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September 05, 2012

Farming out the Animalistic Truth in Orwell's Fairy Story


Image Source: http://exowords.files.wordpress.com/2012/03/animals-looking-up.jpg

Orwell, George. Animal Farm: A Fairy Story. 1945. British. Novel

ENG 311 Students,

Below, please . . .

. . . enter your work on this text as prescribed in class.

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Posted by lhobbs at September 5, 2012 01:26 PM

Readers' Comments:

Shyenne Price
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
September 19, 2012

Question: “What do the animals do about the farmhouse. Explain”

Answer: “A unanimous resolution was passed on the spot that the farmhouse should be preserved as a museum.” (Orwell, 9). The animal’s feared of becoming human like because of the way they were treated by the farmhand Mr. Jones. They were resolute in keeping that farmhouse as a memorial to everything they were once controlled by and no longer wanted any part of.
Orwell, George. "Chapter 2." Animal Farm. N.p.: n.p., n.d. 9. Web. 19 Sept. 2012. .

Posted by: Shyenne Price at September 19, 2012 04:59 PM

Timothy Delay
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
09, September 19, 2012
Question: What changes does Napoleon make after his dogs chase Snowball off the farm? Explain.

Answers: After Napoleon force Snowball off the farm the first thing he does is disband the Sunday morning speech. All dilemmas that face the farm will be dealt with by a committee of pigs. The animals will still be allowed to meet on Sunday to salute the flag, and sing Beasts of England and receive their orders for the week. This effectively stop the animals from making any choices of their own. The Pigs would be the only ones allowed to make the decisions about the farm and with his dogs it let Napoleon to rule over the pigs. (21)

Posted by: Timothy Delay at September 19, 2012 08:31 PM

De’Nisha Butler
Dr.Hobbs
ENG311 CA05
September 21, 2012

Question: What is the significance of the gun’s placement at the foot of the flagpole? Explain.

Answer: The guns are placed at the foot of the flagpole so that the animals remember the battle. It is also to remember their hard work and show that they won the battle. The animals decided to set up the gun “like a piece of artillery” and fire it twice a year. The gun was fired once on October 12th which was the Battle of the Cowshed. And the gun was fired once again on Midsummer Day, the anniversary of the Rebellion.

Page 17

Posted by: De'Nisha Butler at September 20, 2012 08:38 PM

Wollinsky Mendez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
September 21, 2012

Question: What motto does Major give the animals? Explain what it means. (Chapter I)

Answer: The motto that major gave to the animals was, "All men are enemies. All animals are comrades." (4) This motto's meaning is that every man is the enemy of animals. All the animals are brothers even the rats. They are never to become like men. "Whatever goes upon two legs is an enemy. Whatever goes upon four legs, or has wings, is a friend. And remember also
that in ghting against Man, we must not come to resemble him. Even when
you have conquered him, do not adopt his vices." (5) Man is evil and no animal should be like man. The major had a vision of a community ran by animals. His motto touched all the animals.

Posted by: Wollinsky Mendez at September 21, 2012 09:58 AM

Sarah Winans
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
21 September 2012

Question: What was Snowball's part in the Battle of the Cowshed? Explain.

Answer: Snowball seemed to be a major leader in the Battle of the Cowshed. He normally voices a loud opinion, and I think although that can be annoying the other animals see him as a leader. Snowball takes away guilt from Boxer and makes him feel better about taking away a human's life. Snowball even earned a medal for his bravery and leadership in the battle. (Page 17 Paragraph 8)

Posted by: Sarah Winans at September 21, 2012 11:44 AM

Kasey McDearis
Dr. Hobbs
ENG311CA05 Survey of Major twentieth Century Writers
21 September 2012

Animal Farm
Chapter 1-5

Question: Why don’t the other animals protest Napoleon’s decisions?

Answer: The other animals to not protest against him, because they do not want to end up snowball. They are also scared to not obey because of they are afraid of the dogs, and the consequences that may happen if they not follow Napoleon and the other pigs.

Posted by: Kasey McDearis at September 21, 2012 11:49 AM

Jason Anderson
Dr.Hobbs
ENG311 CA05
Animal Farm Part 1

Question:What is significant about how the animals arrange themselves when they gather themselves to hear major? What might this arrangement foreshadow about future meetings and events?

Answer: The pigs and dogs are in front, followed by the horses, cat, ducklings, goat, and donkey. The birds are on the sills and rafters and are therefore on the periphery of the meeting. Due to this arrangement it seems as if the pigs and dogs will be of higher class/caste than the other animals. Also it seems as if the birds will be excluded from major events, due to their position on the outskirts of the barn. (5-6)

Posted by: Jason Anderson at September 21, 2012 12:07 PM

Madison Grabow
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major 20th Century Writers
21 September 2012

HW Question 9: When the humans have been chased from the farm, what do the animals do? Explain (ch 2)

Answer: After the humans were chased out of the manor, the animals "slammed the five-barred gate behind them" (12). The Rebellion against humans had initiated. After canvasing the fields to see if any humans were hiding, the animals went back to the farm buildings to destroy the disgusting equipment and items defining human cruelty to animals. "The harness room at the end of the stables was broken open" and removed of everything (13). The animals threw all human cruelty possessions in the fire. After destroying everything they rejoiced by singing 'Beasts of England'. The next day the animals "painted out Manor Farm from the top bar of the gate and in its place painted Animal Farm" (15). From there the Rebellion grew.

Posted by: madison grabow at September 21, 2012 12:51 PM

Summer Taylor
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
September 21, 2012

Question:
11) Describe the Battle of the Cowshed Chapters 3-4

Answer:
The battle starts out with the humans coming over to the animal farm and trying to attack the animals. "As the human beings approached the farm buildings, Snowball launched his first attack. All the pigeons, to the number of thirty-five flew to and fro over the men's heads and muted upon them from mid-air; and while the men were
dealing with this, the geese, who had been hiding behind the hedge, rushed out and pecked viciously at the calves of their legs. However, this was only a light skirmishing manoeuvre, intended to create a little disorder, and the men easily
drove the geese with their sticks" (Orwell 17). The animals did not stop at this first attack though and continued to have different plans of attack to kill the humans. "Snowball now launched his second line of attack" (Orwell 17). This shows the cunningness of the animals on animal farm; especially Snowball who had studied Julius Carsar's campagins.

Posted by: Summer Taylor at September 21, 2012 01:13 PM

Shaina McSweeney
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CAO5
20 September 2012

2. According to Old Major, what is the cause of all the animals’ problems? Explain. (Chapter I)

Old Major believes that “Man is the only real enemy we have” (2). He thinks that humans are taking advantage of all animals by slaughtering them and their young, taking their milk and eggs, and giving them minimal food in return for vigorous labor.

Posted by: Shaina McSweeney at September 21, 2012 01:44 PM

Jeff, Sarah Winans
September 21, 2012
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311

Topic: Commandments of Animal Farm- whatever goes upon two legs is an enemy.

Answer: The Saint Leo core values that relate to this commandment are Respect and Community. Based on our understanding of the values community is demonstrated because they all have a common understanding that humans are bad. For example when Baxter and snowball are talking, Snowball reassures him that humans are only good when they are dead. (Page 17) Respect is not demonstrated because they have no respect for human life, and think that the only way humans are good is if they are dead.

