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August 03, 2012

What's So 'Great' About Fitzgerald's _Gatsby_?


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Fitzgerald, F. Scott. The Great Gatsby. 1925. New York: Scribner, 2004. ISBN: 9780743273565

Students,

Below, please . . .

. . . enter your work on this text as prescribed in class.

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Posted by lhobbs at August 3, 2012 10:24 AM

Readers' Comments:

Ava L.
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 435
22 January 2009

(6) Stages of the Hero's Journey: Refusal of Return / Flight or Rescue

The hero in F.Scott Fitzgerald’s novel The Great Gatsby is Nick Carraway. Nick, who is originally from the West, finds that he enjoys life in the East. Nick’s experiences in the East are far more exciting than the life he has lived in the West. He takes temporary residence in New York in a small village called West Egg. There he is introduced to the mysterious Jay Gatsby. Nick is intrigued by Gatsby. Nick also becomes close with a young woman named Jordan Baker. Although Nick becomes increasingly aware that he does not fit in with Gatsby’s crowd, he continues to remain in West Egg. There are several times throughout the story that Nick feels compelled to leave or be alone (flight). Some examples that support his desire to flee include his attempt to remove himself from the room when Gatsby decides to reveal his relationship with Daisy to Tom, Nick’s desire to be alone after returning home from the city, and Nick’s attitude toward Jordan during their telephone conversation. All of these examples support Nick’s own realization of how out of place he is in his current surroundings. However, Nick refuses to remove himself completely from the situation. Nick’s gut feeling is that he does not fit in nor does he belong, but he continues to place himself in the midst of all the commotion. His refusal to flee from the commotion emphasizes his fascination with Gatsby.

Nick’s fascination with Gatsby helps to shape Nick as the rescuer of the story. Nick states earlier on that one of his flaws is that he never lies, yet when he discovers Gatsby and Daisy are responsible for Myrtle’s death, he does nothing to about it. In fact, he comes to Gatsby’s aid. He tries to convince Gatsby to go away for a few weeks to Atlantic City or Montreal. Gatsby refuses Nicks attempts to rescue him from the situation. Gatsby winds up dead. Nick feels a sense of responsibility to organize Gatsby’s funeral. He attempts to recruit mourners for Gatsby’s funeral.

Prior to his departure from West Egg, Nick feels it is necessary to tie up all the loose ends that he has left. He attempts to patch things up with Jordan. He does not want to leave without having closure. For a brief moment, Nick is reluctant to leave, but comes to the realization that the city life is no place for a Westerner.

Fitzgerald, F. Scott. _The Great Gatsby_. 1925. New York: Scribner, 1999.

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Notes from Professor:

You have clearly identified the refusal of the return and the rescue stages in Gatsby. Based on your interpretation, we have a new dichotomy to consider: East versus West. Is one of them the ordinary world for Nick and one the special world? Is one of them the world of Jay Gatsby?

~Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: Ava L. at January 24, 2009 07:28 PM

Wesley J.
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 435
January 25, 2009

(1) The Early Sequence of the Monomyth in The Great Gatsby: An ordinary day, Call to Adventure, Refusal of the Call.

In The Great Gatsby, the ordinary day seems to be the early part of the novel. Nick details his younger life and the advice that his father gave him about criticizing others. From here, Nick continues discussing the opening of “curious natures” (Fitzgerald 1) and happening that his life has provided. However, as Nick begins to narrate the actual story of the novel, it also seems that the ordinary day occurs as Nick goes to Tom and Daisy’s house. This meeting also initiates Nick’s adventure. The mention of Gatsby’s name strikes Daisy but it is not developed as to why. Likewise, as the characters sit for dinner, Tom receives a call from his mistress. This acts as a second call to adventure in that explains the events that will occur.

One could argue that the refusal of the call is in Nick’s reluctance to attend Gatsby’s parties and failure to address that Gatsby is his neighbor in Tom and Daisy’s company. It is not until a butler invites him that Nick attends the party and interacts with Gatsby. Also, while Nick is at the party, he is not vehement about meeting Gatsby and fortuitously meets him. While there is no actual refusal to do anything, Nick is not vocal about not wanting to go, he doesn’t take it upon himself to seek out the adventure that was initiated by Tom and Daisy.

However, there are other possibilities. One could argue that the call to action is when Gatsby requests that Nick set up a meeting for Daisy and Gatsby. And, perhaps the ordinary day occurs on the day that Daisy hits Wilson’s wife. This day, while marred by coincidence seems fairly regular. But in light of the fairly familiar flow of the book, rising action, climax, and denouement), I feel pretty confident that as far as the Monomyth is concerned, The Great Gatsby follows a pretty chronological and orderly path.

Fitzgerald, F. Scott. The Great Gatsby. 1925. New York: Scribner, 1999.

Posted by: Wesley J. at January 25, 2009 12:49 PM

Cecilia B.
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 435
25 January 2009

(8) Stages of the Hero's Journey: Elixir to Heal the Land/Master of Two Worlds

Considering F. Scott Fitzgerald’s novel _The Great Gatsby_ and its hero Nick Carraway, the final two stages of Campbell’s monomyth design heavily documents Nick’s struggle between the familiar mundane life of the middle class and Gatsby’s foreign world of opulence and carelessness.

In these stages of the return phase, Nick must heal what has been afflicting the alien world to be able to return to the original and thus gain full awareness and control in both. Gatsby’s lavish life intrudes on Nick’s common existence and consequently introduces Nick to people corrupted by wealth who not only take advantage of Gatsby’s generosity (consider Klipspringer) but are also self-interested. As a result, Nick must introduce an elixir of compassion to heal the illness of Gatsby’s world-and does so when trying to assemble mourners for Gatsby’s funeral including non-relatives as a means of establishing selflessness in him as the hero and projecting it out into the community of West Egg.

Lastly, Nick finally becomes the master of both worlds. Nick has successfully adopted a role in Gatsby’s world while healing it and made the journey back to his original destination and function in the lower middle class stratum. Also, Nick is still capable of making a distinction between the two worlds rather than becoming disillusioned and blurring his role in either one. For example, Nick becomes a selfless friend to Gatsby who momentarily enjoys the luxuries of the upper class but does not try to carry forth these indulgences into the ordinary world. Rather, Nick would be able to maneuver back and forth through each of the worlds without damaging his interior character and contaminating either world with the other’s values. Moreover, Nick can become a hero in the special world without forsaking the values he originally started with (i.e. he goes back home) but still transforms into a more enlightened being with compassion.

Fitzgerald, F. Scott. _The Great Gatsby_. 1925. New York: Scribner, 1999.

Posted by: Cecilia B. at January 25, 2009 01:29 PM

Travis R.

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 435

January 26, 2009

(7) Stages of the Hero’s Journey: Rebirth/Return and Crossing the Threshold (Out)

The two themes of the Hero’s Journey utilized in this post are “Rebirth/Return” and the “Crossing Out of the Threshold.” However, before we dive directly into analysis, it is probably best to define exactly what comprises the other world. Though the Special World of Campbell’s Monomyth illustration can be applied to many themes in Fitzgerald’s novel “The Great Gatsby,” for this purpose it will be referred to as Nick’s adoration of Gatsby, a man whom Nick in many ways wishes to emulate, and his lavish lifestyle.

Nick’s crossing of the threshold into the other world takes place when he begins to acquire a taste for the way Gatsby lives (hosting large parties, frivolously spending money, etc.). He spends time with Gatsby and learns to appreciate the amenities of life that are a product of this newfound friendship. It follows, then, that the crossing out of the threshold takes place when Gatsby plummeted from the pedestal on which Nick had placed him. This fall from grace can be seen shortly after Gatsby’s car strikes (and kills) Mrs. Wilson, the mechanic’s wife and the woman with whom Tom Buchanan is having an affair. After Tom, Jordan, and Nick arrive at the Buchanan household, Nick, while waiting for a taxi, encounters a loitering Gatsby holding vigil over the place of residents. Nick’s belief that Gatsby was driving the car when Mrs. Wilson was killed gives way to an interesting realization: Nick, for the first time in the novel, disdains Gatsby. Nick has become disenchanted with Gatsby and what he represents. In other instances where the integrity of Gatsby’s “good” name had been challenged (e.g. by Tom in a hotel room in New York City mere hours before the accident) Nick turned a blind ear (to mix a metaphor) and refused to believe the accusations. It seems apparent that Nick’s loathing of the man he once so highly regarded is his crossing out of the threshold.

Following Nick’s crossing out of the threshold is his rebirth/return. Here, his continued disenchantment with Gatsby’s lifestyle can be seen by his returning West, to his home. He completes his rebirth by removing himself from the company of Tom and Daisy, whom by the end he saw as fickle, and by also breaking off his relationship with Jordan, his last remaining “gonnegtion” to the special world inhabited by Gatsby and the other residents of both East and West Egg.

Fitzgerald, F. Scott. _The Great Gatsby_. 1925. New York: Scribner, 2004.

Posted by: Travis R. at January 26, 2009 01:05 AM

Kristin B.

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 435

26 January 2009


(2) Stages of the Hero’s Journey: Helpers/ Supernatural Aid

Nick Carraway is a young man from Minnesota who moves to Long Island. The move began his journey as hero in F. Scott Fitzgerald classic novel “The Great Gatsby.” Nick was a man of meager means. His move to the East was motivated by his desire to further himself through the bond business. He rented a house in the wealthy upcoming district of West Egg. Nick enters the unfamiliar “other world” of Western high society.


His departure from the familiar is aided by two specific characters, firstly the dazzling Daisy Buchanan and secondly the mysterious charming Jay Gatsby. It is during the first initial meetings with both Daisy and Gatsby that Nick is aided to continue on his journey. First of all, Nick joined Daisy and her husband Tom for dinner one evening at their fashionable and wealthy home in the East Egg district. During the first dinner with Daisy he met his potential love interest Jordan Baker and also learned first hand the distressing marriage situation between Daisy and her husband. Witnessing everything at first hand, and after meeting Myrtle, the evening really set the stage for the rest of the story. As the summer continued Nick was personally invited to attend Gatsby’s lavish party. During this event Nick is introduced to Gatsby himself and it gave the two a starting point for their friendship. Through out the rest of the novel Daisy and Gatsby act as helpers and propel Nick along his journey. Nick is invited over Daisy’s, Nick is invited over Gatsby’s, Nick invites Daisy over, Nick arranges a meeting between the pair, and etc. The introduction to both Daisy and Gatsby fully immerses Nick into the other world and in fact it is their (potential) relationship that colors Nick’s journey.

Fitzgerald, F. Scott. _The Great Gatsby_. 1925. New York: Scribner, 1999.

Posted by: Kristin B at January 26, 2009 01:12 AM

Sarah T.
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 435
26 January 2009

(5) Stage of the Hero’s Journey – Blessing/Sacrament and the Final Gift

Contrary to the title of the book, The Great Gatsby, Nick Carraway is the hero in the novel. He travels from his ordinary world into the special world of Gatsby in which he experiences various trials. The “Marriage, Baptism, or Blessing” of his journey (stage 5) is towards the end of the novel after his final battle.

The blessing/sacrament that Nick goes through is Gatsby’s funeral and meeting Henry Gatz, Gatsby’s father. In this portion of the journey the blessing is supposed to represent the change the hero is undergoing. This is usually displayed in the form of a marriage but in the case of Nick it represents the death of the special world and helps lead him to decide on whether or not to return to his ordinary world. In the events leading up to the funeral Nick desperately searches throughout “high society” looking for friends of Gatsby’s to attend his funeral. Unfortunately, Nic k does not know how to navigate through this world on his own and cannot get in contact anyone. Henry Gatz is another aspect of this stage because he opens Nick’s eyes to the difference between the two worlds.

The “Ultimate Boon/Final Gift” is represented when Nick runs into Tom on the streets of New York. This is the final gift from the Gods because it helps Nick realize his self-worth. In this scene he comes to understand how low Tom and Daisy truly are and chooses to no longer associate with them. He even feels pity towards them. This is a segue for Nick to enter into the return phase.

Fitzgerald, F. Scott. The Great Gatsby. 1925. New York: Scribner, 1999.

Posted by: Sarah T. at January 26, 2009 09:08 AM

Liz H.
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 435
January 26, 2009

(4) Stage of the Hero's Journey: Supreme Ordeal / Final Battle

For Nick Carraway, the protagonist in F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby, the ordeals, and battles he must deal with come on a literal and symbolic level. As a young man from the Midwest, he must confront the challenging ideologies and social structures of his day; for example, Nick is not used to a world where the rich live so lavishly and can just forget about the existence of the poor because Gatsby has servants who can worry for him. Gatsby is allowed the privilege of only focusing on himself.

However, Nick’s journey throughout the story deals with literal challenges as well. Relationships are a source of strength and struggle for Nick. By dating Jordan, Nick is attempting to become comfortable in a world of affluence. Nick is also able to form a close relationship with Gatsby, and he ends up being the one who discovers Gatsby’s dead body floating in the pool. Gatsby’s death marks the true end of Nick’s life in the West Egg. Gatsby dies because of Wilson’s rash judgments, but suddenly, Nick must deal with the aftermath. One realizes what a strong impact that event has on him when Nick notes that he is writing two years after the funeral. This long passage of time serves as a psychological marker for the difficult strain he must have been under particularly because of the rumors that developed after Gatsby’s death.

Fitzgerald, F. Scott. The Great Gatsby. 1925. New York: Scribner, 1999.

Posted by: Liz H. at January 26, 2009 10:06 AM

Jessica P.
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 435
26 January 2009

(3) Stages of the Monomyth: Cross the Threshold/Road of Tests/Trials/The Belly of the Whale

According to Campbell, a hero must cross the threshold to enter the special world, where he encounters the road of tests/trials and falls into the belly of the whale. In Fitzgerald’s novel, The Great Gatsby, Nick Carraway is identified as the hero and Nick’s relationship with Mr. Gatsby is the special world that Campbell describes. On the last page of this book, readers see Nick’s reflection on Gatsby’s life which was a disillusionment of the American dream versus his simplistic, real life back West. “And as I sat there brooding on the old, unknown world…” (180). Thus, Nick’s friendship with Mr. Gatsby caused him to be sucked into another existence of overwhelming wealth, unrealistic dreams, complicated, damaged love affairs, and open deception.

It can be deduced from the text that Gatsby crossed the threshold to enter the special world when he went to his first party at Gatsby’s house. Previously, Nick had known about Gatsby’s existence and observed his display of wealth, but not until he went to the party, did the relationship with Mr. Gatsby begin.

The Road of Tests and Trials can be defined by relationships. Nick’s encounter and interaction with Jordan can be considered a trial because of the indecisive pain that she caused him. He did not know whether he was in love with Jordan or not, and her presence reminded him of his love back West. Other encounters of Tom’s mistress and husband also were a test, because it drew Nick into Gatsby’s world, where matrimonial deception and lust were prevalent.

Nick’s luncheon with Mr. Gatsby in Chapter four is the dive into the belly of the whale. During this lunch, Mr. Gatsby asks Nick to invite Daisy and him over for tea. It is at this point, the affair with Daisy begins. Having no idea what conflict this is going to cause, this invitation favor is Nick’s first step into turmoil.

Fitzgerald, F. Scott. _The Great Gatsby_. 1925. New York: Scribner, 1999.

Posted by: Jessica P. at January 26, 2009 10:16 AM

Sarah Tatko
Dr. Hobbs
Eng-435
28 January 2009
Nick’s Epiphany
The epiphany I am addressing is Nick after the car accident. What he comes to realize is the desolate nature of the world he occupied with Gatsby; the world of high society. However, I do not feel that Nick was a permanent resident of this world but merely a temporary participant and observer. He was briefly blinded by the shiny lifestyle in which Gatsby, Daisy, and Tom lived and it lured him in. He did not know the true nature of the world just the representation of it through the jewels, fancy cars, parties, and “fun”. The process of Nick’s epiphany is similar to the inhabitants of Plato’s cave. He was bound to the world of high society by his friends and he could not look around to see the reality of it. Rather, they flashed representations in front of him to present a façade of what the world is. They whisked him to New York, flew him in hydroplanes, and dragged him to parties; all materialistic objects. Yet, when Daisy hits a kills Myrtle, Nick is released from his cave and led back into his world of reality. He finally sees that the fancy things of Gatsby’s world (such as the car) were not true representations because he finally saw the car for what it was a senseless machine that kills. This is exactly what the truth of the world is and Nick is enlightened of this concept.

Fitzgerald, F. Scott. The Great Gatsby. 1925. New York: Scribner, 1999.

Posted by: Sarah T. at January 27, 2009 10:16 PM

Jessica P.
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 435
1/28/09

Fitzgerald: “Shaking Hands with Tom”/Plato’s Cave Analogy

In the Great Gatsby, Nick’s summer is spent with the primary characters of the story—Gatsby, Tom, Daisy, and Jordan. On page 178, readers see that Nick shakes Tom’s hand after the plot had dissolved; thus, resulting in an epiphany experience. Developing over the course of the story, this particular epiphany resulted because Nick realizes he is different than Tom and the other characters, who he named “careless people”. Recognizing that Tom had the emotional maturity of a child, he saw that these people were in a world surrounded by themselves and their desires. Using their immense wealth to cover up their mistakes, they simply lived together in a self-centered, worldly-pleasured existence, which was a part of Gatsby’s world. In Plato’s Cave analogy, the people entrapped inside the cave lived in an artificial existence—where one was chained to the wall and forced to look at images. Like these prisoners, Tom and Daisy lived in a fake world. However, after shaking Tom’s hand, Nick broke free from this imprisoned world of disillusionment, and stepped away into the light of honest existence

Fitzgerald, F. Scott. _The Great Gatsby_. 1925. New York: Scribner, 1999.

Posted by: Jessica Pall at January 28, 2009 11:05 AM

Kristin Brittain

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 435

Plato’s allegory of the cave and "The Great Gatsby"


Nick Carraway, the protagonist in “The Great Gatsby” written by F. Scott Fitzgerald, had an epiphany at the time of Jay Gatsby’s funeral. The epiphany that Nick experienced can be compared to Plato’s “Allegory of the Cave” in which an epiphany experienced by the main character leads to enlightenment. Nick was a prisoner of Gatsby’s world of lavish parties, hopes, dreams, and wealth. Nick remained in a state of awe of Gatsby inspired by his notoriety and great portrayals of wealth. However, as Nick soon learned after Gatsby’s death that the world in which he was held captive in is nothing but shadows on the wall. Much like the character held captive in Plato’s allegory that realized the true aspects of the cave’s deception, Nick too eventually realized the falsehood of Gatsby’s reality. Nick’s inability to find mourners to attend Gatsby’s funeral lead him to the epiphany that Gatsby’s world was not real and no one really cared about him. This was Nick’s moment of enlightenment. His desperate search for mourners was Nick’s roadway to truth. After Gatsby’s pitiful funeral Nick realized that the story he told was of the west and not of the east. “I see now that this has been a story of the West, all—Tom and Gatsby, Daisy and Jordan, and I, were all Westerners, and perhaps we possessed some deficiency in common which made us subtly unadaptable to Eastern life” (Fitzgerald 176). Nick’s conclusion was that the westerner’s were inadaptable to life in the East and so Tom, Daisy, and Jordon will remain in their blissful ignorance in the “cave” of the east and Nick will return to the sunlight of the west.


Fitzgerald, F. Scott. _The Great Gatsby_. 1925. New York: Scribner, 1999.

Posted by: Kristin B. at January 28, 2009 11:49 AM

Wesley Johnson
Hobbs
Eng 435
February 3, 2009
“The Language of Paradox” inside The Great Gatsby
Cleanth Brooks’ article “The Language of Paradox” illuminates the notion that poetry is virtually paradox. He argues that full understanding of poetry is only available through an examination of the paradoxical nature of the writing. Applying this article to F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby presents a few problems. First, Fitzgerald’s work is a novel. So, there is an inherent conflict between the poetic focus of Brooks and the prose of Gatsby. Also, Fitzgerald’s paradoxes are not quite as explicit as those in the poems that Cleanth Brooks examines. Therefore, one may have to take a theoretical leap to imagine the occurrences in The Great Gatsby as paradoxical.
An initial examination of the narrator of Fitzgerald’s novel, Nick, may leave one feeling that he is a rather biased and a non-objective narrator. Sarcasm abounds in his initial descriptions of the lifestyle of Tom, Daisy, and Gatsby. He describes Tom and Daisy’s peripatetic lifestyle as leading them to “wherever people played polo and were rich together” (Fitzgerald 6). This type of bucolic regard for the fellow characters that populate the novel creates a paradoxical ambiguity for the readers. Upon examining this type of behavior, the reader is left only to wonder why Nick is the narrator and how the story is going to be told. But, this paradox is rectified in that Nick’s initial sarcasm illustrates his growth as a character. From beginning as an anti-Gatsby persona, his shift into appreciating the namesake of the book highlights his human unfolding.
The above paradox is fairly visible and clear. But, Fitzgerald’s novel contains some very subtle paradoxes that yield far less concrete or ascertainable explanations. The most obvious paradox occurs early in the text. Nick says, “I was standing beside his bed and he was sitting up…clad in his underwear” (Fitzgerald 38). This strange scene seems to depict a potential homosexual tryst between himself and a strange man. This veiled homoeroticism even continues throughout the novel as Nick’s attempts to woo Jordan Baker appear out of place. The paradox is not explained nor focused. Nick’s rendezvous occurs at the end of a chapter and only encompasses little over a paragraph of mention. Without focusing on this scene too much, and potentially falling into the era of queering the entire text, the best a reader can guess is that this awkward scene serves primarily to reinforce Nick’s position as an outsider in the world of Gatsby. Another blatantly created paradox is the actual nature of James Gatsby. The reader never actually learns his past. A description of his life is presented by Nick, but that is a retelling from Gatsby himself, who could easily be lying as he has throughout the novel.
Whether implied or explicit, paradoxes abound in The Great Gatsby. And, while readers can attempt to explain the cause and reasoning behind the paradox, one is ultimately unable to fully explore this. Unlike the explicit poetic language that Cleanth Brooks examines in “The Language of Paradox,” Fitzgerald’s prose is more dense and potentially problematic. Brooks examined poems (the Romantic and metaphysical works of William Wordsworth and John Donne) that had specific goals and authorial explanations for some of their paradoxes. The Great Gatsby does not have this. The best one can do is to pinpoint the paradox of Fitzgerald; actual understanding of the paradoxes and purposes served is too limiting and provides too narrow a scope with which to examine The Great Gatsby.
Work Cited
Fitzgerald, F. Scott. The Great Gatsby. 1925. New York: Scribner, 1999.

Posted by: Wesley J at February 3, 2009 08:41 PM

Travis Rathbone

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 435

February 3, 2009

Formalism Application Paper: “Art as Technique” and “The Great Gatsby”

In his essay “Art as Technique,” Viktor Shklovsky champions art as a way of shaking people out of the reverie of life that is a product of a habitual and automatically unconscious way of existence. Art accomplishes this by casting a different light on what would otherwise be automatic sensations; art achieves its end by de-familiarizing our perception of what is already familiar: “The technique of art,” Shklovsky states, “is to make objects ‘unfamiliar,’ to make forms difficult, [and] to increase the difficulty and length of perception…” (Rivkin, Ryan 16). Finding the unfamiliar (and how it is best executed for this essay) in Fitzgerald’s “The Great Gatsby” is no small task, but, under close scrutiny, some interesting revelations can be made.

Fitzgerald’s mastery of the novel is something to marvel at, and the layers produced in his text quickly become apparent when one looks to apply critical theory. The scene to be analyzed is Nick’s introduction to Gatsby’s business partner, Meyer Wolfsheim. Nick’s sense of unease is apparent when he first describes his encounter with the unsightly little man. In fact, Nick appears to be repulsed by Wolfsheim’s presence, and is unsure how to compose himself. When they first shake hands, Wolfsheim pays him no attention at all and is instead conversing with Gatsby. Throughout the entire scene Nick seems to be uncomfortable (and out of his familiar element), and when he is confronted with another one of Wolfsheim’s little eccentricities, his human molar cufflinks, he has no idea how to acknowledge these disturbing pieces of jewelry: “Well!” He states, “That’s a very interesting idea” (Fitzgerald 72). The molar cufflinks are integral, here, and work on multiple levels. Not only is the protagonist of the narrative thrown even further out of his familiar state of existence by the presence of these cufflinks, but emergence of said items also affects the reader outside of the realm of the characters. By introducing an unusual element into the story, the molar cufflinks, Fitzgerald causes the reader to take pause. The familiarity of cufflinks becomes very unfamiliar very quickly. Not only does this speak about the character who is sporting them, but it also causes this same character to become prominent in the reader’s (and Nick’s) mind because of the defamiliarization that occurs.

Another instance (within the same scene) where defamiliarization can be witnessed is in the author’s excellent use of dialogue. By causing Wolfsheim to pronounce his hard c’s as soft g’s, Fitzgerald not only successfully brings to life a character’s speech pattern (one can practically hear the words come to life off the page), but also causes the reader to pay attention and take note. Because of this, Wolfsheim is again brought to life through familiar speech patterns made unfamiliar. In addition, Wolfsheim is the only character whose speech patterns are written phonetically, making him even more of a unique character, and further appealing to the unfamiliar and causing this character to be even more pronounced in the minds of the reader.

