "betrayal" or as complicated as "a distrust in businessmen." What are some themes in the story? How do they relate to the plot and characters? Where possible, cite exact passages from the text to support your position."

A few of the major themes in the story are phoniness, the pain of growing up, and alienation. The phoniness relates to the characters in that Holden always sees others as being fake. He concludes that all adults or phony and that they cannot see their own phoniness. Holden also tries to resist the prospect of growing up because he is afraid of change and is overwhelmed by its complexity. He uses alienation as a sense of protecting himself; he uses his alienation as proof that he is better than everyone else and is above interacting with them. “Then he started walking up and down the room, taking these very small steps, the way a woman does, and smoking a cigarette and looking at himself in the mirror. He was all alone, too.” (Sallinger 34)

Posted by: Delia Mulvihill and Bryan Baldwin at October 19, 2012 03:19 PM

Tim Delay
Wolly Mendez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
October 19, 2012

Questoin: What is the orle of women in the text? Is love relevant? Are relationships meaningful? Contrast the male-female relations in the text to those found in Siddartha or The Stranger. Where possible, cite exact passages from the text to support your position.

Answer: With older women, he has less respect for them and we can see the disrespect towards them. When it comes to his sister, he has a high repect for her. "I felt so damn happy all of sudden, the way old Phoebe kept going around and around. I was damn near bawling, I felt so damn happy, if you want to know the truth. I don't know why. It was just that she looked so damn nice, the way she kept going around and around, in her blue coat and all. God, I wish you could've been there."(114) It seems that he loves her and thats why respects her more. Unlike in the Stranger, where he did not care about his fiance. He could care less what happens to her. With the older people male and female, he believes that they are all phonies. The older people are not respected but the children are what he respects.

Posted by: Wollinsky Mendez at October 19, 2012 03:20 PM

Timothy Delay
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
10, October 21, 2012
Question: Snub

Answers: Definition- To pay no attention someone or something.

I saw an old friend at the store and said hi but she snubbed me and walked away.

Posted by: Timothy Delay at October 21, 2012 10:34 AM


Kasey McDearis
Dr. Hobbs
ENG311 CA05

21 October 2012
Bourgeois- This relates to a person of middle class. This means an everyday type of person, or a “blue-collar worker”.
Sentence: In Obama’s campaign, his goal is to keep the bourgeois class safe from expensive taxes, and ask the millionaires to help pay a little more money in taxes to balance out the debt of the economy.

Posted by: Kasey McDearis at October 21, 2012 11:19 PM

Leah Hollingsworth
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
22 October 2012

Homework Ch. 17: “’Because you can't, that's all. In the first place, we're both practically children. And did you ever stop to think what you'd do if you didn't get a job when your money ran out? We'd starve to death. The whole thing's so fantastic, it isn't even—‘” (Salinger 71). Who is speaking? Who is being spoken to? What is it about?

Answer: Sally Hayes is speaking to Holden Caulfield. He has just asked her to run away with him at the close of their date. “’I have about a hundred and eighty bucks in the bank. I can take it out when it opens in the morning, and then I could go down and get this guy's car. No kidding. We'll stay in these cabin camps and stuff like that till the dough runs out. Then, when the dough runs out, I could get a job somewhere and we could live somewhere with a brook and all and, later on, we could get married or something. I could chop all our own wood in the wintertime and all. Honest to God, we could have a terrific time! Wuddaya say? C'mon! Wuddaya say? Will you do it with me? Please!’” (Salinger 71). She doesn’t want to run away with him, and responds with the quote above.
Page numbers were taken from the PDF version.

Posted by: Leah Hollingsworth at October 22, 2012 09:11 AM

Leah Hollingsworth
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
22 October 2012

Homework Question: Stenographer

Answer: A stenographer is a court reporter that uses shorthand to take notes during a trial. Example: The stenographer was slow; she could not remember the shorthand fast enough to take notes.

Posted by: Leah Hollingsworth at October 22, 2012 09:15 AM

Bryan Baldwin
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
22 October 2012

Vocab Word: Chiffonier

A chest of drawers, usually with an attached mirror. It can also be a low bookcase in some regards or a shallow, open piece of furniture for displaying china.

Sentence:

The book is on the chiffonier in my bedroom.

