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September 05, 2012

Meeting _The Stranger_ by Albert Camus


Image Source: http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/l_etranger_albert_camus.jpg

Camus, Albert. L’Étranger. [The Stranger].. 1942. French. Novel.

ENG 311 Students,

Below, please . . .

. . . enter your work on this text as prescribed in class.

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Posted by lhobbs at September 5, 2012 10:13 PM

Readers' Comments:

Shyenne Price
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
September 24, 2012

Question: “What happens to Salamano’s dog? How does Salamano react? Explain.”

Answer: Salamano’s dog ends up slipping the collar from around his neck. His first reaction is anger toward the dog, as usual. “Is it likely I’d give money for a mutt like that? No damned fear! They can kill him, for all I care!” (Camus, 27). Later though he comes up to the narrators door asking “They won’t really take him from me, will they, Monsieur Meursault? Surely they wouldn’t do a thing like that. If they do – I don’t know what will become of me.” (Camus, 27). This shows that Salamano really loves his dog and would be terribly lost with out his companionship.

Posted by: Shyenne Price at September 24, 2012 05:36 PM

Shyenne Price
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
September 24, 2012

Question: “What happens to Raymond. Explain.”

Answer: While they were at the beach the Arabs had followed them there and began to follow them down the beach. When they got close enough, Raymond immediately got into their face and began to beat one of the men while Masson beat the other. While not paying attention the Arab that Raymond was beating up took a knife out and slashed him across his arm and his mouth. “The man had gashed Raymond’s arm and mouth as well.” (Camus, 36).

Posted by: Shyenne Price at September 24, 2012 06:43 PM

Timothy Delay
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
09, September 25, 2012
Question: 14. What does Meusrault mean when he says, “it occurred to me…really, nothing had changed.” Explain.
26. In your opinion, is Meursault’s behavior normal regarding his job and his girlfriend? Why/why not? Explain.

Answers: 14. Meusrault means is that nothing had change after the death of his mother. That even though his mother has died and he had to go through this emotional trauma life move on and very little has changed. He still has to go to work and move on with life just without his mother. (17)

26. Yes, I think that Meursault’s behavior is normal regarding his job and his girlfriend. His experience has leaded him to adopt a very existentialism outlook on life and this is shown through his indecision about taken the job in Paris. This is also shown with his indecision of marrying his girlfriend and the fact that he does not love her. He does not have a very define sense of values that he believe in. (27, 29)

Posted by: Timothy Delay at September 25, 2012 01:24 PM

Madison Grabow
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 - Survey of Major 20th Century Writers
25 September 2012

HW Question 3: Why was it odd that Madam Meursault desired a religious burial? explain.

Answer: The warden had let Monsieur Meursault know that he gather from his "mother's friends that she wished to be buried with the rites of the Church" (5). However, Monsieur Meursault knew that his mother "though not a professed atheist. had never given a thought to religion in her life" (5). It is so odd that through her friends she requested a religious burial because her son had no rec-election of it.

HW Question 13:What does Meursault choose to do on Sunday? What does this demonstrate about his character/personality? Explain.

Answer: Meursault simply rested until noon on Sunday because he "never cared for Sundays" (15). After rolling out of bed, he "felt at loose ends and roamed about the little flat" (15). Out of boredom, he read a newspaper and then washed his hands "and, as a last resource, went out on the balcony" (15). While on the balcony, he began to people watch. He observed everyone that walked by while deciding if he knew them or not depending on if they were regular Sunday walkers. The fact that he is able to notice every Sunday people says a lot about his character. Every Sunday he is predictably doing the same "people watching" and never trying anything new. He even feels as though his life has gone on and that nothing has changed even though his mother has passed. He is a simple and boring man.

Posted by: madison grabow at September 25, 2012 06:51 PM

Bryan Baldwin
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
25 September 2012

Question: "What are three of Meursault's last thoughts of the burial?"

He remembers seeing Perez’s face, the church, and thinking about how he could finally get a good night’s sleep. “Some other memories of the funeral have stuck in my mind. The old boys face, for instance…” (Camus, 12) “And I can remember the look of the church” (Camus, 12) “…and I pictured myself going straight to bed and sleeping twelve hours at a stretch.” (Camus, 13)


Question: "Where/who does Ray invite to spend Sunday together? What is his/her ethnicity? Does this have any significance?"

Raymond invites Meursault to his seaside bungalow just outside of Algiers. His ethnicity is of French descent, which allows him to be around Raymond without the Arabs becoming suspicious and actually allows him to kill the Arab that was following Raymond.

Posted by: Bryan Baldwin at September 25, 2012 07:16 PM

Leah Hollingsworth
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
25 September 2012

Homework Question 7: What is the purpose of holding a vigil? How long does it last?

Answer: “Then I can spend the night there, keeping the usual vigil beside the body, and be back here by tomorrow” (Camus 4). A vigil is “the act of keeping awake at times when sleep is customary” according to Merriam-Webster.com. In this story, a vigil is held to watch over someone who has died and mourn for them before their funeral. It lasts one night.
Page numbers taken from chapter 1 in the PDF Public Domain version.

Posted by: Leah Hollingsworth at September 25, 2012 09:06 PM

Leah Hollingsworth
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
25 September 2012

Homework Question 27: What explanation can you offer as to why Meursault follows the woman from Celeste’s?

Answer: Meursault narrates “Having nothing better to do, I followed her for a short distance” (Camus 30). Meursault seems to have an indifferent disposition, and does whatever suits him in the moment. “For a moment the ‘little robot’ (as I thought of her) had much impressed me, but I soon forgot about her” (Camus 30). As he said, he had no plans, and was interested by her.
Page numbers taken from chapter 1 in the PDF Public Domain version.

Posted by: Leah Hollingsworth at September 25, 2012 10:04 PM

Sherman Milton
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 Survey of Major Writers of the 20th Century
26 September 2012

Question: 31. When leaving for the beach, whom do Ray, Meursault, and Marie see across the street? Who is that person? How often is s/he here? Explain.

Answer: They see a group of Arabs across the street hanging outside of the tobacconist. The one they are referring to is the second to last one “the arab” because he has a problem with Raymond. The reason why is because Raymond is sleeping with his sister and he doesn't like it (32).

Posted by: Sherman Milton at September 26, 2012 09:36 AM

Jason Anderson
Dr.Hobbs
ENG311 CA05
The Stranger

Question: What does the reference to "a soldier" tell you about the time period of the story? Explain.

Answer: The reference shows that the story takes place during a war. There are 3 possible wars that it could take place in: WW1, WW2, and the Algerian War. Looking at the original copyright of 1942 we can suppose that the story is set during WW2, likely during the collaborationist regime in France under the Nazis. (p.4)

Posted by: Jason Anderson at September 26, 2012 10:26 AM

Jason Anderson
Dr.Hobbs
ENG311 CA05
The Stranger

Question: On page 21, what hint is the reader given as to where Meursault lives? EXplain.

Answer: "My room looks over the main street in the neighborhood."(p.21) This tells us that he lives in an important part of downtown Algiers. We know the city from previous scenes of his bus ride. This passage tells us that his apartment though old, is in a central part of the city.

Posted by: Jason Anderson at September 26, 2012 10:55 AM

Sherman Milton
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311: Survey of Major 20th Century Writers
26 September 2012

Question: 30. How has Salamano’s loss brought out his humanitarianism? Give one example. Explain.

Answer: Salamano’s has been though a lot in his life. The obstacles he had to overcome brought out his humanitarianism in different ways. First he had to deal with the death of his wife that he loved, and after he found something else to ease the pain he lost that too. His wife dying and the loss of his dog made him have more concern for human welfare.

Posted by: Sherman Milton at September 26, 2012 11:50 AM

Kasey McDearis
Dr. Hobbs
ENG311CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
26 September 2012

Question: After Meursault arranged for his mother to live in a nursing home, why did he visit her so infrequently? Explain.

Answer: Meursault was detaching himself from his mother by only visiting a few times a year. he knew that she was happy there, and had friends and activities to do. he thought back to when they lived at home together, and how bored that she always was.

Question:In your opinion, offer an explanation for why Meursault takes a "flying leap" onto a truck with Emmanuel. Explain.

Answer:

Posted by: Kasey McDearis at September 26, 2012 12:47 PM

Summer Taylor
Dr. Hobbs
English 311 Cao5
26 September 2012

Question: 8) What is Thomas Perez's relationship with Madam? Explain.

Answer: "I’ve given permission to an old friend of your mother to come with us. His name is Thomas Pérez” (Camus 10). At first the reader thinks that Perez is just a friend of the dead woman but then we find out that there may have been some sort of romantic relationship going on between the two. “It’s a rather touching little story in its way. He and your mother had become almost inseparable. The other old people used to tease Pérez about having a fiancée. ‘When are you going to marry her?’ they’d ask. He’d turn it with a laugh. It was a standing joke, in fact" (Camus 10). At this point the reader does not know if Perez was just a very close friend of Madam,or if he was actually somewhat of her lover.