When dissecting this scene and viewing what would normally be considered familiar in a different way, one can see the power making something unfamiliar can wield if utilized correctly. Shedding a different light on an object that is normally mundane and automatic can breathe new life into that same lackluster item. By presenting a man who reels against normalcy, he becomes more alive. And that, ultimately, is the object of defamiliarizing; in other words, that is “art as technique.”


Works Cited
Shklovsky, Viktor. "Art as Technique." Literary Theory: An Anthology, Second Edition.
Eds. Julie Rivkin and Michael Ryan. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing, 2004. 15 - 21.

Fitzgerald, F. Scott. The Great Gatsby. 1925. New York: Scribner, 1999.

Posted by: Travis R at February 4, 2009 09:10 AM

Kristin Brittain

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 435

2/3/2009

Formalist critique: The Great Gatsby

The Great Gatsby written by F. Scott Fitzgerald is a timeless novel. Fitzgerald’s successful use of imagery and symbols emphasize the hollowness that resides within unfulfilled dreams and the drastic occurrences that can happen by desperately trying to obtain them. The universal desire for wanting more takes the characters in the novel through an emotional cyclone.
The Great Gatsby was written during a time of corruption—the American dream that once sought life, liberty, and happiness quickly became the hollow pursuit of wealth and distinction. Many historicists are quick to pinpoint the novel as a commentary on the Jazz Age. Whether Fitzgerald visualized his work as a scathing commentary and representation of America during the 1920’s (his everyday world) is unimportant. When examining the text closely readers realize through Fitzgerald’s use of language, imagery, and symbols that the characters and story line are representations of the haunting universal realization of unfulfilled dreams. The green light at the end of Daisy’s dock is a symbol of such strong desires. For Gatsby, the symbol at first motivates him. Fitzgerald creates an unforgettable image of Gatsby trembling at both the closeness and the proximity of the light. His lifelong dream to be together with Daisy again is witnessed from the very beginning, “he stretched out his arms toward the dark water in a curious way, and, far as I was from him, I could have sworn he was trembling” (20-21). At the very beginning of the novel the light is at first a symbol of hope. In fact, Gatsby is overcome physical overcome by his desires. However, by the end of the novel the green light shows its true colors, so to speak, and it is really a symbol of Gatsby’s unfulfilled dream.
“And as I sat there brooding on the old, unknown world, I thought of Gatsby’s wonder when he first picked out the green light at the end of Daisy’s dock […] and his dream must have seemed so close that he could hardly fail to grasp it. He did not know that it was already behind him, somewhere beyond that vast obscurity beyond the city” (180).
The green light was merely a symbol for what Gatsby wanted most in life, but could never have.
It was also a symbol of the corruption of Gatsby’s dream. The color of the light is green— the same color of money. This light at the end of the dock became a beacon for Gatsby, and Gatsby needed to become affluent before he pushed his way into Daisy’s materialistic world. Gatsby earned his money by illegally bootlegging liquor, and thus the green light became a beacon of corruption and materialism.
Fitzgerald’s use of imagery and symbols truly depicts the universal desire created by unfulfilled dreams. The greatest example is the way Gatsby reached out to the green light as if it could unlock his dream future with Daisy. The green light is a beacon; it stands as a symbol for unfulfilled dreams—what Gatsby wanted the most but could not have.


Work Cited
Fitzgerald, F. Scott. The Great Gatsby. 1925. New York: Scribner, 1999.

Posted by: Kristin B at February 4, 2009 01:17 PM

Sarah Tatko
Dr. Hobbs
Eng-435
11 February 2009
The Great Gatsby According to Social Classification
A key concept of Pierre Bourdieu’s work “Distinction” is the idea of social classification being a determinate of one’s taste towards an object (237). Society is divided according to different classifications which have been determined over the years by the people. The majority of the population is aware of the classification system and the proper place in which they belong. It is for this reason that individual readers respond to literature in different manners according to their own classifications. Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby is one text that is open to multiple perceptions due to the wide range of class issues present in the book.
A good application of this concept would be to analyze the book through two perspectives: a middle class citizen and an upper class citizen. A member of the middle classification would view upper class members as more conceited and superior due to their social status and amount of wealth. He would also view himself as more “down to earth” and level-headed because, as middle class, he had to work for what he earned. This is a common perception for this social status.
Due to these pre-conceived ideas about the upper class the middle class reader would feel bitterness towards the Buchanans and Gatsby. He would feel a kinship towards Nick because of the personal struggles he undergoes while socializing with the upper class. Nick feels out of place and awkward at Gatsby’s party and the reader would be able to empathize with him. However, an upper class reader would not understand because it is not different from any other social setting; the party guests are people just like Nick. Bourdieu would recognize this as the opposition between free and forced. For example, the middle class reader would feel forced while the upper class reader would feel free, and the difference between the two readers is their understanding of society and the classification system.
Another opposition present in the book is the dominant and the dominated. This theme would be perceived differently by the two readers. The middle class reader would feel that Gatsby and the Buchanans are the dominated; the same would be true with Nick whenever he participates in their social setting. The reasoning is because they are confined by social restrictions and they need to uphold their appearance of superiority. Nick would be viewed as the dominant at the end because he overcame the oppressiveness of high society. On the other hand, an upper class reader would perceive Nick to be the dominated because he could not succeed in the high society. The evidence for this is because he was not able to get over Myrtle’s accident and it weighed him down in life. Each scene is open to different perceptions and interpretations according the reader and their own personal social experiences.

Works Cited
Bourdieu, Pierre. “Distinction.” Literary Theory: An Anthology. 2nd ed. Eds. Julie Rivkin and Michael Ryan. Malden, MA: Blackwell, 2004. 237-253.
Fitzgerald, F. Scott. The Great Gatsby. 1925. New York: Scribner, 1999.

Posted by: Sarah T. at February 9, 2009 06:32 PM

Cecilia B
Dr. Lee Hobbs
ENG 435
11th February 2009
Reader-Response Approach to The Great Gatsby
Tacit persuasion patterns, as expounded upon by reader-response critic Robert Lanham in his same-titled article, involve the various rhetorical devices that contain similar linguistic structures which in turn are attractive to readers (Lanham 178). This is evident in Fitzgerald’s work, The Great Gatsby, where chapter three alone demonstrates such linguistic patterns which Lanham mentions such as anaphora, isocolon, chiasmus, and alliteration (Lanham 180-183). These rhetorical devices affect a reader’s understanding of the logic within the world of the book and also allow one to observe how the characters in the work are affected by such devices as well. For example, Klipspringer’s rant on the authenticity of Gatsby’s book collection empowers his bold and enraged statements towards other partygoers’ skepticism by the use of anaphora; “What thoroughness! What realism! ...What do you want? What do you expect?” (46). Such lines of similar opening construction do not simply startle the logic of the characters into rethinking their fixed beliefs but also become ingrained in the reader’s memory. Further in the text’s chapter, inverted anaphora is additionally employed to impact the reader and emphasize the singularity of the figure Gatsby: “girls were putting their heads on men’s shoulders, girls were swooning backward playfully into men’s arms,” then its negative counterpart follows: “but no one swooned backward on Gatsby, no French bob touched Gatsby’s shoulder, no swinging quartets were formed with Gatsby’s head” (50).
The concept of isocolon is also scattered throughout chapter three of Fitzgerald’s work. This device uses “phrases of equal length and corresponding structure” (Lanham 182) and is expressed in the following lines: “with mops and scrubbing-brushes and hammers and garden-shears” and “A celebrated tenor had sung in Italian, and a notorious contralto had sung in jazz” (Fitzgerald 39, 47). Each of these lines follows the ABAB pattern and therefore satisfies the reader’s sense of mathematics, symmetry, and reason. Furthermore, chiasmus and isocolon are both at work to present logic in Nick’s evaluation of the intimate party setting: “It understood you just as far as you wanted to understand yourself, it believed in you as you would like to believe in yourself” (48); with this passage, inversion is evident in each independent clause but the two clauses exhibit similar structure patterns when paired. Finally alliteration is the last of Lanham’s lecture on tacit persuasion patterns and, though a simplistic model of persuasive word patterns, saturates Fitzgerald’s third chapter such as “repairing the ravages,” “funny fellow,” and “sound of silver scales” (Fitzgerald 39, 43, 47). These straightforward coupled words involve concentrated symmetry and thus appeal to the reader and his logical control.

Works Cited
Fitzgerald, F. Scott. The Great Gatsby. New York: Macmillan, 1980.
Lanham, Robert. “Tacit Persuasion Patterns.” Literary Theory: An
Anthology. Eds. Julie Rivkin and Michael Ryan. New York: Blackwell
Pub., 1998. 177-194.

Posted by: Cecilia at February 10, 2009 12:10 PM

Ava Littlefield
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 435
16 February 2009
Seeking out the Structure in Gatsby
According to Stephen Lynn, author of Texts and Context, “structuralism is a pattern or design that is somehow “in” a text, that the reader must actively perceive” (Lynn 107). Structuralism is focused on both the text and the reader’s response; more specifically it aims to reveal how the text affected the reader and why. The intended purpose of structuralism is to “expose the system of meaning that enabled the response of the reader” (Lynn 110).
Several of the structural systems that exist in F.Scott Fitzgerald’s novel The Great Gatsby include the structure of plot formulas, romantic, and ironic structures, and patterns of narrative structure among the characters (Tyson 226-244). Each type of structural system within the novel actively influences the reader’s perception of what is taking place. A close examination of each structural system allows the reader to associate the text to its proper discourse.
Conflict and resolution, struggle and reconciliation, and separation and union are used to create the plots of formula structure. These types of structures are implemented through the “actants, also referred to as the characters (Tyson 225). The character of Nick serves two very important parts of this type of structure. Nick is the “hero’s helper and a quester” (Tyson 225). Nick attempts to help Gatsby on his own quest to regain the love of Daisy Miller but in the process is on his own quest for individual identity and belonging. Nick’s conflict is that he is unsatisfied with his current position in life and desires a deeper fulfillment. He finds his resolution to his conflict at the end of the novel when he realizes that he “was unadaptable to Eastern life” (Fitzgerald 176). His desire to return home was directly impacted by his own individual struggle to find identity. Nick’s attempts to separate himself from the West failed and resulted in his realization that he will always be united with what he refers to as “My Middle West” (Fitzgerald 176).
Gatsby “embodies the structure of romance (the mythos of summer, the quest)” (Tyson 239). Gatsby’s attempt to reclaim the past (his quest to reunite with Daisy) is unsuccessful. Gatsby is reunited with Daisy but only momentarily. His quest is unsuccessful because Daisy remains with Tom and Gatsby is murdered. Nick’s narrative serves as the “structure of irony (the mythos of winter, realism)” (Tyson 239). Nick initial desires were to lead a lifestyle similar to that of Gatsby’s. However, when everything is done and said Nick comes to the realization that his life, the one in the West, is superior to Gatsby’s. Nick’s search for identity results in his return home, where he can find happiness. The structure of romance is overridden by the structure of irony because by the “close of the novel Nick realizes that romance is no longer possible in the modern world” (Tyson 239).
One very important structure that can exist within the novel is the patterns of narrative structure. The narrative pattern of structure enables the reader to associate the text with its proper discourse. Some of the patterns included in this structure are the wealthy world, the poverish world, the combining of the two worlds, the triangle of romance, the explosion of the triangle, the intersection, and finally the narrator’s reflection at the end of the novel. Gatsby serves as the wealthy world. Gatsby lives in a mansion which Nick describes as “a colossal affair by any standard” (Fitzgerald 5). Nick on the other hand serves as the poverish world. He lives in the part of West Egg that is “less fashionable” (Fitzgerald 5). Irregardless of the social division that exists between Nick and Gatsby, they still become acquaintances. This union of the two worlds, rich and poor, is a typical structure that is seen in many different texts. The union between the wealthy and the poverish is but one element to consider when attempting identifying the discourse that the text belongs to. The triangle of romance that takes place between Gatsby, Daisy, and Tom can also be considered a structure. This type of romantic triangle is typical within texts as is the explosion of the triangle (Gatsby confronting Tom at the hotel about his feelings towards Daisy). The final narrative structure that takes place within the novel is the narrator’s reflection or meditation. The narrator’s reflection (Nick’s realism) is another element that the reader might consider when trying to categorize the text to the appropriate discourse.
The application of a Structuralist approach is an important part of understanding how the reader is affected by the text and why. It allows the reader to “identify the subjects, the verbs, the modifiers so that the sentences being read make sense” (Lynn 107). By approaching the text using Ferdinand Saussure’s synchronic view of structuralism the reader is able to “look at the relationships of all the parts of the language” (Lynn 109) rather than examining a singular element of it. Saussure’s view of structuralism “seeks to find commonalities and distinguishing differences, bringing a scientific approach to the language” (Lynn 109). These distinctions and differences are the “basis for the underlying structures” (Lynn 109) within the language of the text.

Work Cited
Fitzgerald, F. Scott. The Great Gatsby. New York: Scribner, 1925. 5-176.
Lynn, Stephen. “Opening Up the Text: Structuralism and Deconstruction”. Text and Context: Writing About Literature with Critical Theory 5th ed. New York: Pearson, 2008. 107-10.
Tyson, Lois. Critical Theory Today: A User Friendly Guide 2nd ed. New York: Routledge, 2006. 225-44.

Posted by: Ava L. at February 17, 2009 09:20 PM

Jessica P.
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 435
2/25/09

Deconstructing The Great Gatsby Through Differance

Jacques Derrida wrote an essay in 1968, Differance, which draws from the work of Saussure, Heidegger, and Nietzsche to justify and explain his theory of differance (Derrida 278). Although it is not a word or a concept, differance embodies both meanings of the verb, “to differ”, and is at the root of everything. Representing differing both in the temporal sense and unique identity factor, differance can be used to deconstruct literary texts such as F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby (Derrida 279).

In The Great Gatsby, readers can identify the differance by examining the differences that make up the story. One example is Fitzgerald’s description of the East and West. Readers must understand that these two geographical locations only exist because there are differences that separate them apart. Nick, originally from the West, is dissatisfied with living there; therefore, he comes to the East to work in the bond business, hoping to find a better life. In the beginning, the East is the idealized, desired, good location; however, by the end, Nick becomes disillusioned with the East and its role switches from good to bad (Fitzgerald 3, 176) In addition, readers find that this difference exists in the present. Thus, the differences that identity the East and the West are not from the past or the future. Instead, they are in a present state of being because one exists due to the contrast of the other.

Another differance that can be easily identified is the contrast between Nick and Jordan’s character. Specifically, Jordan is identified as a dishonest individual (Fitzgerald 58). In contrast, Nick identifies himself as “one of the few honest people I have ever known” (Fitzgerald 59). Thus, this is an example of differance because it represents a definite identity contrast, and in the temporal sense is a present state that they are both identified with. If both Nick and Jordan acted the same way, then there would be no reason to distinguish their different characteristics. However, this distinct difference allows differance to come in play; thus, naming the characters honest and dishonest.

Since differance is at the root of everything, then one can find it everywhere in deconstructing literary texts such as The Great Gatsby. Differance deconstructs texts to reveal the structure that the book, even down to language it is comprised of. Thus, readers find that meaning is unlocked through the understanding of the differance.

Works Cited
Derrida, Jacques. “Difference”. Literary Theory: An Anthology. 2nd ed. Ed. Julie Rivkin and Michael Ryan. Malden, MA: Blackwell, 2004.278-299.
Fitzgerald, F. Scott. _The Great Gatsby_. 1925. New York: Scribner, 1999.

Posted by: Jessica Pall at February 25, 2009 10:52 AM

Travis R
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 435
4 March 2009

Scrutinizing Swastikas: A New Historical Approach to Fitzgerald

Though Louis Montrose’s essay, “Professing the Renaissance: The Poetics and Politics of Culture,” describes (in detail) many aspects of New Historicism, applying the actual essay to a text is somewhat difficult. So instead of applying the essay itself to Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby, the aim will be to apply New Historicism as a whole to the work and explain how further research may be performed.

Upon an intense scrutinizing of The Great Gatsby, one seemingly minor detail stuck out among the rest: a swastika. Near the end of the novel, Nick Carraway travels to the office of Jay Gatsby’s shady business partner, Meyer Wolfsheim, in order to invite him to Gatsby’s funeral. The name on the office door inspires no interest in Nick, but should to modern day readers: “The door that I pushed open, on the advice of an elevator boy, was marked “The Swastika Holding Company,” (Fitzgerald 170). This information arouses no emotion in Nick, nor perhaps would it do so for the common reader in 1925. But the same apathetic reaction by a more modern reader should not be assumed. Upon reading the title on the office door, one might be inspired to ask: was Fitzgerald a modern day Nostradamus, attempting to warn his audience of a group that would become a scourge to humanity little more than a decade after the novel’s publication? This is an interesting train of thought, though ultimately flawed, and upon further investigation, some interesting background information gives way to an interesting reading.

Research turned up an article discussing prohibition era New York City and a bootlegger, Larry Fay, who owned nightclubs and used the symbol of the swastika as a good luck charm. With Fitzgerald’s knowledge of the city and its night life, he would have certainly known of Fay. It does not even seem implausible that Gatsby’s character was based loosely off this actual man: “Fay's sartorial tastes and lifestyle were very much like Gatsby's; he was given to loud shirts and ties, and once returned from London with twelve trunks of clothes” (Gross 1). Basing Gatsby off of this unsavory person does not help laud the fictional character’s overall good-but-misunderstood disposition. If The Swastika Holding Company of the novel is based off an authentic, unlawful business, it does not seem logical that the fictional business would pride itself on altruistic endeavors. Therefore, Gatsby—seeing as he was a business associate of this company’s owner—and his true nature are both suspect.

In order to continue this line of research, I would need to perform an exhaustive investigation of multiple facets of the novel. Because The Great Gatsby is set during the prohibition, I could begin by searching for books and articles concerning this topic. Fitzgerald and the New York City bourgeoisie night life would be another logical step in accumulating information for a New Historical look at the novel. In addition to this, swastikas and the rise of Nazism might be another avenue to pursue. In the end, performing background research can bring to light some interesting discoveries, and perhaps alter one’s perception of a work and its author. The research performed here, though not exhaustive, was already enough to alter the perception (or interpretation) of a small aspect of The Great Gatsby. It would be interesting to see what dedicating more time to delving into the past might uncover and how this knowledge would, perhaps, further add to the reading experience.


Works Cited

Fitzgerald, F. Scott. The Great Gatsby. 1925. New York: Scribner, 1999.

Gross, Dalton and Mary-Jean Gross. “F. Scott Fitzgerald's American swastika: the prohibition
underworld and 'The Great Gatsby.'” Literature Resource Center. 1994. GALE.
3 Mar. 2009

Montrose, Louis. "Professing the Renaissance: The Poetics and Politics of Culture."
Literary Theory: An Anthology, 2nd Ed. Eds. Julie Rivkin and Michael Ryan.
Malden, MA: Blackwell, 2004. 584 - 591.

Posted by: Travis R at March 4, 2009 09:33 AM

-------------------------------------------

Remark from Professor:

Travis, this sounds fascinating

You will find that much has been written about Antisemitism elements in both Fitzgerald and Hemingway's works. To get away from what has already been covered, it sounds like a an investigation into the Swastika as a symbol would be a good start and how that symbol was "read" by Americans in the period between the two world wars (preceding the rise of the Third Reich).Good work.

~Dr. Hobbs


---------------------------

ENG 435 Students of Spring 2009,

As directed in class, enter your choice from the monomyth chart (what you signed up for) and apply it to F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby. The blog entry for the monomyth is available HERE and the handouts I asked you to read are available at the bottom of the page HERE. I'm looking for a paragraph (at least) or so of very specific info. Use the online handouts to find out more about your "part" of the monomyth. Some of you may have more than one, e.g. ordinary day and refusal of the call. There will be crossover in some of your choices, e.g. refusal of the call and departure.

If the monomyth exercise for this work is giving you trouble, do print, read, and study the handouts on the syllabus entry of this blog and understand that the monomyth can be either literal or SYMBOLIC. The best stories in literature are both, and I believe that The Great Gatsby is both. It will, naturally, require a bit more careful thinking than the Wizard of Oz exercise which has an overtly literal manifestation of the scheme. Go back and read your classmates responses to the Wizard of Oz and you will see how many of their approaches are symbolic rather than literal descriptions of the stages.

Keep in mind as you try to identify a particular phase or stage of the hero's journey that there is no ONE correct answer. There are any number of possibilities--it is ultimately up to you to postulate one and then make the case. You should always start by first identifying which “hero” in the narrative that you think is on a journey. Then (and this is critical) you must satisfactorily identify your hero’s ordinary world and special world (those will definitely differ depending on the hero AND your interpretation). It can certainly be different for every reader. Some readers may see the special world literarily as “Gatsby’s World.” Others in our class saw it "symbolically" as the world of “high society” or any world that Nick was not yet familiar with. Could it be geographical (literal) as in a city-mouse vs. the country mouse scenario?, e.g. "New York City" in the 1920s and “The Hamptons” in the 1920s? Or, morally, does the hero move from the world of innocence to a world of decadence?; Economically, from a world of poverty to a world of wealth?; Philosophically, from a world of ignorance to one of enlightenment? You make that decision as you best see it and then identify the helpers who may have assisted Nick (or, whoever you consider the protagonist) across the threshold dividing the worlds.

If the stage you want to discuss is, for example, the "Assistance from a Helper," if that stage clearly exists, realize that even the stage itself could be symbolic rather than literal. Is the assistance in the form of information? Is it something that doesn't seem overtly like magic, such as money? Maybe the invitation is a real invitation like a letter mailed to the hero. Is it merely a "networking" experience, e.g. an introduction to someone important/critical to the new world by a third character in the story? Some characters have multiple roles and sometimes the stages don’t happen in the exact order they appear on the chart (it is merely a guide). Don't give up without considering these possibilities.

If any of you ever find that you may be having trouble with any of the theories in this course, as young scholars who want to succeed you will definitely want to consider at least three things (this is standard advice I give everyone):

(1) do more outside research on the subject at hand—it’s abundant. You can start with Encyclopedia Britannica online (see our library databases) or university websites on the subject, but DO follow up (religiously) on their list of scholarly references at the end of each article. If there are no scholarly sources listed that you can follow up on then the article is probably unreliable.
(2) visit me more frequently during my office hours—a lot can be explained/discussed with your professors in a one on one session that is often missed in a short, 50-minute meeting.
(3) consider forming a study group with the students in the class who seem open to this idea. I will try to remember to remind the class at our next meeting to consider forming one.

As with any paper you post--even if it is only a paragraph or two--always create a title, a primary source citation (think of it as a review) and use the MLA format where possible (ID info on upper left). Remember to keep your identity somewhat anonymous. First name, last initial. Remember to keep a hardcopy of anything you post on the blog or turnitin.com for your records and portfolio (always bring to class too in case we decide to use it as part of an in-class activity). Don't forget that formatting is different for online publications, e.g. paragraphs aren't normally indented and text is single-spaced. So, go back and space between your paragraphs to indicate the break. If you get your comments in to me in a timely fashion, I can leave feedback. The closer your submission is to classtime, the less likely I will have time to provided any.

Just FYI, if you have not purchased this book, it is on reserve in our library. The call number is: PS3511.I9 G837 1986.

Later. . .

[1] Application Papers (at various times throughout the semester) and
[2] Conference Papers (and the end of the semester when we set up the mock-panels)

[1] If you wrote an application paper on this work, you will enter it in the comment box below.

Keep in mind that you will write 10 short, but concise, application papers this semester: one for each module / theory. However, ALL of your application papers will NOT be on the same work of literature. After your initial choice, you are expected to rotate between the four primary works (Fitzgerald, Joyce, Shepard, and Fleming) before coming back to this one. Enter your application papers for the other authors in their own dedicated entries on the English-Blog (click on the "Critical Theory" or "Literature" links in the Scattegories menu to the left if you are lost!).

In addition to being due n the comment box below by the deadline (see itinerary), your application paper is ALSO due in the appropriate folder on turnitin.com. Bring a hardcopy of your paper to class according to the deadline listed on our itinerary (see syllabus) and, as usual, be prepared to discuss your article with the rest of the class.

The purpose of the application papers are to give you exercise and preparation for the longer paper due in the final weeks of the course (see itinerary) for our mock-student-conference panels.

[2] If you wrote a conference paper on this author, enter it in the comment box below. It is also due on turnitin.com by the deadline AND as a hardcopy for your portfolio and for the actual conference itself (you will read it aloud).


I look forward to seeing your work,

Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: Dr. Hobbs at March 4, 2009 09:43 AM

Jessica P.
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 435
3/4/09

Understanding The Great Gatsby through Music

F. Scott Fitzgerald novel, The Great Gatsby, was published in 1925 by Charles Scribner’s Sons. Understanding this novel requires a familiarity of American culture during the 1920’s. Thus, researching the historical meaning behind different parts of the book will give readers insight that they may not otherwise have obtained.