Posted by: Bryan Baldwin at October 22, 2012 10:56 AM

Sarah Winans
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
22 October 2012

Question: Vocab Word-Matinee

Answer: Definition-a movie playing in the afternoon.
Sentence-My friends and I will go to a matinee after lunch.

Posted by: Sarah Winans at October 22, 2012 12:49 PM

Jason Anderson
Dr.Hobbs
ENG311 CA05
The Catcher in the Rye

Pedagogical- Of or relating to the art of teaching

Synonyms:Educational, Didactic, Instructional

Example: The number of quotations in this essay does not matter,and does not diminish its' pedagogical content.

Posted by: Jason Anderson at October 22, 2012 01:07 PM

Matt Lynch
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 Survey of Major Writers 20th Century
October 21, 2012
The Catcher in the Rye Vocabulary word

Chapter 7
“You could hear him putting away his crumby toilet articles and all, and opening the window. He was a fresh-air fiend. Then, a little while later, he turned off the light. He didn't even look around to see where I was at.” (Salinger 27).

Fiend: a person who is extremely addicted to some pernicious habit: an opium fiend.
She was a fiend for smoking cigarettes, she had to have one nearly every hour or she would get cranky.
A fiend is someone who is extremely attached to something. I doesn't necessarily mean drugs or something bad, could be anything. I could be a fiend for grilled cheese sandwiches.

Posted by: Matt Lynch at October 22, 2012 01:11 PM

Summer Taylor
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
19 October 2012


Question: Symbols, such as the green light in Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby or the glass unicorn in Williams’s The Glass Menagerie are tools used by writers to emphasize certain points they want to establish. What are some symbols in The Catcher in the Rye? How do they relate to the plot and characters? Where possible, cite exact passages from the text to support your position.

Answer: He was making out like he was walking a very straight line, the way kids do, and the whole time he kept singing and humming. I got up closer so I could hear what he was singing. He was singing that song, "If a body catch a body coming through the rye." He had a pretty little voice, too. He was just singing for the hell of it, you could tell. The cars zoomed by, brakes screeched all over the place, his parents paid no attention to him, and he kept on walking next to the curb and singing "If a body catch a body coming through the rye." It made me feel better. It made me feel not so depressed any more" (Salinger 62). This example is the motif of The song that Holden likes and aslo the title of the book. This is important because this shows that Holden does not liike typical things and answers his sisters question of, "what do you want to be when your older," in a very interesting way. Another example of a popular motif in the book is Holden's hat, "He took another look at my hat while he was cleaning them. "Up home we wear a hat like that to shoot deer in, for Chrissake," he said. "That's a deer shooting hat."
"Like hell it is." I took it off and looked at it. I sort of closed one eye, like I was taking aim at it. "This is a people shooting hat," I said. "I shoot people in this hat" (Salinger 12). I believe that this motif not only explains Holden but also is present during key plot points such as Holden giving the hat to his sister, and fighting with his roommates. I believe that this hat not only is a motif when Holden puts it on he see's others more clearly, but also to cover up his own insincurities.

Posted by: Summer Taylor at October 22, 2012 01:48 PM

Summer Taylor
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
22 October 2012

Question: On the master sign-up sheet, choose the most unusual word from this list (one you don’t
know) and then define it, paraphrased in your own words. Finally, use it in an original sentence.
My word: incognito.

Answer: According to Dictionary.com incognito means- "adjective, adverb, noun, plural in·cog·ni·tos for 3, 5.
adjective
1. having one's identity concealed, as under an assumed name, especially to avoid notice or formal attentions."

I believe incognito is when one is trying to avoide and hide from other people.

Holden was trying to stay incognito when he was in his house, so that his parents would not know that he was home yet.

Posted by: Summer Taylor at October 22, 2012 01:54 PM

De'Nisha Butler
Dr. Hobbs
English 311 CA05
October 22nd, 2012

Word: Hound's-tooth.

Definition: A pattern or broken jagged checks used on a variety o fabrics

Sentence 1: "Yeah. Listen. If you're not going out anyplace special, how 'bout lending me your hound's-tooth jacket?"
Page 14

Sentence 2:I waited for an entire two months for that hound's-tooth jacket I wanted from Macy's to go on sale.