Posted by: Summer Taylor at September 26, 2012 01:39 PM

Matt Lynch
Eng 311 Survey of Major Writers of 20th Century
Dr. Hobbs
General Questions for Camus’ The Stranger #’s 36 &40
Question # 36: What does Raymond consider doing to the Arabs? Why don’t the Arabs react to this discussion unfolding directly in front of them? Explain.
Raymond considered fighting the Arabs when they walked past them on the street on the way to the bus stop. He looks at them while talking to Meursault trying to identify who the exact Arab who he had the grudge with. “I explained that those Arabs across the way had a grudge against Raymond. She insisted on our going at once. Then Raymond laughed, and squared his shoulders.” (Camus 32). The Arabs did not react to the conversation since it was on the opposite side of the street and they were with a lady.

Question #40: Why does Meursault feel threatened and consequently pull out a gun? Explain.
Meursault feels threatened when he and Raymond return to the beach and see the Arabs. Earlier Raymond and Meursault encountered the Arabs on the beach it began with an argument and continued with a fight resulting in Raymond being cut by a knife one of the Arabs had possessed. So when the second time came to confront the Arabs on the beach Meursault gets the gun from Raymond, since last time the Arabs brought a knife. Raymond and Meursault brought the gun for just their protection in case the Arabs tried to pull a quick one on them. “Listen,” I said to Raymond. “You take on the fellow on the right, and give me your revolver. If the other one starts making trouble or gets out his knife, I’ll shoot.” (Camus 37).

Posted by: Matt Lynch at September 26, 2012 01:41 PM

Summer Taylor
Dr. Hobbs
English 311 Cao5
26 September 2012

Question: 8) What is Thomas Perez's relationship with Madam? Explain.

Answer: "I’ve given permission to an old friend of your mother to come with us. His name is Thomas Pérez” (Camus 10). At first the reader thinks that Perez is just a friend of the dead woman but then we find out that there may have been some sort of romantic relationship going on between the two. “It’s a rather touching little story in its way. He and your mother had become almost inseparable. The other old people used to tease Pérez about having a fiancée. ‘When are you going to marry her?’ they’d ask. He’d turn it with a laugh. It was a standing joke, in fact" (Camus 10). At this point the reader does not know if Perez was just a very close friend of Madam,or if he was actually somewhat of her lover.

Posted by: Summer Taylor at September 26, 2012 01:43 PM

Joe May
Dr. Hobbs
Eng-311 CA06
26 September 2012

Homework Questions
Chapter 1 Question 4
4. Q. Does Meursault give an explanation for wanting/ not wanting an open casket? Why would someone respond in this way? Does this seem like normal behavior? Explain.
A. Meursault does not specifically give an explanation for not wanting to see the open casket. He states his mother was not very religious and did not need a religious funeral. As of this time in the story it seems Meursault has not given his mother the attention she needed in her old age. He sent her to a retirement home and had trouble even getting off of work for her funeral. In my opinion i believe that he feels bad for leaving her to die or doesnt want to see her in such a frail state. He doesnt want the casket open because he feels guilty.

Part 1 Chapter 3 Question 21
21. Q. What does Mersault do for Raymond to have Ray say, "Now you're a pal, Mersault." Explain. A. Mersault writes a "stinker" of a letter to Ray's girlfriend/ prostitute who is his lover. He wants her to repent what shes done and come back to him. He gives her money for rent, and food and apparently he really loves her.

Posted by: Joseph May at September 26, 2012 01:55 PM

Summer Taylor
Dr. Hobbs
English 311 Cao5
26 September 2012

Question: 18) Who is Raymond Sintes? What is “the word around the neighborhood” regarding Raymond? Explain.

Answer: “The general idea hereabouts is that he’s a pimp. But if you ask him what his job is, he says he’s a warehouseman. One thing’s sure: he isn’t popular in our street” (Camus 19). One interesting thing is that he cares about animals and did not like to see Salamano’s dog chained up like he was, however he had no problem beating a girl that did him wrong. In the neighbors opinion he is a thug and deals with prostitutes, but in his opinion he did nothing wrong by beating the girl, and somebody else always starts fights first. He just stands up for himself. By having Meursault write the letter for him, it almost suggests that either he didn’t want that to be traced to him, or that he was not educated because he also had Meursault read the letter to him. Either way not too many facts are known about Sintes and is a bit of an enigma.

Posted by: Summer Taylor at September 26, 2012 02:00 PM

Shaina McSweeney
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05
26 September 2012

11. Who does Meursault meet the day after his mother is buried? What is the significance of this meeting? Explain.

Meusault meets Marie Cardona. The meeting is important because Meusault fancies Marie. “I was rather keen on her in those days, and I fancy she liked me, too” (Ch. 2, pg.14).

17. Who is Salamano? Explain his relationship with his pet. Do you think Salamano cares about its health care? Explain.

Salamano is Meursault’s neighbor. He has a pet dog, and treats it very cruelly. “He beats his dog and calls it names” (Ch. 3, pg. 19). It is apparent that Salamano doesn’t care about the wellbeing of the dog. “When the dog wants to stop at a lamppost, the old boy won’t let him, and drags him on, and the wretched spaniel leaves behind him a trail of little drops. But, if he does it in the room, it means another hiding”(Ch. 3, pg. 19.

Posted by: Shaina McSweeney at September 26, 2012 02:46 PM

Shyenne Price
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
September 26, 2012

Question: “Who is Meursault’s first visitor? Explain.”

Answer: The first visitor that Meursault has is his girlfriend Marie. This is the only time she comes to visit because she is not his wife. Marie tries to keep a smile on her face the whole while they are talking and tells him “It’ll all come right, you’ll see, and then we shall get married.” (Camus, 47)

Posted by: Shyenne Price at September 26, 2012 05:45 PM

De’Nisha Butler
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
September 26, 2012

Question: When they first arrive at their destination, what do Marie, Meursault, and Masson embark upon? Who do the three men see on the beach? Explain.

Answer: When they finally arrive at their destination, the three of them walk to the beach and find the wooden bungalow of Raymond’s friend. Raymond introduces Masson and his wife to Meursault and Marie. The three men see two Arabs “in blue dungarees a long way down the beach coming our direction”. As the Arabs approached swiftly, which seemed rather slowly to the men, they plotted out who would fight who if a fight broke out. Indeed a fight broke out and as a result Raymond received a stab wound to his arm and was gashed to the mouth.

Pages 35-36

Question: On the second trip to the beach, where do the three men find the two Arabs? Do the Arabs seem frightened by the approach? Why/ why not?
Answer: At the end of the beach the three men came to a small stream that had a cut in the sand. There they found the two Arabs, dressed in blue dungarees, lying on the sand. The Arabs did not seem frightened by the approach, they looked harmless as if they were not angry and they did not move when approached by the three men. One stared and the other made himself seem occupied.

Page 36

Posted by: De'Nisha Butler at September 26, 2012 05:58 PM

De’Nisha Butler
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
September 26, 2012

Question: When they first arrive at their destination, what do Marie, Meursault, and Masson embark upon? Who do the three men see on the beach? Explain.

Answer: When they finally arrive at their destination, the three of them walk to the beach and find the wooden bungalow of Raymond’s friend. Raymond introduces Masson and his wife to Meursault and Marie. The three men see two Arabs “in blue dungarees a long way down the beach coming our direction”. As the Arabs approached swiftly, which seemed rather slowly to the men, they plotted out who would fight who if a fight broke out. Indeed a fight broke out and as a result Raymond received a stab wound to his arm and was gashed to the mouth.

Pages 35-36

Question: On the second trip to the beach, where do the three men find the two Arabs? Do the Arabs seem frightened by the approach? Why/ why not?
Answer: At the end of the beach the three men came to a small stream that had a cut in the sand. There they found the two Arabs, dressed in blue dungarees, lying on the sand. The Arabs did not seem frightened by the approach, they looked harmless as if they were not angry and they did not move when approached by the three men. One stared and the other made himself seem occupied.

Page 36

Posted by: De'Nisha Butler at September 26, 2012 05:58 PM

Shyenne Price
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
September 26, 2012

Question: “What is ‘the trouble with the guillotine’? Explain.”

Answer: Meursault states “that what was wrong about the guillotine was that the condemned man had no chance at all, absolutely none.” (Camus, 69) He goes on to say that the patient has to hope that the apparatus must be in working order for there to be any chance of his survival.

Posted by: Shyenne Price at September 26, 2012 06:47 PM

Jeff Champlain
ENG 311
Dr. Hobbs

Question: Describe Meursault dream-like experience. What is happening?

Answer: Meursault is going in and out of sleep durning this time. This feels like a dream because he is half asleep, but the events are actually happening. The visions are fuzzy because he is not truly paying attention to all the people coming to pay there respects. " I was feeling very comfortable; the coffee had warmed me up, and through the open door came scents of flowers and breaths of cool night air. I think I dozed off for a while." (page 7 PDF)

Question: What opportunity does Meursault's boss offer? what offer does Marie propose?