Posted by: Jeff Champlain, Sarah Winans at September 21, 2012 03:09 PM

Leah Hollingsworth
Wollinsky Mendez
Madison Grabow
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
21 September 2012

In-class Commandment 7: All animals are equal. What SLU Core Value/s are associated with the commandment your group is working on. Is it being acknowledged or disavowed in the commandment? Why?
Answer: The commandment ‘All animals are equal,’ follows our core values of respect and community. It mandates that all animals value each others’ individual talents and in unity bring together individual strengths. In the beginning the pigs “with their superior knowledge… assume[d] the leadership. Boxer and Clover would harness themselves to the cutter” (Orwell 17). Each animal brought their unique strengths to the table to help the farm. “And every animal down to the humblest worked at turning the hay and gathering it” (Orwell 17).
Page numbers taken from chapter 2 in the printed version.

Posted by: Leah Hollingsworth at September 21, 2012 03:12 PM

Marcus Chisholm, Summer Taylor, Tim Delay
Dr. Hobbs
ENG-311-CA05
17 September 2012
What SLU Core Value/s are associated with the commandment your group is working on. By your own understanding of the Core Value/s, is it being acknowledged or disavowed in the commandment? Why Explain.
Community is the main SLU Core Value that is associated with our commandment, No Animal Shall ever kill another animal. In the Animal Farm community there is a sprit of belonging, unity and interdependence. The animals are unified together as one to fight against the human race and overcome this hardship. The animals are working together as an efficient community. The animals eventually ran away from community and changed the rule against the Core Value. The animals didn't know what to do with animals who were traitors; therefore, the rule had to be changed. Chapter 8 states, It ran: `No animal shall kill any other animal without cause.' Somehow or other, the last two words had slipped out of the animals' memory. But they saw now that the Commandment had not been violated; for clearly there was good reason for killing the traitors who had leagued themselves with Snowball (35).

Posted by: Marcus Chisholm/Summer Taylor/Tim Delay at September 21, 2012 03:19 PM

Jeff Champlain
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311
September 21, 2012

Question: What Changes have been made in the weekly meetings over the last year?

The secret meetings that use to be held on sundays are now called off by Napoleon. He believes that these secret meetings are a waste of time. Instead of having meetings on sundays, Napoleon states that any questions regarding the farm will be handled by a committee of pigs that he presided over. (page 21) Other animals did not really agree with this but they could not find a argument that was good enough reasons to argue this case.

Posted by: Jeff Champlain at September 21, 2012 03:21 PM

Shyenne Price, Delia, Mulvihill, De’Nisha Butler
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
September 21, 2012

Question: “What SLU Core Value/s are associated with the commandment your group is working on. By your own understanding of the Core Value/s, is it being acknowledged or disavowed in the commandment? Why? Explain.”

Answer: Three Core Values that are associated with commandment 3, “No animal shall wear clothes.” (Orwell, 9) are Community, Respect, and Integrity. In the beginning the animals were a united front to the betterment of their farm, but after the pigs were caught wearing clothes, the animals were divided into casts of “some animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others.” (Orwell, 51-52). This leads to the lack of respect the pigs had for the other animals. In the end they only wanted what was best for them. All together these actions of the pigs wearing clothes behind the other animals backs show their lack of integrity of the honest system they started their reign over Animal Farm with.
Orwell, George. Animal Farm. N.p.: n.p., n.d. Web. 21 Sept. 2012. .

Posted by: Shyenne Price, Delia Mulvihil, De'Nisha Butler at September 21, 2012 03:22 PM

Madison Grabow
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major 20th Century Writers
21 September 2012

HW Question 6: Why does Napoleon order that the hens' eggs be sold? Explain.

Answer: Napoleon ordered that eggs were to be sold in case the animals were unable to grow enough wheat to sustain their needs. This idea came about when Napoleon stated "from now onwards Animal Farm would engage in trade with neighbouring farms: not, of course, for any commercial purpose but simply in order to obtain certain materials which were urgently necessary" (41). Hay would be the first to go, but if needed, "the sale of eggs, for which there was always a market in Willingdon" would go next (41).

Chapter 6

Posted by: madison grabow at September 21, 2012 06:52 PM

Shyenne Price
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
September 21, 2012

Question: “What happens to Boxer? How do the animals accept it? Explain.”

Answer: Boxer had started to become weaker after the Battle of the Windmill and while he was moving more stone for the rebuilding of the windmill he collapsed and never recovered his strength. On the day that the van arrived to take Boxer away the side of it read “…Horse Slaughterer and Glue Boiler…Dealer in Hides and Bone-Meal.” (Orwell, 47). The animals were outraged by this, but Squealer eased them by saying that Boxer was given the utmost care and received the best medicines and also said to them that the van they had seen used to be owned by Addison and was not yet painted over with the hospital lettering. Squealer also told them the last words Boxer had said to ease their minds with his death “Forward comrades! Forward in the name of the Rebellion! Long live Animal Farm! Long live comrade Napoleon! Napoleon is always right!” (Orwell, 48).

Orwell, George. Animal Farm. N.p.: n.p., n.d. Web. 21 Sept. 2012. .

Posted by: Shyenne Price at September 21, 2012 07:18 PM

De’Nisha Butler
Dr.Hobbs
ENG311 CA05
September 24, 2012

Question: Why does Napoleon insist the windmill must be rebuilt immediately? Explain.

Answer: Napoleon insists the windmill be rebuilt immediately because he wants to prove that he is a better person. Napoleon also wants to prove that the farm is still succeeding. Napoleon wanted to teach Snowball that despite his efforts of destroying the windmill, that won’t stop them so easily. Napoleon concluded with “Forward, comrades! Long live the windmill! Long live Animal Farm!

Found on page 28

Posted by: De'Nisha Butler at September 22, 2012 09:06 PM

Shaina McSweeney
Jason Anderson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG311 CA05
Animal Farm

QEP for Commandment 5: No Animal shall drink alcohol.

Answer: The value most associated with this commandment is community. This commandment acknowledges that drunkenness causes a break down in social order. The drunkenness of Mr. Jones causes him to not feed the animals and results in the rebellion. This is what the commandment is supposed to prevent. (page 19)

Posted by: Jason/Shaina at September 23, 2012 10:48 AM

Bryan Baldwin
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
23 September 2012

Question: "What are Napoleon's ideas about education?"

Napoleons ideas about education are that only the younger animals should be educated. Time should not be wasted on trying to teach the older animals. "He said that the education of the young was more important than anything that could be done for those who were already grown up." (Orwell, 13-14)

Posted by: Bryan Baldwin at September 23, 2012 08:24 PM

Timothy Delay
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
09, September 23, 2012
Question: What are living conditions like for all of the animals except the pigs and dogs? Explain.

Answers: The living conditions for the animals are harsh as very little has changed since the rebellion against Jones. The other animals still live in the barn and are given very little food. Their lives are short and the work is hard. They still do not have heat during the winter and many die from the cold and the lack of food. (41,43,44,45)

Posted by: Timothy Delay at September 23, 2012 11:47 PM

Leah Hollingsworth
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
24 September 2012

Homework Question 7: How does Napoleon react when the hens rebel against his orders?

Answer: “Napoleon acted swiftly and ruthlessly. He ordered the hens’ rations to be stopped, and decreed that any animal giving so much as a grain of corn to a hen should be punished by death” (90 Orwell). He acts as a dictator, starving those going against his wishes, and killing those aiding his enemies.
Page numbers taken from chapter 7 in the printed version.