One interesting aspect of Fitzgerald’s book to examine is the music that was chosen to be included in the story. In particular, the scene in chapter five, featuring Daisy, Gatsby, Nick, and Klipspringer, has two songs that are mentioned. This scene begins with Daisy, Gatsby, and Nick browsing through Gatsby’s house when Gatsby summons his guest, Klipspringer, to play them a song on the piano. Reluctantly, Klipspringer plays Love Nest. Stopping after this song, Gatsby encourages and orders his guest to continue playing. Readers are then given the lyrics to “Ain’t We Got Fun” dissected by a paragraph of setting description.

Looking closely at this scene, readers should question why these two songs were chosen to be played. Thus, researching whether these songs were real or fiction is useful information. In fact, both of these songs were composed and popular during the 1920’s.
Love Nest is a song used in George M. Cohen musical, “Mary”, with music by Louis A. Hirsch and Lyrics by Otto Harback. Further, it was sung and popularized by John Steel in 1920 (http:www.nme.com/video/id/kgm6xrdLiggl). Once establishing that the songs are real, readers should question why these songs were picked. Looking up the lyrics to these songs may provide insight to Gatsby and Daisy’s affection for each other. Researching the music that was popular during this time period would also prove useful as one must know whether readers at the time Fitzgerald published The Great Gatsby would have recognized these songs. Readers can use books like Twentieth-century Music: An Introduction to help familiarize themselves with music of the 1920s. More significance can be placed on the song choices if these songs were popular and well identifiable to the average reader.

Examining these two songs in the Great Gatsby can be useful in determining the mood and purpose of the scene. Not understanding what these songs imply or why they were popular is critical information necessary for understanding the scene. Thus, readers must research these songs in order to gain complete benefits of the novel.

Works Cited
Fitzgerald, F. Scott. The Great Gatsby. 1925. New York: Scribner, 1999.
Salzman, Eric. Twentieth-century Music: An Introduction. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Hall, 1967.
NME First For Music News. IPC MEDIA 1996-2009. March 3, 2009. .

Posted by: Jessica Pall at March 4, 2009 10:46 AM

Kristin Brittain

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 435

3/2/09

Power and discipline within The Great Gatsby

The Great Gatsby written by F. Scott Fitzgerald is a commentary on America during the Jazz Age. Power and money are crucial to the characters within the novel which lead them into moral decay. During the time when “the self made man” gained rising status Jay Gatsby climbed up the ranks at whatever means. Gatsby had no ruling authority figure and was excluded from the only source that held power over him, Daisy Buchanan. The society in which The Great Gatsby is immersed in is based on disciplinary models used in seventeenth and eighteenth century Europe according to Michel Foucault’s, “Discipline and Punish.” Because Gatsby is stuck within the disciplinary model he, the society he lived in, along with the people he interacts with, spiral downward into their delusional world of emptiness and greed.
The disciplinary model Foucault dissects primarily separates people from one another. It created division amongst everyone. This correlates to the novel when it comes to East and West Egg—Gatsby and Daisy. The division is clear: “I lived at West Egg, the—well, the less fashionable of the two, though this is a most superficial tag to express the bizarre and not a little sinister contrast between them. […] Across the courtesy bay the white palaces of fashionable East Egg glittered along the water” (5). The disciplinary model that Gatsby operated within kept him in “a segmented, immobile, frozen space. Each individual is fixed in his place. And, if he moves, he does so at the risk of his life” (Foucault 551). Both Gatsby and Daisy were fixed in their own world. Gatsby could not seek out Daisy; he had to get helpers Nick and Jordan. And, when Gatsby finally reunited with Daisy everyone eventually met their demise; the main victim was Gatsby himself. So, when Gatsby did try to move out from his “fixed place” he risked his life and died.
The characters within The Great Gatsby exist in their own world. This is actually fitting of the time period. Primarily the division among Gatsby and Daisy are the strongest. Gatsby’s ruling authority figure is not present in his life. Thus, he worked outside of the law to gain the money and power that is so vital to not only him but the other characters in the novel. Gatsby is trapped within the disciplinary model, secluded from the society he truly wanted, and spiraled downward until he died.




Works Cited
Fitzgerald, F. Scott. “The Great Gatsby.” New York: Scribner, 2004.
Foucault, Michel. “Discipline and Punishment.” Literary Theory: An Anthology 2nd Ed. Ed. Julie Rivkin and Michael Ryan. Massachusetts: Blackwell Publishing Ltd, 1998. 549- 566.

Posted by: Kristin B at March 4, 2009 01:08 PM

Sarah Tatko
Dr. Hobbs
Eng-435
11 March 2009
The Neo-Colonial Impressions in The Great Gatsby
According to Ania Loomba in Colonialism – Postcolonialism, many societies today do not live in a postcolonial culture. Rather, they live in a neo-colonial culture because they are still dependent upon the culture of their colonizer (1103). Fitzgerald demonstrates this in his book The Great Gatsby where the American dream acts as the colonizer as it forces the “natives” to assimilate to its traditions and rituals.
In the novel, the major characters are all from the west and come from meager means; this includes Gatsby, Nick, Tom, Daisy, and Jordan. At first it appears that it is the east that colonizes these characters because they all move from the west to east which is where the action of the story is set. However, they only moved to the east as way to capture their American dream. This is because the east is viewed as progressive and a place where the money is made and in order for them to achieve their goal they must take the eastern culture and that of high society as their own; this is where the problem begins.
When the characters take the rituals of high society as their own they become greedy and have difficulty remembering who they really are. Daisy wants to be with both Tom and Gatsby and expects Tom to accept it, while, Tom is being hypocritical because he has his mistress Myrtle on the side. Nick just wants to be a part of something and to have friends and Gatsby wants Daisy all to himself. Nothing is ever good enough for these characters and they become capitalistic in the idea that they always want more.
The reader is not able to see the neo-colonial culture until the end of the book because it occurs after their American dreams are crushed by the accident and the death of Myrtle and Gatsby. After these events Tom and Daisy flee, Jordan becomes engaged to another man, and Nick realizes that this culture is not meant for him (he is the only character who can be designated as postcolonial). Tom and Daisy still are dependent upon the rituals of high society (the colonizing culture) because they no longer belong to the old culture, yet, they do not belong to the new either. This can be witnessed when Nick runs into Tom two months after the funeral: “When I went to give up that flat and saw that damn box of dog biscuits sitting there on the sideboard, I sat down and cried like a bay. By God it was awful” (Fitzgerald 178-179). This demonstrates Tom’s dependence because he is lost without this accessory of the high life. Jordan is another example because she quickly becomes engaged to another man during the two months. It is clear that Tom, Daisy, and Jordan are all living in a neo-colonial culture because they are caught between their old culture in the west and that of the American dream.

Works Cited
Fitzgerald, F. Scott. The Great Gatsby. 1925. New York: Scribner, 1999.
Loomba, Ania. “Situating Colonial and Postcolonial Studies.” Literary Theory: An Anthology. 2nd ed. Eds. Julie Rivkin and Michael Ryan. Malden, MA: Blackwell, 2004. 1100-1111.

Posted by: Sarah T. at March 10, 2009 08:48 PM

Cecilia B
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 435
11th March 2009
Postcolonial Reading of Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby
The postcolonial implications in F. Scott Fitzgerald’s novel, The Great Gatsby, are diluted in comparison with C.C. Eldridge’s essay on imperial ideology and colonialist intention, yet there are still instances of social/cultural intrusion with Gatsby character Tom Buchanan. Of Buchanan, C.C. Eldridge would suggest Tom exhibits imperial motives since Eldridge’s idea of cultural transformation and expansion of empire (1091) are relevant to Tom’s actions with his wife, Daisy, and mistress, Myrtle. Beginning with Daisy, Tom metaphorically expands empire and capitalizes on new resources by marrying the girl with “the largest of banners and the largest of lawns” (Fitzgerald 75). In effect, Tom’s marriage to Daisy Fay is similar to the Victorian colonists’ desire to increase estate. Additionally, Tom’s surname alone is transcribed to Daisy’s in traditional marital fashion which is itself an extension of personal domain. Through matrimony, Tom is able to add a new individual under the ‘empire’ Buchanan while simultaneously making use of Daisy’s fortune. What’s more, Tom’s interaction with Myrtle Wilson is also indicative of imperialist ideology since he is concerned with re-colonizing her social status and class. As the wife of a middle-class car mechanic, Myrtle has neither the money nor the social connections involved with Tom’s aristocratic station. To essentially level Myrtle’s ‘savage’ position to the refined class, Tom lavishes her with expensive clothes and an apartment with which she can engage in upper-class social relations. Tom’s action with Myrtle are similar to the nineteenth-century colonizer who perceives other native peoples to be inferior because of their lack of material and technological goods, and as a result strives to ‘bless the savages’ (Eldridge 1091) with his culture.
Works Cited
Eldridge, C.C. “The Revival of the Imperial Spirit.” 1996. Literary Theory: An
Anthology. Ed. Julie Rivkin and Michael Ryan. New York: Blackwell Pub., 1998.
1090-1099.
Fitzgerald, F. Scott. The Great Gatsby. New York: Macmillan, 1980.

Posted by: Cecilia at March 11, 2009 11:56 AM

Ava L.
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 435
14 March 2009

Artificial Love
According to Sigmund Freud in his 1920 essay “Beyond the Principle of Pleasures” humans possess two types of psychological drives. The first drive is influenced by an individual desire to secure attachments in life for pleasure. The second, known as the Death Drive, is influenced by the desire to prohibit oneself from becoming attached to anything or anyone. The Death Drive is a predominant drive within F. Scott Fitzgerald’s novel The Great Gatsby. Most of the characters within the novel suffer from a psychological defense mechanism called the fear of intimacy, as described by Lois Tyson in her literary text Critical Theory Today. Tyson defines this defense as a “fear of emotional involvement with another human being” (Tyson 16).
Some of the ways that this psychological defense is utilized by Fitzgerald is seen through characters like Tom and Daisy Buchanan, Nick Carraway, Myrtle Wilson, and Jay Gatsby. The Buchanan’s do not present themselves as a happily married couple. The tension that exists between both Tom and Daisy is very apparent. They both step outside of their marriage and engage in extramarital affairs; Tom with Mrs. Myrtle Wilson and another woman only revealed as one of his chambermaids, and Daisy with Jay Gatsby. Although both of them eventually become aware of the extramarital affairs that each is involved in, they resolve to remain married. Tyson regards this type of behavior as “a drama of dysfunctional love” (Tyson 40). Both Tom and Daisy find it easier to remain in a relationship that is free of intimate expectations.
Nick exhibits similar behavior concerning his relationship with Jordan Baker. Although Nick is intrigued by Jordan, which he himself states claiming that “I wasn’t actually in love, but felt a sort of tender curiosity” (Gatsby 57), he purposefully remains aloof, continually imposing limitations on the time that he spends with her. Nick always signs his letters love but states that “Nevertheless there was a vague understanding that had to be tactfully broken off before I was free” (Gatsby 59). This statement on Nick’s behalf reinforces Tyson’s assertion that he is one of the numerous characters within the novel that suffer from a fear of intimacy.
Fitzgerald presents Jordan Baker similarly to the way the other characters are presented with one exception. Jordan seems to genuinely care for Nick, yet she too remains aloof at times. There are subtle hints throughout Gatsby that suggest Jordan would consider embarking in a relationship with Nick if given the opportunity. However, although Jordan seems to be emotionally attached to Nick, there are also comments that allude to the fact that Jordan may also suffer from a fear of intimacy. One such example is when Nick and Jordan are at one of Gatsby’s parties. Jordan states that she likes Gatsby’s large parties because they are always so intimate and that small parties prohibit privacy (Gatsby 49).
Myrtle Wilson’s affair with Tom Buchanan is also an example of the psychological defense, fear of intimacy. Myrtle enjoys the outward affection that Tom shows her. Tom dotes over Myrtle but in a sexual way, free from any emotional ties. Myrtle and Tom have an unspoken arrangement between themselves that stifles any intimate expectations from being imparted. Myrtle is under the misconception that her relationship with Tom will somehow free her from the bonds of intimacy that her husband George places upon her. If she is able to free herself from George’s expectations through her adulterous behavior with Tom, then she can live her life carefree and without any commitment to others.
Unlike some of the other characters within the novel, Jay Gatsby’s fear of intimacy is not as obvious. To understand the depths of Gatsby’s fear, the reader must first recollect on Gatsby’s history. Gatsby has done a great deal of traveling throughout his life. He was in a war, he isolated himself almost completely from his parents and as an adolescent, and he found it difficult to express an interest in girls, with the exception of Daisy. Gatsby has a different perception of Daisy because she is of upper class and does not seem to be like the other girls. Gatsby’s relationship with Daisy serves as a symbolic form of his own security and acceptance in the upper class. Not only does he achieve social elevation, but he also regards Daisy as a trophy of his elevation. When he returns from his travels abroad, the only unfinished business that he feels compelled to complete is re-securing his relationship with Daisy. Although he and Daisy do reunite, it is only for a brief time because Daisy does not want to engage in anything that requires intimacy. Daisy departs with Tom to continue to repeat her lifestyle of prohibiting intimate expectations. Freud regards Daisy’s behavior as a “compulsion to repeat” (Freud 434). Daisy’s behavior parallels Gatsby’s desire to return to the lifestyle he once had with Daisy.
The many love triangles that exist within Fitzgerald’s novel are not fueled by the desire to be intimate. The characters within the novel are not in search of some pleasure principle that will allow them to be completed by another individual, but rather the desires to keep them from having to commit to such relationships. The fact that Fitzgerald’s characters chose to repeat all of their unwanted situations and endure these painful emotions in transference reinforces the fear of intimacy that they all seem to suffer from (Freud 435).

Work Cited
Fitzgerald, F. Scott. The Great Gatsby. New York: Scribner, 1925. 49-57.
Freud, Sigmund. “Beyond the Principle Pleasures.” 1920. Literary Theory: An Anthology 2nd ed. Eds. Julie Rivkin and Michael Ryan. Malden, MA: Blackwell, 2004. 434-35.
Tyson, Lois. Critical Theory Today: A User Friendly Guide. New York: Routledge, 2006. 16-40.

Posted by: Ava at March 14, 2009 09:22 PM

Liz H


Dr. Hobbs


ENG 435


March 24, 2009


The Great Gatsby and Trauma


In F. Scott Fitzgerald’s novel, The Great Gatsby, the protagonist Nick Carraway must deal with a number of difficult situations: from learning to fit in with this new society and expectations of conduct to the unfortunate death of Myrtle. I believe one can apply essential concepts from “The Black Hole of Trauma” ” by Bessel A. van der Kolk and Alexander C. McFarlane to Nick especially after the death of Gatsby.

The novel ends with Nick reflecting back on what a mad circus Gatsby’s funeral was, and he is able to share his reflections nearly two years after Gatsby’s unfortunate and untimely death. This long passage of time between the story’s narration helps to support Kolk and McFarlane’s premise that trauma does indeed affect an individual’s ability to cope and think rationally. Nick is overwhelmed by the loss of his friend, and he is unable to best articulate just what the loss means to him immediately after his death. The passage of time is realistic and lends an air of credibility to the story overall because death is an experience that every reader would experience at some point in time.

Trauma as Kolk and McFarlane allege is indeed a part of the condition of being human. Nick Carraway’s experiences of the events that surround Gatsby’s death support these claims even though he is not diagnosed with PTSD or any other severe or adverse mental ailments.


Works Cited


Fitzgerald, F. Scott. The Great Gatsby. 1925. New York: Scribner, 1999.


Van der Kolk, Bessel A., and Alexander C. McFarlane. "The Black Hole of Trauma."
Literary Theory: An Athology. Eds. Julie Rivkin and Michael Ryan. 2nd ed. Malden: Blackwell, 2008. 487-502.

Posted by: Liz H at March 25, 2009 10:47 AM

Travis Rathbone
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 435
8 April 2009

East and West Egg, Sunny Side Up: Societal Assimilation in The Great Gatsby

In Lisa Lowe’s essay concerning Asian American literature, “Heterogeneity, Hybridity, Multiplicity: Marking Asian American Differences,” she spends a significant amount of time presenting the dangers of both nationalism and assimilation. Like radical nationalism, complete assimilation into a culture creates a dichotomy, which can be a breeding ground for negative aspects of character: “Their nationalism…can be distorted easily into racism, territorialism, separatism, or ethnic dictatorships” (Tyson 1038). For Lowe, the answer does not lie in either extreme but, rather, in the middle somewhere between the two opposite ends of the spectrum; Asian Americans should find a middle ground between the East and the West where they can accept American culture while still incorporating their Asian roots. In The Great Gatsby, by F. Scott Fitzgerald, the dangers of assimilation become apparent if one looks closely. For Nick Carraway, assimilation into the culture of the East Egg was his main purpose. His purpose changes at the end of the novel but not until horrific events transpire.

The dichotomy of East and West is prevalent throughout The Great Gatsby. Beginning with Nick’s career in the military where he fought in the East, enjoying it so much he was restless back in his Mid West home. Because of this, he relocates East (from his home in the Middle West) for a change of scenery and to try his hand in the bonds business. After arriving East, He settles in West Egg, not only the less posh of the two residential Eggs but also the most geographically unsavory—it is the most “West” of the two. In the novel, Nick’s pursuit of complete assimilation into the world of the East is sharply trenchant, but he is not the only character to attempt this same end. Both Myrtle Wilson and Jay Gatsby were casualties of failed attempts to assimilate into a culture to which they were not born.

Jay Gatsby did not originally hail from a wealthy background. Instead, he spent most of his life in pursuit of such a lifestyle, and even though he achieved great success and perpetuated a façade of wealth and class, he was still unable to feel like he fully belonged to his beloved social tier. He did, after all, live in the West Egg. In the end, his pursuit of the East would be his downfall, and he met his demise before he could fully assimilate and establish himself in the culture and status of the East. Myrtle Wilson is another character whose attempts at grandeur were thwarted. Like Gatsby, she was not satisfied with her lot in life, her subsistence in West Egg married to a mechanic. So, she attempted to rise above her conceived, mediocre notion of existence in the West by perpetuating a relationship with Tom Buchanan, a patron of the East. Myrtle attempted to live a life of wealth, with her apartment in the city and her taste for the more expensive clothing. However, Myrtle also never fully achieved assimilation into the society of the East, for she too fell prey to the pursuit of wealth as her life was cut short by an icon of prosperity—the automobile.

In the end, the only character who attempted assimilation and survived was Nick. Unlike Gatsby and Myrtle, Nick found an existence between the two worlds of the East and the West. He may have attempted assimilation into the East, but he did not succeed: “perhaps we possessed some deficiency in common which made us subtly unadaptable to Eastern life” (Fitzgerald 176). Indeed, it seems the point of Lowe’s essay is not far removed from the point of Fitzgerald’s story. Even though it is folly to suggest there is only one truth embedded in either the novel or the essay, the reeling against complete cultural assimilation presented in both texts is difficult to overlook.


Work Cited
Fitzgerald, F. Scott. The Great Gatsby. 1925. New York: Scribner, 1999.

Lowe, Lisa. "Heterogeneity, Hybridity, Multiplicity: Marking Asian American Differences."
1991. Literary Theory: An Anthology, 2nd Ed. Eds. Julie Rivkin and Michael Ryan. Malden, MA: Blackwell, 2004. 1031 - 1050.

Posted by: Travis R at April 8, 2009 11:45 AM

Cecilia B
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 435
15th April 2009
Feminist Reading of Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby
Judith Butler’s claims that sex and gender are inextricably linked because of societal ideology are greatly applicable of the female characters in Fitzgerald’s Gatsby. In effect, Jordan Baker and Myrtle Wilson are molded under a sexist patriarchal lens. For example, before the concept of the New Woman, negative and powerless connotations were generally ascribed to the idea of a woman, and this rings true for Jordan’s and Myrtle’s condition as they are continually placed in defaming situations.
To start, Jordan comes off as a liar between her interactions with Nick when she blatantly deceives him about leaving the top down on a car she had borrowed from a friend after a rainstorm. Despite the fact that she is an accomplished golfer and can therefore uphold her own autonomy without the assistance of a male, Jordan is still portrayed negatively. Even as a golfer, Jordan is accused of cheating through bribery and is therefore unable to support herself righteously. In a man’s sport and even the masculine task of driving, Jordan is construed as careless and manipulative.
Moreover, Myrtle’s character is overtly sexual, carrying “her surplus flesh sensuously” (29) and thus destructive to her fate. To explicate, Myrtle’s extramarital affair with Tom Buchanan only proves fatal for her rather than proving consequential for Tom. For instance, Tom never loses his reputation or his wife because of his infidelity yet Myrtle suffers death for the same transgression.
Work Cited
Fitzgerald, F. Scott. The Great Gatsby. New York: Macmillan, 1980.

Posted by: Cecilia at April 14, 2009 05:29 PM

Sarah Tatko
Dr. Hobbs
Eng-435
15 April 2009
Imperial Feminism in The Great Gatsby
Gayatri Chakrovaorty Spivak discusses in her 1986 essay, “Three Women’s Texts and a Critique of Imperialism”, about imperial feminism. This concept is based on the idea that literature, especially female characters or authors, can demonstrate the role of women in society through imperialism (Spivak 838). The reason for this is because literature is used as a tool in English society to produce the cultural representation of English imperialism, therefore, it can be used to comment feminism as well. Fitzgerald’s novel, The Great Gatsby, illustrates the idea of imperialism through its female characters.
One of the first characters is Myrtle. Myrtle is having an affair with Tom Buchanan. Tom, however, is married to Daisy which makes Myrtle the mistress. Because Myrtle is the mistress she remains a secret and in seclusion from society but she does not like this and attempts to speak out and expand. The way she does this is through taunting Tom about Daisy: “Tom Buchanan and Mrs. Wilson stood face to face, discussing in impassioned voices whether Mrs. Wilson had any right to mention Daisy’s name [. . .] shouted Mrs. Wilson. ‘I’ll say it whenever I want to! Daisy! Dai—‘ Making a short deft movement, Tom Buchanan broke her nose with his open hand” (Fitzgerald 37). In this scene Myrtle attempts to assert her right to imperialism by expanding her role, however, Tom effectively her by breaking her nose. Fitzgerald is commenting on the wrong way for women to make their way in society; it is not through force because they will be shut down.
Yet, Fitzgerald does provide the readers with a successful character who uses imperialism to her advantage, and this is Daisy Buchanan. Throughout the novel Daisy is seeing Gatsby behind Tom’s back; even in front of his back. She is able to enjoy her married privileges while being able to have fun with Gatsby. While Daisy’s set up ultimately causes ruin, it is interesting to note who it causes ruin for, Myrtle. Myrtle is the only female character who ends up dead and it is because of Daisy’s successful imperialistic qualities kill Myrtle’s ineffective qualities. Symbolically it represents the proper way for women to expand because it kills the improper way.

Works Cited
Fitzgerald, F. Scott. The Great Gatsby. 1925. New York: Scribner, 1999.
Spivak, Gayatri Chakravorty. “Three Women’s Texts and a Critique of Imperialsim.” Literary Theory: An Anthology. 2nd ed. Eds. Julie Rivkin and Michael Ryan. Malden, MA: Blackwell, 2004. 838-853.


Posted by: Sarah T. at April 14, 2009 10:44 PM

Kristin Brittain
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 435
4/13/09
Homosexuality’s indirectness within The Great Gatsby
Epistemology of the Closet is a book written by Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick concerning gay and lesbian representations within literature. Sedgwick focuses on deconstruction in the theme of binary oppositions that create categories which mirror cultural situations. The Great Gatsby is a timeless novel written by F. Scott Fitzgerald that represents the binary oppositions of heterosexual over homosexual.
The binary of heterosexual over homosexual reflects the cultural dichotomy of homosexuality being inferior to heterosexuality. Fitzgerald reflects society’s refusal to fully acknowledge the homosexual choice of lifestyle. Towards the end of chapter two Nick accompanied Mr. Mckee home. Mr. Mckee requested to see Nick again, “Come to lunch some day” he said. After agreeing to see Mr. Mckee again and an interesting employment of ellipses the text un-expectantly jumped to Nick standing beside Mr. Mckee in his bed only in his underwear. “… I was standing beside his bed and he was sitting up between the sheets, clad in his underwear, with a great portfolio in his hands” (Fitzgerald 38). The possibility of the nature of the men’s encounter is left questionable because the text does not supply any other information on the two men’s possible sexual encounter. Fitzgerald does not directly address the reasoning’s of Mr. Mckee’s almost nakedness and Nick’s presence in his bedroom. Instead the possibility of the men’s homosexuality is hinted at mirroring society’s actual binary opposition of heterosexuality’s acceptance over homosexuality. “It makes every difference that these impactions of homo/heterosexual definition took place in a setting, not of spacious emotional or analytic impartiality, but rather of urgent homophobic pressure to devalue one of the two nominally symmetrical forms of choice” (Sedgwick 913).
Fitzgerald refused to pronounce the homosexual aspects of The Great Gatsby. Instead, Fitzgerald simply hinted at the likelihood of a possible homosexual encounter between Mr. Mckee and Nick. This skirting around the issue of homosexuality reflects the society in which Fitzgerald lived in.