Posted by: De'Nisha Butler at October 22, 2012 02:12 PM

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*NOTE* The deadline for this particular assignment has now passed. Any comments listed below are *ONLY* for the reposting of comments that I specifically asked to be revised or are ones from non-student posters. Any 'student' posts below that missed the assignment deadline will not get credit for the assignment.


~ Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: Dr. Hobbs at October 25, 2012 08:28 PM

Wollinsky Mendez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
December 4, 2012

Question: Beret

Answer: The definition of Beret is, noun
a soft, visorless cap with a close-fitting headband and a wide, round top often with a tab at its center.

Sentence 1: Page 67, "She really did. She had on this black coat and sort of a black beret.She hardly ever wore a hat, but that beret looked nice."

Posted by: Wollinsky Mendez at December 4, 2012 09:21 AM

Wollinsky Mendez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
December 4, 2012

Question: What advice did Dr. Thurmer give to Holden?

Answer: "Oh. . . well, about Life being a game and all. And how you should play it according to the rules. He was pretty nice about it. I mean he didn't hit the ceiling or anything. He just kept talking about Life being a game and all. You know."(Salinger, 5) Since Holden flunked out of school, he wanted to tell him that he needed to be like everyone else. He was not going to get anywhere in life unless he became apart of society. Holden did not like this because he believes that most people are phonies and that he does not want to be like them.

Posted by: Wollinsky Mendez at December 4, 2012 10:25 AM

Wollinsky Mendez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
December 4, 2012

Question: Does the novel end the way you expected? How? Why? What were you expecting to happen
(think about The Stranger). Does the ending work/make sense? Where possible, cite exact
passages from the text to support your position

Answer: The novel does not end how I expected it to. When Holden's sister asks to come with him, he realizes that he is affecting more people than he realizes. He does not want to make his sister into himself. "Why can't I? Please, Holden! I won't do anything-- I'll just go with you, that's all! I won't even take my clothes with me if you don't want me to--I'll just take my--"
"You can't take anything. Because you're not going. I'm going alone. So shut up."(Salinger,111) "My hunting hat really gave me quite a lot of protection, in a way; but I got soaked anyway. I didn't care, though. I felt so damn happy all of sudden, the way old Phoebe kept going around and around. I was damn near bawling, I felt so damn happy, if you want to know the truth. I don't know why. It was just that she looked so damn nice, the way she kept going around and around, in her blue coat and all. God, I wish you could've been there."(Salinger,114) This is where it ends and he feels emotion unlike in the Stranger. He likes Pheobe and wants to stick around for her.

Posted by: Wollinsky Mendez at December 4, 2012 10:33 AM

Delia Mulvihill
Dr. Hobbs
ENG311 CA05
Catcher in the Rye Homework 2

Question 4: Why does Holden watch the game from the hill?

Answer: There are a couple reasons why Holden watches the game from the hill. One of them is that he just got back from NY with the fencing team and he had left all their equipment on the subway so the team was mad at him. The other reason why he was on the hill was because he was on his way to see Mr. Spencer and say goodbye to him. “The other reason I wasn't down at the game was because I was on my way to say good-by to old Spencer, my history teacher” (Salinger 2).

Posted by: Delia Mulvihill at December 5, 2012 01:18 PM

Delia Mulvihill
Dr. Hobbs
ENG311 CA05
Catcher in the Re Whole Book Discussion

Question: Does the novel end the way you expected? How? Why? What were you expecting to happen (think about The Stranger). Does the ending work/make sense? Where possible, cite exact passages from the text to support your position.

Answer: The novel does not end in the way I expected. I honestly thought the novel was going to end in some way pertaining to Phoebe, not him in the hospital because he is sick. The part that most surprised me was when he said that he missed all of the people he just bashed about for the past one hundred pages of the story. “About all I know is, I sort of miss everybody I told about. Even old Stradlater and Ackley, for instance. I think I even miss that goddam Maurice. It's funny. Don't ever tell anybody anything. If you do, you start missing everybody” (Salinger 115).