Posted by: Leah Hollingsworth at September 24, 2012 01:05 AM

Matt Lynch
Eng 311 Survey of Major Writers
Dr. Hobbs
Homework Question #11 Animal Farm, Chapters 1-5
Question #11. What further examples of the difference between the pigs, and the other animals occur in these two chapters? Explain. (Chapters 3&4)
Throughout chapters 3 and 4 of Animal Farm the pigs seem to be of a higher class than the other animals on the farm. The pigs are more intelligent than the other animals, for instance the pigs try to educate the other animals by teaching them how to read. Yet the pigs realize the other animals are ignorant and will not learn. Since the pigs are wiser they begin to supervise the production of the farm, yet unlike the other animals on the farm the pigs will do no hard labor. Another things is that the pigs begin to take the milk and apples and explain to the other animals that they need them in order to maintain their health.
“`Comrades!' he cried. `You do not imagine, I hope, that we pigs are doing this in a spirit of selfishness and privilege? Many of us actually dislike milk and apples. I dislike them myself. Our sole object in taking these things is to preserve our health. Milk and apples (this has been proved by Science, comrades) contain substances absolutely necessary to the well-being of a pig. We pigs are brainworkers. The whole management and organisation of this farm depend on us.”(Orwell 15)
The pigs end up taking control in all ways since they are directing and supervising the farm and controlling the Sunday meetings.

Posted by: Matt Lynch at September 24, 2012 06:44 AM

Jason Anderson
Dr.Hobbs
ENG311 CA05
Animal Farm Part 2

Question: How do the animals now feel about their social order, their farm? Explain.

Answer: The animals are largely described as being terrified of the pigs and dogs. The pigs walk upright now and use whips just like humans. The most complete passage on how they feel is in chapter 7 where Clover reminisces. How this society of fear, violence, and hunger was not what she worked for. They had worked for equality, freedom, and peace. She cries because the exact opposite has happened.(p.86) In the end the animals cannot find a difference between the pigs and humans. (p.141)

Posted by: Jason Anderson at September 24, 2012 01:37 PM

Sarah Winans
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
24 September 2012

Question: What is happening to Boxer?

Answer: Although he is not complaining, Boxer is injured and he is struggling to recover since he is getting older. Because of his old age, Boxer will soon have the option to retire in which he plans to do, since he has worked so hard his entire life. (page 43)

Posted by: Sarah Winans at September 24, 2012 02:10 PM

Marcus Chisholm
Dr. Hobbs
ENG-311-CA05
24 September 2012
10. Why does Napoleon order the animals to stop singing “Beasts of England?” Explain.
Napoleon orders the animals to stop singing “Beasts of England because, he says that it was a song of the rebellion which is now over. Chapter 7 states, `Beasts of England was the song of the Rebellion. But the Rebellion is now completed (34). The execution of the traitors this afternoon was the final act (34). The enemy both external and internal has been defeated. In Beasts of England we expressed our longing for a better society in days to come (34). But that society has now been established. Clearly this song has no longer any purpose (34).'

Posted by: Marcus Chisholm at September 24, 2012 02:11 PM

Jeff Champlain
ENG 311
Dr. Hobbs
September 24, 2012

Question: Why do the men blow up the windmill?

Answer: The men blow up the windmill because they want to show all the animals that they have the absolute power on the farm. The humans really wanted to get the point across that the animal farm couldn't be run sufficiently by animals.

"Meanwhile Frederick and his men had halted about the windmill. The an- imals watched them, and a murmur of dismay went round. Two of the men had produced a crowbar and a sledge hammer. They were going to knock the windmill down." page 39

Posted by: Jeff Champlain at September 24, 2012 02:37 PM

Wollinsky Mendez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
September 24, 2012

Question: How is the windmill destroyed? Why does Napoleon blame Snowball? Explain.

Answer: The windmill was destroyed by a large gust of wind. "Finally there came a night when the gale
was so violent that the farm buildings rocked on their foundations and several
tiles were blown o the roof of the barn. The hens woke up squawking with
terror because they had all dreamed simultaneously of hearing a gun go o in
the distance. In the morning the animals came out of their stalls to nd that
the
agsta had been blown down and an elm tree at the foot of the orchard
had been plucked up like a radish. They had just noticed this when a cry of
despair broke from every animal's throat. A terrible sight had met their eyes.
The windmill was in ruins."(28) Napoleon blames Snowball because he was named as a traitor and wants the animals to believe that he is the cause of their problems. He uses Snowball as inspiration to the animals. Napoleon wants the animals to keep going and making the farm profitable. Almost as saying that no matter what Snowball does or anyone does, Animal Farm will be profitable and sufficient.

Posted by: Wollinsky Mendez at September 24, 2012 04:15 PM

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*NOTE* The deadline for this particular assignment has now passed. Any comments listed below are *ONLY* for the reposting of comments that I specifically asked to be revised or are ones from non-student posters. Any 'student' posts below that missed the assignment deadline will not get credit for the assignment.


~ Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: Dr. Hobbs at September 28, 2012 08:44 AM

Joe May

Question 2 Animal Farm

2. According to Old Major, what is the cause of all the animals’ problems? Explain. (Chapter I) The cause of the animals problems according to Old Major is man. Old Major says that man is the root of all of their problems because he controls them, abuses them and takes advantage of them. "Man doesnt lay eggs, man doesnt produce milk" is one of Majors quotes.

Posted by: Joe May at December 5, 2012 12:22 PM

Joe May

20. What are living conditions like for all of the animals except the pigs and dogs? Explain. The pigs are eating the most food, living in the house and not contributing much work during their control of animal farm. They serve as more of a leadership role while all the other animals are forced to ration their already limited food, sleep outside and work long days. Hard work is done by all animals except the hierarchy.

Posted by: Joe May at December 5, 2012 12:29 PM

Delia Mulvihill
Dr. Hobbs
ENG311 CA05
Animal Farm Homework 1

Question: 18. Why does Mollie run away from the farm? Explain.

Answer: Mollie runs away from the farm because she likes the attention she gets from humans and being pampered with ribbons. At the farm she didn’t really like to work or pull her weight around so she left and was found over by Willingdon and had already found a new owner. “She was between the shafts of a smart dogcart painted red and black, which was standing outside a public-house. A fat red-faced man in check breeches and gaiters, who looked like a publican, was stroking her nose and feeding her with sugar. Her coat was newly clipped and she wore a scarlet ribbon round her forelock. She appeared to be enjoying herself…” (Orwell 18).

Posted by: Delia Mulvihill at December 5, 2012 01:34 PM

Delia Mulvihill
Dr. Hobbs
ENG311 CA05
Animal Farm Homework 2

Question: 9. What is happening to Boxer? Explain.
Answer: Boxer is getting older. He has a split hoof but refuses to take any days off of work or to work any less hard. He is turning twelve in the late summer and will be able to retire then but wants to see the windmill well in progress before he retires. “He had, he said, only one real ambition left to see the windmill well under way before he reached the age for retirement.” (Orwell 43).

Posted by: Delia Mulvihill at December 5, 2012 01:43 PM

Joe May
Dr. Hobbs
Final Exam Examples of struggles for power, methods used to secure power, how the government evolved and how the characters evolved in Animal Farm.