Works Cited
Fitzgerald, F. Scott. The Great Gatsby. 1925. New York: Scribner, 1999.
Sedgwick, Eve. “Epistemology of the Closet.” Literary Theory: An Anthology 2nd Ed. Ed. Julie Rivkin and Michael Ryan. Massachusetts: Blackwell Publishing Ltd, 1998. 912-921.

Posted by: Kristin at April 20, 2009 02:13 AM

Tiffany Anne Carpenter
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 435- Literary Criticism
13 February 2012
Application 1: The Intentional Fallacy in Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby
William K. Wimsatt defines the intentional fallacy of a poet as examining what the poet “intended in” according to the “design or plan in the author’s mind…[and] the author’s attitude toward his word, the way he felt, [and] what made him write.” (4). The issue with this approach, Wimsatt and Beardsley argue, is that readers can never really know the true meaning behind the author’s intentions and are often confused by their focus on his intentions, rather than using the text itself for evidence and other critical examinations. Another key element, is that Wimsatt and Beardsley focus their argument on the work of poets because of the portrayal of their use of diction, etc. It becomes challenging, then, to apply an examination of the role of intentional fallacies in a work such as F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby because of the obvious difference in form, with Gastby’s elaborate prose. However, some similarities and connections can indeed be drawn between the two.
For example, examining the biography of Fitzgerald can provide insight into the reader’s understanding of the work, especially when making judgments about the various characters. As readers, we can make assumptions about Fitzgerald’s choices to establish Nick Carraway as an outside narrator who is looking in on the life of Tom, Daisy, the various people in East and West Egg, and especially Jay Gatsby. Nick acts as this unreliable narrator who comments on the inner-workings of those around him, guiding the reader to have certain perspectives on the characters, namely Gatsby.
If one were to attempt to apply the various techniques of evidence that Wimsatt and Beardsley point out, it would be difficult to establish them because of the type of novel that Fitzgerald creates with The Great Gatsby. For example, examining the role of public, internal, and intermediate evidence throughout the work rely only on Nick’s commentary of what is happening in Gatsby’s life and journey to establish himself in town and win Daisy over. The reader is only given limited perspectives and most of the evidence relies solely on the text itself, causing the reader to assume that Nick’s perceptions are those intended by Fitzgerald and thus personal to his motives as an author. Using the text itself, allusions can easily be examined, however, their intentions from the author are much more difficult to assess. In this respect, although The Great Gatsby is not a work of poetry that meets all of the standards that Wimsatt and Beardsley mention, it still can have certain aspects of the rules they point out regarding the intentionally fallacy by ensuring that the reader views the work from an internal standpoint of the text, finding connection with literary elements and evidence, rather than searching for the ambiguous intentions of the author.


Works Cited
Fitzgerald, F. Scott. The Great Gatsby. 1925. New York: Scribner, 1999. Print.
Wimsatt, William K. and Monroe C. Beardsley. “The Intentional Fallacy.” The Verbal Icon. 1954. Rpt. In The Critical Tradition: Classic Texts and Contemporary Trends. Ed. Daivd H. Richter. Boston: Bedford, 1998. 748-56. Print.

Posted by: tiffany carpenter at February 15, 2012 06:58 PM

If I was a film director and had to coohse the cast for great Gatsby movie, I would coohse:A- For the role of daisy I would coohse Kate Winslet because she is very elegant, beautiful and looks like a traditional woman.B- For the role of tom I would coohse vin disel, because he is brawny, looks like an ex football player and seems to be shallowC- For nick I would coohse Penn Badgley (gossip girl) because he doesn’t call peoples attention, he is very normal D- For the role of myrtle I would coohse Rene9e Zellweger, because she is chubby but looks sexy, and she is perfect for that roleE- For the role of George Wilson I would coohse Mike O'Malley because he looks like a poor worker, and a little stupid. Also he is fat, has blue eyes and is baldF- For the role of Jordan I would coohse Blake lively because she is thin, tall beautiful, looks like a careless woman which likes to go to partiesG- And for the role of Gatsby I would coohse Leonardo di caprio, because he looks mysterious, and has a very beautiful smile, and Gatsby’s smile is described as a very particular one.

Posted by: Lloyd Masiza at June 2, 2012 02:46 PM

Timothy Delay
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
September 11, 2012
Question: Though we do not meet Gatsby until Chapter 3, we hear references to him in the conversations of others. Note each reference. What impressions do you get?

Answers: In the beginning Nick reference to Gatsby and how in his eye he was a great person. The second time Gatsby is referred to is when nick move into his house and comments on Gatsby mansion. Gatsby is referred again in the chapter is when Jordan ask Nick if he knows Gatsby but the conversation is quickly dismiss in favor of something more scandalous. The last time Gatsby it brought up is when nick get home and see Gatsby standing in his yard look at the stars. There a bright green light and then Gatsby disappear. The impression I get is that Gatsby is a mysteries man that has a lot of wealth. Very few people know Gatsby on a personnel level everything about him is rumors and speculation. (4, 7, 14, 24)

Posted by: Timothy Delay at September 11, 2012 12:33 PM

Sherman Milton III
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Writers of the Twentieth Century
11 September 2012

Question: “Explain what Fitzgerald achieved by using Nick’s point of view to tell Gatsby’s story?”

Answer: Using Nick’s point of view, Fitzgerald was able to show us things differently. It was almost as if Nick was outsider looking in and he saw things as they were. This way he was able to evaluate the situation and keep it real.

Posted by: Sherman Milton at September 11, 2012 08:27 PM

De’Nisha Butler
Dr.Hobbs
ENG311 CA05
September 10, 2012

Question 13

What does the scene in this New York apartment reveal about Tom? About Myrtle?

The scene in the New York apartment reveals that Tom is possessive, short-tempered and capable of physical violence. He has no respect for Myrtle, because he sees her as just another object. This lack of respect for Myrtle is displayed after he breaks her nose. The scene also reveals that Myrtle is accepts being ill-treated and victimized by Tom because she is dependent on him. “Daisy! Daisy! Daisy’ shouted Mrs. Wilson. I’ll say it whenever I want to! Daisy!” this shows that Myrtle is not only jealous of Daisy but she also resents her.

Page 41

Posted by: De'Nisha Butler at September 11, 2012 08:46 PM

Leah Hollingsworth
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
11 September 2012

Homework Question 20: At the end of Chapter 3, Nick meets Jordan again. The author includes several episodes that emphasize her carelessness and basic dishonesty. Discuss these instances. What do they reveal about Jordan? About Nick?

Answer: Jordan demonstrates carelessness in several ways. “When we were on a house-party together up in Warwick, she left a borrowed car out in the rain with the top down, and then lied about it…” (Fitzgerald 63). “…She passed so close to some workmen that our fender flicked a button on one man’s coat” (Fitzgerald 64). She also demonstrated dishonesty. “At her first big golf tournament there was a row that nearly reached the newspapers—a suggestion that she had moved her ball from a bad lie in the semi-final round” (Fitzgerald 63). Nick labels her dishonest due to a feeling of entitlement. She even feels that others should be careful around her because she is not. Nick narrates, “It made no difference to me. Dishonesty in a woman is a thing you never blame deeply—I was casually sorry, and then I forgot” (Fitzgerald 64). Although Nick rebukes her carelessness, this passage reveals that Nick is neither concerned with the values of people with whom he associates, nor does he hold them completely responsible for their actions.
Page numbers taken from Chapter 3 in the Public Domain PDF version

Posted by: Leah Hollingsworth at September 11, 2012 09:03 PM

Madison Grabow
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major 20th Century Writers
11 September 2012

HW Question 7: What does the story about the butler's nose have to do with anything?

Answer: It is not exactly obvious as to why the butler's nose was brought into conversation. Perhaps it can be a form of foreshadowing to explain that "things went from bad to worse," but implying that that is what will occur. (17). Things can perhaps go from bad to worse in the mere future. For some insight it could even be explaining how the butler came to be theirs since "he had to give up his position." (17). This story could be suggesting that the butler is unable to smell or use his nose efficiently since the silver polishing affected it so much. The women can just simply be gossiping or trying to avoid more discussion of Tom's racist rant.

Posted by: madison grabow at September 11, 2012 09:14 PM

Bryan Baldwin
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
11 September 2012

Question: "In what way are Nick and Gatsby similar at this point? Why are they paradoxical?"

Nick and Gatsby are similar in that they both live in the same neighborhood, they were both in the 3rd Division in the war. (Fitzgerald, 52) They are somewhat paradoxical in that they are essentially the same person but Gatsby is much more sociable and flamboyant when he puts on events. He is more formal as well.

Posted by: Bryan Baldwin at September 11, 2012 09:46 PM

Sarah Winans
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
12 September 2012

Question: "Does Nick enjoy the afternoon at the apartment in New York? Why or why not?

Answer: Because of Nick's honest and reserved personality, I think he was very uncomfortable to be at the party because of how raunchy people were getting the drunker they got. However, this is so new to him that I think he was fascinated and that led him to stay. Overall, I think he enjoyed being exposed to New York's fast paced environment.

Posted by: Sarah Winans at September 12, 2012 10:41 AM

Wollinsky Mendez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
September 12, 2012

Question: When Nick leaves the Buchaanan's house, he is "confused and a little disgusted." Why? What does this suggest about his values.

Answer: Nick feels this way because he came to this part of the country to get away from the rumors of his town. Daisy said,"But we heard it,’ insisted Daisy, surprising me by opening
up again in a flower-like way. ‘We heard it from three
people so it must be true."(23) This makes the Buchanans look less rich and Nick is disgusted because they seem gossip about meaningless things like Nick's engagement. They are suppose to be intelligent and they still are in people's business. Nick values are important to him and he wants to be a private person. He does not like to be talked about. He wants to get away from where he came from and enjoy his time away in the East.

Posted by: Wollinsky Mendez at September 12, 2012 10:50 AM

Jeff Champlain
ENG 311 CA05
9/12/12

Question: How does Myrtle's speech reveal her character?

Myrtle's speech is revealed by the dialog she uses. She tries to sound more wealthy then she actually is. Compared to daisy though myrtle is more down to earth and is planning for the future while daisy is sorta in it for the ride. Myrtle is not as wealthy as tom and daisy though she tries to be perceived in a way that she is on there level.
 

Posted by: Jeff Champlain at September 12, 2012 12:52 PM

Jason Anderson
Dr.Hobbs
ENG311 CA05

Question: In discussing East Egg and West Egg, Nick states:"To the wingless a more arresting phenomenon is their dissimilarity in every particular except shape and size." Indicate what the dissimilarities might be.

Answer:Nick states that East Egg has white palaces, and West Egg is described as being less fashionable. Therefore it is inferred that the richer neighborhood is East Egg. He also states that West Egg is has eccentrics. Specifically he states that he has rented a house in one of the strangest communities in America. He also states that both his house and Gatsby's were eyesores; another example of the strangeness in West Egg.(7)

Posted by: Jason Anderson at September 12, 2012 01:34 PM

Delia Mulvihill
Dr. Hobbs
ENG311 CA05
The Great Gatsby Homework #1

Question 15 : Chapter 3 describes Gatsby’s “little party.” Enumerate details about the party itself, about the guests and about their conversation and behavior.

Answer: The party is a very lavish and luxurious event. There are caterers, a full orchestra, cocktail waiters, lights strung everywhere in the garden, an expensive party at that. It is ironic that it is described as a “little party” because it is anything but that. The guests themselves came from all over; most were not invited they just showed up. A specific conversation that depicts the behavior is when Nick Carraway is sitting at a table with Jordan Baker, two other women and three other men, and they are all gossiping about what Jay Gatsby used to do; possibilities were that he killed a man, or that he was a German spy. (Page 48)

Posted by: Delia Mulvihill at September 12, 2012 01:40 PM

Summer Taylor
Professor Hobbs
English 311 CA05
September 12, 2012

Great Gatsby HW 1

#4) Question: Compare the homes of Nick, Gatsby, and the Buchanans. How does each home reflect the personality of its owner?

Answer: The Great Gatsby, Chapters 1-3 Pages 3,5,8,12,16

The first thing the reader hears about Nick's house is "a weather beaten cardboard bungalow at eighty a month" (pg 3). He goes on to say that his house was an "eyesore" (pg 5- which most people would not admit about their house even if it was not the most attractive house on the block. This seems to mirror the personality of Nick because Nick seems to be bluntly honest to the reader. This is apparent when he is talking about Mr. Buchanins mistress and also when talking about the other characters.
The Buchanins house reflect their personality because when Nick first goes over is seems to take on this airy surreal appearance. Daisy acts almost "airy" and "not living in the real world" because she is not true to her feelings about her husband and her husbands mistress. Nick also talks about how large the house was and this reminds me of Mr. Buchanins personality. He seems to do whatever he wants, like having a mistress and hitting her and making her nose bleed, because he was a big football star.
Mr. Gatsby's house is very grand. This seems to match his personality, at least the personality people think he has, because everybody seems to think many outlandish things about him. Some of these things being that he was an Oxford man, he killed a man, and that he was in the war. Mr. Gatsby seems to be as genuine as his real books though; he seemed very pleased to see Nick at his house party and also wanted to spend more time with him. Being genuine seems to come as a surprise to most of the party goers because they are surprised to find that all of Mr. Gatsby's books in his library are real and not pasted on. Mr. Gatsby's personality would probably come as a surprise to many people as well because the characters believe many of the outlandish things that have been spread.

Posted by: Summer Taylor at September 12, 2012 01:44 PM

Matt Lynch
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 311 Survey of Major Writers 20th Century
11 September 2012
Homework Question #21
What does “non-olfactory” money mean? What are there so many references to noses in this novel?
Non-olfactory money means money without a paper trail or money without corruption or greed. The money is earned the right way by someone good of heart. In a sense it means the money does not stink it is clean money.
The nose is referenced so much in the book to portray the stereotype of Jewish people. The Jewish stereotype is that they are greedy with their money, hold on to their money, and can sniff out money which is why they have big noses.

Posted by: Matt Lynch at September 12, 2012 02:32 PM

Marcus Chisholm
Dr. Hobbs
ENG-311-CA05
12 September 2012
Chapter 1/# 2
We learn that Nick Carraway is the narrator of The Great Gatsby. He is a young man from Minnesota but acts as if he is the author. We also learn that in the summer of 1922, he moved to New York in a town called West Egg, in Long Island. Nick also sees himself as highly moral and highly tolerant.

Posted by: Marcus Chisholm at September 12, 2012 02:40 PM

Kasey McDearis Timothy Delay
Dr Hobbs
ENG311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
12 September 2012

Question: In what ways are the various rooms in Gatsby's mansion described in historical terms? Be specific. Quote example from the text.

Answer: pg 97/98
The rooms are described as luxurious, and with antiques and Restoration Salons. One of the rooms is described as swathed in rose and lavender silk with flowers. On page 97 Marie Antoninette's music room is mentioned, which describes the mansion as based on the French Revolution, or British aristocrats.

Posted by: Kasey McDearis at September 12, 2012 02:52 PM

Summer Taylor and Madison
Professor Hobbs
English 311
Sept. 12, 2012

The Great Gatsby

Question:#21
Describe the effect of rain on the plot. Be specific. Quote examples from the text.

Answer: Chapter 5

When Gatsby enters the scene he is very nervous and at this time it is also raining out. Gatsby even says, "This is a terrible mistake," when refering to Daisy's company (94). When Gatsby calms down, the rain also slowed down. "I thought for a moment he was going to shake hands. "It's stopped raining" "Has it?" When he realized what I was talking about. that there were twinkle-bells of sunshine in the room, he smiled like a weather man, like an ecstatic patron of recurrent light, and repeated the news to Daisy" (95-96).

Posted by: Summer Taylor and Madi at September 12, 2012 02:53 PM

Marcus Chisholm/Delia Mulvihill
Dr. Hobbs
ENG-311-CA05
12 September 2012
Chapter 4 # 8
8. List all the rumors told about Gatsby. Be Specific. List examples.
Throughout Chapters three and four, many of the different guests at the party continually gossip about Gatsby. No one really knows who exactly he is; therefore, many different rumors are brought up about his true identity. ‘He’s a bootlegger, said the young ladies, moving somewhere between his cocktails and his flowers (66.) ‘One time he killed a man who found out that he was a nephew to von Hindenburg and second cousin to the devil (66). These untrue rumors were brought up about Gatsby’s past and many of the fellow guests even believed some of it. In Chapter three, Lucille even argued that he killed a German spy during the war. ‘Somebody told me they thought he killed a man once’ (48). ‘I don’t think it’s so much THAT,’ argued Lucille skeptically; ‘it’s more that he was a German spy during the war (48).’

Posted by: Marcus Chisholm/Delia Mulvihill at September 12, 2012 02:55 PM

Shaina McSweeney
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
10 September 2012

10. Evaluate Myrtle’s talk of her unhappy marriage. What does she seem to be trying to justify?

When talking about her marriage, specifically her husband, she demeans him. “He wasn’t fit to lick my shoe” (Pg. 38). She degrades him to try and justify her affair with Tom Buchanan.

Posted by: Shaina McSweeney at September 12, 2012 02:55 PM

Leah Hollingsworth
Jason Anderson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
12 September 2012

In Class Question 23: Explain the significance of the green light. Be Specific. Quote examples from the text.

Answer: “It had seemed as close as a star to the moon. Now it was again a green light on a dock. His count of enchanted objects had diminished by one” (Fitzgerald 100). The light represents Daisy as the light of Gatsby’s life. When it is off at the end of the chapter, he does not need it to keep his company because she is around. “Possibly it had occurred to him that the colossal significance of that light had now vanished forever” (Fitzgerald 100).
Page numbers taken from chapter 5 in the Public Domain PDF version

Posted by: Leah Hollingsworth at September 12, 2012 02:56 PM

Sherman Milton & Shaina McSweeney
ENG 311 CA05
12 September 2012

Question: Nick says, “There are only the pursued, the pursuing, the busy and the tired.” What does Nick mean? How does each character in the novel fit into this schema? Be specific. List examples.

Answer: In the quotation, “there are only the pursued, the pursuing, the busy and the tired”, Nick means that the pursued is busy and the pursuing is tired. An example of this would be Daisy and Gatsby. Daisy is pursued by Gatsby making Daisy the pursued and Gatsby the pursuer. Another example is Nick the narrator; he is pursuing a better life. Tom is pursuing a different life with Myrtle, while also being tired in his marriage with Daisy. In this way Tom represents both the pursued and the pursuer.

Posted by: Sherman Milton at September 12, 2012 02:57 PM

Bryan Baldwin
Wollinsky Mendez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
12 September 2012

Question: "How truthful was Gatsby when he relayed the story of his life to Nick? Why Does Fitzgerald tell the story of Jay Gatz now?"

Gatsby was not very truthful, he took pieces of the truth about his life and turned them into an even more elaborate tale. "It was James Gatz who had been loafing along the beach that afternoon in a torn green jersey and a pair of canvas pants, but it was already Jay Gatsby who borrowed a row boat, pulled out to the TUOLOMEE and informed Cody that a wind might catch him and break him up in half an hour." (Fitzgerald, 105) Fitzgerald tells Gatz' past because it shows how he changed to become the person he was in the book, he essentially changed his entire being from what he was.

Posted by: Bryan Baldwin and Wollinsky Mendez at September 12, 2012 03:07 PM

Joe May/ Sarah Winans
Dr. Hobbs
Eng-311 CA05
12 September 2012

Group 2 Question 11

11. What role does Meyer Wolfsheim play in the novel? Why is there so much focus on his nose and what does this tell you about Fitzgerald's politics? Be specific.List examples.

Meyer Wolfsheim is considered a shady character among the new and old money of the east and west egg. He is rumored to have rigged the world series, is a notorious bootlegger and is said to have multiple ties to organized crime. Many look at people and judge them by the company they keep or the occupation they hold. With all of these bad connections he is also connected very well in the political world. This in our opinion is due to the time period of prohibition. Politicians that made the laws, as well as the officers whose job it was to enforce the laws were corrupt or breaking the law. Officers and political figures took bribes, and attended "speakeasies" on a regular basis. In regards to his nose, when Nick talks to Meyer Wolfsheim the first thing he notices, and all he can focus on is his nose. In my personal opinion (Joe) it is as if his personal character (Meyer) makes Nick look at his nose more as if he were a Pinocchio whose nose grew when he lied or a witch who is notoriously bad with a long nose. In retrospect the nose is also a poke at his Jewish heritage. Image, heritage, culture and wealth were how people, especially this social class judged eachtother in those days.

Posted by: Joe May at September 12, 2012 03:12 PM


Question: #33

They’re both from different worlds. Toms is arrogant and always had the money. Gatsby is a veteran just getting money. The meeting is tense and awkward. Both know something is about to happen but Tom is not sure what. The meeting reveals that Gatsby doesn’t know how to survive without his dream of Daisy. Tom seems like the “alpha male” end isn’t going to let anyone stand in his way. Gatsby is nervous and tells Tom he knows Daisy and loves her.

Questions: #35

Agree with Nick. Gatsby is a dreamer and imagining a lot of thins. Gatsby has a dream, somewhat of an illusion of the past. But that is only in this context but otherwise the past can be repeated.

Posted by: Jeff Champlain, De’Nisha Butler at September 12, 2012 03:14 PM

Timothy Delay
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
September 13, 2012
Question: List all of the rumors told about Gatsby. Be specific. List examples.

Answers: The rumors about Gatsby and his life range wild from him being a spy for the Germans during the war, to being a Oxford man. Other rumors include him being relative of Kaiser Wihelm, being a Bootlegger, killing a man, being a great hero in the American Army, and That Gatsby order a new gown for a girl that tore it during one of his parties. Although most of these rumors are without merit, Gatsby does not indulge in the rumors. (48, 54, 66, 70, 144

Posted by: Timothy Delay at September 13, 2012 04:15 PM

Sarah Winans
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
13 September 2012

Question: Who fixed the World Series? Why does it matter? What is the connection between this “fixer” and the other characters in the novel. Be specific.

Meyer Wolfsheim fixed the World Series, and this is significant for a few reasons. First of all, Wolfsheim and Gatsby are close, so this suggests that Gatsby has been involved in illegal mob type business. Wolfsheim being a mobster also stereotypes Jewish people in this novel, specifically because he is the only Jewish character we know of so far and he has a negative reputation. It is also interesting that Gatsby seems to be German and Wolfsheim is Jewish...this novel's setting was during racist times.

Posted by: Sarah Winans at September 13, 2012 05:56 PM

De’Nisha Butler
Dr.Hobbs
ENG311 CA05
September 12, 2012

Question 4

In the description of Gatsby’s car, what is the significance of its being bright with nickel and swollen in its monstrous length with all kinds of boxes?

Answer: In the world not only then but also now cars represent status; people are often put into certain social classes based on the cars they drive. Gatsby’s car represents wealth, “It is a rich cream color…” (Fitzgerald 69). The description goes on to say “…with triumphant hatboxes and supper-boxes and tool-boxes….”, it makes Gatsby seem very materialistic and kind of a show-off

Posted by: De'Nisha Butler at September 13, 2012 07:19 PM

Madison Grabow
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major 20th Century Writers
13 September 2012

Question HW 17: How long has it been since Daisy and Gatsby had seen each other? How does Gatsby dress for the rendezvous with Daisy?

Answer: At the first of Gatsby, Daisy had said "I certainly am awfully glad to see you again;" however, she only knew that it had been years since they last saw each other (92). Whereas, for Gatsby he knew that it would be "five years next November" (93). Gatsby's nervousness and excitement trailed through the room. It was especially noticeable by how he dressed. "Gatsby in a white flannel suit, silver shirt and gold-colored tie hurried in" to Nick's house before Daisy was able to arrive (90). "He was pale and there were dark signs of sleeplessness beneath his eyes" (90). Gatsby wanted to dress to impress, even though he reeked of anxiety.

Posted by: madison grabow at September 13, 2012 09:20 PM

Leah Hollingsworth
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
13 September 2012

Homework Question 10: Why does Gatsby tell Nick about his life? Do you believe Gatsby? Does Nick?

Answer: “Gatsby tells Nick about his life to dispel rumors. “‘Well, I’m going to tell you something about my life,’ he interrupted. ‘I don’t want you to get a wrong idea of me from all these stories you hear’” (Fitzgerald 50). I do not believe Gatsby. The way he pulls out evidence as if to eagerly prove his stories is disconcerting. “‘Here’s another thing I always carry. A souvenir of Oxford days…’” (Fitzgerald 51). At first Nick does not believe Gatsby, but after Gatsby reveals his evidence, Nick is inclined to believe him. “Then it was all true. I saw the skins of tigers flaming in his palace on the Grand Canal; I saw him opening a chest of rubies to ease, with their crimson-lighted depths, the gnawing of his broken heart” (Fitzgerald 51).
Page numbers taken from chapter 4 in the printed version titled “Three Novels of F. Schott Fitzgerald: The Great Gatsby, Tender is the Night, The Last Tycoon.”