Posted by: Delia Mulvihill at December 5, 2012 01:26 PM

Kasey McDearis
ENG 311 CA05
Research Paper
Dr. Hobbs
Empowerment in Women
There are two female characters that stood out the most to me when it comes to the definition of empowerment. This word means to refer to increasing the spiritual, political, social or economic strength of individuals and communities. It often involves the empowered developing confidence in their own capacities. Daisy (The Great Gatsby) and Phoebe (Catcher in the Rye) are very similar, yet different when it comes to the meaning of this definition. Daisy shows empowerment and strength, but in turn is just as weak as any women would be back in the 1920’s. Phoebe never backed down from the challenges she faced with Holden. To be and empowered woman, there are three basic things that you need to know, and have. These women had decision-making power of their own, for the most part. They thought positively on the ability to make a change. They absolutely had the ability to learn skills for improving their personal or group power.
Daisy, being a woman in the nineteen twenties, the man in your life, which is most of the time your husband, has most, if not all the power of your decisions, and the things that you do in your everyday life. Yet, this was true for Daisy; she knew that she had to make sure that Tom knew that he could not have all the power over her. She wanted him to know that even though she is a woman, she is powerful, and independent. All of her life, all that she wanted was to be loved, cared for, noticed, and heard. Knowing that she could have had all the happiness with Gatsby, and even independence, she chose money, for security purposes. This eventually would lead to her downfall, and a life of misery. Even though she told Tom of her independence and what she wants, he still would always have power over her.
Even though Phoebe was so much younger than her brother Holden, she was empowered to tell her opinion and the things that she knew was right, or what was wrong. Holden always came to her with the problems that he was having, and when he needed someone to talk to. Phoebe made sure tell him when he was wrong, even when he did not want to hear it. It is amazing that someone so young can have such a powerful influence on you, and help you to make smart choices. So in this case she had most of the power in the decision making. No one told her that she was too young to have empowerment.
Daisy made changes, or at least she tried to make changes. When she was with Gatsby, she knew that she loved him, but she desperately wanted a life of luxury. When she married Tom, she knew that having everything she wanted would make her happy, but in the long run, it did not. She realized that she was not happy, she vowed to herself and Tom, also Gatsby that she was going to make a change, and that nothing was going to stop her from having her independence.
Phoebe was a strong willed girl, even though she was extremely young. She helped Holden whenever possible. She knew that when he was wrong, that she had the power to help make the decision for him. This was only because he trusted her judgment, and knew that she had his best interest at heart.
Everything that these women did in their lives depended on the things they did and said to the people in their lives. They set out to make a difference, and to live independently. Whether or not daisy failed at this task, despite the effort that she put in, she tried everything that she could to find empowerment. Phoebe on the other hand, changed Holden. Her goal was to make him a better person. She gave him advice, and attempted to make him a better person. She succeeded in the long run. That to me, is the definition of empowerment. No matter how young she was, she had the power to make her older brother a better person.