Answer: Meursaults boss asks him if he would like to go to Paris and help open a new branch so they would be able to deal with all the big companies on spot instead of having to deal with mail delays. His boss tries to convince Meursault to go over to Paris, “You’re a young man,” he said, “and I’m pretty sure you’d enjoy living in Paris. And, of course, you could travel about France for some months in the year.” (Page 28 PDF)
Marie proposes that they get married. Merusault said yes if it would make her happy he would do it. They argue a little bit about the whole marriage thing, Marie asks him if he felt the same way about another girl would he say yes to marriage as he did to her. (Page 28-29)

Posted by: Jeff Champlain at September 26, 2012 08:21 PM

Leah Hollingsworth
Madison Grabow
Wollinsky Mendez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
26 September 2012

In-class Question Chapter 5: What is a key quotation from this chapter that sums up the spirit of the chapter?

Answer: “He then asked if a ‘change of life,’ as he called it, didn’t appeal to me, and I answered that one never changed his way of life; one life was as good as another, and my present one suited me quite well” (Camus 28). Meursault is narrating in this quotation, and also quoting his boss. The reader is being spoken to. In this passage Meursault’s boss takes the time to ask him if he would like to take a new job in Paris. Meursault, as always, is uncaring and unenthusiastic. Later, a woman asks if he would like to marry her and he reacts quite the same way. The quote above is significant because it exposes Meursault’s philosophy that people are cemented in a lifestyle and that all lives are created equal. The quote also expresses the theme that Meursault is moseying through his life with content.
Page numbers taken from chapter 5 in the PDF Public Domain version.

Posted by: Leah Hollingsworth at September 26, 2012 11:42 PM

Sarah Winans
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
26 September 2012

Question (1): What prompted Raymond to beat his girlfriend "till she bled"? Explain.

Answer (1): Raymond beat his girlfriend because he suspected her of cheating on him. He said that he use to beat her in a playful way, but now he was angry and he beat her aggressively. (page 21)

Question (2): On page 53, what is symbolic about Meursault's statement, "The blazing sand looked red to me now."

Answer (2): This is symbolic because he was thinking this right before Raymond got slashed by the Arabs. There was blood everywhere, and I felt like that was almost a foreshadow of what was going to happen to Raymond. (page 53)

Posted by: Sarah Winans at September 27, 2012 11:25 AM

Timothy Delay
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
09, September 27, 2012
Question: 19. A previous incident occurred between the caretaker and Meursault, which is briefly discussed during the trial. This leads to Camus’s title of the novel. What is the incident? Explain.
41. Why does Meursault wish that a large crowd of spectators greet him with cries of hat at his execution.

Answers: 19. The incident is when Meursault and the Caretaker are chatting with each other in the mortuary. They are both drinking coffee and smoking cigarettes next to the coffin of Meursault mother, and it is here that the caretaker notices that Meursault has no emotion about his mother’s death. Meursault is like a stranger in the room not knowing the person in the coffin. (Ch 3, part2, 56)

41. As Meursault near death, he starts to feel free from life’s burdens and that he can finally be at peace. This crowd of angry spectators would be his only hope left since he knows that there is no way out. Meursault has accepted his fate and is no longer going to try to fight it in any way. Meursault is eager to show the crowds that his is content with his being a stranger to society and a outsider to it morals.

Posted by: Timothy Delay at September 27, 2012 03:11 PM

Jason Anderson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG311 CA05
The Stranger Part 2

Question: In your opinion, does Meursault feel complimented when referred to as Monsieur Antichrist? Why or Why not? Explain.

Answer: Meursault does not feel complimented so much as he feels welcomed by the Magistrate. He says " I had the ridiculous impression of being "one of the family"."(chapter 1, page 70) This feeling of companionship fills a void in his life because he never felt that comradeship with any other person. This isolation from society makes Meursault a stranger; thus the title of the novel. In this passage he for the first time feels included in society.

Posted by: Jason Anderson at September 27, 2012 06:58 PM

Jason Anderson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG311 CA05
The Stranger Part 2

Question: What is Meursault's sentence? In your opinion, is his reaction normal? Explain.

Answer: Meursault is sentenced to execution by guillotine. He is remarkably calm. It is later when he is awaiting execution that he begins contemplating his fate. Even then he refuses to see the chaplain, believe in God, nor does he show remorse or cry. He seems to have accepted death save that he is afraid, though he copes differently than any other person. He ultimately says that he is freed from the confines of his life and can start anew. (p.122)

Posted by: Jason Anderson at September 27, 2012 07:45 PM

Leah Hollingsworth
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
27 September 2012

Homework Question 6: The magistrate becomes frustrated with Meursault. What does he retrieve from his filing cabinet?

Answer: The Magistrate becomes frustrated with Meursault because he will not answer to why he paused before the first shot and the four consecutive shots. “’I ask you “Why?” I insist on your telling me.’ I still kept silent. Suddenly he rose, walked to a file cabinet standing against the opposite wall, pulled a drawer open, and took from it a silver crucifix, which he was waving as he came back to the desk” (Camus 43). He is disturbed that Meursault seems to lack the fear of God. “…he had drawn himself up to his full height and was asking me very earnestly if I believed in God. When I said, ‘No,’ he plumped down into his chair indignantly” (Camus 43).
Page numbers taken from part 2, chapter 1 in the PDF Public Domain version.

Posted by: Leah Hollingsworth at September 27, 2012 08:42 PM

Leah Hollingsworth
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
27 September 2012

Homework Question 15: The last sentences refer to Meursault’s mother’s funeral and to what nights in prison are like. In your opinion, is there a connection between the two?

Answer: “And something I’d been told came back; a remark made by the nurse at Mother’s funeral. No, there was no way out, and no one can imagine what the evenings are like in prison” (Camus 51). My opinion is that this quote either uses prison as a metaphor for death or for life in the Home. All of those experiences are unimaginable and trapping.
Page numbers were taken from part 2, chapter 2, in the PDF Public Domain version.

Posted by: Leah Hollingsworth at September 27, 2012 09:33 PM

Madison Grabow
Hobbs
ENG 311-Survey of Major 20th Century Writers
28 September 2012

HW Question 4: What explanation does Mersault give regarding "nature"? explain.

Answer: Mersault explains that everything he did was out of nature; what most would do. He acts the way he does for no reason besides nature. When the magistrate explains that Mersault has a reputation for being selfcentered, Mersault replies "Well, I rarely have anything to say. So, naturally I keep my mouth shut" (42). He goes on to answer "yes, like everybody else" when questioned if he loves his mother (42). Mersault explains that his actions and feelings are tose that simply come about, not premeditated.

Page 42 Part 2 Chapter 1 PDF

HW Question 22: What is the prosecutor implying when he questions Raymond?

Answer: The prosecutor explained "that in this case "chance: or "mere coincidence" seemed to play a remarkably large part" (59). He then goes into Raymond's job in order to belittle him, express to the court that this man's testimony is worthless because the "witness lived on the immoral earnings of women" (60). The prosecutor tried his best to explain that everything within this trial was all by chance to emphasize that they had no hard facts.

cahpter 3 part 2 PDF

Posted by: madison grabow at September 28, 2012 08:53 AM

Marcus Chisholm/Sarah Winans
Dr. Hobbs
ENG-311-CA05
28 September 2012
The Stranger
6. Mission Objective 1: Summarized the events in the chapter in about 1 to 2 minutes. Introduce any NEW characters mentioned in this chapter. Are they important characters or non-important characters (so far). Which characters are round? Which are flat?
Meursault’s boss is annoyed at the fact that he decided to take the weekend off from work; therefore, he would get four days off instead of two. Meusault decided to go swimming at a public beach, where he bumped into an old friend, Marie Cardona, who used to be a typist at the office. They swim and flirt throughout the day and later on go to the movies. While I was helping her to climb on to a raft, I let my hand stray over her breasts (14). Then she lay flat on the raft, while I trod water (14). After a moment she turned and looked at me (14). Her hair was over her eyes and she was laughing (14). Upset about his mother, he decides not to have lunch at Celete’s because, to avoid being questioned about his mother’s death. Marie is a very important character. Marie is Meusault’s love interest. She is a young woman who loves swimming and the outdoors. She is going to largely support him in the future. In this chapter she doesn’t play a big role, but her character progresses as the story moves forward. Marie is therefore a round character, since we are going to see her later on in the story.
7. Mission Objective 2: What is a key quotation from this chapter that sums up the spirit of the chapter. In other words, if we had to know at least, one significant quotation from this chapter, what would it be? Read it aloud to the class. Who is speaking? Who is being spoken to? What is the context of the passage?
When we had dressed, she stared at my black tie and asked if I was in mourning. I
explained that my mother had died (14). The narrator is speaking. As Meursault and Marie get ready to go to the movies, she sees that he is dressed in a black tie and asks, “Are you in mourning?” Marie is shocked to learn that, Meusault’s just buried his mother yesterday and has the strength to go to the movies and hang out with her all day like nothing is wrong. This shows that Meusault isn’t really mourning his mother’s death. He casually acts as if that day was any other day.