Posted by: Leah Hollingsworth at September 14, 2012 12:25 AM

Jason Anderson
Dr.Hobbs
ENG311 CA05
The Great Gatsby (ch.4-6)

Question:Why does Nick say Gatsby's House look like the world's fair? What is the World's Fair? Why is this important/significant?

Answer: Nick says Gatsby's house looks like a World's Fair because it is lit by numerous lights and is highly decorated much like the World's Fair. The World's Fair is an international expo where each country displays its' technological, industrial, and cultural achievements. The comparison is significant because it shows how far Gatsby goes to impress Daisy who arrives later in the chapter for tea. (97)

Posted by: Jason Anderson at September 14, 2012 12:01 PM

Kasey McDearis
Dr Hobbs
ENG311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
14 September 2012

Question: Why did Fitzgerald list all of Gatsby's guests?

Answer: There are many types of guests that attend Gatsby's parties. there are guests that he invited personally. Guests that weren't invited, but attended anyway. Then are rich men that are middle aged who were invited. Fitzgerald lists the guests to show the "immortality of the engagement."

Posted by: Kasey McDearis at September 14, 2012 12:34 PM

Sherman Milton
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 “Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
14 September 2012

Question: What is the suggestion about Henry L. Palmetto’s death?

Answer: Well Henry committed suicide by jumping in front of a train in Times Square because he was afraid. This suggests that Gatsby hangs out with the wrong people and typically you are who you hang out with. Henry was into making illegal money and most likely Gatsby was too.

Posted by: Sherman Milton at September 14, 2012 12:57 PM

Summer Taylor
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major 20th Century Writers
14 September 2012

The Great Gatsby. Chapter 4

Question:
14) What does Jordan's story of Daisy's marriage reveal about Daisy?

Answer:
Jordan's story reveals that though Daisy has a hard outer facade, she never was completely over Gatsby. The proof in this is the day before Dasiy's marriage she was in hysterics but after she got married she seemed to accept her fate and hid her feelings better (Fitzgerald 82-83). Jordan also said a curious thing about Dasiy's relationship with her husband, "I saw them in Santa Barbara when they came back and
I thought I’d never seen a girl so mad about her husband" (Fitzgerald 83). Then a few sentences down Jordan speaks about how Daisy would lay her head in her husbands lap. This shows that Daisy is very good at hiding her feelings towards her husband and is concealing her real feelings.

Posted by: Summer Taylor at September 14, 2012 01:41 PM

Joe May
Dr. Hobbs
Eng-311
14 September 2012

Homework Questions

Ch. 3 Question 16
16. Q. What does Owl Eyes mean when points to the library books and insists that Gatsby exhibits just the right amount of realism? A. When Owl eyes points to the books in Gatsbys collection he is impressed by the authors. Many of the wealthy of that time only posessed literature that was culturally acceptable and only the wealthy could afford. The literature Gatsby possesed was that of a realist and a "normal joe". A normal person with normal everyday books not just a wealthy person with books a wealthy person of that time period was expected to own.
(From when I was sick)


Ch. 5 Question 22
22. Q. Why does Gatsby offer Nick work? How does Nick feel about this? A. Gatsby offers Nick Carroway work because in a way Nick reminds Gatsby of himself. Nick is a hardworker and Gatsby considers him a friend. Nicks work is simple tasks around Gatsbys estate. Some may call him a buttler but in modern day he is more of a personal assistant. He explains to Nick that his work will not have to deal with characters such as Meyer Wolfsheim.

Ch. 6 Question 35
35. When Nick told Gatsby that "you can't repeat the past", Gatsby replied, "Why of course you can!" Do you agree with Nick or Gatsby? Why? Be specific. Quote examples from the text. A. I agree with Gatsby because as the cliche goes "history repeats itself". In Gatsbys case his history with Daisy could repeat itself. Gatsby still loved her and hoped that she loved him. In his opinion things were better than ever and their history could be restored and brought to the present.

Posted by: Joseph May at September 14, 2012 01:43 PM

Wollinsky Mendez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
September 14, 2012

Question: Why does Gatsby offer Nick work? How does Nick feel about this?

Answer: Gatsby offers Nick work because he got Daisy to come to the reunion. Nick did not hesitate to say no. He did not want to be paid for his service. If Gatsby wanted to give Nick a job, he would have gave him more information and in debt of the job opportunity.

Posted by: Wollinsky Mendez at September 14, 2012 02:07 PM

Marcus Chisholm/Summer Taylor
Dr. Hobbs
ENG-311-CA05
14 September 2012

7. East and West Egg are two adjacent but different regions. What is the distinction between theme? How does one bridge the gap between the two (both literally and symbolically)?
East and West Egg are two identical island. However, East Egg is known as “new money” and West Egg is known as “old money.” West Egg is filled with different families that belong to generations that have had money for centuries. West Egg’s parties are extremely exclusive, only the “who’s who” individuals get invitations. East Egg’s parties are more luxurious and are more open to the public. East Egg’s population contains those who recently came upon money and love to flaunt their newfound wealth. West Egg feels as if East Egg’s population isn’t worthy, while on the other hand, East Egg feels as if West Egg is old fashioned and irrelevant. I lived at West egg, the-well, the less fashionable of the two, though this is a most superficial tag to express the bizarre and not a little sinister contract between them (7). However, these two adjacent regions are divided by a bridge, which causes the “social class” between the two. The bridge literally divides, Old Money from New Money and furthermore creates a social class between the two.; West Egg being old money and East Egg being new money.

Posted by: Marcus Chisholm/Summer Taylor at September 14, 2012 03:13 PM

Sherman Milton & Sarah Winans
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 “Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
14 September 2012

Question: Look up the word “juxtapose.” How does Fitzgerald juxtapose the different regions of the United States? Does he write more positively about the East or the Midwest?

Answer: The term “juxtapose” means to place side by side. Many people use the word when dealing with comparison and contrast. Fitzgerald portrays the east in a negative way by making them seem snobby, all about money, and not enjoying life. He also makes New York city seem unwelcoming because he does not make the people reserved at all. The Midwest is portrayed as being more laid back just like Nick Carraway. (Ch. 7, pg. 130)

Posted by: Sherman Milton at September 14, 2012 03:15 PM

Shaina McSweeney Sarah McDearis
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 Survey of Major Writers of the Twentieth Century CAO5
14 September 2011
12. Discuss the various persons who must take some responsibility for the death of Gatsby. (Tom, Daisy, Myrtle, Gatsby himself, etc.). Who is the most responsible? Give some reasons why or why not each character is implicated in the murder.
Well, many people were responsible in Gatsby’s death. Daisy was responsible for killing Myrtle and Gatsby is responsible for driving on and not stopping (154). Tom was responsible because in his hatred for Gatsby let Wilson believe that Gatsby was driving the car. Wilson was responsible for actually pulling the trigger (173). Daisy and Tom are the most responsible for leading Wilson to believe Gatsby was driving and having an affair with Myrtle, and Daisy would not accept the responsibility of running over Myrtle.

Posted by: Shaina McSweeney at September 14, 2012 03:17 PM

Leah Hollingsworth
Madison Grabow
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
13 September 2012

In-class Question 1: You’ve heard of the expression: “The American Dream”- what is it, exactly? Now that you’ve read The Great Gatsby, analyze Fitzgerald’s conception of the American Dream. Is pursuing the American dream necessarily a good thing, as evidenced by The Great Gatsby? Do you think Fitzgerald views it as totally dead/impossible, or is it possible to revive it?

Answer: The American Dream is being able to change your position in society without going into crime. Fitzgerald shows the materialistic side of the American Dream. Gatsby says, “‘I’ve got a man in England who buys me clothes. He sends over a selection of things at the beginning of each season, spring and fall’” (Fitzgerald 99). Pursuing the American Dream is not necessarily a good thing. Fitzgerald’s characters in pursuit of the dream do not end up well. “‘Hello!’ I interrupted breathlessly. ‘Look here—this isn’t Mr. Gatsby. Mr. Gatsby’s dead’” (Fitzgerald 178). I think Fitzgerald views the American Dream as impossible to get. “‘I’m thirty,’ I said. ‘I’m five years too old to lie to myself and call it honor.’ She didn’t answer. Angry, and half in love with her, and tremendously sorry, I turned away” (Fitzgerald 190). Fitzgerald is devoid of hope at the end of the book.
Page numbers taken from chapter 5 & 9 in the public PDF version.

Posted by: Leah Hollingsworth at September 14, 2012 03:20 PM

Joe May and Joey Lontrato
Dr. Hobbs
Eng-311
14 September 2012

In Class Discussion Question 3

3. Q. We know how important we are affected by color. We are also aware of the symbolism that some colors seem to project, e.g., black for death/ignorance, etc. Using your “ctrl+F” function, trace the use of the color white in the
novel (note all the pages where it occurs). When does the color white falsify a sense of innocence? When does it
symbolize true innocence? A. The color white appears over 50 times in the novel Great Gatsby. The color white is said to represent innocence and purity but ironically throughout the story the color white represents some form of evil or something not pure. Gatsby has an expensive white car, which he was able to purchase after doing illegal things. His house is white, but he bought it with drity money and lied about how he was able to purchase it and lies about his profession. His shirts are mostly white cotton and it is ironic in the sense that white is supposed to represent purity but when a man with character such as Gatsby wears it, it does not. Also a great point Dr. Hobbs brought up in class was Gatsby wearing a pink suit. Pink is white mixed with red. The innocence of white is mixing with the devilish characters of red to make a neutral color.

Posted by: Joseph May at September 14, 2012 03:22 PM

Shaina McSweeney Kasey McDearis (Please post this one)
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 Survey of Major Writers of the Twentieth Century CAO5
14 September 2011
12. Discuss the various persons who must take some responsibility for the death of Gatsby. (Tom, Daisy, Myrtle, Gatsby himself, etc.). Who is the most responsible? Give some reasons why or why not each character is implicated in the murder.
Well, many people were responsible in Gatsby’s death. Daisy was responsible for killing Myrtle and Gatsby is responsible for driving on and not stopping (154). Tom was responsible because in his hatred for Gatsby let Wilson believe that Gatsby was driving the car. Wilson was responsible for actually pulling the trigger (173). Daisy and Tom are the most responsible for leading Wilson to believe Gatsby was driving and having an affair with Myrtle, and Daisy would not accept the responsibility of running over Myrtle.

Posted by: Shaina McSweeney at September 14, 2012 03:26 PM

Bryan Baldwin
De'nisha Butler
Time Delay
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
14 September 2012

Question: "It is not uncommon to hear the term 'a self-made man.' In what possible ways might this term be explained? How does Gatsby fit that definition? In what ways does he take it too literally?"

A self-made man is someone who accomplishes something in life without help, they can provide for themselves. Gatsby fits the definition because he creates a new life for himself after he returns from the war. “Well, he told me once he was an oxford man.” (Fitzgerald, 54) Even though his newfound wealth is illegal, he is still able to provide for himself. He takes the term too literally when (attempts) to fulfill his picture of grandeur that he has for himself.

Posted by: Bryan Baldwin, De'nisha Butler, Tim Delay at September 14, 2012 04:28 PM

Madison Grabow
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major 20th Century Writers
14 September 2012

HW Question 11:Who is Dan Cody and what is his significance in Gatsby's life?

Answer: While Nick was walking around and examining Gatsby's house, he came across "a large photograph of an elderly man in yachting costume attracted me, hung on the wall over his desk" (100). The portrait turned out to be Dan Cody. Gatsby had met Dan Cody a short time after removing himself from Oggsford. "Then he drifted back to Lake Superior, and he was still searching for something to do on the day that Dan Cody’s yacht dropped anchor in the shallows along shore" (106). "He was employed in a vague personal capacity—while he remained with Cody he was in turn steward, mate, skipper, secretary, and even jailor, for Dan Cody sober knew what lavish doings Dan Cody drunk might soon be about and he provided for such contingencies by reposing more and more trust in Gatsby. The arrangement lasted five years during which the boat went three times around the continent" (107). Dan Cody found a confidant in Gatsby to the point where he offered Gatsby a large sum in his passing. Unfortunately, Gatsby was unable to accept this money due to a woman of Dan Cody. Dan Cody was the push that Gatsby needed. Gatsby turned to crime with Wolfsheim to take another step in the caste system. Living with Cody, Gatsby realized he needed to find a way to make his dream happen.

Can be found in the pdf version Chapter 5, 6, and 8.

Posted by: madison grabow at September 14, 2012 10:46 PM

Sarah Winans
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
12 September 2012

Question: "Does Nick enjoy the afternoon at the apartment in New York? Why or why not?

Answer: Because of Nick's honest and reserved personality, I think he was very uncomfortable to be at the party because of how raunchy people were getting the drunker they got. However, this is so new to him that I think he was fascinated and that led him to stay. Nick states, "I was within and without, simultaneously enchanted and repelled by the inexhaustible variety of life" (19th paragraph from bottom of chapter 2). Overall, I think he enjoyed being exposed to New York's fast paced environment.

Posted by: Sarah Winans at September 15, 2012 06:36 PM

Timothy Delay
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
September 15, 2012
Question: Describe the fight between Gatsby and Tom. What do these men think of each other? How are they similar and how are they different?

Answers: The fight between Gatsby and Tom was a one-side argument in which Tom belittled Gatsby over his dark past. Tom will attack Gatsby on anything that he found that will discredit him. Gatsby on the other hand tries not to attack Tom directly but to convince Daisy to leave to Tom and go with him. Gatsby think that Tom is a brute and a womanizer. Tom sees Gatsby as a showoff and does not condone his past of bootlegging. They are both similar as they both have money and have a affectation to Daisy. They are also both suck in the past. Tom is old money getting it for his parents. He thinks that the old way of thinking is the only way. Gatsby on the other hand is a shelf-made man and see the world changing for the better. (125-131)

Posted by: Timothy Delay at September 16, 2012 01:35 PM

De’Nisha Butler
Dr.Hobbs
ENG311 CA05
September 14, 2012

Question 17

What is the purpose of Nick’s last meeting with Jordan?

Answer: “There was one thing to be done before I left, an awkward, unpleasant thing that perhaps had better been let alone...I saw Jordan Baker and talked over and around what happened to us together and what had happened afterward to me…” (Fitzgerald 189).

Nick had come to the conclusion that he had enough of the fast life in New York, he missed the life in the Midwest, the snow and the Christmas wreaths etc. But there was one last thing for him to do, one last meeting with Jordan and that was to break it off with her. The last meeting between Jordan and Nick, Nick expected it to be simply him telling Jordan that they would have to go their separate ways. However, to Nick’s surprise Jordan revealed that she was engaged to another man.

Posted by: De'Nisha Butler at September 16, 2012 07:00 PM

Leah Hollingsworth
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
13 September 2012

Homework Question 3: Compare George Wilson and Tom. What did each man learn about his wife and how did they each react?

Answer: In chapter 7, Tom learns that Daisy is in love with Gatsby. “She had told [Gatsby] that she loved him, and Tom Buchanan saw. He was astounded” (Fitzgerald 90). George Wilson also finds that his wife Myrtle is having an affair. “He had discovered that Myrtle had some sort of life apart from him in another world, and the shock had made him physically sick” (Fitzgerald 94). Tom goes on to call out the affair and reveal the truth about Gatsby to his wife. “’He and this Wolfsheim bought up a lot of side-street drug-stores here and in Chicago and sold grain alcohol over the counter’” (Fitzgerald 102). George decides to move with his wife out west. “’I’ve got my wife locked in up there,’ explained Wilson calmly, ‘She’s going to stay there till the day after to-morrow, and then we’re going to move away’” (Fitzgerald 104). Each husband tries to keep hold of their wives, but by very different means.
Page numbers taken from chapter 7 in the printed version titled “Three Novels of F. Schott Fitzgerald: The Great Gatsby, Tender is the Night, The Last Tycoon.”

Posted by: Leah Hollingsworth at September 17, 2012 12:29 AM

Sherman Milton
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05: Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
17 September 2012

Question: How does Fitzgerald achieve a melancholic mood in the beginning of this chapter?

Answer: Fitzgerald achieves the melancholic mood by painting a picture in the beginning of the chapter, but instead of the reader seeing something the reader can hear the sound of the fog-horn. (pg.157)


Posted by: Sherman Milton at September 17, 2012 06:13 AM

Wollinsky Mendez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
September 17, 2012

Question: Describe the fight between Gatsby and Tom. What do these men think of each other? How are they similar and how are they different?

Answer: Both Tom and Gatsby are in love with Daisy and are trying to be with her. They have this fight when Tom realizes what is really going on between Daisy and Gatsby. Although Daisy does say the she loves Gatsby and "I did love him once—but I loved you too."(142) She has a difficult time saying what she wanted and then Tom starts to say things about Gatsby's past. There is so much hostility between Tom and Gatsby. The truth hurts both of them and they both think the other is terrible for Daisy.

Posted by: Wollinsky Mendez at September 17, 2012 11:58 AM

Sarah Winans
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
17 September 2012

Question: How was Jay Gatz’s childhood schedule consistent with the adult Gatsby’s behavior?

Answer: Jay Gatz's childhood schedule was consistent with the adult Gastby's behavior because he loved the East when he was younger and had success there and when he got older he stayed in the East and had huge success there. People know him for his valuable possessions and mansion. Gatsby's dad says, "“Jimmy always liked it better down East. He rose up to his position in the East" (Chapter 9 Paragraph 43)

Posted by: Sarah Winans at September 17, 2012 01:15 PM

Jason Anderson
Wollinsky Mendez
Dr.Hobbs
ENG311 CA05
Great Gatsby

Question:Revisit Fitzgerald's decription of the valley of ashes, and read it again closely. What are some commonly known religious symbols? How does Fitzgerald use religious imagery?

Answer: The valley of ashes describes an industrial area where the people are covered in ash. This image gives the idea that the people and the land is dead. The people are watched over by Dr. Eckleburg who is an image for God. God is watching over the people and factories.
“But above the grey land and the spasms of bleak dust which drift endlessly over it, you perceive, after a moment, the eyes of Doctor T. J. Eckleburg.” (p.26)
Meeting Myrtle Wilson there may be a foreshadowing of her death in the end of the novel. Similarly it may be a foreshadowing of Gatsby’s death, or of new life for Nick who leaves New York after the novel.

Posted by: Jason/Wolly at September 17, 2012 01:23 PM

Jason Anderson
Dr.Hobbs
ENG311 CA05
Great Gatsby

Question: Trimalchio is the hero or protagonist of The Satyricon. What is the significance of his mention in chapter 7? Explain how this describes Gatsby.

Answer: Trimalchio much like Gatsby throws extravagant parties, including amazing decorations, and delicacies such as live birds sown into a pig's stomach. And even has the party goers enact his own funeral. Gatsby is much like Trimalchio because of his extravagant parties that include great decorations and expensive food.
Both Trimalchio and Gatsby try to impress the nouveau riche. Though both pretend to have been born in riches they both attained their riches through work. Therefore Gatsby and Trimalchio are alike in many ways.
The main difference is that Trimalchio already has his love and never ceases his partying ways. Gatsby ends his partys so as to better pursue Daisy. (p.120)

Posted by: Jason Anderson at September 17, 2012 01:33 PM

Jeff Chamlain
Matt Lynch
ENG 311
Dr. Hobbs
9. In what ways are Wilson and Gatsby similar? In what ways are they dissimilar? Which of the two is Nick more sympathetic to?
Similarities between Wilson and Gatsby:
Wilson and Gatsby both wish to achieve the American Dream.
Wilson and Gatsby both seek love from a woman.
“He nodded sagely. ‘And what’s more, I love Daisy too.”(pg.140)
Both in the end, end up with no one.
Differences between Wilson and Gatsby:
The first way that Wilson and Gatsby are different is in social statue. Gatsby is a rich man with lots of money and Wilson is a modest hardworking man. Another way they are different is in their personalities. Jay Gatsby is very ostentatious and like to show off his wealth to everyone, while George Wilson is a modest man and is hardworking.
By the end of the novel the Great Gatsby Nick seems to be more sympathetic to Jay Gatsby. Nick seemed sympathetic when Gatsby died and it seemed that no one truly cared that he was gone.

Posted by: Matt Lynch at September 17, 2012 02:06 PM

Matt Lynch
ENG 311
Dr. Hobbs
Gatsby Homework Question #10
10. How are seasons used in constructing this novel?
Seasons are important throughout the Great Gatsby. Seasons help to bring placement to the novel.
“I saw them one spring in Cannes and later in Deauville and then they came back to Chicago to settle down.” (pg. 84)
“It was a cold fall day with fire in the room and her cheeks flushed.” (pg.160)
“Once I wrote down on the empty spaces of a time-table the names of those who came to Gatsby’s house that summer.”(pg.66)
Yet season also are a figure to show a new beginning or a new start to something whether it be life, a relationship, or new obstacles. This is used in the Great Gatsby, Gatsby has new clothes arrive at the beginning of seasons and it illustrates throughout the novel the way the setting looked clean and new with color in the fall when the leaves change.
“‘I’ve got a man in England who buys me clothes. He sends over a selection of things at the beginning of each season, spring and fall.’”(pg.99)
“the history of the summer really begins on the evening I drove over there to have dinner with the Tom Buchanans.” (pg.8)
“‘Life starts all over again when it gets crisp in the fall.’” (pg.126)

Posted by: Matt Lynch at September 17, 2012 02:07 PM

Joe May
Dr. Hobbs
Eng-311
17 September 2012

HW Question Chapter 7 Question 8

8. Q It is not uncommon to hear the term “a self-made man.” In what possible ways might this term be explained? How does Gatsby fit that definition? In what ways does he take it too literally? A. Gatsby since a young age has shaped his own path. He was not happy with the life he was given and the family he was born into. He was raised in poverty with a farming family in the Midwest and at the age of 17 he ran away to the big City of New York. He soon after joined the military where he served in the first world war. With great work ethic and a popular repor among the men he was in charge of leading he quickly became an officer. After the war he was sent by the Army to study for 5 months at Oxford university in England. Upon his return to the states he was unemployed and had no money. His goal of achieving great wealth began when he began working for Meyer Wolfsheim, who at the time was a notorious alcohol bootlegger. AS he did in the Military he quickly rose to the top and made millions of dollars during the prohibition years and was finally able to live the rich life he had always hoped for. With this he sought to buy a big house and find the love of his life who had grown tired of waiting for him during the war so he purchased a home in the same area that she lived in and threw huge parties iin hope that she would come and they could reunite. Gatsby himself, as well as many others created rumors about the new money millionare. When asked where he studied he stated Oxford, when asked where in the Midwest he was from he said California. He created an image for himself and many believed he was an honest, hardworking, intelligent millionare who had acquired great wealth in an honest way, when in fact he was a criminal who was from a poor family in the midwest and had lied about how he had gained his wealth. Many people are self made in the aspect that they are entrepeneurs, or worked hard and rose the ladder to success. In Gatsbys case he rose to the top, worked hard but often lied about what he did, how he did it and the success he actually had.

Posted by: Joe May at September 17, 2012 02:09 PM

Summer Taylor
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
September 17, 2012

Question:
14) Why did Nick take care of Gatsbys funeral?

Answer:
Nick took care of Gatsbys funeral because he couldn't find anybody to even show up to his funeral. "I wanted to get somebody for him. I wanted to go into
the room where he lay and reassure him: ‘I’ll get somebody for you, Gatsby. Don’t worry. Just trust me and I’ll get somebody for you" (Fitzgerald 175). Nick feels a pull towrds Gatsby and puts himself in Gatsbys corner. Nick feels like though everybody claimed to be Gatsbys friend, that he had no true friends that cared about him other than Gatsby threw great parties. "When the butler brought back Wolfshiem’s answer I began to have a feeling of defiance, of scornful solidarity between Gatsby and me against them all" (Fitzgerald 176). Because of Nick's unable to get ahold of anybody, including Daisy, he feels obligated to take care of Gatsby's funeral.

Posted by: Summer Taylor at September 17, 2012 02:09 PM

Marcus Chisholm
Dr. Hobbs
ENG-311-CA05
17 September 2012
Chapter 7, Number 2
2. Describe Daisy and Gatsby’s new relationship.
Gatsby has become to take a very fond liking to Daisy. Gatsby begins to change his life for Daisy. He fires all of his staff to prevent gossip about the two and replaced them with half a dozen others, who never went into West Egg Village to be bribed by the tradesmen, but ordered moderate supplies over the telephone (120). ‘I wanted somebody who wouldn’t gossip. Daisy comes over quite often—in the afternoons (121). Daisy and Gatsby indeed have begun to fall for each other. However, it is expected on Daisy’s part since she’s in a tarnished relationship and is looking for that love that she’s not getting in her marriage with Tom. While on the train ride, Daisy admits her love to Gatsby and kisses him on the mouth (123).