While the struggle for power or control is similar throughout both works of literature, the leaders used different methods in their struggle to secure and maintain power. In Animal Farm, Napoleon used methods such as defamation to turn the animals against Snowball and support him. Defamation is witnessed when Napoleon releases the statement, “[. . .] it appears that Snowball had not attempted to lose the Battle of the Cowshed by means of a stratagem, but had been fighting on Jones's side. In fact, he had been the leader of the human forces, and had charged into battle screaming the words `Long live Humanity'” (Orwell 45). This defamation caused the animals to despise Snowball and support Napoleon.
The governing body of Animal Farm began as a democratic republic; however, when Napoleon seized power, the structure resembled more of a totalitarian state. This observation is supported by evidence in a statement made by Squealer, “Do not imagine, comrades, that leadership is a pleasure, it is a heavy responsibility. No one believes more firmly than Comrade Napoleon that all animals are equal. He would be only too happy to let you make your decisions for yourselves. But sometimes you might make the wrong decisions, comrades, and then where would we be” (Orwell 14).
The pigs that controlled the government transformed over time to act like humans when they began learning to talk, write, read, and obtain modern technology like telephones. The pigs began doing business with the humans so they could make money to run the farm and buy building materials to build a windmill for the farm. Evidence that supports the claim that the pigs were transforming to be like humans is shown with the quotation “It was a pig walking on his hind legs, [. . .] and a moment later came a long line of pigs walking on their hind legs. [. . .] Napoleon came out carrying a whip in his trotter” (Orwell 52).

Posted by: Joe May at December 5, 2012 02:39 PM

Wollinsky Mendez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
December 4, 2012
Animal Farm vs. Fahrenheit 451
During the course of the semester, there were 10 novels and plays that were assigned to read. There are two novels that were assigned and show strong similarities but also show differences in how the ideas were unfolded. The first novel was George Orwell’s, Animal Farm, which showed how the common animals revolted against a tyrant. The second novel was Bradbury’s Fahrenheit 451 which showed the progression of Guy Montag’s curiosity and opposition to the current law. Even though both novels show the ideas of the public taking back control, the stray from everyday life, and the final outcomes are similar, Fahrenheit 451 presents a better solution for dealing with their tyrant.
In Animal Farm, the animals of Manor Farm have had enough of their farmer. They believe that they are being mistreated and do not find that he cares about the wellbeing of the animals. One night, the farmer goes out drinking and passes out before he is able to feed the animals. This upsets the animals to the point of a rebellion. Old Major had foreseen this happening before his death and he put the idea of rebellion in the heads of the animals. “I do not know when that Rebellion will come, it might be in a week or in a hundred years, but I know, as surely as I see this straw beneath my feet, that sooner or later justice will be done. Fix your eyes on that, comrades, throughout the short remainder of your lives!” (Orwell, 4) When the rebellion occurred, the animals stood together as Major predicted and they won the farm for themselves. “With one accord, though nothing of the kind had been planned beforehand, they ung themselves upon their tormentors. Jones and his men suddenly found themselves being butted and kicked from all sides.” (Orwell, 8) In Fahrenheit 451, Guy Montag is a firefighter that burns books for a living. He lives in a world where it is the law to burn any books. Although it is illegal to read books, he is curious about the content of books and he starts to read them. The captain knows that he has books in his possession and so warns Montag about the consequences. "We don't get overanxious or mad. We let the fireman keep the book twenty-four hours. If he hasn't burned it by then, we simply come and burn it for him." (Bradbury, 29) In both books, there is the law of the land that the main character does not like. In Animal Farm, the animals are ruled by the farmer and then by their fellow pig, Napoleon. Even though Napoleons rule is strict, there is still hope for the animals. They believe that there is a better life for them and they want to feel that security. In Fahrenheit 451, Montag feels no security because he is stuck in the world of the firefighters. He finds someone who can help him reach his goals and they make an effort to explore books, Faber, who becomes his mentor. Montag’s mind is opened to a whole new reality, one where he feels in control of his thoughts and actions. Animal Farm ends very differently from Fahrenheit 451 in that the animals fought for something different and ended up in the same situation. They ended up being ruled by the pigs and all of their ideas of freedom were crushed. “Twelve voices were shouting in anger, and they were all alike. No question, now, what had happened to the faces of the pigs. The creatures outside looked from pig to man, and from man to pig, and from pig to man again; but already it was impossible to say which was which.”(Orwell, 55) The animals feel betrayed and do not feel the same unity as they did in the beginning. In the beginning of Fahrenheit, Montag feels trapped and during the novel he develops his ideas of escaping. Being a firefighter is not what he wants to do because of certain situations that occurred. When he burned the woman in her house because she did not want to give up the books, he came to realize that he needed a drastic change in what he believed in and in his everyday life. His curiosity was peeked and he began reading books more and more. Over the years he collected 20 books and then started to read them. “When he was done he looked down upon some twenty books lying at his wife's feet.
"I'm sorry," he said. "I didn't really think. But now it looks as if we're in this together."(Bradbury, 31) When he got caught with the books Beatty was killed and he was chased out of the city by a mechanical hound. This is interesting because in Animal Farm, dogs played an important role in showing authority in the farm. The animals did not come out of line or else the dogs would kill the animals. “At this there was a terrible baying sound outside, and nine enormous dogs
wearing brass-studded collars came bounding into the barn. They dashed straight for Snowball, who only sprang from his place just in time to escape their snapping jaws.” (Orwell, 22) In Montag’s situation, he was chased and he escaped by running into the lake. The hound that came after him lost his scent and he was free to join the other people on the railroads. He finds freedom with the group of people that also enjoy knowledge and reading. “To everything there is a season. Yes. A time to break down, and a time to build up. Yes. A time to keep silence and a time to speak. Yes, all that. But what else. What else? Something, something . . .” (Bradbury, 76) He finds what he is looking for even though he had to leave everything he knew behind unlike the animals that were stuck in an endless loop of being reined forcefully.

References
Bradbury, Ray. Fahrenheit 451. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1967. Print.
Orwell, George. Animal Farm;. New York: Harcourt, Brace, 1954. Print.

Posted by: Wollinsky Mendez at December 5, 2012 02:43 PM

Joseph May
Dr. Hobbs
ENG-311
3 November 2012

The Quest for Power: Methods Used in the Struggle for Superiority in Animal Farm and Lord of the Flies