Posted by: Marcus Chisholm/Sarah Winans at September 28, 2012 10:48 AM

Sarah Winans
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
28 September 2012

Question: What question does the attorney feel compelled to ask? Explain.

Answer: The lawyer asks Meursault if he was upset by his mother's death. This is significant because after the lawyer heard a rumor that he was not, the lawyer had an uneasy feeling that death did not phase Meursault. The attorney must now think that Meursault is a cold-blooded murderer who does not have an emotional affect towards death. It was pretty sick when Meursault says, "All normal people, I added as on afterthought, had more or less desired the death of those they loved, at some time or another" (41). The lawyer has no choice but to think that Meursault is a little crazy!

Question: What penalty does the prosecutor ask of the jury? Explain.

Answer: The prosecutor asks for the death penalty. He states, "You will have observed the way in which he answered my questions; he is intelligent and he knows the value of words. And I repeat that it is quite impossible to assume that, when he committed the crime, he was unaware
what he was doing" (63). Basically, he is saying that Meursault is a dangerous man who needs the death penalty because he is educated and knew exactly what he was doing, and there is no telling when the next time is he will commit a murder.

Posted by: Sarah Winans at September 28, 2012 11:22 AM

Jason Anderson
Timothy Delay
Summer Taylor
ENG311 CA05
Dr.Hobbs
The Stranger Part 1

Objective 1: The chapter describes the funeral of Meursault's mother, and his reaction to her death. In doing so it shows how detached he is from everything around him because he feels no emotions. This is in contrast to the other characters at the nursing home who feel sorrow.

Objective 2: "Mother died today. Or yesterday maybe, I don't know." (p.1) This quote sums up the spirit of the chapter; the utter lack of emotion from Meursault. He is speaking to himself about a telegram that he received that states his mother's death. It is significant in showing his detached character, which is the focus of the novel.

Posted by: Jason/Timothy/Summer at September 28, 2012 11:33 AM

Summer Taylor
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
September 28, 2012

Question: 1) What has happened to Meursault? Explain.

Answer: Meursault got arrested for shooting and killing the Arab in the previous chapter. “I was questioned several times immediately after my arrest. But they were all formal examinations, as to my identity and so forth” (Camus 40). In the beginning of chapter one of part two Meursault has been brought into the police station, questioned, and has spoken with his own attorney.

Posted by: Summer Taylor at September 28, 2012 11:43 AM

Sherman Milton
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311: Survey of Major 20th Century Writers
28 September 2012

Question: 20. When Celeste, the fourth witness, is called to testify, how does he show support for Meursault?

Answer: He supports Meursault by trying to paint a better picture of his image for the jury. He explains how he believes it was just an accident (58).

Posted by: Sherman Milton at September 28, 2012 12:05 PM

Sherman Milton
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311: Survey of Major 20th Century Writers
28 September 2012

Question: Does Meursault feel like he has anything to say to defend himself? Explain.

Answer: No he doesn’t. Everyone has said so much during the trial that he is tired of hearing what they have to say (62).

Posted by: Sherman Milton at September 28, 2012 12:06 PM

Summer Taylor
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
September 28, 2012

Question: On pg. 79, Meursault states that having "a memory" is "an advantage." Briefly explain.

Answer: Meursault uses his memory to kill time. "After a while, however, once I’d learned the trick of remembering things, I never had a moment’s boredom" (Camus 49). He remembers things about his past and even spends time remembering all of the details of everything that is in his jail cell. "So I learned that even after a single day’s experience of the outside world a man could easily live a hundred years in prison. He’d have laid up enough memories never to be bored" (Camus 50). "Sometimes I would exercise my memory on my bedroom and, starting from a corner, make the round, noting every object I saw on the way" (Camus 49).

Posted by: Summer Taylor at September 28, 2012 12:31 PM

Kasey McDearis
Dr. Hobbs
ENG311CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
28 September 2012

Question" On p. 100 Mersault reveals the key to his character/personality. What is this?

Answer: Meursault decides that he is going to exclude himself from society, he is critical against it, and feel that he is insignificant.

Question: What is Meursault's pessimistic view on life and death? Explain.

Answer: Meursault thinks the view on life is that in the end everyone dies, and thinking that he believes life is not worth living. he says whether you die at thirty or seventy, you still are going to die, and other men and women will continue to go on living without you.

Posted by: Kasey McDearis at September 28, 2012 01:05 PM

Matt Lynch
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 311 Survey of Major Writers 20th Century
The Stranger: Part 2 Questions #’s 1 & 10
Question #1: What has happened to Meursault? Explain.
Answer: Meursault has been arrested for the Arab he killed at the end of Part 1. “Every nerve in my body was a steel spring, and my grip closed on the revolver. The trigger gave, and the smooth underbelly of the butt jogged my palm. And so, with that crisp, whip crack sound, it all began.” (Camus 39).
He gets taken to the jail and questioned him to identify him, get his side of the story, and figure out if he was going to have a lawyer for his defense. “Like the others, he began by asking my name, address, and occupation, the date and place of my birth. Then he inquired if I had chosen a lawyer to defend me. I answered, “No,” I hadn’t thought about it, and asked him if it was really necessary for me to have one. “Why do you ask that?” he said. I replied” (Camus 40).

Question #10: Briefly describe Meursault’s prison cell. Is this what he has expected? Explain.
Originally when Meursault was brought to prison he was placed in a common room jail cell with other prisoners. When he arrived the other prisoners asked what he had done, in this room he slept with a mat and could fell bugs crawling on him. “On the day of my arrest they put me in a biggish room with several other prisoners, mostly Arabs. They grinned when they saw me enter, and asked me what I’d done. I told them I’d killed an Arab, and they kept mum for a while. But presently night began to fall, and one of them explained to me how to lay out my sleeping mat. By rolling up one end one makes a sort of bolster. All night I felt bugs crawling over my face.” (Camus 46).
Then a few days later he was transferred to a room which he had for himself. This room had a bed that was hanging from the wall a small bathroom bucket and a little window. “Some days later I was put by myself in a cell, where I slept on a plank bed hinged to the wall. The only other furniture was a latrine bucket and a tin basin. The prison stands on rising ground, and through my little window I had glimpses of the sea. One day when I was hanging on the bars, straining my eyes toward the sunlight playing on the waves, a jailer entered and said I had a visitor. I thought it must be Marie, and so it was.” (Camus 46).

Posted by: Matt Lynch at September 28, 2012 01:49 PM

Marcus Chisholm
Dr. Hobbs
ENG-311-CA05
28 September 2012
15. Show, from the text, the evidence of Meursault's compulsion to wash his hands?
There was a pile of bills of lading waiting on my desk, and I had to go through them all (18). Before leaving for lunch I washed my hands (18). I always enjoyed doing this at midday (18). In the evening it was less pleasant, as the roller towel, after being used by so many people, was sopping wet (18). Meusault enjoyed washing his hands, he even went as far to inform his boss that the towel that everyone used to dry their hands was too wet. This says that, Meursault always had a guilty feeling, that he was constantly trying to get rid of. After a killer murders someone, he washes up to get rid of any of his victims DNA that may have landed on him. Meursault is constantly trying to get rid of this guilt, which makes him feel dirty.
22. What do Meursault and Marie hear coming from Raymond’s room? What is happening? How do you know if Meursault is upset or calm about what just happened? Explain.
On my way back I heard a woman’s voice in Raymond’s room (24). Marie and Meursault hear a woman arguing with Raymond in his room. Raymond calls her a bitch and they start fighting. Meanwhile the girl went on sobbing and repeating: “He hit me, the coward. He’s a pimp” (25). Meursault is calm about what happened, while Marie and him go out to eat, Marie is so scared that she has lost her appetite, and Meursault eats all his food. Meursault goes back to his house to take a nap and goes out for a stroll with Raymond. He then agrees to be a witness and say whatever he has to say to help Raymond.

Posted by: Marcus Chisholm at September 28, 2012 02:24 PM

After the funeral in the first part of the book, Meursault does not really show any emotion towards it. It seems as if it is almost a bother to him to go out of his way for the funeral of his mother. As stated at the end of chapter one Meursault says,"I pictured myself going straight to bed and sleeping twelve hours at a stretch."(Camus,13). He feels indifferent towards emotion in every day situations.

Posted by: Joseph Lontrato, Joseph May, Bryan Baldwin at September 28, 2012 02:49 PM

Leah Hollingsworth
Sherman Milton
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
28 September 2012

In-Class Chapter 3 of Part 2: What is a key quotation from this chapter that sums up the spirit of the chapter? Who is speaking? Who is being spoken to? What is the context of the passage? Finally, why is it significant?