Posted by: Marcus Chisholm at September 17, 2012 02:13 PM

Leah Hollingsworth
Maddy Grabow
Wollinsky Mendez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Writers of the Twentieth Century
September 17, 2012

Part One: Gatsby developed himself differently than how SLU defines it. He wanted to develop himself in all aspects but did not develop himself in the community. “The truth was that Jay Gatsby, of West Egg, Long Island, sprang from his Platonic conception of himself. He was a son of God—a phrase which, if it means anything, means just that—and he must be about His Father’s Business, the service of a vast, vulgar and meretricious beauty. So he invented just the sort of Jay Gatsby that a seventeen-year-old boy would be likely to invent, and to this conception he was faithful to the end.” (Chpt 6 pdf , 105)

Part Two: Gatsby and the Siddhartha can be comparable because they both did not like what they were born into. They wanted to better themselves and change who they are. Siddhartha is looking for enlightenment and Gatsby is looking for acceptance.

Posted by: Wollinsky Mendez at September 17, 2012 03:06 PM

Kasey McDearis and Shaina McSweeney
Dr Hobbs
ENG311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
17 September 2012

Core Value: Excellence: The quality of being outstanding or extremely good.
How it relates to the story:
The First Decision: Within this story, excellence appears in Gatsby. He made himself into something, when he had nothing for his entire life. He strived for a goal and worked hard for a long time to become wealthy and everything important, so that he could be with Daisy. He did this extremely well. On page 44, it states all the extravagant things that Gatsby got for the entertainment at his party, like the big band, and alcohol, and all the types of people he invited. This proves that he is proud of what he is, and he wants to show it off to the best of his ability.
The Second Decision: I think that Gatsby and Siddhartha are very similar and very different at the same time. For example, they both left their homes to achieve a goal that they so desperately wanted. At the same time, Siddhartha left his home of wealth and a type of royalty to be without anything, and Gatsby was striving to be wealthy and to make a name for himself. Excellence comes into play with this in how they actually did achieve their goals. They both tried for so long to become what they always wanted, and made it for themselves.

Posted by: Kasey McDearis at September 17, 2012 03:15 PM

Marcus Chisholm/Summer Taylor/Tim Delay
Dr. Hobbs
ENG-311-CA05
17 September 2012
6. Integrity- The commitment of Saint Leo University to excellence demands that its members live its mission and deliver on its promise. The faculty, staff, and students pledge to be hones, just, and consistent in world and deed.
In this text, the core value of Integrity is best exemplified in chapter 7 and on pages 27 and 123. Lack of Integrity is continuously shown throughout the novel. The first character that shows this lack of integrity is Daisy’s husband, Tom Buchanan. ‘We’re getting off!’ he insisted. ‘I want you to meet my girl (27). Tom says to Nick. Tom’s mistress is Myrtle Wilson, who is married to one Tom’s friends who owns a car garage. Both Tom and Daisy are unhappy in their marriage; Therefore, both parties have decided to go astray. Chapter 7 states, As he left the room again she got up and went over to Gatsby and pulled his face down kissing him on the mouth (123) ‘You know I love you,’ she murmured (123). Daisy has started to show her lack of integrity towards the middle of the novel, when she begins to once again, fall in love with Gatsby, even though she is married to Tom. Siddhartha and The Great Gatsby are actually quite similar; lack of integrity is shown in both novels. While Tom was supposed to be a good, faithful husband, Siddhartha was supposed to be a priestly monk; however, he is having a sexual relationship with Kamala with is frowned upon in the Buddhism religion. This relationship, is shown in the chapter enititled, Kamala. “Laughing, Kamala exclaimed: "No, my dear, he

doesn't satisfy me yet (38). Clothes are what he must have, pretty clothes, and shoes, pretty shoes, and lots of money in his pouch, and gifts for Kamala (38).

Posted by: Marcus Chisholm/Summer Taylor/Tim Delay at September 17, 2012 03:15 PM

Sarah Winans, Joe May, Sherman Milton
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 CA05 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers
17 September 2012

Question: What does the core value of community mean and how does it relate to The Great Gatsby?

Answer: In this text, the core value of community is best exemplified in chapter nine on page 177. Community is best defined as a group of people with similar interests or hobbies that bring them together. In The Great Gatsby, community appeared to be present throughout the entire book through parties at Gatsby's house and other large get-togethers. However, the sense of community was false and this is proven in chapter nine when no one shows up to Gatsby's funeral. Earlier in the story, it would appear that Gatsby was apart of a close and strong community. After the turnout of the funeral, it is clear that they were only using him for his parties and gossip!

Posted by: Sarah Winans, Joe May, Sherman Milton at September 17, 2012 03:17 PM

Shyenne Price, Delia Mulvihill, Bryan Baldwin, De’Nisha Butler
ENG311 CA05

Core Value: Responsible Stewardship

The only example of Responsible Stewardship in The Great Gatsby is when Gatsby dies in the end and Nick stays to plan the funeral. “I was responsible, because no one else was interested-interested, I mean, with that intense personal to which everyone has some vague right at the end.” (Page 175). All of the other characters did not care, or were not able to get ahold of. The only people who came to the funeral were Nick, Gatsby’s Father, and Mr. Gatz.

Posted by: Delia Mulvihill at September 17, 2012 03:19 PM

-----------------


*NOTE* The deadline for this particular assignment has now passed. Any comments listed below are *ONLY* for the reposting of comments that I specifically asked to be revised or are ones from non-student posters. Any 'student' posts below that missed the assignment deadline will not get credit for the assignment.


~ Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: Dr. Hobbs at September 28, 2012 08:42 AM

Leah Hollingsworth
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311 Survey of Major Twentieth Century Writers CA05
4 December 2012
Dream Catching: An Analysis of Gatsby and the Old Man
The ability to set and achieve goals is invaluable. It can mean the difference between realizing dreams and being sorely disappointed. It is important to set goals that are achievable, have a specific outcome, measurable results, and a deadline. However, there is more to goal achievement than simply setting a goal. Essentially, goals ought to be based on strong personal values, must involve a particular result, and should be pursued with pre-determined steps. If goals are approached in this manner, success is much more likely. This can be demonstrated by analyzing The Great Gatsby, a novel by F. Scott Fitzgerald, and The Old Man and the Sea, another novel, by Ernest Hemmingway. By comparing and contrasting Gatsby in The Great Gatsby and the old man in The Old Man and the Sea, it is clear that having strong values, setting goals that are well-defined, and approaching them with set steps is necessary for goal achievement.
Strong personal values provide the foundation for any goal. Gatsby and the old man are similar in that they have the values needed to achieve their goals. For example, both men are determined. The old man used to fish with his friend, the boy. Addressing the boy, the old man says, “‘…I know many tricks and I have resolution” (Hemmingway 8). The old man is determined to catch a fish. Gatsby is just as determined to rise in society. Gatsby’s father says, ‘[he] always had some resolves like this or something. Do you notice what he’s got about improving his mind? … He told me I et like a hog once and I beat him for it’” (Fitzgerald 185). Gatsby is resolute to improve himself socially and intellectually in order to be a part of high society. Values like determination help the two men effectively pursue their goals. The old man in Hemmingway’s novel also has principles that positively inform his goal setting. Faith is one principle that allows the old man to set goals. The boy talks to him one evening about their shared faith (Hemmingway 2). Faith is what allows the old man to set lofty goals of a constructive nature. Gatsby, in Fitzgerald’s novel, cannot rely on such values. In desperation, he takes the easy route. Tom says, “‘[Gatsby] and this Wolfshiem bought up a lot of side-street drug stores here and in Chicago and sold grain alcohol over the counter. That’s one of his little stunts’” (Fitzgerald 143). A lack of faith restricts Gatsby’s imagination in goal setting and leaves him with results that may not leave him better off. Although Gatsby and the old man have values that help them pursue goals, Gatsby lacks the values that aid in goal setting.
Before pursuing a goal, it is necessary to choose one and define it well. The old man has one goal in mind. “‘Fish,’ he said ‘…I will kill you dead before this day ends’” (Hemmingway 19). He desires to kill the fish that he has caught. Gatsby’s goal is to get into high society (Fitzgerald 105). He yearns for the lifestyle that he never had growing up. The old man’s goal is explicit, reachable, has a deadline of a day, and he can determine if he has killed the fish or not. Gatsby, however, does not invent a well-determined goal. Nick narrates, “…it is what preyed on Gatsby, what foul dust floated in the wake of his dreams that temporarily closed out my interest in the abortive sorrows and short-winded elations of men” (Fitzgerald 4). The glory of the American dream possesses Gatsby and does not serve as a clearly defined pursuit. His goal is broad, does not have a deadline, and he does not describe how he knows when he meets his goal, and so it is not achievable or realistic. Although both men have constructed goals, Gatsby has not constructed his well.
The last component of goal setting is creating outlined steps that will aid in the attainment of a goal. The old man often gives himself small steps leading up to his desired outcome. He says to himself, “Now I will pay attention to my work and then I must eat the tuna so that I will not have a failure of strength” (Hemmingway 20). He decides that nourishment will help him kill the fish. Gatsby also spreads his goal into small phases. Gatsby writes, “Read one improving book or magazine per week” (Fitzgerald 185). He plans to concentrate on improving intellectually in order to be accepted into the upper class. The old man focuses his actions on his goal at all times. While fishing, “He felt faint again now but he held on the great fish all the strain that he could” (Hemmingway 34). He puts all of his effort into killing the fish. Gatsby, however, begins to focus on steps that distract him from his primary goal. He becomes obsessed with a woman named Daisy, and focuses all his effort on getting her to leave her husband. He says to Daisy, “...Just tell him the truth—that you never loved him—and it’s all wiped out forever’” (Fitzgerald 141). He puts more effort into winning Daisy than into steps that would more effectively gain him entrance into the upper class. Both the old man and Gatsby outline minor steps that aid them in reaching the result that they seek, but Gatsby takes actions unrelated to his pursuit.
In the end, the old man is more successful. He succeeds in killing the fish (Hemmingway 35). Gatsby, on the other hand, does not attain his goal. It is clear that the upper class never accepted him when only two people attend his funeral (Fitzgerald 186). The old man and Gatsby were aided by values helpful in pursuing goals, their ability to set goals, and their ability to construct clear steps. Gatsby is let down by a lack of values helpful in goal setting, the inability to create a well-defined goal, and his unfocused actions.

Works Cited
Fitzgerald, Scott. The Great Gatsby. Planet e-Book. Web. 5 Dec 2012.
Hemingway, Ernest. The Old Man and the Sea. Asiaing. Web. 5 Dec 2012.

Posted by: Leah Hollingsworth at December 5, 2012 12:37 PM

Joe May

6. Who is Mr. Spencer and why was Holden going to visit him.

Mr. Spencer is a former history teacher of Holden. He goes to him because he values his opinion and wants to hear it about Holdens idea to go away. The meeting goes okay but while asleep Holden wakes up and thinks Mr. Spencer is innapropriately touching him and leaves.

Posted by: Joe May at December 5, 2012 12:54 PM

Delia Mulvihill
Dr. Hobbs
ENG311 CA05
The Great Gatsby Homework 2

Question: 5. What phrase does Gatsby repeatedly use to address Nick and others?

Answer: Gatsby repeatedly uses the phrase “old sport” when addressing Nick and others. “‘I thought you knew, old sport. I’m afraid I’m not a very good host.’” (Fitzgerald 53).

Posted by: Delia Mulvihill at December 5, 2012 01:56 PM

Delia Mulvihill
Dr. Hobbs
ENG311 CA05
The Great Gatsby Homework 3

Question: 6. What was significant about Nick’s thirtieth birthday?

Answer: Nick’s thirtieth birthday made him think about how lonely he was. He felt like he was going to never get married but then felt better when Daisy fell asleep on him in the car ride. “Thirty—the promise of a decade of loneliness, a thinning list of single men to know, a thinning brief-case of enthusiasm, thinning hair” (Fitzgerald 145).

Posted by: Delia Mulvihill at December 5, 2012 02:02 PM

Kasey McDearis
ENG 311 CA05
Research Paper
Dr. Hobbs
Empowerment in Women
There are two female characters that stood out the most to me when it comes to the definition of empowerment. This word means to refer to increasing the spiritual, political, social or economic strength of individuals and communities. It often involves the empowered developing confidence in their own capacities. Daisy (The Great Gatsby) and Phoebe (Catcher in the Rye) are very similar, yet different when it comes to the meaning of this definition. Daisy shows empowerment and strength, but in turn is just as weak as any women would be back in the 1920’s. Phoebe never backed down from the challenges she faced with Holden. To be and empowered woman, there are three basic things that you need to know, and have. These women had decision-making power of their own, for the most part. They thought positively on the ability to make a change. They absolutely had the ability to learn skills for improving their personal or group power.
Daisy, being a woman in the nineteen twenties, the man in your life, which is most of the time your husband, has most, if not all the power of your decisions, and the things that you do in your everyday life. Yet, this was true for Daisy; she knew that she had to make sure that Tom knew that he could not have all the power over her. She wanted him to know that even though she is a woman, she is powerful, and independent. All of her life, all that she wanted was to be loved, cared for, noticed, and heard. Knowing that she could have had all the happiness with Gatsby, and even independence, she chose money, for security purposes. This eventually would lead to her downfall, and a life of misery. Even though she told Tom of her independence and what she wants, he still would always have power over her.
Even though Phoebe was so much younger than her brother Holden, she was empowered to tell her opinion and the things that she knew was right, or what was wrong. Holden always came to her with the problems that he was having, and when he needed someone to talk to. Phoebe made sure tell him when he was wrong, even when he did not want to hear it. It is amazing that someone so young can have such a powerful influence on you, and help you to make smart choices. So in this case she had most of the power in the decision making. No one told her that she was too young to have empowerment.
Daisy made changes, or at least she tried to make changes. When she was with Gatsby, she knew that she loved him, but she desperately wanted a life of luxury. When she married Tom, she knew that having everything she wanted would make her happy, but in the long run, it did not. She realized that she was not happy, she vowed to herself and Tom, also Gatsby that she was going to make a change, and that nothing was going to stop her from having her independence.
Phoebe was a strong willed girl, even though she was extremely young. She helped Holden whenever possible. She knew that when he was wrong, that she had the power to help make the decision for him. This was only because he trusted her judgment, and knew that she had his best interest at heart.
Everything that these women did in their lives depended on the things they did and said to the people in their lives. They set out to make a difference, and to live independently. Whether or not daisy failed at this task, despite the effort that she put in, she tried everything that she could to find empowerment. Phoebe on the other hand, changed Holden. Her goal was to make him a better person. She gave him advice, and attempted to make him a better person. She succeeded in the long run. That to me, is the definition of empowerment. No matter how young she was, she had the power to make her older brother a better person.

Posted by: Kasey McDearis at December 5, 2012 02:52 PM

Shaina McSweeney
Professor Hobbs
ENG 311
6 December 2012
The Pursuit of the American Dream Gone Wrong
The pursuit of the American Dream is a theme that has been featured in a number of different literary works. Among these works are “The Great Gatsby” by F. Scott Fitzgerald and “Death of a Salesman” by Arthur Miller. The original meaning of the American Dream was rooted in the US’s founding. It was a dream of seeking freedom from Great Britain and gaining ultimate liberty. Since that time, including the time period in which the novel and the play were written in, the American Dream has come to mean financial success, with the notion that popularity and happiness will follow suit. In the two works of literature mentioned above, while there are some differences, the American dream controls the two main characters, ultimately leading to their failure, and death.
For Jay Gatsby, he must obtain financial success as a way to become popular and well known, which would ultimately lead to winning back Daisy Buchanan. However, for Willy Loman, this idea is reversed: popularity obtains financial success. Willy seems to believe that popularity and wealth come hand in hand. He teaches his sons, “Be liked and you will never want” (Miller, Act One). Both authors use fruit to show how the popularity aspect of the American Dream is not always as it seems. Fitzgerald mentions the “pulpless halves” of oranges and lemons left behind after one of Gatsby’s parties (Fitzgerald 43). The fruit symbolizes Gatsby; he was used in life for his extravagant parties, but when he died, no one showed at his funeral. Miller also uses fruit to symbolize the main character. After Willy is fired, he makes the proclamation, “You can’t eat the orange and throw the peel away- a man is not a piece of fruit!” (Miller, Act Two). Willy believed he was well liked at his company; but when his sales began to drop, and they fired him, he felt as if he was being used.
In “The Great Gatsby”, Gatsby seems to obtain the American dream. He has wealth and popularity, but he still is unhappy due to the fact that he does not have the love of his life, Daisy. This shows that the financial stability does not always bring happiness. Willy, on the other hand, never reaches financial stability and therefore never obtains the American dream. He kills himself in order to provide life insurance for his family, which in the end, doesn’t come through. By showing a character who achieves the American dream and one that does not both fail, the two authors allude to the corruption of the American dream itself. In both works, the pursuit of the American dream is riddled with deception. The idea of the American Dream drove both Gatsby and Willy to obtain financial success in a corrupt manner. For example, Gatsby was a “bootlegger” in order to become wealthy, because he believes this will achieve Daisy’s approval (Fitzgerald 143). Willy has an affair, because the Woman’s tells him she can put him “right through to the buyers”, which will lead to more money (Miller, Act One). This corruption leads to the two character’s failure. When Daisy finds out that Gatsby has gained his fortune as a bootlegger, she no longer wants to be with him. When Willy’s son discovers he is having an affair, the relationship (the one Willy values most) between the son and father becomes strained.
Jay Gatsby and Willy Loman were two characters who believed that financial success would ultimately bring them happiness. By pursuing this dream, it led to their demise. Although “The Great Gatsby” and “Death of a Salesman” have different ways of capturing this demise, the main theme in both works is the failure of the American Dream.


Work Cited
Fitzgerald, F. Scott. The Great Gatsby. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1925. Print.
Miller, Arthur. Death of a Salesman. New York City: Penguin Books, 1998. Print.

Posted by: Shaina McSweeney at December 5, 2012 03:08 PM

Marcus Chisholm
Dr. Hobbs
ENG-311-CA05
3 December 2012
Class Conflict in Death of a Salesman and The Great Gatsby
The theme of Class Conflict was continually shown in F. Scott Fitzgerald’s, The Great Gatsby and Arthur Miller’s, Death of a Salesman. In both works, each author shows the trials and tribulations that come with class position. Class is the sociological concept that refers to a group of people who share a similar social or economic position in society. This shared financial position is generally based on different variations of wealth, material possessions, power, authority and prestige. Those in different classes have differences in access to education, healthcare and leisure. Conflict is the struggle for power in society. A conflict occurs when two our more groups oppose each other, and are continually trying to gain more power, at the same time, trying to prevent their opponent from gaining power. Death of a Salesman, Willie is trying to compete with a materialistic America and achieve this “American Dream” and society beats him down. The tragic downfall of each main character in both novels is caused to do their class, or social status.
Death also plays a substantial role in both novels. However, while Gatsby was murdered, Willy kills himself because he does not want his family to struggle financially anymore. Willy commits suicide in hopes that his family will collect a large sum of money from the insurance company. Many different factors lead to Willy’s death. Willy’s obsession with the American Dream leads to his suicide. Even though, Willy is a salesman, he is the product. At the beginning of the work, we are shown that Willy is constantly overworking himself, worrying his family. Since his sons are not successful, in a way he wants to be successful for his sons. His sons lack of success and motivation to go further in life force Willie to over work himself and try to achieve unrealistic dreams. At the beginning of the work, we are shown that Willie’s wife, Linda, is worried that Willie is working way too much, especially for his age. On page 3, Linda states to Willy, “Well, you’ll just have to take a rest, Willy, you can’t continue this way” (Miller, 1949). Linda feels as if Willie is too old to have such a hectic work schedule. He is an older man and should be on his way to retirement. Throughout the novel, we are Miller constantly shows Willy’s different “get rich quick” schemes and his different means of achieving his idea of the American dream. Willy constantly has daydreams, which causes him to mentally switch between the past to the present. During many of his daydreams, he speaks to Ben, his wealthy older brother who has recently died. Ben is the symbol of success that Willy craves for both him and his family. In Act two, Ben speaks to Willy speak about a $20,000 proposition that his financially unstable family could benefit from. Ben knows that, this money is not promised and is quite unrealistic. “WILLY: It’s twenty thousand dollars on the barrelhead. Guaranteed, gilt-edged, you understand?
BEN: You don’t want to make a fool of yourself. They might not honor the policy.” After an argument over success between Willy and Biff, Willy speeds off and commits suicide. Death is a very common theme in Fitzgerald’s, The Great Gatsby. There are many forms of death, both mental and physical. Gatsby kills his old self and is reborn as a successful, wealthy young man who lives in a mansion in, West Egg. George kills Gatsby for a crime he did not commit. Generally, the characters of The Great Gatsby are rich, educated individuals who could care less about what’s going on in the news or about people they are not socially involved with. However, therein lies one difference between the two. Class, in terms of Old money and new money split up the novel’s two locations; West Egg represents new money, while on the other hand, East Egg represents old money. East eggers look down upon West Eggers, such as Gatsby. On page 115, Tom states, "Who is this Gatsby anyhow?" demanded Tom suddenly. "Some big bootlegger?" (Fitzgerald). In this quote Tom assumes that all newly rich people are bootleggers. Tom’s friend George is married to a woman named Myrtle who is suspected to be having an Tom, a married man. Tom’s wife, Daisy, accidentally strikes Myrtle with Gatsby’s car. Tom immediately tells George that it was Gatsby driving in hopes that he would retaliate against Gatsby. Shortly after, George shoots Gatsby as he lay in his pool. Gatsby is killed due to both Tom’s jealousy against him and also the fact that he is a West Egger, who is close with an East Egger, Tom’s wife. Gatsby’s death is indeed a form of class conflict between new money and old money. However, popularity also plays a large role in the two works.
The theme of popularity is shown in both works. While Gatsby is indeed, very popular, Willy thinks he is popular, even though he is not. Towards, the end of Death of a Salesman, when Willy is contemplating his funeral he tells Ben how popular he is and how massive his funeral will be. “Ben, that funeral will be massive! They’ll come from Maine, Massachusetts, Vermont, New Hampshire! I am known! Rhode Island, New York, New Jersey — I am known, Ben, and he’ll see it with his eyes once and for all.” Popularity and reputation is one of Willy’s main concerns. He believes that in order to be successful, one must be known, attractive and well liked. Willy’s and his family are neither well known nor well liked, and Willy’s funeral is very empty. Instead of focusing on trying on popularity, Willy could have gotten his family out of the lower class a while ago. Willy went about success in the wrong direction, which is why he never achieved it and had to go to extreme means as an attempt to gain $20,000 for his family. While Gatsby was actually popular during his lifetime, his funeral too was quite empty and attended by very few. Gatsby was popular for the lavish, fancy parties he used to throw at his gigantic mansion. However, what about Gatsby set him out from the rest? What boosted his popularity? Gatsby was very mysterious and everyone wanted to know who he was, where he came from and where his wealth came from. The homeowners on both West Egg and East Egg developed rumors and assumptions to where he got his wealth. On page 48, we are shown the different rumors that were brought up about Gatsby. “‘Somebody told me they thought he killed a man once. It’s more that he was a German spy during the war.” Popularity is not everything. Both authors are trying to show readers that, even with or without popularity, one will still be forgotten. In both works, popularity leads to their tragic downfall. In Death of a Salesman, Willy focuses on becoming popular, which causes him not become successful, in turn caused him to keep struggling for power in society, which is the meaning of conflict. Gatsby’s popularity caused him to gain a large amount of attention to himself, which caused him to murdered by someone of a different class. Gatsby’s main conflicts were with those of different classes. Tom who is, “old money” and George who is, “lower/working class.”
The American Dream also plays a substantial role in both novels. Similar to popularity, while one somewhat gains his idea of the American Dream, the other does not. Both novels are based on similar settings. While The Great Gatsby is based on a 1920’s Long Island, New York; Death of a Salesman is based on a 1940’s New York. Willy and his family members believe that during this time, the United States is a place of growth and opportunity, while in fact during this time it was a place repetition and dull. “WILLY: You and Hap and I, and I’ll show you all the towns. America is full of beautiful towns and fine, upstanding people.” During this time, the United States was crowded, of people trying to achieve the same goal, the American Dream. This also played a factor in why, Willy could not achieve the American Dream. Towards the end of the novel, Willy believes that his self worth is determined by his financial status. Willy’s lack of achieving the American Dream is what drives him to his personal failure. In The Great Gatsby, Fitzgerald shows readers that America was once a place that lacked in moral values and placed importance on materials and social status. Gatsby’s idea of the American Dream is a tainted, version of what we see it as. Money, pleasure and fame were his “American Dream.” Gatsby achieved his corrupted “American Dream” through organized crime and bootlegging.