Saint Leo students are taught to follow the University’s Benedictine core values, but if students were stranded on an island as the boys in Lord of the Flies, or forced to live under a corrupt government as the animals in Animal Farm, could they maintain those values? There are numerous instances throughout Lord of the Flies by William Goulding and Animal Farm by George Orwell that display conflict in the quest for power. Struggle can be defined as difficulty faced during the journey to accomplish a goal, while power can be defined as authority over an outside force. The various methodologies used in the struggle for power can be compared and contrasted using the methods leaders used to gain power, how the leadership/governmental structure transformed, and how characters changed after leaders obtained power will be used as criteria.
While the struggle for power or control is similar throughout both works of literature, the leaders used different methods in their struggle to secure and maintain power. In Animal Farm, Napoleon used methods such as defamation to turn the animals against Snowball and support him. Defamation is witnessed when Napoleon releases the statement, “[. . .] it appears that Snowball had not attempted to lose the Battle of the Cowshed by means of a stratagem, but had been fighting on Jones's side. In fact, he had been the leader of the human forces, and had charged into battle screaming the words `Long live Humanity'” (Orwell 45). This defamation caused the animals to despise Snowball and support Napoleon. In comparison, Jack in Lord of the Flies used propaganda to lure boys from Ralph’s camp to his hunting tribe. The biggest use of propaganda was the “beastie,” with the staking of the pig head in front of the cave where the monster allegedly lived by the hunters to show the “littluns” the hunters were powerful. Jack used the imagery of the beast to support the statement, “I gave you food, said Jack, and my hunters will protect you from the beast. Who will join my tribe?” (Goulding 150) By using this propaganda, Jack put himself in a position to gain the support and control of the boys on the island. Although leaders in both novels used different methods in their quest to secure power, their goal of achieving power was the same.
In both Lord of the Flies and Animal Farm, the leadership structure transformed as time progressed and the leaders deviated from their original principles. The governing body of Animal Farm began as a democratic republic; however, when Napoleon seized power, the structure resembled more of a totalitarian state. This observation is supported by evidence in a statement made by Squealer, “Do not imagine, comrades, that leadership is a pleasure, it is a heavy responsibility. No one believes more firmly than Comrade Napoleon that all animals are equal. He would be only too happy to let you make your decisions for yourselves. But sometimes you might make the wrong decisions, comrades, and then where would we be” (Orwell 14). In comparison, the governing body in Lord of the Flies also morphed as time went on and deviated from the original goals established by all of the boys on the island. The narrator depicted their government as a democracy with the electing of Chief Ralph and the use of the conch with the observation, “They obeyed the summons of the conch, partly because Ralph blew it, and he was big enough to be a link with the adult world of authority” (Goulding 50). The power structure changed into a dictatorship when Jack began to defy all of the established rules and stated, “Bollocks to the rules! We are strong we hunt! If there is a beast, we will hunt it down! We’ll close in and beat and beat and beat” (Golding 131). This symbolized their transformation during the struggle for power. Both works included potential leaders who sought power, a rival also struggling for that power and a transformation of government structure when Napoleon ruled his population like a communist, and Jack like a dictator.
Though both works are similar in many ways, one striking difference between the two is seen in characters after power was secured. The pigs that controlled the government transformed over time to act like humans when they began learning to talk, write, read, and obtain modern technology like telephones. The pigs began doing business with the humans so they could make money to run the farm and buy building materials to build a windmill for the farm. Evidence that supports the claim that the pigs were transforming to be like humans is shown with the quotation “It was a pig walking on his hind legs, [. . .] and a moment later came a long line of pigs walking on their hind legs. [. . .] Napoleon came out carrying a whip in his trotter” (Orwell 52). In contrast, Jack’s hunters in Lord of the Flies began to de-evolve and act like cave dwellers and this is best seen in the situation when, “Jack lowered his chin and stared at the traces as though he would force them to speak to him. Then dog-like, uncomfortably on all fours yet unheeding his discomfort, he stole forward five yards and stopped” (Goulding 66). The boys and the pigs both changed in ways they thought would maintain their position of power and end the struggle.
In conclusion, leaders in Lord of the Flies and Animal Farm both faced great difficulty in their struggle to maintain power. While on the rise to the top, the methods they used to gain and maintain power contradicted their morals, but they felt what they were doing was necessary. The animals and the boys changed the shape of the government to suit their needs because they were struggling to maintain power. The leaders and subjects alike changed under the leaders rule because it was a key to their survival. Even though the boys started out as choirboys, their struggle turned them into savages with Jack resembling a dictator and the power turned the pigs into human-like dictators.


Posted by: Joe May at December 5, 2012 02:54 PM

Delia Mulvihill
Dr. Hobbs
ENG311 CA05
Final Exam Paper
Compare and contrast the significance or the methodologies used for the struggle for power/ultimate control in the following two works read in this course: Animal Farm and The Lord of the Flies. You will need to include a working definition of “struggle” and “power” or “control” that you will stick to throughout the paper. The criteria that ou will use to compare and contrast these two works must all be aspects of the topics as you have defined it. This paper should NOT be a neutral, “for your consideration only” type of paper. It must begin with a thesis that clearly indicates a reason for the comparison that can be proved.
There is a struggle for power every day in this world. Whether it be over who has control of the television at a certain time or over an entire nation, this is not a new concept. In the two works Animal Farm and The Lord of the Flies, both represent struggle for power. What is a struggle? A struggle is having a hard time against an opposing force. What is power? Power is having the ability to control or be in charge of a group. Although both of these works have numerous similarities and differences, there is a significant similarity between the characters Jack and Napoleon’s use of fear to maintain control in their struggle to power.
In Lord of the Flies, Jack is jealous of Ralph from the very beginning when he is not appointed as the leader. Ralph mistakenly puts Jack in charge of the hunting, to give him something to do and keep him happy. This is how Jack starts to gain his followers. He shows violent tendencies when he is hunting for the pig in the beginning. “He snatched his knife out of the sheath and slammed it into a tree truck. Next time there would be no mercy. He looked round fiercely, daring them to contradict” (Golding 42). Jack and Napoleon similarly both have sidekicks to help with their dirty work. Roger is known as a terror and will go about hurting the “littluns” just for fun. “’You don’t know Roger. He’s a terror.’ ‘And the chief—they’re both –‘ ‘—terrors – ‘ ‘—only Roger – ‘” (Golding 272). Napoleon has Squealer, who goes about talking to all of the other animals because he is a much more eloquent speaker and does a better job of persuading the animals. For example, “Afterwards Squealer made a round of the farm and set the animals' minds at rest. He assured them that the resolution against engaging in trade and using money had never been passed, or even suggested. It was pure imagination, probably traceable in the beginning to lies circulated about Snowball” (Orwell 26). Both Animal Farm and The Lord of the Flies each have a character that uses fear and tricks in order to control the other characters.
Although there were similarities in how Jack an Napoleon used fear in the struggle to power, there are also differences that are significant. One of the main differences is in the type of game either Jack or Napoleon uses. Jack is all about being physical, after he kills the pig for the first time and with help from Roger, he does not hesitate to use physical violence in order to get his way. "Bollocks to the rules! We're strong — we hunt! If there's a beast, we'll hunt it down! We'll close in and beat and beat and beat — !" (Golding 130). Napoleon on the other hand plays a mental game. He takes advantage of the fact that most of the other animals cannot read and changes the Seven Commandments throughout the story in order to accommodate him better. Since most of the animals cannot read when they find a rule is different than how they remember it, they all just assume that since the wall says so that they must have just remembered it wrong. He also uses the fact that most of the animals are not the brightest bulbs in the batch and turns them all against Snowball, saying that everything bad that happens is Snowball’s doing or fault. “Comrades, do you know who is responsible for this? Do you know the enemy who has come in the night and overthrown our windmill? SNOWBALL!” (Orwell 28). Not only do Jack and Napoleon differ in the way they instill fear and control their respective groups, but in the end Jack maintains control of his group all the way to the end and Napoleon loses the respect of his fellow animals and ultimately loses control of them.
People go to different extremes in order to gain power. No person ever gets into a position of power without a little struggle. If there was no struggle then power would not be regarded as what it is. Animal Farm and Lord of the Flies are two completely different stories about completely different ideas and morals. Jack in Lord of the Flies uses violence and brute force in his struggle to power, while Napoleon uses words and mind games in order for him to gain control. Although they are very different, the idea of struggle for power or control is prevalent throughout both.

Bibliography
Golding, William. Lord of the Flies. New York: Coward-McCann, 1962. Print.
Orwell, George. Animal Farm;. New York: Harcourt, Brace, 1954. Print.