Answer: “Céleste turned and gazed at me. His eyes were moist and his lips trembling. It was exactly as if he’d said: ‘Well, I’ve done my best for you, old man. I’m afraid it hasn’t helped much. I’m sorry’” (Camus 58). Celeste is speaking. Meursault is being spoken to. Celeste has testified and is expressing that he does not think that the trial will go in Meursault’s favor. This quote is significant because if foreshadows the result of the trial.
Page numbers were taken from part 2, chapter 3, in the PDF Public Domain version.

Posted by: Leah Hollingsworth at September 28, 2012 02:50 PM

Marcus Chisholm/Jason Anderson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG-311-CA05
28 September 2012
The Stranger
6. Mission Objective 1: Summarize the events in the chapter in about 1 to 2 minutes. Introduce any NEW characters mentioned in this chapter. Are they important characters or non-important characters (so far). Which characters are round? Which are flat?
Masson, Raymond’s friend invites both Meursault and Marie to spend a day with him at his beach house. Meursault’s boss offers him a job in Paris, that he refused since he has already lived in Paris before and hated it. However, Marie has never lived in Paris and would love to live there. Marie asks Meursault if he loves her and wants to marry her. He gives an indifferent answer and basically acts as if love and marriage does not mean anything. Marie wants to marry him anyway. When Meursault arrives home, he sees Salamono waiting for him at his door. They talk about Madame Meursault’s death and Salamono says that, members of the community looked down on him for sending her to the home. Salamono feels as if they can relate to each other since he has also suffered a great loss, his dog. However, Salamono suffers from his dog’s death, while Meursault still acts indifferent to his mother’s death. In Chapter 5, we are introduced to Masson. He was tall, broad-shouldered, and thick-set; his wife was a plump, cheerful little
woman who spoke with a Paris accent (33). Masson isn’t an important character; therefore, he is flat. He is only spoken about in Chapter 6. He is simply an excuse for them to go to the beach.
7. Mission Objective 2: What is a key quotation from this chapter, that sums up the spirit of the chapter. In other words, if we had to know, at least, one significant quotation from this chapter, what would it be? Read it aloud to the class. Who is speaking? Who is being spoken to? What is the context of the passage? Finally, why is it significant?
His life had changed now and he wasn’t too sure what he was going to do (45-46). In this context, Salamono is having a conversation with Meursault about his loss that he is mourning. This quote foreshadows the trial that Meursault is going to through later in the book. Meursault is going to begin questioning his life and is going to be confused on what exactly he is going to do.

Posted by: Marcus Chisholm/Jason Anderson at September 28, 2012 02:56 PM

Kasey McDearis and Shyenne Price
Dr. Hobbs
ENG311CA05 Survey of Major twentieth Century Writers
28 September 2012

Chapter 2 of Part 2

"So, what with long bouts of sleep, my memories, readings of that scrap of newspaper, the tides of light and darkness, the days slipped by. I'd read, of course, that in jail one ends up by losing track of time."

Meursault is speaking to himself. The context of the passage is that he is reading these things and recollecting his memories so that he does not lose his mind while he is in prison. This quote is significant because this quote alone sums up everything he is saying and thinking in the chapter.

Posted by: Kasey McDearis at September 28, 2012 03:10 PM

Wollinsky Mendez
Tim Delay
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
September 28, 2012

Key Quotation: "'Well,' I said, 'you taught her a lesson, all right, and that’s what you wanted, isn’t it?'
He agreed, and pointed out that whatever the police did, that wouldn’t change the fact she’d had her punishment."(25-26)

This quote is very important because Raymond beats his mistress and gets arrested for it. Even though the police were there, he still treated her without respect and felt that he had done right.

Posted by: Wollinsky Mendez at September 28, 2012 03:16 PM

Delia Mulvihill and Shaina McSweeney
Dr. Hobbs
ENG311 CA05
Group #7

Mission Objective 1:

New Characters:
1. Lawyer – flat character
2. Magistrate – flat character

Summary of the chapter: Part Two Chapter 1 entails the interview processes that Meursault goes through for eleven months. He is appointed a lawyer by the court. There is an interview between Meursault and the Magistrate without his lawyer present where the Magistrate goes off on a tangent about whether Meursault believes in God. After that interview, Meursault’s lawyer was present at every interview. The interviews afterwards did not last as long and only a few questions were asked here and there.

Mission Objective 2:

Important Quote: “And I can say that at the end of the eleven months that this investigation lasted, I was almost surprised that I had ever enjoyed anything other than those rare moments when the judge would lead me to the door of his office, slap me on the shoulder, and say to me cordially, ‘That’s all for today, Monsieur Antichrist.’ I would then be handed back over to the police.” Page 45

Speaker: Meursault

Who is being spoken to?: The reader

Context/Significance: This quote is describing how boring Meursault found the investigation process and shows his uncaringness for what was going on. He looked at it as just an average part of his life, he found humor in the Magistrate’s comment of him not believing in God.

Posted by: Delia Mulvihill at September 28, 2012 03:16 PM

Sarah Winans and De'Nisha Butler
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
28 September 2012

Question: In class discussion questions summary and key quote (chapter 6)

Answer:
Mission Objective 1:
Chapter 6 began with Marie, Meursault, Masson's journey to the beach for an early morning swim. As they journeyed to the beach they encounter two Arabs across the way who Raymond said had a grduge with him. However, they continued to the beach.Before hitting the water to swim, they all visited Raymond's friend and his wife a cheerful woman with a Paris accent, who owned a small wooden bungalow at the emd of the beach. After swimming, two Arabs in blue dungarees were seen coming their direction. They plotted on who would fight who if an alercation were to occur. They indeed fought, Raymond was gashed in the mouth and and slit with a knife by one the Arabs. Raymond received treatment for his wounds and decides to take a walk on the beach alone. Masson and Meursault decided to follow him; they encountered the Arabs once again who seemed harmless and held no malice. The Arabs suddenly vanish. Meursault decided to go back on the beach then once again encounters one of the Arabs lying on the sand. The Arab drew the knife and held it against him, he then gripped Raymond's revolver and shots were fired.

Mission Objective 2: A key quotation that sums up the spirit of this chapter is found at the end as Meuresault describes the scenery of where he shot the Arab. He states, "Beneath a veil of brine and tears my eyes were blinded; I was conscious only of the cymbals of the sun clashing on my skull, and, less distinctly, of the keen blade of light flashing up from the knife, scarring my eyelashes, and gouging into my
eyeballs" (38). It seems as if he is trying to make an excuse as to why he shot the Arab; he tries to play it off as not being in the right frame of mind because of the heat. This will be important later because Meuresault trying to defend himself with this statement could be crucial to the murder case.

Posted by: Sarah Winans and De'Nisha Butler at September 28, 2012 03:20 PM

Madison Grabow
Matt Lynch
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 311 Survey of Major Writers
September 28, 2012
In- Class Discussion Question
Part 1 Chapter 2 Summary:
1)The chapter begins with Mersault meeting Marie at the swimming pool, they begin their journey together. He takes Marie to a movie then after they return to Mersault's house. Marie Sleeps over, but when Mersault awakes Marie is gone. After a night with Marie, Mersault continues his normal Sunday routine of watching people around the neighborhood from his room window/ balcony. "My bedroom overlooks the main street of our district. Though it was a fine afternoon, the paving blocks were black and glistening. What few people were about seemed in an absurd hurry. First of all there came a family, going for their Sunday-afternoon walk; two small boys in sailor suits, with short trousers hardly down to their knees, and looking rather uneasy in their Sunday best; then a little girl with a big pink bow and black patent-leather shoes." (Camus 15).

2)"It occurred to me that somehow I’d got through another Sunday, that Mother now was buried, and tomorrow I’d be going back to work as usual. Really, nothing in my life had changed.
Fair" (Camus 17). This quotation describes the chapter since this was the day after his mothers funeral and yet he continued to go to the swimming pool and observe people throughout the neighborhood, his normal Sunday routine, nothing had changed.

Posted by: Matt Lynch at September 28, 2012 03:22 PM

De’Nisha Butler
Dr.Hobbs
ENG311 CA05
September 28, 2012

Question: In your opinion, offer an explanation for why Meursault takes a “flying leap”
onto a truck with Emmanuel. Explain.

Answer: In my opinion, Meursault takes a “flying leap onto a truck with Emmanuel, because Emmanuel suggested they did. He also did it to arrive at Celeste’s Restaurant quicker than on foot. I feel also with the passing of his mother, and everything else going on he agreed to do something that would bring him into an adrenaline rush.

Page 18

Question: Meursault shows no respect for religion or the priest. Give one example of this. Explain. Answer: Meursault shows complete disrespect for religion and the priest when the priest visited his cell. He explained to the priest that he didn’t believe in the existence of God. The priest was disrespected as Meursault refused to refer to him as “Father” because he felt he was his father. Meursault continued to show disrespect by yelling at the priest with insults and gripping him by the neck in a verbal rampage about all the thoughts that were in his head.
Page 74

Posted by: De'Nisha Butler at September 28, 2012 08:28 PM

Madison Grabow
Hobbs
ENG 311 Survey of Major 20th Century Writers
28 September 2012

HW question 11: It would seem that Marie and Mersault have differing views of their relationship. How so?