Posted by: Marcus Chisholm at December 5, 2012 03:18 PM

Shyenne Price
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 311 Survey of Major Writers of the Twentieth Century CA05
3 December 2012
The Integrity of Napoleon and Nick
Integrity as shown in the Saint Leo Core Values is a little skewed as to what most think about when reflecting upon the word. Having Integrity is being honest and knowing the difference between right and wrong and using these moral principals in everyday life. When reading the novella Animal Farm (1945) by George Orwell (1903-50) we can see that Napoleon the pig does not have an ounce of integrity in him while Nick Carraway, from F. Scott Fitzgerald’s (1896-1940) modernist novel The Great Gatsby (1925), embodies what integrity means. Napoleon is nothing but dishonest and selfish who thinks only of himself and his fellow pigs, but Nick always tries to tell his comrades the truth when they ask something of him, and he only wants what is best for his friends living in West Egg.
When Napoleon becomes the head of the farm, he starts out by telling all the other animals little white lies and eventually tells his biggest lie of all: Boxer dying graciously in the hospital. A few of Napoleon’s little lies include Snowball betraying everyone on the farm, changing the story of Snowball’s position in the Battle of the Cowshed, taking credit for the idea of building the windmill, and even blaming Snowball for the destruction of the windmill saying, “Do you know the enemy who has come in the night and overthrown our windmill? SNOWBALL!” (Orwell, 28). On page 48 in the pdf version of Orwell’s text, Squealer says, “I was at his bedside at the very last. And at the end… he whispered in my ear… ‘forward comrades!’” A few days after Boxer’s death Napoleon comes to the Sunday meeting and announces “it had not been possible to bring back their lamented comrades remains” (Orwell, 48), yet another notable lie. In reality, Boxer was removed from the farm and taken to a slaughterhouse so the pigs could have more money to spend on whisky. Parallel to Napoleon, Nick Carraway never lied to anyone. Whenever he spoke with Jay Gatsby, Nick always gave honest answers. When Gatsby asks about whether or not he had upset him earlier in the day nick responds, “I don’t like mysteries, and I don’t understand why you won’t come out frankly and tell me what you want.” (Fitzgerald, 77). Nick also shows his honesty throughout his entire tale during the summer he met Gatsby. He does not hide the truth about the deceit, lies, and affairs between the three of his friends.
Napoleon being a selfish pig was his biggest flaw in his personality that limited him in his integrity. Once the seven commandments of Animal Farm were painted on the wall of the barn, over time he slowly began to change them for the benefit of himself. The first change was the original third commandment of no animal is to sleep in a bed that became “No animal shall sleep in a bed with sheets” (Orwell, 27). The second is the sixth commandment of no animal killing another animal, which changed to “No animal shall kill any other animal without cause” (Orwell, 35). Thirdly, commandment number five, which states no animal will drink alcohol, suddenly changed on page 42 of the pdf version of George Orwell’s novel to “No animal shall drink alcohol to excess.” Each commandment change is explained away to the other farm animals as a result of “Napoleon’s wisdom” (Orwell, 36) when in truth Napoleon only wants to have these certain luxuries and responsibilities to himself. Nick may be quiet spoken, but he does speak up and advise his friends so that they can be better off and improve their lives when the time comes. When Gatsby is making his arrangements in stealing Daisy away from her husband Tom, he confides in Nick about his plane to remind her of what they had before she married. Nick wants Gatsby to let go of Daisy so that he can live a happier life by telling him, “I wouldn’t ask too much of her, you can’t repeat the past” (Fitzgerald, 118). Ultimately Gatsby does not heed Nick’s warning, which results in his death.
Clearly, the protagonist of one tale shows all that integrity is and the antagonist from another tale does not have a single decent bone in their body. Integrity should be about having a driving force inside that makes a person honest, know right from wrong, and then apply these morals on a daily basis. Napoleon is only focused on the betterment of himself, not his “comrades” on the farm, and lying to get his way to be seen as the good guy. Nick Carraway, on the other hand, has a good head on his shoulders and tries guiding others into making the right decisions for themselves by being open and honest.


Works Cited
Fitzgerald, F. Scott. The Great Gatsby. N.p.: n.p., n.d. PDF.
Orwell, George. Animal Farm. N.p.: n.p., n.d. PDF.

Posted by: Shyenne Price at December 5, 2012 03:19 PM

Summer Taylor
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 311
1 December 2012
Excellence or Average: A Comparative Analysis of The Great Gatsby and Siddhartha
Every person strives for something in his or her life at least once. It can be money, love, power, or even a job. With all of these things to choose from, people have the option of choosing multiple goals to accomplish throughout their life. One goal that all people can identify with, however, is the pursuit of excellence. Excellence can mean many different things to different people, and can be applied to just about anything. These can include excellence in family matters, excellence in personal development, and excellence in religion. Since excellence is an immense topic with a myriad of meanings, there will be a working definition of the “type” of excellence that will be discussed in this paper. In this paper, the definition of excellence is a character or characters striving for perfection in some aspect of their life, and also having a natural “knack” for their particular goal. This paper will show that Hermann Hesse’s Siddhartha is a better, more identifiable example of the pursuit of excellence than Scott F. Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby by comparing and contrasting three aspects of excellence: excellence in love, excellence in society, and excellence in self-improvement.
In The Great Gatsby, Gatsby's entire life was driven by his love for Daisy Buchanan, but in the end, she did not choose him. Through Gatsbys attempts to woo Daisy, the reader can obviously see that Gatsby has no natural “knack” for his goal. Even though he spent many years trying to impress Daisy, it was never enough. One example of this is, “She was appalled by West Egg, this unprecedented ‘place’ that Broadway had begotten upon a Long Island fishing village—appalled by its raw vigor that chafed under the old euphemisms and by the too obtrusive fate that herded its inhabitants along a short cut from nothing to nothing” (Fitzgerald 115). In Hesse’s story, the main character Sidhartha has no problem getting the girl he wants. His love, Kamala, is all too impressed by Siddhartha’s natural inclination for love even though he has no experience in the art. "You are the best lover," she said thoughtfully, "I ever saw” (Hesse 52). Though Gatsby tried harder than Siddhartha to excel in his pursuit, Siddhartha had a natural knack for love that Gatsby seemed not to possess.
Excellence in society is a key part in life; it can increase popularity and standing, and if exceptionally excellent, wealth. This was such the case that Gatsby encountered. Gatsby befriended a wealthy man named Dan Cody and worked on his yacht for five years, which gave Gatsby a taste of what money could be like. Gatsby worked for years on this goal, and certainly succeeded in getting rich, but in the end it was all for nothing. Gatsby’s tale is an extreme example of a person who seems to show an obvious natural inclination for excellence in society, but Gatsby forgot the most important part- it is not always about the money. Being sociably also means to make and keep friends. Nobody even cares enough about Gatsby besides Gatsbys father and Nick to come to his funeral. “The minister glanced several times at his watch so I took him aside and asked him to wait for half an hour. But it wasn’t any use. Nobody came” (Fitzgerald 186). Gatsbys story of rags to riches is not a very realistic and relatable example of excellence like Siddhartha. Siddhartha shows excellence in society, but his examples are a bit more understated than Gatsbys are. Siddhartha displays this excellence by simply making and keeping friends easily. Siddhartha’s friends have willingness to follow him no matter what happened, or where Siddhartha went. “He [Govinda] wanted to follow Siddhartha, the beloved, the splendid. And in days to come, when Siddhartha would become a god, when he would join the glorious, then Govinda wanted to follow him as his friend, his companion, his servant, his spear carrier, his shadow” (Hesse 3). This is an example of how Siddhartha’s excellent in society influenced the people around him and what loyalty his friends felt towards him. Siddhartha may not have gained a huge house and a mass of money, but he was by far the wealthiest man in the end.
Both The Great Gatsby and Siddhartha have main themes centered around self-improvement. Gatsby wanted self-improvement in a material sense. He wanted to improve his social status and wealth in order to impress his love Daisy, so she would leave her husband and be with Gatsby instead. Gatsby did succeed in the money part of his venture, but had to turn to the underworld to do so. Because of this, Gatsby did not truly improve himself as he thought he did. Gatsby’s social status may have improved, but his “self” became corrupt. Unlike Gatsby, Siddhartha succeeded in his self-improvement, because his self-improvement was about his spirit and not his material things. Since childhood, Siddhartha showed a knack for improving himself as shown in this example, “[ his father]….saw him growing up to become great wise man and priest, a prince among the Brahmans” (Hesse 1). By the end of Hesse’s novel Siddhartha has found nirvana and completed what he started- a transformation from ignorance to understanding.
The Great Gatsby and Siddhartha both show strong central characters that will do almost anything to achieve their goals, but only one of these books displays true excellence- Herman Hesse’s Siddhartha. Siddhartha shows an innate natural knack in his goals that Gatsby just does not seem to possess. This natural inclination and actual success in his goals is what rises Siddhartha about the “just average” to excellent.

Posted by: Summer Taylor at December 5, 2012 06:42 PM

Kerriann Salatti
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
27 September 2013

Question: 30. What does the reaction of the drivers of the wrecked automobile suggest about the values of Gatsby’s guests?

Answer: Gatsby’s guest had taken the wrecked car from another person and when pulling out of the driveway one of the wheels of the car had come off and went into the ditch. The person that had been driving the car was to intoxicate to understand that it was not his car he was driving. He also was under the impression that the car was out of gas not broken down. The drunken driver said “Wonder’ff tell me where there’s a gas’line station” (Fitzgerald 55). While this was occurring the rest of the guests stood around and watched the drunken man try and continue to drive the vehicle of the library patron. By reading this you can tell that the people that come to Gatsby’s parties have very low morals and can be combination of the upper and lower class. The upper-class people seem to care very little for their personal objects knowing they can easily buy more, and the lower class is careless with the objects of other because they can be spiteful that they are able to have such nice possessions. Overall most of their motives are to go to a party as if it’s a free ticket to an amusement park for no benefit other than for them. “Sometimes they came and went without having met Gatsby at all, came for the party with a simplicity of heart that was its own ticket of admission” (Fitzgerald 41).

Posted by: Kerriann Salatti at September 25, 2013 09:07 PM

Stephanie Gilbert
Dr. Hobbs
Eng-210CL- Love and Desire in Literature- CA01
26 September 2013

Chapter 2

Question # 23: What more have you learned about Nick in this Chapter? Is he similar or different than the people he spends his time with?

One thing we have learned from Nick is he is back from the war, and lives right next to a man by the name of Gatsby. Nick also knows Tom’s girl, and though it appears, he does not like Tom. It looks as though they get along as of right now. He is different to the people he spends his time with because though, he likes to talk he does not like to gossip. For example, when Daisy says; “We heard you were engaged to a girl out West.” “That’s right” corroborated Tom kindly. “We heard that you were engaged.” “It’s libel. I’m too poor.” “ But we heard it,” insisted Daisy, surprising me by opening up again in flower-like way. “We heard it from three people, so it must be true.” Of course, I knew what they were referring to, but I was not even vaguely engaged. The fact that gossip had published the banns was one of the reasons I had come east. You cannot stop going with an old friend on account of rumor, and on the other hand, I had no intention on being rumored into marriage (Fitzgerald, Pg. 19).” Another reason why he is different is that he does not have a lot of money though; he lives in one of the richest neighborhoods, and gets along with some of the richest, finest people in the neighbor- hood he is not one of them.

Posted by: Stephanie Gilbert at September 26, 2013 08:57 AM

Jocelyne Hilary
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature

26th September 2013

Question: #12 How does Nick react to Jordan?

Nick’s initial reaction to Jordan Baker the very first time, was that she did not come across as warm or inviting. “If she saw me out the corner of her eyes she gave no hint of it- (pg. 8)”. She did not appreciate Nick’s presence in contrast to his cousin Daisy who made him feel like “that there was no one in the world she so much wanted to see. (pg. 9)” Jordan intimidated Nick, due to her lack of effort in interest when Daisy introduced them. Her lack of efforts in wanting to socialize with Nick, made him feel as if he had “disturbed her time by coming in. (pg. 8)”

Posted by: Jocelyne Hilary at September 26, 2013 02:53 PM

Jordan Dadez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
26 September 2013

Question: Why does the owl-eyed man describe Gatsby as a real Belasco?

Answer: During the heyday of theatre, David Belasco was a popular impresario and playwright. He was considered a master of illusions during his plays, and then he would surprise his audience at the end with something completely different than what they had thought. The owl-eyed man says, “See! It’s a bonafide piece of printed matter! It fooled me” (Fitzgerald 45). The fact that the owl-eyed man calls Gatsby a “real Belasco” implies that he may not be as impressive as everyone makes him out to be. He was surprised at the fact that he actually had real books in his library.

Posted by: Jordan Dadez at September 26, 2013 05:00 PM

Lydia R Santana
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 Love and Desires in Literature
26 September 2013

Question 34: Describe Gatsby the first time Nick sees him.

Answer: Nick seems to portray Gatsby as a type of mysterious character and the first time Nick see's him; it's only for a brief moment in time. Nick assumed that the person he was admiring from afar was Gatsby, just by Gatsby's position. Nick admires, "[S]tanding with his hands in his pockets regarding the silver pepper of the stars. Something in his leisurely movements and the secure position of his feet upon the lawn suggested it was Gatsby himself" (Fitzgerald 20). What also made Gatsby seem peculiar, is when Nick notices Gatsby admiring a green light. It states, "He stretched out his arms toward the dark water in a curious way, and, far as I was from him I could of sworn he was trembling. Involuntarily I glanced seaward-- and distinguished nothing except a single green light. [. . .] When I looked once more for Gatsby he had vanished, and I was alone again in the unquiet darkness" (Fitzgerald 20-21).

Posted by: Lydia Santana at September 26, 2013 07:14 PM

Maria Benkirane

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 210 CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature

26 September 2013

Question: How is Gatsby different from his guests?

Answer: Gatsby is different from his guests in the sense that people don't even know who he really is. Nick describes Gatsby as being generous and hospitable, While his guests come to the party to enjoy the music, orchestra, flirt and drink all night. They use his house, boats and pool, whom most are not even invited. Nick was one of the only guests who got invited to the party but was not able to find Gatsby. They just show up because they all know that there is a party going on: "Once they were introduced by someone who knew Gatsby, and after that they conducted themselves according to the rules of behavior associated with amusement parks" (Fitzgerald 41). Gatsby is a very mysterious character who keeps a very low profile. All that people know about him are simply rumors or things they heard from other people.

Posted by: maria benkirane at September 26, 2013 08:27 PM

Monica Guirguis
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire Literature
28 September 2013

Question: Describe Nick. What facts do you know about him,and what do you infer about him? What kind of a narrator do you think he will be?

Answer: Nick is the character who is the narrator of the book and he is a very educated man who studies at Yale and was very involved in World War, According to page 7 "I participated in that delayed Teutonic migration known as the Great War"(Fitzgerald, 7). The other fact that Nick says is that He lived in West Egg and right of him was Hotel de Ville In Normandy. According to page 9 "The one on my right was a colossal affair by any standard" (Fitzgerald, 9). I infer about him is that he will become one the main characters in the book and he will fall in love with Daisy. I think he will be a very good narrator but telling things from his mind and the way he thinks about it.

Posted by: Monica Guirguis at September 26, 2013 08:30 PM

Dana DeLosa
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01: Love and Desire in Literature
25 September 2013

Question: “Chapter 02: How does Myrtle react to Tom’s arrival?"

Answer: As Myrtle first descended from the stairs in her husband’s business, she physically did not react to Tom’s arrival (Fitzgerald 28). However when she sauntered across the room, Myrtle walked “through her husband as if he were a ghost” and went straight for Tom (Fitzgerald 29). She then displayed her excitement at his presence through body language and the way she sensually “wet her lips, and without turning spoke to her husband in a soft, coarse voice” (Fitzgerald 29).

Posted by: Dana DeLosa at September 26, 2013 08:35 PM

Morgan Salter
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
27 September 2013

Question: What is the significance of Jordan’s lies?
Answer: Jordan Baker tells many lies simply to keep her at an advantage to other people that she encounters. She tells stories to increase her social standing and keep people interested in her life. Nick exemplifies this tendency for dishonesty in an example from a time Jordan had been involved in a golfing scandal. She takes her lies to lengths of stretching the truth and making up scenarios in efforts to put on a front that gives the illusion of collectiveness and honesty “and yet satisfy the demands of her hard, jaunty body” (Fitzgerald 63).

Posted by: Morgan Salter at September 26, 2013 09:15 PM

Emily Paulino
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
26 September 2013
Question: Why does Nick choose to share his thoughts and feelings with Jordan?
Answer: Nick chooses to share his thoughts and feelings with Jordan because she was the only person that he knew at time about Gatsby and his parties. He wanted to know about this “Gatsby guy” and how he had a big house throwing all these fancy parties and such.

Posted by: Emily Paulino at September 26, 2013 09:22 PM

Camila Pinzon
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
26 September 2013

Question 20. Chapter 2: Describe the “valley of ashes.” What does it look like and what does it represent?

Answer: The valley of ashes is a road that joins West Egg and New York; all wealthy residents of Long Island must pass through the “valley of ashes” to reach New York City. It is described as a dark gloomy city that has a blanket of pollution resting on it from the railroads and gray cars. Fitzgerald describes the gray land as “bounded on one side by a small foul rivers, and, when the drawbridge is up to let barges through, the passengers in waiting trains can stare at the dismal scene” (Fitzgerald 24). The valley of ashes is not a pleasant it is representative of the limbo people who die go through, the gloomy desolate area no one is happy inhabiting its space. They are either on the road to heaven of hell, New Egg or New York City, Fitzgerald agrees as there are “men who move dimly and already crumbling through the powdery air” (Fitzgerald 23).The residents of the valley of ashes are even weighed down by the negativity that surrounds it

Posted by: Camila Pinzon at September 26, 2013 09:30 PM

Joe Rulli
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
26 September 2013

Question 27. What does the owl-eyed man find extraordinary about the books in Gatsby's library? Why does it matter?

Answer: The owl eyed man is impressed that Gatsby's books are real. He expected them to be a fake cardboard cut-out in illusion of having real books in his library. This matters because the man knows that Gatsby is newly rich. The owl eyed man has also said that he has been drunk for a week now.

Posted by: Joe Rulli at September 26, 2013 09:36 PM

Jasmine Charlton
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
25 September 2013

Question: “What are the eyes of Doctor T.J. Eckleburg?

Answer: Through reading this chapter, the concepts of the eyes were confusing, but I think that may be what the author wanted to peek the curiosity of his readers. When I first read I thought the doctor just had big eyes when he said, “ the eyes of Doctor T. J. Eckleburg are blue and gigantic – their retinas are one yard high” (Fitzgerald 23). Then he continued on and said, “ They look out of no face, but, instead, from a pair of enormous yellow spectacles which pass over a non-existent nose” (Fitzgerald 23) that is what peeked my curiosity. The eyes F. Scott Fitzgerald, spoke of were not literal human eyes, but instead a pair of glasses and eyeballs on a billboard advertisement for an optometrist who had moved away. It became clearer when he said,“ But his eyes, dimmed a little by many paintless days under sun and rain, brood on over the solemn dumping ground" (Fitzgerald 24). It was then I realized that the eyes of the doctor were watching over the town, but not because he was a prominent person of that town, but because he had a billboard with his eyes on them.

Posted by: jasmine Charlton at September 26, 2013 10:08 PM

Jalisa Lowe
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
27 September 2013

Question: Where is Gatsby’s mansion located? What makes his location different from the counter location across the water?

Answer: Gatsby’s mansion is located “twenty miles from the city a pair of enormous eggs, identical in contour and separated only by a courtesy bay, jut out into the most domesticated body of salt water in the Western hemisphere, the great wet barnyard of Long Island Sound” (Fitzgerald 5). Out of both East and West egg, the West was “the less fashionable of the two” (Fitzgerald 5). Gatsby’s mansion “was a factual imitation of some Hotel de ville in Normandy, with a tower on one side, spanking new under a thin beard of raw ivy, and a marble swimming pool, and more than forty acres of lawn and garden” (Fitzgerald 5).

Posted by: Jalisa Lowe at September 26, 2013 10:16 PM

Allison Knipe
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
26 September 2013

Question: 36. Chapter 3: What does Nick think of Gatsby after meeting him?

After Nick meets Gatsby, he is almost in awe. He admired Gatsby greatly. When seeing him from afar, he thinks "just as it began my eyes fell on Gatsby, standing alone on the marble steps and looking from one group to another with approving eyes. His tanned skin was drawn attractively tight on his face and his short hair looked as though it were trimmed every day. I could see nothing sinister about him" (Fitzgerald ebook). Nick was fascinated by Gatsby and was curious to find out more about him.

Posted by: Allison Knipe at September 26, 2013 10:23 PM

Flavia Vazquez
ENG 210CL CA01
Question 21:What are the eyes of doctor T.J. Elkleburg?

Answer:
The eyes of Dr. Elkleburg are blue and gigantic.

Posted by: Flavia Vazquez at September 26, 2013 10:35 PM

Erica Esqueda
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
26 September 2013
Question: 26. Chapter 3 – Describe the two ways in which Nick differs from the other guests at the party.
One of the ways in which Nick differs from the others guests at Gatsby’s party is, he “was one of the few guests who had actually been invited,” (Fitzgerald 41). Most of the guests that usually attended Gatsby’s parties were just random people who would show up to the party, without an invitation. Nick, however, had received a formal invitation sent by Mr. Gatsby with a chauffeur. The other way in which Nick differed from the other guests was that he was the only one who seemed to genuinely want to meet Gatsby. The other guests were too wrapped up with the party that they seemed to care less about the host of the party, and more about their own fun. When Nick finally encountered Mr. Gatsby, he was ashamed that he did not automatically know it was him, and even decided he wanted to apologize for it. In the end of the chapter Nick decides that he is “one of the few honest people” (Fitzgerald 59) that he has ever known, meaning that from all of the people that he has met, away from the parties as well as at them, he realizes that many of those people may not be trustworthy.

Posted by: Erica Esqueda at September 26, 2013 10:53 PM

Lindsey Thilmony
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire of Literature
26 September 2013

Question: Pay attention to time. What is the day and year during the first scene at Daisy’s house?

Answer: The scene was a Saturday evening in 1922. Nick states the year when he says, “Father agreed to finance me for a year, and after various delays I came East, permanently, I thought, in the spring of twenty-two” (Fitzgerald 3). The day of the week is stated, “Tom and Miss Baker sat at the either end of the long couch and she read aloud to him from The Saturday Evening Post− the words, murmurous and uninflected, running together in a soothing tune” (Fitzgerald 17).

Posted by: Lindsey Thilmony at September 26, 2013 10:55 PM

Vera Smirnova
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
26 September 2013

Question: What Rumors Have Been Told about Gatsby? Why does Fitzgerald reveal rumors rather than fact?

Answer: There were several different rumors about Gatsby. For example, that he was a German spy. That he killed a man and was a relative of a German kaiser. The rumors about Gatsby make him a mysterious character. Fitzgerald is creating a picture of a mystery man. It makes you want to read more and find out who is Gatsby. Although we can be confused by all the rumors, we can see that Gatsby is a man who is trying to stay away from the world. He is watching it from the distance.

Posted by: Vera Smirnova at September 26, 2013 11:17 PM

Jasmine Collins
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL: Love and Desire in Literature CA01
26 September 2013
Question 17: Chapter 2: How does Myrtle behave as the party progresses?
Answer: At the start of the party you could say she was excited and happy to be out of her house and with Tom. But as people started to show up, and when she changed her clothes, she started to change. “With the influence of the dress her personality had also undergone a change” (Fitzgerald 30), when she was given a compliment on her dress, she looked at the person with disdain. She started to act as if she was higher up than everyone in the apartment. With a few more drinks in her system she became nice. As described she became a giver of gifts, “I’m going to give you this dress” (Fitzgerald 36), she was becoming nicer. Just before that statement she was explaining how she and Tom had met. That could be a reason why she became nicer. Happy memories tend to do that.

Posted by: Jasmine Collins at September 26, 2013 11:34 PM

Paula Pion
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02
27 September 2013

Question 6: "What is Gatsby doing when Nick first sees him?"

Answer: I am using the public domain version of The Great Gatsby available to the students in the lib guide. Gatsby is on his lawn looking at the night sky when Nick first sees him (Fitzgerald 24).

Posted by: Paula Pion at September 26, 2013 11:36 PM

Deirdre Rowan
Dr. Hobbs
English 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
26 September, 2013

Question 19: Why did Tom break Myrtle’s nose? How is this consistent with the author’s description of him in Chapter I? Judging by his treatment of Myrtle and his wife Daisy, what seems to be Tom’s attitude toward women?

Answer: Tom break Myrtle's nose because she keeps bringing up the name of his wife, Daisy. This is consistent with Fitzgerald's description on Tom in Chapter I as a dangerous force restrained by a genteel manner: "Two shining arrogant eyes had established dominance over his face and gave him the appearance of always leaning aggressively forward[ . . . ]It was a body capable of enormous leverage — a cruel body. His speaking voice, a gruff husky tenor, added to the impression of fractiousness he conveyed(7)." These characteristics, along with his violent action against Myrtle, allow the reader to deduce that Tom is a sexist and misogynist.

Posted by: Deirdre Rowan at September 27, 2013 12:05 AM

Diana Shoemaker
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
27 September 2013

Question: Chapter 3: Why does Gatsby throw huge, expensive parties for people he does not even know?