Posted by: Delia Mulvihill at December 5, 2012 03:04 PM

Madison Grabow
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
2 December 2012
Violence in Animal Farm and Lord of the Flies
When society is disrupted and there is a cause for change in governance, violence tends to take over any rational decisions. As defined by the Merriam-Webster Dictionary, violence is an exertion of physical force so as to injure or abuse, an instance of violent treatment through power, and strength or destruction of language. These three forms of violence are represented in Orwell’s text of Animal Farm and Golding’s text of Lord of the Flies.
An exertion of physical force as to injure or abuse is present several times throughout Animal Farm and Lord of the Flies. In Animal Farm, the major conflict of animals versus humans creates violence throughout the text. When the animals are placed under stress and harsh conditions, the animals retaliate and gain control of the farm in the process: “Jones and his men suddenly found themselves being butted and kicked from all sides. The situation was quite out of their control” (Orwell 8). In Lord of the Flies, a lack of governance and fear of a beast causes savagery to take flight while civilization disappears. Jack and his hunters notice the “beast” one night and “at once the crowd surged after it, poured down the rock, leapt on to the beast, screamed, struck, bit, tore. There were no words, and no movements but the tearing of teeth and claws” (Golding 219). The hunters’ animalistic behavior took over and the hope of a return to order was lost in the death of Simon.
An instance of violent treatment through power is represented in Animal Farm when Napoleon decides that negotiating and working together is not an option he desires. Just as Snowball is winning over the animals vote to build the windmill, Napoleon takes action and emits a high-pitched whimper. “At this there was a terrible baying sound outside, and nine enormous dogs wearing brass-studded collars came bounding into the barn. They dashed straight for Snowball” (Orwell 22). Napoleon’s drive to be in control forces him to take violent measures to obtain his desired power. The desire for power which causes violence can also be seen in Lord of the Flies. Jack is not pleased with the outcome of the boys placing Ralph in charge. After many tiny abruptions, Jack is fed up with following Ralph’s rules and takes control of his hunters. This new tribe results in violent uprisings. Jack’s hunters attack Ralph and his boys to gain control of Piggy’s glasses: “Ralph hit out; then he and what seemed like a dozen others were rolling over and over, hitting, biting, scratching. He was torn and jolted, found fingers in his mouth and bit them” (Golding 241). The reign towards tyranny brought out the darkest colors in Napoleon and Jack.
Physical force is a very quick way to implement violence upon a group; however, strength or destruction of language can do just as much damage. Language is used as a technique of control and violence in Animal Farm and Lord of the Flies. In Animal Farm Major’s Seven Commandments start out as a socialist revolution, but are quickly twisted and distorted to keep Napoleon in power. The commandments first symbolized what was necessary and equal for the farm. The commandments quickly changed into what was necessary for Napoleon. By the end of the text the only commandment to remain was the equality commandment; however, this statement had changed. The new and final commandment read “ALL ANIMALS ARE EQUAL BUT SOME ANIMALS ARE MORE EQUAL THAN OTHERS” (Orwell 52). “After that it did not seem strange when next day the pigs who were supervising the work of the farm all carried whips in their trotters” (Orwell 53). Lord of the Flies uses language to express the control that Jack contains over the young ones and stir-up a sense of violence. The hunters’ motto of “Kill the beast! Cut his throat! Spill his blood!” (Golding 218) is expressed at first for the death of the pigs. These statements soon turn into words used to attack the “beast”. Violent language implants itself into followers and becomes ritual to recite; therefore, removing any logic and processing necessary to remain civilized.
Animal Farm and Lord of the Flies are two texts built off of the lack of governance. That lack of governance turns the most civilized and well developed societies into savages, power-hungry members, and violent followers. Physical force, violent treatment, and destructive language are the three ways Orwell and Golding use violence to disturb a balance. Power can bring out the worst sides of juvenile animals and people.


Works Cited

Golding, William. Lord of the Flies. New York: Coward-McCann, 1962. Print.
Orwell, George. Animal Farm;. New York: Harcourt, Brace, 1954. Print.

Posted by: madison grabow at December 5, 2012 03:07 PM

Timothy Delay
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 311 Survey of Major Writers of the Twentieth Century
5, December 2012
The Sacrifice of Idealism, Is It Worth It?
Since the beginning, of time man has always tried to better himself, and He has employed various methods to achieve a peaceful existence with others chief among these is the role of idealism. Idealism is an economic or political system that helps to benefit the people. Although an idealism created to benefit the people and works on paper, it rarely works in real life, and the negative effects it has on others out way the benefits. The main idealism that seen in the world today are capitalism, and communism. These cannot be better exemplified than George Orwell's Animal Farm and Arthur Miller Death of A Salesman. These two works focus on the negative aspects of capitalism and communism respectively. The price of idealism is not worth the effect it has on others and Arthur Miller's Death of a Salesman shows this better than George Orwell's Animal Farm, by showing the effect idealism can have on the main protagonists, society, and their friends and family.
The first thing that usually starts to show strain from the pursue of an idealism is the one that is actively sacrificing in order to achieve their goal. In George Orwell's Animal Farm, the main protagonists snowball the female cart horse experiences the pain and sacrifice of upholding an idealism mainly, communism. In its purest form communism is a political system that abdicates control of publicly owned properties and equality among the people.To reach her goals, she had to sacrifice her sleep, house, and even food in order to achieve the communist goal. This can be depicted in this narration of how the animals are lacking food “For days at a time the animals had nothing to eat but cha_ and mangels. Starvation seemed to stare them in the face” (Orwell, pg.29). Clover even saw loved ones die in their pursuit of the communist dream, but in and nothing profoundly changed as their farmer for it to what it reversely was. Orwell depicts this by stating “The creatures outside looked from pig to man, and from man to pig, and from pig to man again; but already yet was impossible to say which was which” (Orwell Pg 54). This one sentence shows how far the farm has come in the pursuit of the communist ideal by overthrowing its previous owners and just reverting to its old ways despite everything that has been done.
Willy Loman the main protagonist in Arthur Miller’s Death of a Salesman has similarities in clovers sacrifices, but unlike Clover, Willy never achieves a glimpse of his pursuit of the American dream.Although Willy for all his life sacrifice everything in order to move up the social ladder, he never truly went anywhere. He sacrificed so much for this idealism that it even started to affect his own senses as he started to hallucinate and contemplate suicide because of his failure to achieve this idea of an American dream. He even went so far as to sacrifice himself in order for his family members to benefit from this idealism, but even that fails as he is awarded no money for his sacrifice. Although he does inspire others to take up his cause, namely his son Happy “All right, boy. I’m gonna show you and everybody else that Willy Loman did not die in vain” (Arthur Miller pg104), it is nothing more than a futile dream to achieve something that is unachievable. As stated by Charley, “No man only needs a little salary” (Miller Pg 103) that although Willy came close to paying off his debts it would never be enough for him or anybody else.
The next thing that damaged by the pursuit of an idealism is the society around the main protagonists that pursue it. This society does not include the protagonists primary group which mainly consist of friends and family. For George Orwell's animal Farm, this consisted of the additional farms that surrounded the Manor Farm. The Manor Farm has to deal with the other various farms that do not trade with them because of this new idealism. They had a fight for what they believed in, and many of them sacrifice their lives.
In Arthur Miller's death of a salesman Willy Loman affected by society in the form of his boss does not give him a raise. During this conversation Willy slowly starts to realize that although he worked all his life he has achieved little gain, but his boss who is much younger than him was able to achieve his position because of his father who was the owner of the company. Willy starts to see that no matter how hard you work there always be others to get shortcuts. The last thing that these two books are able to exemplify are the negative effects of holding an idealism on their primary group namely their family and friends. In George Orwell's animal Farm, you can see the main protagonists Clover lose friends through various efforts of trying to sustain communism. Orwell shows this sacrifice in the way that Boxster die for weight he believed it.
Miller does a much better job of showing the negative effects that holding in idealism has on a family by having Willy pursuit of the American dream destroy his family. This all starts out with Willy taking out his son, but it starts to escalate when Willy starts to bring harm to his wife. Willy starts to cheat on her without her knowledge. Willy contemplation of suicide also affects his wife emotionally because she fears for her husband safety. Although idealism works on paper it rarely does in real life, and both of these works show how something that promise much is out weight by the sacrifices one must undertake to get there, but Arthur Miller is able to convey this message more effetely over the course of his book. Holding an idealism affect more than just the protagonists lives, but effect their society, and friends and family. In the end, it not worth dyeing over to achieve a dream that can be corrupted as in Orwell’s Animal Farm or that will never gain ground without some interventions like Miller‘s death of a Salesman.