Answer: Marie is the one in this relationship who uses her entire heart; whereas, Mersault is with her just because. Marie had approached Mersault and asked if he would marry her. "I said I didn't mind; if she was keen on it, we'd get married. The she asked me again if I loved her. I replied, much as before, that her question meant nothing or next to nothing- but I supposed I didn't" (28). Mersault was taking this subject very lightly while Marie cared a great deal about this. "She remarked that marriage was a serious matter" to which Mersault did not agree (29). Mersault does not love, but Marie does.

Ch 5 part 1 pdf

Posted by: madison grabow at September 28, 2012 08:46 PM

Sarah Winans
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
29 September 2012

Question: In his jail cell, Meursault finds an old newspaper article about a Czechoslovakian man who is murdered by his mother and sister. How
does this article relate to Meursault’s own trial for murder? How does this article expand the themes in The Stranger? How does it support
Camus’s philosophy of the absurd?

Answer: The Czechoslovakian murder relates to Meursault's own trial for murder because they were both deemed as mistakes by the murderers. The wife and daughter did not know that the man was family, therefore they killed him and robbed him, and once they found out who he really was they killed themselves because they were so ashamed of what they had done. Meursault claims to have a lapse of judgement by murdering the Arab and I think he blames the heat for majority of this mistake. He had no plan to kill the Arab, just how the girls had no plan to kill the man. The reoccuring theme here seems to be that people make major mistakes without thinking and have strong regrets afterwards. It supports Camus' idea of the absurd because it is another freak incident where the murderers seem to have motives but it was really just a lapse of judgment.

Posted by: Sarah Winans at September 29, 2012 12:52 PM

Leah Hollingsworth
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
30 September 2012

Homework III Question 10: Which relationship was the most loving? Deep? Loyal? Casual? Sexual? Complex? Rooted in friendship and companionship? Indifferent? Uninteresting? Shallow? Sad?

Answer: I would say that Maman and Perez have the most loving relationship rooted in friendship and companionship. “He and your mother had become almost inseparable” (Camus 10). The deepest and most complex relationship may have been between Salamano and his dog. “’They won’t really take him from me, will they, Monsieur Meursault? Surely they wouldn’t do a thing like that. If they do—I don’t know what will become of me’” (Camus 27). The most loyal relationship exists between Meursault and Celeste. “Céleste turned and gazed at me. His eyes were moist and his lips trembling. It was exactly as if he’d said: “Well, I’ve done my best for you, old man. I’m afraid it hasn’t helped much. I’m sorry” (Camus 58). The most casual, sad, and indifferent relationship exists between Meursault and his mother. “…[Salamano] said that Mother and I had very little in common and that explained why I’d fixed up for her to enter the Home” (Camus 59). A very sexual and shallow relationship is held between Meursault and Marie. “She pressed her leg against mine while we were in the picture house, and I was fondling her breast. Toward the end of the show I kissed her, but rather clumsily. Afterward she came back with me to my place” (Camus 14). I find none of these relationships uninteresting.
Page numbers were taken from the PDF Public Domain version.

Posted by: Leah Hollingsworth at October 1, 2012 01:42 AM

Timothy Delay
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
09, September 27, 2012
Question: 3. Consider the concept of irrationality. When it comes to Camus’s novel
The Stranger, how do readers know that they are dealing with the
irrational? In what ways do the assorted cast of characters deal with this
sense of irrationality? Explain.

Answers: 3. Irrational is the lack of reason and is contrary to reason or logic. The reader knows that they are dealing with irrational characters since they do not act like within societal norms. Meursault is detached from the world and show little to no emotions. This can be seen by “It occurred to me that somehow I’d got through another Sunday, that Mother now was buried, and tomorrow I’d be going back to work as usual. Really, nothing in my life had changed”. ( Ch1 pg. 17) This one quote setup the sense of Camus characters will behave irrational. Other character like Raymond also show a sense of irrational when he deals with his mistress. Each characters look the other way when another character show a sense of irrationality. (17, 23)

Posted by: Timothy Delay at October 1, 2012 11:55 AM

Jason Anderson
Dr.Hobbs
ENG311 CA05
The Stranger: Homework 3

Question 18.

Answer: The passage is different because it is far more detailed in describing the sweltering heat and the building headache Meursault feels. He is returning to the cove to cool off in the shade and water. He sees the Arab there. The Arab draws his knife and reflects light into Meursault's eyes which causes him pain and blinds him. He kills the Arab to escape the pain therefore the sun is at fault for causing his pained drunkenness. Therefore his explanation is somewhat valid; though he should have given more detail in his trial.

Posted by: Jason Anderson at October 1, 2012 01:34 PM

Kasey McDearis
Dr. Hobbs
ENG311CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
1 October 2012

Question: which played the greater role--emotion or reason-- during Meursault's trial? In what way was each employed? Explain.

Answer: In Chapter 3, during his trial, Meursault used reason more than he used emotion. In fact, he is rather emotionless with everything. The courtroom knew this also because of how he reacted to his mothers death. Though he was "upset" from the outcome of the trial, he thought more with his head more than his emotions in the situation.

Posted by: Kasey McDearis at October 1, 2012 02:31 PM

De’Nisha Butler
Dr.Hobbs
ENG311 CA05
October 1, 2012

Question: It is difficult for Meursault to explain his motivation(s) for killing the Arab. Do the reasons he cite comment on the absurd? Are the reasons he cite irrational? Are they justifiable? And if they are irrational, irrational compared to what? Is “logical” not a relative word?

Answer: Throughout the novel, Meursault never gave a rational reason for killing the Arab; he actually gave no reason to explain his actions. The murder of the Arab was senseless, completely irrational and unjustifiable. While Meursault's detached attitude and lack of emotion sets him apart from society, he never appeared insensitive enough to kill someone. Maybe it was for self-defense, but he admits himself that "all I had to do was turn around and that would be the end of it"... The fight between Meursault and the Arabs had nothing to do with Meursault in the first place. The Arabs held malice towards Raymond. Therefore Meursault had no need to murder the Arab. When the magistrate asked Meursault why he had fired five consecutive shots, Meursault instead of explaining why he had even shot the Arab explained that he let off one shot, paused and then let off the other five. Meursault was then asked “Why did you pause between the first and second shot?” Meursault then made no reply. Meursault never actually gave a reason for killing the Arab; therefore, the murder was not justifiable. Meursault had no reason what so ever in killing the Arab. Meursault does seem to blame the sun, as if the heat was too much against his cheeks as sweat drained down his face;" I could feel my forehead swelling under the sun". Meursault decides that people’s lives have no grand meaning or importance, and that their actions, their comings and goings, have no effect on the world.

Posted by: De'Nisha Butler at October 1, 2012 06:04 PM

-----------------


*NOTE* The deadline for this particular assignment has now passed. Any comments listed below are *ONLY* for the reposting of comments that I specifically asked to be revised or are ones from non-student posters. Any 'student' posts below that missed the assignment deadline will not get credit for the assignment.


~ Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: Dr. Hobbs at October 6, 2012 04:23 PM

Wollinsky Mendez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
December 3, 2012

Question: What are three of Meursault’s last thoughts of the burial? Explain.

Answer: Meursault says that he showed his true feelings at the funeral. "For the present, it’s almost as if Mother weren’t really dead. The funeral will bring it home to me, put an official seal on it, so to speak. ..."(Camus, 4) He finds truth in himself. He feels that he is being judged and does because of his lack of emotion. He is not going along with what the lawyer said. He struggles with his identity and is difficult to relate to the people around him at the funeral. "
And I can remember the look of the church, the villagers in the street, the red geraniums on the graves, Pérez’s fainting fit—he crumpled up like a rag doll—the tawny-red earth pattering on Mother’s coffin, the bits of white roots mixed up with it;
then more people, voices, the wait outside a café for the bus, the rumble of the engine, and my little thrill of pleasure when we entered the first brightly lit streets of Algiers, and I pictured myself going straight to bed and sleeping twelve hours at a stretch." (Camus, 12)

Posted by: Wollinsky Mendez at December 3, 2012 07:50 PM

Wollinsky Mendez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
December 3, 2012

Question: What two places does Salamano check for his missing dog? Explain

Answer: Salamano looks for his dog in his apartment and then searches the pound. "I told him that there was a pound at the police station, where stray dogs are taken. His dog was certain to be there and he could get it back on payment of a small charge. He asked me how much the charge was, but there I couldn’t help him. Then he flew into a rage again." (Camus, 26)

Posted by: Wollinsky Mendez at December 3, 2012 08:02 PM

Wollinsky Mendez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
December 3, 2012

Question: What’s the BIG question the magistrate finally asks Meursault?

Answer: The magistrate asks, “Do you want my life to become meaningless?” (Camus, 68) He thinks that if he stops believing then his life will stop. Meursault makes the magistrate have a breakdown of his internal walls. For Meursault it does not matter if someone has suffered for what he has done. He has already performed his task and whatever happens as a result will happen. He has basic logic and does not believe in much that will help him through his life.