Posted by: Kasey McDearis at December 5, 2012 02:53 PM

De’Nisha Butler
Dr. B. Hobbs
English 311
December 5th, 2012

Innate Choices and Actions in Albert Camus’ “The Stranger and J.D Salinger’s “The Catcher in the Rye”
From the first day of creation, the world has evolved and become an innocent haven for careless existence and freedom of speech, shaped by different points of views, individuality, and many different ways of thinking. Consequences have become limited, the world spins on the axis of liberation and independence as social roles have become less valued by society. A sense of identity, self-worth and morality are mechanisms that influence values and behavior portrayed by earth dwellers. Actions are deciphered by individual meanings; whether a person, place or thing, it will be treated according to what meaning it has, if any at all.
The two novels I analyzed are “The Stranger” (1942) by Albert Camus (1913-1960), in which a young man fights societal influences and “The Catcher in the Rye” (1951) by J.D Salinger (1919-2010), in which a teenager struggles between childhood and adulthood. While there are some similarities between the two protagonists of the novels who are making decisions and taking action without thought, there are some key differences that emphasize the pointlessness, meaninglessness, and futility of their actions.
Both novels have depicted acts of pointlessness, “total lack of meaning or ideas” (Webster-dictionary.org). In “The Stranger”, the protagonist, Meursault speaks directly to the reader, as he explains the passing of his mother, finds love, and murders a man without reason. Meursault is a cold, detached man, living nonchalantly and without ambition. He acts as if nothing in life matters because death is inevitable, he says “Once you’re up against it, the precise manner of your death has obviously small importance” (Camus 71). Meursault is painfully honest and isn’t conformed or influenced by the ideals of society. He becomes involved with Marie who loves him and wants to marry him, but he doesn’t seem too interested. Meursault murders a man pointlessly and doesn’t seem to know why. When the magistrate asked Meursault “Why did you fire five consecutive shots?” he thought for a while and answered “…they weren’t quite consecutive. I fired one at first, and the other four after a short interval (Camus 43). Compared to “The Catcher in the Rye”, Holden is a bitter, psychologically challenged teenager living in a world that seems to exist imaginarily only to him. “There's a word I really hate. It's a phony. I could puke every time I hear it”, Holden says because he fights between being a normal teenager and an adult phony (Salinger 5). He is alienated from society because of his strange actions, he thinks all adults are phonies; he enjoys imagining sexual encounters with women, liquor, freedom, and telling pointless lies. Although he enjoys acting as an adult, he always retreats back to his childhood behavior, complaining he doesn’t want to be a phony like everyone else. It is clear that both protagonists see themselves as independent beings in liberal societies sharing the “I don’t care what I do, it’s my life, I make my own choices and expect no consequences” point of view, intentionally choosing to act out pointless aspects of life.
The Protagonists in both novels have said and acted in a manner of meaninglessness, “having no meaning, lacking any significance” (webster-dictopnary.org). At the beginning of the novel “The Stranger”, Meursault’s mother dies and he finds himself apologizing to his boss for two days off the attend his mother’s funeral because he seems annoyed. He says “Sorry, sir, but it’s not my fault, you know. Afterwards it struck me I needn’t have said that. I had no reason to excuse myself”, he himself realizes what he said was meaningless (Camus 1). Everything seemed meaningless to Meursault; Marie asked him to marry her and he agreed and responded asking if he loved her, he responded saying “I replied, much as before, that her question meant nothing or next to nothing”. Anyone would think that love and marriage are two of the most meaningful things acquired in life but to Meursault, it meant nothing. In contrast, in “The Catcher in the Rye”, Holden saw education as a form of meaninglessness. Throughout his childhood he had attended a number of expensive schools, but intentionally flunked out of them because he wants to remain a child along with having no interest in attending school or getting an education.
Both novels have depicted acts of futility, “uselessness as a consequence of having no practical result” (Webster-dictionary.org). In “The Stranger”, Meursault is very futile towards religion, he doesn’t believe in the existence of God. At the beginning of the meeting with the chaplain who he’s been avoiding, Meursault was asked if he believed in God and he made it known that he didn’t. The chaplain asked if he was sure about that and Meursault replied “I said I saw no point in troubling my head about the matter; whether I believed or didn’t was, to my mind, a question of so little importance” (Salinger 72). Meursault didn’t see the need in believing in God because he felt whether he did or not he still couldn’t be helped and his problems would not be resolved. In “The Catcher in the Rye”, Holden portrayed futility towards a different aspect of religion; he hated ministers because he felt all of them were phonies. He said “If you want to know the truth, I can't even stand ministers…all have these Holy Joe voices when they start giving their sermons. God, I hate that… They sound so phony when they talk” (Salinger 54). It is clear that beliefs of both protagonists are based on the futility seen in the world around them. Certain beliefs they both attain are based on the results they expect to get from their actions.
The interpretation of “pointlessness”, “meaningless”, and “futility” in both “The Stranger” and “The Catcher in the Rye” can be interpreted through the different points of views, individuality, and many different ways of thinking depicted in both novels. The protagonist in “The Stranger”, Meursault, is a cold, detached man, living nonchalantly and without ambition. In “The Catcher in the Rye”, the protagonist Holden is a bitter, psychologically challenged teenager living in a world that seems to exist imaginarily only to him. The reader can only judge the protagonists from their own personal views as the world is a shelter for freedom of speech, individuality and independence.


Works Cited

Camus, Albert. The Stranger. Vintage Books: New York, 1946. Print.
Salinger, J.D. The Catcher in the Rye. 1951. Print.
“Pointlessness.” Webster Dictionary.org. Web.
“Meaninglessness.” Webster Dictionary.org. Web.
“Futility.” Webster Dictionary.org. Web.

Posted by: De'Nisha Butler at December 5, 2012 05:49 PM

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