Works Cited
Miller, Arthur. Death of a Saleman. N.p.: n.p., 1952. Print.
Orwell, George. Animal Farm;. New York: Harcourt, Brace, 1954. Print.

Posted by: Timothy Delay at December 5, 2012 03:11 PM

Shyenne Price
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 311 Survey of Major Writers of the Twentieth Century CA05
3 December 2012
The Integrity of Napoleon and Nick
Integrity as shown in the Saint Leo Core Values is a little skewed as to what most think about when reflecting upon the word. Having Integrity is being honest and knowing the difference between right and wrong and using these moral principals in everyday life. When reading the novella Animal Farm (1945) by George Orwell (1903-50) we can see that Napoleon the pig does not have an ounce of integrity in him while Nick Carraway, from F. Scott Fitzgerald’s (1896-1940) modernist novel The Great Gatsby (1925), embodies what integrity means. Napoleon is nothing but dishonest and selfish who thinks only of himself and his fellow pigs, but Nick always tries to tell his comrades the truth when they ask something of him, and he only wants what is best for his friends living in West Egg.
When Napoleon becomes the head of the farm, he starts out by telling all the other animals little white lies and eventually tells his biggest lie of all: Boxer dying graciously in the hospital. A few of Napoleon’s little lies include Snowball betraying everyone on the farm, changing the story of Snowball’s position in the Battle of the Cowshed, taking credit for the idea of building the windmill, and even blaming Snowball for the destruction of the windmill saying, “Do you know the enemy who has come in the night and overthrown our windmill? SNOWBALL!” (Orwell, 28). On page 48 in the pdf version of Orwell’s text, Squealer says, “I was at his bedside at the very last. And at the end… he whispered in my ear… ‘forward comrades!’” A few days after Boxer’s death Napoleon comes to the Sunday meeting and announces “it had not been possible to bring back their lamented comrades remains” (Orwell, 48), yet another notable lie. In reality, Boxer was removed from the farm and taken to a slaughterhouse so the pigs could have more money to spend on whisky. Parallel to Napoleon, Nick Carraway never lied to anyone. Whenever he spoke with Jay Gatsby, Nick always gave honest answers. When Gatsby asks about whether or not he had upset him earlier in the day nick responds, “I don’t like mysteries, and I don’t understand why you won’t come out frankly and tell me what you want.” (Fitzgerald, 77). Nick also shows his honesty throughout his entire tale during the summer he met Gatsby. He does not hide the truth about the deceit, lies, and affairs between the three of his friends.
Napoleon being a selfish pig was his biggest flaw in his personality that limited him in his integrity. Once the seven commandments of Animal Farm were painted on the wall of the barn, over time he slowly began to change them for the benefit of himself. The first change was the original third commandment of no animal is to sleep in a bed that became “No animal shall sleep in a bed with sheets” (Orwell, 27). The second is the sixth commandment of no animal killing another animal, which changed to “No animal shall kill any other animal without cause” (Orwell, 35). Thirdly, commandment number five, which states no animal will drink alcohol, suddenly changed on page 42 of the pdf version of George Orwell’s novel to “No animal shall drink alcohol to excess.” Each commandment change is explained away to the other farm animals as a result of “Napoleon’s wisdom” (Orwell, 36) when in truth Napoleon only wants to have these certain luxuries and responsibilities to himself. Nick may be quiet spoken, but he does speak up and advise his friends so that they can be better off and improve their lives when the time comes. When Gatsby is making his arrangements in stealing Daisy away from her husband Tom, he confides in Nick about his plane to remind her of what they had before she married. Nick wants Gatsby to let go of Daisy so that he can live a happier life by telling him, “I wouldn’t ask too much of her, you can’t repeat the past” (Fitzgerald, 118). Ultimately Gatsby does not heed Nick’s warning, which results in his death.
Clearly, the protagonist of one tale shows all that integrity is and the antagonist from another tale does not have a single decent bone in their body. Integrity should be about having a driving force inside that makes a person honest, know right from wrong, and then apply these morals on a daily basis. Napoleon is only focused on the betterment of himself, not his “comrades” on the farm, and lying to get his way to be seen as the good guy. Nick Carraway, on the other hand, has a good head on his shoulders and tries guiding others into making the right decisions for themselves by being open and honest.


Works Cited
Fitzgerald, F. Scott. The Great Gatsby. N.p.: n.p., n.d. PDF.
Orwell, George. Animal Farm. N.p.: n.p., n.d. PDF.

Posted by: Shyenne Price at December 5, 2012 03:20 PM

Jason Anderson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG311 CA05
“Freedom vs. Control” in Animal Farm and Lord of the Flies
The struggle for power is a common theme in many novels throughout history. Two novels in particular share a similar power struggle: Animal Farm, and Lord of the Flies. In these novels the struggle for power occurs for different reasons, but both sides in each novel have their own methodologies, and ultimately in both books the more militant groups are victorious. Power in this case is quite simply political control. How each side develops political control reveals a great deal about themselves and society as a whole.
In Lord of the Flies the ‘’good” or protagonist side is led by Ralph. Ralph as a leader focuses on emulating adult society back in England. As a result he promotes democracy in which everyone has freedom to say and do as they like. This freedom, however, ultimately results in his downfall. He has no force or power to compel the others to work, and as a result nothing is accomplished. (Golding, p.50) He is also unable to keep power because of his lack of physical force to compel others to follow him; thus Jack is able to rebel and take control. Ultimately Ralph’s government collapses and he is alone against the others, and he survives because of the arrival of the rescue party at the end of the novel.
In Animal Farm Snowball represents the protagonist or “good” side with his views of government. Snowball promotes council meetings and democratic ideas of having the animals vote on various resolutions. Snowball also promotes technology and improvements so as to make life for all of the animals easier. Snowball is easily displaced by Napoleon because the other animals are easily frightened and are not very intelligent; and therefore easily swayed. When Napoleon’s dogs chase Snowball out the other animals are easily cowed into submission. Snowball’s fate is unclear, although we know he escaped the farm.
The antagonist of Lord of the Flies is Jack, a young man who becomes leader of the children. Jack is an interesting antagonist because he is driven largely by his own primal desires. Jack gradually descends into primal savagery and bases his rule on being stronger than the other children. “The madness came into his eyes again.” (Golding, p.51)He manages to convince the others to leave Ralph because he offers them protection, meat, and is able to intimidate with his greater size and combat skill. Jack also plays upon the children’s fear of the beast, and argues that the beast is real and that he will be able to protect them. Jack becomes mad with power and attempts to kill Ralph, who represents the only resistance to his rule, simply because he resists. Jack is able to keep order better than Ralph because he has force and fear to back him up; he also unites them against Ralph which creates a common enemy.
Napoleon in Animal Farm becomes leader of the animals by the ruthless elimination of all dissent by use of his brainwashed followers. Although he himself is a coward in battle, his dogs are able to put down all resistance. (Orwell, p.104) Unlike Jack who rules by virtue of personal strength and persuasion, Napoleon relies on the powers of his subordinates. Napoleon creates an ordered society with a delineated hierarchy that is based on the subordination of all others to himself. Napoleon’s motivations are more obscure than Jack who is driven by primal forces. Napoleon seems driven by his own ego as he consistently declares himself above any rules, and above all the others. Napoleon is essentially a stereotypical dictator, whereas Jack is a representation of the barbarous chaos of primal man.
In conclusion, the methodologies of the characters in each novel are quite different particularly on the part of the antagonist. Even so the protagonists share an appreciation of democratic ideals, which contrasts with the dictatorial regimes of the antagonists. The motivations of both Ralph and Snowball are quite similar in that both promote the greater good and survival of the group as a whole. Jack and Napoleon on the other hand promote themselves at the expense of others, but with different methods of violence and for different reasons. The struggle for power therefore occurs for different reasons despite similar violent means of conflict.