Posted by: Wollinsky Mendez at December 3, 2012 08:11 PM

Wollinsky Mendez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
December 3, 2012


Question:What penalty does the prosecutor ask of the jury? Explain

Answer: “I ask you for this man’s head…” (Camus, 99) The court does not think twice about this request. They feel that Meursault has no emotions and that the request can be fulfilled. To the jury, he is a monster without feelings and without any hope for bettering his life. It is the jury's job to make him suffer and do society a favor.

Posted by: Wollinsky Mendez at December 3, 2012 08:17 PM

Question: Which played the greater role—emotion or reason—during
Meursault's trial? In what way was each employed? Explain.

Answer: During Meursault's trial, there was a lot of emphasis on the emotional part of the trial. The jury made their decision on the meer fact that Meursault did not show emotion during the trial. He stood before them without much want for life. The jury said, “Murder of malice aforethought ... Provocation ... Extenuating circumstances.” (Camus, 66) “Do you really love these earthly things so very much?” he asked in a low voice.
I made no reply.
For quite a while he kept his eyes averted." (Camus, 74) His reaction shadowed the outcome of the trial.

Posted by: Wollinsky Mendez at December 3, 2012 10:21 PM

Shaina McSweeney
Dr. Hobbs
ENG311CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
28 September 2012
14. Salamano’s ugly dog is regularly beaten by his owner. What does Meursault think of the dog and his owner? Why do you think Camus includes the story of Salamano’s dog?
Answer: Both the dog and his owner have the same ugly patched skin, that could be an indication of the bond the two share. “Salamano has come to resemble it” (19). Mersault knows of how long Salamano has had the dog and understands that even though Salamano beats his dog, he still has this dear love for it. This love is shown when Salamano gets flustered when he loses his dog. I believe Camus included the story of Salamano and his dog, to show contrats of the varying relationships throughout the novel.

Posted by: Shaina McSweeney at December 5, 2012 02:25 AM

Joe May

4. Does Meursault give an explanation for wanting/not wanting to see the open casket? Why would someone respond in this way? In your opinion, is this normal behavior? Explain.

Mersault does not specifically give an explanation for not wanting to see an open casket. Specifically Mersault comments on his mothers lack of religion. I think Mersault felt guilty about abandoning his mother for such a long time that he did not want to bear seeing what she looked like.

Posted by: Joe May at December 5, 2012 12:34 PM

Joe May

38. When Meursault encounters the lone Arab, he is
once again overcome by the sun’s heat. What event does the heat force him to recall? Explain. The heat and the sun force him to recall his past and the passing of his mother. Anger is stirred up inside of him and he shoots the Arab with the gun he was given.

Posted by: Joe May at December 5, 2012 12:38 PM

De’Nisha Butler
Dr. B. Hobbs
English 311
December 5th, 2012

Innate Choices and Actions in Albert Camus’ “The Stranger and J.D Salinger’s “The Catcher in the Rye”
From the first day of creation, the world has evolved and become an innocent haven for careless existence and freedom of speech, shaped by different points of views, individuality, and many different ways of thinking. Consequences have become limited, the world spins on the axis of liberation and independence as social roles have become less valued by society. A sense of identity, self-worth and morality are mechanisms that influence values and behavior portrayed by earth dwellers. Actions are deciphered by individual meanings; whether a person, place or thing, it will be treated according to what meaning it has, if any at all.
The two novels I analyzed are “The Stranger” (1942) by Albert Camus (1913-1960), in which a young man fights societal influences and “The Catcher in the Rye” (1951) by J.D Salinger (1919-2010), in which a teenager struggles between childhood and adulthood. While there are some similarities between the two protagonists of the novels who are making decisions and taking action without thought, there are some key differences that emphasize the pointlessness, meaninglessness, and futility of their actions.
Both novels have depicted acts of pointlessness, “total lack of meaning or ideas” (Webster-dictionary.org). In “The Stranger”, the protagonist, Meursault speaks directly to the reader, as he explains the passing of his mother, finds love, and murders a man without reason. Meursault is a cold, detached man, living nonchalantly and without ambition. He acts as if nothing in life matters because death is inevitable, he says “Once you’re up against it, the precise manner of your death has obviously small importance” (Camus 71). Meursault is painfully honest and isn’t conformed or influenced by the ideals of society. He becomes involved with Marie who loves him and wants to marry him, but he doesn’t seem too interested. Meursault murders a man pointlessly and doesn’t seem to know why. When the magistrate asked Meursault “Why did you fire five consecutive shots?” he thought for a while and answered “…they weren’t quite consecutive. I fired one at first, and the other four after a short interval (Camus 43). Compared to “The Catcher in the Rye”, Holden is a bitter, psychologically challenged teenager living in a world that seems to exist imaginarily only to him. “There's a word I really hate. It's a phony. I could puke every time I hear it”, Holden says because he fights between being a normal teenager and an adult phony (Salinger 5). He is alienated from society because of his strange actions, he thinks all adults are phonies; he enjoys imagining sexual encounters with women, liquor, freedom, and telling pointless lies. Although he enjoys acting as an adult, he always retreats back to his childhood behavior, complaining he doesn’t want to be a phony like everyone else. It is clear that both protagonists see themselves as independent beings in liberal societies sharing the “I don’t care what I do, it’s my life, I make my own choices and expect no consequences” point of view, intentionally choosing to act out pointless aspects of life.
The Protagonists in both novels have said and acted in a manner of meaninglessness, “having no meaning, lacking any significance” (webster-dictopnary.org). At the beginning of the novel “The Stranger”, Meursault’s mother dies and he finds himself apologizing to his boss for two days off the attend his mother’s funeral because he seems annoyed. He says “Sorry, sir, but it’s not my fault, you know. Afterwards it struck me I needn’t have said that. I had no reason to excuse myself”, he himself realizes what he said was meaningless (Camus 1). Everything seemed meaningless to Meursault; Marie asked him to marry her and he agreed and responded asking if he loved her, he responded saying “I replied, much as before, that her question meant nothing or next to nothing”. Anyone would think that love and marriage are two of the most meaningful things acquired in life but to Meursault, it meant nothing. In contrast, in “The Catcher in the Rye”, Holden saw education as a form of meaninglessness. Throughout his childhood he had attended a number of expensive schools, but intentionally flunked out of them because he wants to remain a child along with having no interest in attending school or getting an education.
Both novels have depicted acts of futility, “uselessness as a consequence of having no practical result” (Webster-dictionary.org). In “The Stranger”, Meursault is very futile towards religion, he doesn’t believe in the existence of God. At the beginning of the meeting with the chaplain who he’s been avoiding, Meursault was asked if he believed in God and he made it known that he didn’t. The chaplain asked if he was sure about that and Meursault replied “I said I saw no point in troubling my head about the matter; whether I believed or didn’t was, to my mind, a question of so little importance” (Salinger 72). Meursault didn’t see the need in believing in God because he felt whether he did or not he still couldn’t be helped and his problems would not be resolved. In “The Catcher in the Rye”, Holden portrayed futility towards a different aspect of religion; he hated ministers because he felt all of them were phonies. He said “If you want to know the truth, I can't even stand ministers…all have these Holy Joe voices when they start giving their sermons. God, I hate that… They sound so phony when they talk” (Salinger 54). It is clear that beliefs of both protagonists are based on the futility seen in the world around them. Certain beliefs they both attain are based on the results they expect to get from their actions.
The interpretation of “pointlessness”, “meaningless”, and “futility” in both “The Stranger” and “The Catcher in the Rye” can be interpreted through the different points of views, individuality, and many different ways of thinking depicted in both novels. The protagonist in “The Stranger”, Meursault, is a cold, detached man, living nonchalantly and without ambition. In “The Catcher in the Rye”, the protagonist Holden is a bitter, psychologically challenged teenager living in a world that seems to exist imaginarily only to him. The reader can only judge the protagonists from their own personal views as the world is a shelter for freedom of speech, individuality and independence.


Works Cited

Camus, Albert. The Stranger. Vintage Books: New York, 1946. Print.
Salinger, J.D. The Catcher in the Rye. 1951. Print.
“Pointlessness.” Webster Dictionary.org. Web.
“Meaninglessness.” Webster Dictionary.org. Web.
“Futility.” Webster Dictionary.org. Web.