Posted by: Jason Anderson at December 5, 2012 05:13 PM

Bryan Baldwin
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311
02 December 2012

Technology as a Help or Hindrance

Technology is an ever-evolving part of modern life today. It always being improved upon in some way, shape, or form. Technology is a process or product that is created to help ease the life of its user. Today it is all about having the newest, biggest, brightest, or best ‘thing’. With technology playing key roles in Fahrenheit 451 and Animal Farm, it can be seen as a great help or a terrible hindrance.
The role of technology in Fahrenheit 451 is so overwhelming that it seems the characters in the book can never escape it. The amounts of advanced technological systems in the story provide the characters with an almost meaningless existence. They are provided for and aided by some machine or gadget. People are afraid of some of the technology in the story, such as the mechanical hound. Millie is so depressed with the world that she lives in, that she tries to take her own life. She is actually saved by a piece of technology. The characters in the story At the end of the story, the city and all of the technology is destroyed. “"It's flat," he said, a long time later. "City looks like a heap of baking-powder. It's gone." And a long time after that. "I wonder how many knew it was coming? I wonder how many were surprised?"” (Bradbury 75) Montag then begins to rebuild a simple life and society free from the bounds of technology.
The role of technology in Animal Farm is very underwhelming at first and almost primitive at best. The technology that is utilized in the story is built by the working animals and used only by the animals that govern the workers. The ones that build the windmill are essentially mindless workers that the pigs control and can use to their advantage. They are even forced into the work under the Commandments set forth by the pigs. The animals also become more and more depressed as the story goes on, and the pigs become more and more powerful. The technology used becomes such a big issue that neighboring farm animals go to war over its use. In the end, the pigs become the ‘rulers’ in a sense and the farm returns to the way that it started, with all of the animals living their normal lives again. “Henceforward the farm was to be known as ‘The Manor Farm’ which, he believed, was its correct and original name.” (Orwell 54) Technology and advancement had contributed to the rise of the pigs’ power and ultimately to the demise of their grand vision.
In both works, it appears that technology is a great asset to the societies. It is seen as this great ‘thing’ that will improve the lives of its users or make everything easier or better. However, when a closer look is taken, it is glaringly obvious that technology is indeed a great hindrance. Both societies ended up falling apart or failing in some way because of technology. Both ended up without wanting it or feeling like they needed it. Technology can be great, but it should not be allowed to take over a person’s life. Likewise, a person should not live their life around obtaining the latest and greatest ‘thing’.

Posted by: Bryan Baldwin at December 5, 2012 05:20 PM

Joseph Lontrato
ENG-311
Dr. Hobbs
12-5-12

Control and Information

In the world today, control and the freedom of information have a significant impact on people’s actions. Control can be defined as a person or groups ability to assume leadership roles, while at the same time gaining power over a certain group or situation. Information on the other hand can be defined as knowledge or experience that an individual has or has obtained over time. In addition, throughout years these two aspects of control and information have been introduced into works literature. Two works that these aspects both play a role in are “Animal Farm” and “Lord of the Flies.”
In these two works of literature, the idea of control and information is very similar in the aspect that the idea of age and knowledge equates to leadership. In the novel written by Orwell, there seems to be the idea that the older, smarter, or knowledgeable individuals assume leadership. In Orwell’s Animal Farm it is stated, “Four legs good, two legs bad.” (Orwell, p. 29). This phrase was said by Snowball when he came to the conclusion that this concept contained the essential principle of Animalism. He then decided it should be written on the end wall for all the animals to see. This being said, Snowball and the other pigs were far more advanced than other animals on the farm. Unlike others, the pigs could read, write, as well as were educated in trades. Throughout the text, these pigs used this idea as a sense of control and power against other animals on the farm. Noticing that animals such as birds, hens, and ducks were very poorly educated, it created more advantage for the animals in leadership positions. Furthermore, the novel “Lord of the Flies”also portrays the importance of maturity and knowledge in assuming leadership. In Lord of the Flies, two of the older boys both assume a leadership role throughout the novel. Although Ralph was voted into the position of chief, he offers control to another older boy named Jack. Following the vote Jack says to Ralph,“Ralph, I’ll split up the choir—my hunters, that is—into groups, and we’ll be responsible for keeping the fire going” (Golding, p. 42-43). This is a great example in the novel when the advantage of being older and having more knowledge can provide an important advantage over others.
The next point in these two works is the idea of limiting information, and how it can pertain to the idea of gaining or keeping control. This idea is expressed in the novel when Ralph and Piggy discover the conch. Piggy says to Ralph, “S’right. It’s a shell! I seen one like that before. On someone’s back wall. A conch he called it. He used to blow it and then his mum would come. It’s ever so valuable—” (Golding, p. 15). The idea of limited knowledge plays an important role here in the fact that piggy is the only boy on the island that knows not only what the shell is called, but how and can be used to call meetings on the island. Overall, the conch symbolizes a sense of order and control. Although the same idea applies throughout Animal Farm in the essence that limited knowledge of others can provide power and control, it is portrayed slightly different. In the book Animal Farm, it is stated, “All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others” (Orwell, p. 112). This is simply stating that overall; all animals are still animals, but some animal species possess higher levels of equality. These can refer to how the pigs in the book only allowed other animals on the farm to learn to a certain degree. In addition, the idea of filtering certain information to gain an advantage over others also arises when the pigs do not attempt to teach the others about blacksmithing, carpentering, and other necessary arts they had learned from books they took from the farmhouse.
In conclusion, the principles of control and information are greatly portrayed throughout these two works. With these overall ideas that age and knowledge as well as the limiting of knowledge play a significant role in leadership, it is very simple to see how throughout Orwell and Golding’s novel how both authors were able to implement the importance of this relationship and show how it could be used in literature.

Posted by: Joseph Lontrato at December 5, 2012 08:22 PM

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