Posted by: De'Nisha Butler at December 6, 2012 12:08 PM

Joseph Schwartz
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 435
23 April 2013

An Analysis of _A Farewell to Arms_ and _The Stranger_ through Deconstructionist Criticism

_A Farewell to Arms_ by Ernest Hemingway is a story that represents two types of literary thought. The story is seen as an early example of modernism; it also seen through the lens of the deconstruction. Deconstructionist criticism teaches that the "text" is not always truth, and that different structures like truth, are fallible constructs of man. By approaching Hemingway's text, from this perspective, we can see how the truths of love and war fail to represent any meaning. Albert Camus, The Stranger, a popular novella written in 1943, it is one of the prominent symbols of absurdism in literature. This text will be used as a secondary source in order better discuss the deconstruction of truth within A Farewell to Arms. Both these works and there authors, are infamous for representing a period corrupted by violence, poverty, and war. The stories represent the feeling of ambiguity and hopelessness in a world that was seemingly lost. Hemingway and Camus created pessimism in their work that reflected the time period they lived in. Since both authors were heavily involved with political affairs, their lives were an enduring legacy in popular culture. A Farewell to Arms when first published in 1929 solidified Hemingway's claim to literary immortality. Already famous for his earlier work, The Sun Also Rises, Hemingway (only the age of twenty-nine) second effort became one of the more prominent novels of a "lost" generation. Albert Camus also would later become a literary force in the 1940's. His novels centered on characters who lacked emotional depth and his plots were often narcissistic and meaningless. The Stranger is Camus first novel, and one of his most intriguing. The story is about a protagonist with no feeling or emotion. He is neither evil nor good; he represents the philosophy of absurdism. A Farewell to Arms and The Stranger are two works that represent the ideals of deconstructionism. These authors also rely on the underlying meaning of text to produce emotion and insight. A Farewell to Arms and The Stranger are both great examples of this form. Jacques Derrida's quote below is the definition of how underlying meaning can be derived both of these works. “What cannot be said above all must not be silenced but written” (Derrida).
A Farewell to Arms is a classic of American literature. It is one of the most important pieces that discuss the depravity of World War I. The novels primary themes are love and war. Each represents truths that can be deconstructed. The novel is about an American expatriate named Fredric Henry. He joins the Italian army in World War I despite his cultural differences. As an ambulance driver for the army he has become disenchanted with war. The sadness and violence that surrounds the battlefront have destroyed Fredric both emotionally and mentally. The consequences of these feelings often deprive Fredric of enjoying a normal life. Instead he gets drunk often and has affairs with many women. Although Fredric has the persona of a "tough-guy," in actuality Fredric has trouble dealing with his feelings of isolation and insecurity. Hemingway depicts Fredric as a simple man who enjoys simple pleasures. His desire for wine and salacious nights on the town have a created a lost sense of moral ethics within him. Hemingway makes it a point to depict Fredric as a man who has a lost sense of morality. Like Camus’, The Stranger, Hemingway writes in a terse simple style. He limits his words and detail in order to convey underlying emotion in the work. The Ice-Berg theory is a theory created by Hemingway to understand the philosophy behind the style. Hemingway describes a good work of fiction as an iceberg that only shows the surface of its proper purpose. It is not until careful re-readings that one will see the deeper meaning underneath the surface of a text. In A Farewell to Arms this theme is highly prevalent. There are many examples, where it is apparent that Hemingway left certain parts of the novel ambiguous. Because of this, acquiring truth from the work is complex and subjective. This relates to one of the principles of deconstructionist theory. Truth is a construct built from a human structure; how we define truth is through language that is often flawed and vague. Hemingway is purposely using vague language to show us how the search for the truth is senseless and absurd. In this quote from the novel he discusses how men who live in chaos have nothing lose compared to others who fight the futility. “But life isn't hard to manage when you've nothing to lose” (Hemingway 138). In the novel, Frederic falls in love with a British nurse, Catherine Barkley. Here is another example of absurdism in the piece. Catherine and Frederic are separated from their homes for miles. Both serve on a foreign front, and Fredric is an American who assumes the identity of another culture. There is no objective truth to truly define these individuals. Instead they are a simply two people caught in the hopelessness of war. As they fall in love, Frederic is nearly killed in a bombing. Because of this, he experiences a brief freedom from the hell that is the Italian battlefront. Although at first Fredric joined the Italian Army to acquire glory, he comes to the consensus that the truth of war is chaos. The officers from the front are inflicted by the death and violence happening around them. Most of them use prostitution and drinking to sedate their emotions. Because of this many have lost their morale and others cannot carry living anymore. There are many examples in the novel of how the chaos of war has caused people to lose their sense of humanity and there value of truth. Earlier in the novel Frederic treats a man who is willing to give himself a concussion and prolong his painful hernia to avoid the battlefront. Before the bombing that injures Frederic, he and his fellow ambulance driver are discussing the injustices of the war. Passini and another driver are arguing with Frederic over whether the Italian army should give into Austrians and surrender.
“It could be worse,' Passini said respectfully." There is nothing worse than war."
“Defeat is worse."
“I do not believe it," Passini said still respectfully. "What is defeat? You go home”
(Hemingway 52).
They begin to agree that they would rather see their country surrender then to spend another night on the front fighting the war, no matter what the consequences. After the bombing, Frederic is awarded the Medal of Honor for no apparent reason. The only thing he did was bring macaroni and cheese to the hungry drivers sitting in the dugout. He did nothing be become injured. This is again another example of how the war and the countries pursuit of achieving victory have no real morale truth. The war does not create bravery or glory; instead it creates evil and chaos. The end of the novel is one of the most controversial of all literature. The symbolism surrounding the death of Catherine Barkley in child birth and what is left of Frederic Henry afterwards is left up to speculation. Love in the story is the only way Frederic comes close to absolution and truth in his life. “When I saw her I was in love with her. Everything turned over inside of me. She looked toward the door, saw there was no one, then she sat on the side of the bed and leaned over and kissed me” (Hemingway 91). Before he meets Catherine he is a drunkard who gives in to the pleasures of a sinful existence. After they fall in love he transforms. This transformation begins as a romance and slowly evolves into feelings intense passion. Emotions for Frederic are very hard for him express, but his feelings for Catherine are intense and beautiful. Her death shows how although love can form a sense of truth, but in a world where there is no sense of meaning, love is lost.
Albert Camus, The Stranger, is a story about a man named Meursault who lacks feeling and emotion. In order to properly show how The Stranger and A Farewell to Arms both exude the philosophy of absurdism, there must be an in depth analysis of how Meursault and Frederic compare. Both are reflections of each other. Meursault is a protagonist who is not very interesting, like Frederic Henry he can be seen as boring and almost ineffectual. Although both characters enjoy the pleasures of life, they have trouble relaying their emotions to others. Meursault like Frederic also kills for insubordination. Meursault kills a man he doesn't even know because he "rebelled" against the domestic abuse caused by his friend Raymond. Frederic in turn, kills a "strange" man because he deserted the Italian army. Both of these protagonists show little emotion after they kill, in a sense both they are hardened by their unemotional nature. As you can see, both of these novels are similar, in that they value chaos over reason. Frederic's life is destroyed by the chaos of life, and Meursault seeks destruction through chaos of violence. In A Farewell to Arms, the idea that life is a chaotic entity, uncaring of humanities struggle is personified in this quote: “The world breaks every one and afterward many are strong at the broken places. But those that will not break it kill. It kills the very good and the very gentle and the very brave impartially” (Hemingway 293). Camus' obsession with the absurd does not just focus on truth. Like Hemingway, Camus also sees the notion of "god" and religion as ridiculous. In a world built on chaos, there can be no room for a creator or divine structure. Instead both of these authors saw life as a force that cared little for humanity or any reason. This created a pessimism that permeated in both A Farewell to Arms and The Stranger. The Stranger's ending deals with the Meursault's trial and conviction. In a sense it is Meursault's trial and conviction of God. When he is sentenced to execution, he visits a priest who does anything in his power to convert him. Meursault refuses to believe in the notion of God and religion because he believes that people live a meaningless existence. Going so far as to say: “I had only a little time left and I didn't want to waste it on God” (Camus 73).The same theme can be seen A Farewell to Arms, where a priest is accosted by fellow soldiers for his religious views. Like Meursault, Frederic seeks spiritual fulfillment through the priest, yet he finds nothing more than absurdity. In the novel he states: “All thinking men are atheists” (Hemingway 8).
In both A Farewell to Arms and The Stranger there is a lack of morale and spiritual truth. Each work personified how people seek truth in their daily lives only to find despair and isolation. Albert Camus was described as the premier existentialist during his time period. Hemingway also exhibits the same sort of "existential loneliness" in his modernist works. Existential loneliness is defined by that idea that humans are by nature born into loneliness. In both novels the feelings of this isolation are portrayed through the protagonists. Existentialist thought holds the belief that humanity faces the question through life and into death. Camus and Hemingway believed that meaning of life was facing this truth. In exploring these authors we have found that they both embrace the ideal of deconstructionist criticism. The use of language and themes in both of these works show how the truth is a construct created by man. Because truth is a fallible construct it is meaningless to search for its meaning in daily life. Hemingway and Camus captured the essence of this idea through fiction.

Works Cited

Camus, Albert, and Matthew Ward. The Stranger. New York: Vintage International, 1989. Print.

Hemingway, Ernest. A Farewell to Arms. New York: Scribner Classics, 1997. Print.

Posted by: Joseph Schwartz at April 24, 2013 05:30 PM

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