Answer: At this point in the book we do not know the very exact reason why he throws these parties. What we do know is that he wants everyone to like him. He wants people to associate him as a good person who wants nothing bad with anyone. There was even a point where a woman explains that at the previous party she ripped her dress and Gatsby sent her a brand new one. Another girl stated “He doesn’t want any trouble with anybody” (Fitzgerald 29). This goes to show one of the reasons why he throws these elaborate parties. He wants people to have a good persona of him, so when people talk about him they only say good things. Not only did he throw these expensive parties where everything had to be perfect, but Gatsby himself was an extremely charming man. The narrator (Nick) even states at one point about his smile “It understood you just as far as you wanted to be understood, believed in you as you would like to believe in yourself, and assured you that it had precisely the impression of you that, at your best, you hoped to convey” (Fitzgerald 32). Gatsby’s personality is attractive and makes people feel how they would want to in a conversation. He just wants everyone to like him.

Posted by: Diana Shoemaker at September 27, 2013 12:20 AM

Connor Schaefer
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL- CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
27 September 2013


Question: Why according to Catherine, has Tom not left Daisy to marry Myrtle?


Answer: The answer to this question is very simple. While Nick was at the apartment with Myrtle, Tom, Catherine, and the McKee’s some asked why Tom and Myrtle do not leave their wife or husband. Catherine told Nick what the reasoning was. She said, “It’s really his wife that’s keeping them apart. She’s a Catholic and they don’t believe in divorce” (Fitzgerald 33). Catherine is trying to tell Nick that Tom and Daisy are not divorces because Daisy is a Catholic. The interesting part is that Nick knows Daisy is not a Catholic, so that means that Catherine was lying. The reason why Tom has not left Daisy, according to Catherine is because Daisy is a Catholic.

Posted by: Connor Schaefer at September 27, 2013 01:34 AM

Alexia Chambers
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and desire in literature CA02
26 September 2013
Question:
11. What Image does the author use to describe Jordan Baker? What does it mean?
Answer:
On page 11 the author describes her by saying “She was a slender, small-breasted girl, with an erect carriage, which she accentuated by throwing her body backward at the shoulders like a young cadet.” He describes her as a young cadet, which I believe he is saying she is quiet obedient and elegant in a way.

Posted by: Alexia Chambers at September 27, 2013 01:56 AM

Ashley Johnson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
27 September 2013

Question 23:
Chapter 2: What more have you learned about Nick in this chapter? Is he similar or different than the people he spend his time with?

Answer:
What I learned about Nick in this chapter is that he will pretty much go along with anything. This includes willingly spending a day with Daisy’s cheating husband and his mistress. He is a pushover. Nick is different from the people he spends his time with.

Posted by: Ashley Johnson at September 27, 2013 02:58 AM

Hector Rosario
ENG210CL CA01
Professor Hobbs
September 27, 2013

25. Why does Gatsby throw huge, expensive parties for people he does not even know?

Jay Gatsby is a man surrounded by mystery. He throws these lavish parties to keep up his appearances. The text supports this idea by saying only some people are invited while others just drive and show up at his door step. The invitees were important but others "sometimes came and went without having met Gatsby at all, came for the party with a simplicity of heart that was its own ticket of admission" (Fitzgerald, page 41). When trying to find out about his whereabouts, he was greeted with the same shroud of mystery from the guests that surrounded Gatsby himself.

Posted by: Hector Rosario at September 27, 2013 09:22 AM

Abdulaziz Alsaif
Dr. Hobbs
English -210 CL - CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
27 September 2013

Question #31
What does Nick learn about Jordan after he’s spent some time with her?

Answer:
Once Nick meets Jordan again at the party, he gets to speak to her and get to know her better. Nick learns that he liked walking around with her for the fact the she was a famous golf champion, but for him it was more than that, he felt like he loved her, he felt a sort of tender curiosity. He also realized that she would always lie about different things and one of them is where she left a borrowed car out in the rain with the top down and lied about it afterwards. He also explains that Jordan avoided clever men. He says in the text, “She was incurably dishonest” (Gatsby 57-58)

Posted by: abdulaziz alsaif at September 27, 2013 11:05 AM

Salvatore Christlieb
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
Dr. Hobbs
27 September 2013


Question: Why did Tom break Myrtle’s nose? How is this consistent with the author’s description of him in Chapter I? Judging by his treatment of Myrtle and his wife Daisy, what seems to be Tom’s attitude toward women?

Answer: Tom broke Myrtle’s nose because Myrtle spoke of Daisy. As the passage goes “I’ll say it whenever I want to! Daisy! Dai- Making a short deft movement, Tom Buchanan broke her nose with his open hand” (Fitzgerald 37). Daisy was Tom’s wife and Myrtle his mistress. With Tom’s aggressive nature towards his mistress Myrtle, Tom’s treatment of women is harsh and misogynistic. This is consistent of the first description of Tom in chapter one when he is introduced as aggressive and supercilious.

References
Fitzgerald, F. Scott. The Great Gatsby. New York: Scribner, 2004. Print

Posted by: Salvatore Christlieb at September 27, 2013 11:30 AM

Erica Bodden
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
28 September 2013


Question: What does Tom Behavior reveal about his character?

Answer: In Fitzgerald Great Gatsby, we are introduced to many peculiar characters all with their own separate backgrounds. Tom Buchanan is the husband of Daisy, and one of the first groups of people Nick met during the novel. After a few conversations with Tom it was easily determined he would not make a good friend. Tom is a very hostile, haughty tempered, sexist and rascist man. “It’s up to us, who are the dominant race to watch our or these other races will have control of things”(Fitzgerald,13). His racism is not only reflected in his narcissistic superior attitude but also towards the way he views the social standards that everyone else is living by. Tom is not a well-liked character in this novel he is mainly tolerated.

Posted by: Erica Bodden at September 28, 2013 01:12 PM

Erica Bodden
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
28 September 2013

Question: What does Gatsby tell Nick he wants Daisy to do?

Answer: After many causal affairs Gatsby spent with Daisy his love for her continues to blossom. The emptiness that spread through his life for five years is slowly starting to fill with purpose again. Gatsby desperately longs to be whole. He is seriously worried that the five-year gap may have erased what they shared a long time ago. “I feel far away from her he said… I’m going to fix everything just the way it was before, he said” (Fitzgerald 110). The fact that Daisy has married another man is unsettling for Gatsby. “He wanted nothing less of Daisy than that she should go to Tom and say: I never love you” (Fitzgerald 109).

Posted by: Erica Bodden at September 28, 2013 01:52 PM

Camila Pinzon
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
28 September 2013

Question 85 Chapter 6: What parallel is suggested by the fact that Gatsby never gets the inheritance bequeathed to him by Cody?
Answer: As a young apprentice of Dan Cody’s Gatsby worked on Cody’s boat learning and working alongside him for 5 years, Cody had intended to give Gatsby an inheritance. “A legacy of twenty-five thousand dollars. He didn’t get it. He never understood the legal device that was used against him, but what remained of the millions went intact to Ella Kaye” (Fitzgerald 100). Parallel to this incident Gatsby lost something else he had worked hard to earn. He worked for years, struggled through the army, Gatsby went from rags to riches to swoon Daisy away and to have a proper home and lifestyle, only to have Tom Bucchanan sweep in and take her away as well.

Posted by: Camila Pinzon at September 28, 2013 03:12 PM

Connor Schaefer
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL- CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
30 September 2013

Question: Why does Gatsby want to have tea with Daisy in Nick’s house? Why doesn’t Gatsby ask Nick for this favor himself? Why did Gatsby want Daisy to see his house?

Answer: Gatsby does not want to invite Daisy over for tea because he has not seen her in years. The main reason why Gatsby wants to have tea at Nick’s house is that he wants to see Daisy again. Nick asks Jordan why not Gatsby just asked him the favor himself. Jordan’s responses saying, “He’s afraid, he’s waited so long. He thought you might be offended” (Fitzgerald 78). The reason why Gatsby did not ask Nick himself was that he thought Nick would be offended. Nick seems to get a little worried and confused of that statement. Another reason why Gatsby wants to have tea at Nick’s house is because he wants Daisy to see his house. Fitzgerald does not come out and say exactly why Gatsby wants Daisy to see his house, but the reader can assume it is because he wants her to see his life style. Anyone that has a mansion like Gatsby would want to show his or her house off to anyone.

Posted by: Connor Schaefer at September 28, 2013 06:47 PM

Kerriann Salatti
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
30 September 2013

Questions: Where did Gatsby study after the war? How long was he there?

Answer: After the war Gatsby studied at oxford, but only for a few months. ( Fitzgerald 67)

Posted by: Kerriann Salatti at September 28, 2013 06:52 PM

Aye’Kendria George
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
24 September 2013

Question: Why, according to Catherine has Tom not left Daisy to marry Myrtle?
Answer: According to Catherine Daisy does not believe in divorce because she is catholic(33).
Fitzgerald, F. Scott, and Matthew J. Bruccoli. The Great Gatsby. New York, NY: Scribner, 1996. Print.

Posted by: Aye'Kendria George at September 28, 2013 10:40 PM

Jocelyne Hilary
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
29th September 2013
Question: Chapter 5- In this chapter, Gatsby’s dream seems to be fulfilled. What indications are there that, reality cannot satisfy his dream?
Answer: This chapter illustrates what could be defined as an oxymoron. Despite the fact that, Gatsby may have fulfilled everything in order to get him up the social ladder, and has all the material sustenance one could ever dream of, on one hand there is an emptiness that the material items cannot fill. The chief reason, for which Gatsby’s dream cannot be realized, is due to two major contributors, Daisy, and time itself.
Daisy ironically is Gatsby’s mirage that fuels his ambition, yet she is also his undoing. Gatsby’s infatuation of Daisy from five years ago has blinded him to the fact that, she is not the woman he has idealized and placed on a pedestal. Gatsby has been living in a made up fantasy, which he fails to recognize.
Time is the other factor that fails to relate Gatsby’s dream to reality, since Gatsby has built his new life based on a fantasy from the past. Everything Gatsby owns and does, has had some sort of inspiration from a Daisy he was in love with five years ago. Gatsby wants to relive the past only this time, he hopes his material sustenance could write him and Daisy a new ending. Unfortunately, this dream is futile, as the past cannot be revisited especially when it is mostly a figment of your own creation in your mind.

Posted by: Jocelyne Hilary at September 29, 2013 03:10 AM

Jasmine Charlton
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
27 September 2013

Question: What are Gatsby’s feelings by the end of the chapter?

Answer: By the end of chapter 5, Gatsby was feeling various emotions he was nervous at the thought of being reunited with Daisy he was also extremely happy because he had spent time with her, and he was hopeful because he wanted to rebuild a relationship with Daisy whom he had admired from day one. Gatsby’s infatuation with Daisy was so strong that even the book said, “ there must have been moments even that afternoons when Daisy tumbled short of his dreams, not through her own fault, but because of the colossal vitality of his illusion” (Fitzgerald 95). The emotions Gatsby had for Daisy was so powerful that it would rush through his veins when, “ he held daisy hands while she said something low in his ear” (Fitzgerald 96). Lastly, throughout the chapter it is now known that after the interactions between Gatsby and Daisy you can see that Gatsby is clearly in love with Daisy.

Posted by: jasmine Charlton at September 29, 2013 01:27 PM

Emily Paulino
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
29 September 2013
Question 59: How long did it take Gatsby to make the money to buy the mansion?
Answer: It took Gatsby three years to make the money after the guy that he saved on the boat died.

Posted by: Emily Paulino at September 29, 2013 02:02 PM

Lindsey Thilmony
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire of Literature
29 September 2013

Question: Why do you think Daisy sobs when Gatsby shows her his shirts?

Answer: Daisy’s excuse for crying is, “It makes me sad because I’ve never seen such—such beautiful shirts before” (Fitzgerald 92). Daisy is an emotional rollercoaster. She is either jubilant or distraught. My guess as to why she cries at Gatsby’s shirts is because she knows the day must end. She will have to go home to Tom whom she does not love. She loves the company of Gatsby and Nick. When she comes to the realization this is not her life, it saddens her.

Posted by: Lindsey Thilmony at September 29, 2013 02:54 PM

Lindsey Thilmony
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire of Literature
29 September 2013

Question: Why do you think Daisy sobs when Gatsby shows her his shirts?

Answer: Daisy’s excuse for crying is, “It makes me sad because I’ve never seen such—such beautiful shirts before” (Fitzgerald 92). Daisy is an emotional rollercoaster. She is either jubilant or distraught. My guess as to why she cries at Gatsby’s shirts is because she knows the day must end. She will have to go home to Tom whom she does not love. She loves the company of Gatsby and Nick. When she comes to the realization this is not her life, it saddens her.

Posted by: Lindsey Thilmony at September 29, 2013 02:54 PM

Lindsey Thilmony
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire of Literature
29 September 2013

Question: Why do you think Daisy sobs when Gatsby shows her his shirts?

Answer: Daisy’s excuse for crying is, “It makes me sad because I’ve never seen such—such beautiful shirts before” (Fitzgerald 92). Daisy is an emotional rollercoaster. She is either jubilant or distraught. My guess as to why she cries at Gatsby’s shirts is because she knows the day must end. She will have to go home to Tom whom she does not love. She loves the company of Gatsby and Nick. When she comes to the realization this is not her life, it saddens her.

Posted by: Lindsey Thilmony at September 29, 2013 02:55 PM

Morgan Salter
Dr. Hobbs
English 210 CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
30 September 2013

Question: What does Gatsby’s friendship with Meyer Wolfshiem imply about his own background?
Answer: Meyer Wolfshiem is a gambler involved in organized crime and delinquency, infamously known during this time as the “man who fixed the World’s Series back in 1919” (Fitzgerald 73). Wolfshiem and Gatsby met after the end of the war and immediately hit it off as friends. His friendship with Meyer Wolfshiem implies that Gatsby may have been involved in illegal activity earlier in his life. This further implies the possibility that Gatsby could still be involved in such activity/behavior, giving an explanation to his riches and abundance of wealth.

Posted by: Morgan Salter at September 29, 2013 03:35 PM

Maria Benkirane
Dr. Hobbs

ENG 210 CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature

29 September 2013

Question: Why does Gatsby tell Nick about his life? Do you believe Gatsby? Does Nick?

Answer: Gatsby tells Nick about his life in order to get him on his side and build up a trust. He also tells him everything so that he doesn't believe the rumors that people tell about Gatsby: "Well I am going to tell you something about my life. I don't want you to get a wrong idea of me from all these stories you hear" (Fitzgerald 65). Gatsby also wants Nick to organize a tea party so that Daisy and Gatsby reunite. I do not believe Gatsby completely. I believe there is something darker about his past. At first, Nick does not really believe what Gatsby is telling him. Then Gatsby shows him the medal and the picture of him playing cricket at Oxford. Nick then starts to believe some part of what he told him but was he was still doubting everything.

Posted by: maria benkirane at September 29, 2013 04:41 PM

Alexia Chambers
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and desire in literature CA02
27 September 2013
Question:
86. How truthful was Gatsby when he relayed the story of his life to Nick? Why does Fitzgerald tell the story of Jay Gatsby now?
Answer:
Gatsby is not completely honest when he tells nick about his life. He tells him many things about his past but leaves out many details he should have included. Gatsby tells Nick about how he inherited all of his family’s money when they died, but that just isn’t true later on Nick learns the real story in chapter 6 “So he invented just the sort of Jay Gatsby that a seventeen-year-old boy would be likely to invent, and to this conception he was faithful to the end.” The person Gatsby is now is not who he was born as, it is an idea that became a reality. He got his start when Dan Cody left him a large sum of money and from that moment on he decided he would be a wealthy man and forget his former life.

Posted by: Alexia Chambers at September 29, 2013 07:27 PM

Jordan Dadez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
29 September 2013

Question: What is Daisy’s opinion of Gatsby’s party and how does it affect him?

Answer: Daisy did not like Gatsby’s party because she is “[. . .] appalled by its raw vigor that chafed under the old euphemisms and by the too obtrusive fate that herded its inhabitants along a short-cut from nothing to nothing” (Fitzgerald 107). Daisy comes from old money, and she lives in East Egg. She is disgusted by people who became wealthy from questionable means. She is appalled at the fact that those who deem themselves to be in high society are not acting as such. This view of West Egg upsets Gatsby because he recalls a time when Daisy was not like that. He tells Nick they used to talk for hours and hours on end and be entertained.

Posted by: Jordan Dadez at September 29, 2013 07:29 PM

Jalisa Lowe
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
30 September 2013

Question: How are Daisy and Gatsby different when Nick returns to the house after a half an hour?

Answer: When Nick returns to the house to say goodbye to Daisy and Gatsby, “the expression of bewilderment had come back into Gatsby’s face, as though a faint doubt had occurred to him as to the quality of his present happiness” (Fitzgerald 95). The sense of embarrassment had left both of them, and they had become comfortable around each other. Nick watched as Gatsby “adjusted himself a little, visibly. His hand took hold of hers, and as she said something low in his ear he turned toward her with the rush of emotion” (Fitzgerald 96). The two were so into each other. It was as if Nick was not even there. Nick decided to leave and give the two some alone time.

Posted by: Jalisa Lowe at September 29, 2013 07:42 PM

Allison Knipe
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
29 September 2013

Question: 67. Chapter 5: What does Gatsby offer Nick in return for Nick’s cooperation in inviting Daisy to his house?

In return for his cooperation in inviting Daisy for tea, Gatsby gives Nick a business proposition. He says, “Well, this would interest you. It wouldn’t take up much of your time and you might pick up a nice bit of money. It happens to be a rather confidential sort of thing” (Fitzgerald ebook). Nick knew that he was saying it in return for a favor, but he didn't accept the offer. Instead, he changed the subject.

Posted by: Allison Knipe at September 29, 2013 08:52 PM

Stephanie Gilbert
Dr. Hobbs
English-210CL-CA01
29 September 2013


What is Jordan Baker’s occupation? Nick’s? Gatsby’s?
Jordan Baker’s occupation is a tennis player. Gatsby and Nick are both war veterans.

Posted by: stephanie gilbert at September 29, 2013 10:04 PM

Deirdre Rowan
Dr. Hobbs
English 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
29 September, 2013

Question 63: What is Gatsby’s real name and where is he from?

Answer: Jay Gatsby was originally named James Gatz and came from North Dakota.

"Just why these inventions were a source of satisfaction to James Gatz of North Dakota, isn’t easy to say. James Gatz — that was really, or at least legally, his name (97-98)."

Posted by: Deirdre Rowan at September 29, 2013 10:16 PM

Lydia R Santana
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 Love and Desires in Literature CA01
29 September 2013

Question 61: What had the green light on the dock meant to Gatsby?

Answer: I believe, based off of the readings, that the light resembled the painful distance that Gatsby had from where he was and from the woman he loved; Daisy. I also think that the light had resembled a mild stone for him, because it had been soon long since he last saw Daisy; how he’s so close to her yet still out of reach (until, of course, when Gatsby meets with Daisy to have tea). The reader can tell that by the way that Gatsby carries himself, that he is infatuated with Daisy. Take for example when Daisy and Gatsby were in Nick’s living room and they were recalling when they had last seen each other, and right away Gatsby replied, “Five years next November” (Fitzgerald 87). He also has Jordan fill Nick in about his and Daisy's life, before and after they were together. Jordan retorts to Nick that Gatsby tried to look for any sign of Daisy while she lived in Chicago and that he kept reading the Chicago paper in the hopes of catching her name in it. As Jordan states;“ [H]e read a Chicago paper for years just on the chance of catching a glimpse of Daisy’s name” (Fitzgerald 79). Gatsby himself even admits to having the newspaper clippings when he gave Nick and Daisy a tour or his elaborate mansion and shows it to them. Gatsby states, “Look at this,’ said Gatsby quickly. ‘Here’s a lot of clippings—about you’” (Fitzgerald 93). Gatsby comes to realize that his dream had become a reality, and that the distance was no longer a problem for him and his beloved Daisy (which is what the light had resembled to Gatsby). He states, “You always have a green light that burns all night at the end of your dock.’ [. . .] Possibly it had occurred to him that the colossal significance of that light had now vanished forever. Compared to the great distance that had separated him from Daisy it had seemed very near to her, almost touching her. [. . .] Now it was again a green light on a dock. His count of enchanted objects had diminished by one” (Fitzgerald 93).

Posted by: Lydia R Santana at September 29, 2013 10:54 PM

Diana Shoemaker
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature

Question: What does Gatsby offer Nick in return for Nick’s cooperation in inviting Daisy to his house?

Answer: Gatsby tells Nick that he can help in out in the business world. Gatsby knows that Nick does not make a lot of money, but he knows of a side job that can help him make more. Nick is not exactly interested. Gatsby says “It wouldn’t take up much of your time and you might pick up a nice bit of money” (53). Gatsby clearly feels that he must do something in return for Nick.

Posted by: Diana Shoemaker at September 30, 2013 01:05 AM

Dana DeLosa
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01: Love and Desire in Literature
29 September 2013

Question: “ What does Gatsby tell Nick about himself?”

Answer: In the car on their way to the city for lunch, Gatsby reveals to Nick the true history of his life in hopes of receiving a favor from Nick (Fitzgerald 70). Gatsby describes his unfortunate youth in which he lost all his family members but came into wealth because of it; he also states that he was, in fact, “educated at Oxford” but only because his ancestors “have been educated there for many years” (Fitzgerald 70). Additionally he tells Nick about travelling, living around the world, and indulging in all that the countries had to offer. Finally, Gatsby describes his time in the armed force; he explains to Nick how he “tried very hard to die”, but instead received a medal of honor for his service (Fitzgerald 71).

Posted by: Dana DeLosa at September 30, 2013 01:36 AM

Ashley Johnson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
30 September 2013

Question 66:
Chapter 5: What does Gatsby want from Daisy?
Answer:
Gatsby wants a future with Daisy. He wants Daisy to be with him.

Posted by: Ashley Johnson at September 30, 2013 02:13 AM

Kaitlin Millner
Dr.Hobbs
27 September 2013
The Great Gatsby
Question chapter 3: Describe the two ways in which Nick differs from the other guest at the party?

Nick differs from the other guest in two different ways. One way in which Nick goes to Gatsby’s party and all his guest of talking about Gatsby and Nick just over hear rumors. Nick feels that no one really knows the truth about Gatsby. Another way that Nick differs from the other guest at the party is that all the guest are rich high roller important people.

Posted by: Kaitlin MIllner at September 30, 2013 07:34 AM

Kaitlin Millner
Dr.Hobbs
27 September 2013
The Great Gatsby
Question chapter 3: Describe the two ways in which Nick differs from the other guest at the party?

Nick differs from the other guest in two different ways. One way in which Nick goes to Gatsby’s party and all his guest of talking about Gatsby and Nick just over hear rumors. Nick feels that no one really knows the truth about Gatsby. Another way that Nick differs from the other guest at the party is that all the guest are rich high roller important people.

Posted by: Kaitlin MIllner at September 30, 2013 07:34 AM

Hector M Rosario
ENG 210CL CA01
Professor Hobbs

48. What role does Meyer Wolfshiem play in the novel? Why is there so much focus on his nose and what does this tell you about Fitzgerald's politics?

Meyer Wolfshiem is a friend of Gatsby. The emphasis placed on his nose indicates that he believes he is of higher stature that his subordinates. When he was angered or irritated he was seen as having "his tragic nose trembling" (Fitzgerald, page 72). Meyer Wolfshiem also highlighted his ivory cuff buttons to bring some attention to his stature. Fitzgerald is playing on the idea that those in power tend to look down on their peers and flaunt what they have.

Posted by: Hector Rosario at September 30, 2013 08:33 AM

Kaitlin Millner
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL
The Great Gatsby

Question 42: According to Jordan, what did Daisy do on her wedding day? Why? What does this reveal about Daisy?

According to Jordan, on Daisy’s wedding day a lot went down. Gatsby reveals to Jordan that Gatsby bought a mansion on east eggs to be closer to Daisy. Not only did Gatsby buy a house to be closer to Daisy but, he told Jordan that he is in love with Daisy. Jordan is told by Gatsby to convince Nick to arrange a reunion between Gatsby and Daisy or arrange a tea date.

Posted by: Kaitlin Millner at September 30, 2013 08:33 AM

Jasmine Collins
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL: Love and Desire in Literature CA01
30 September 2013
Question 56: Chapter 4: What “matter” did Gatsby have Jordan Baker discuss with Nick?
Answer: Jordan and Nick were having a conversation about Daisy after one of Gatsby’s parties. First Jordan explains how she knew Gatsby, by retelling a story that began with “ One October day in nineteen-seventeen” (Fitzgerald 74). But the conversation was leading up to what Gatsby wanted Jordan to ask Nick. His simple request was, “He wants to know if you’ll invite Daisy to your house some afternoon and then let him come over” (Fitzgerald 78). Nick seems perfectly fine with inviting her over.

Posted by: Jasmine Collins at September 30, 2013 10:23 AM

Julia Della Penna
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
30 September 2013

58. Chapter 5: Describe the meeting between Gatsby and Daisy.
Answer: At the start of Chapter 5, Nick Carraway's home is where the meeting between Jay Gatsby and Daisy first takes place. Nick initiates the meeting of the pair by inviting Gatsby, but tricking Daisy to come over “for tea,” but then the conference moves to Gatsby luxurious home. Before and even when Daisy arrives, Gatsby is “pale as death” (Fitzgerald, 92) from being so extremely nervous about meeting the woman, he has loved after this long period. In the beginning, the meeting is quite uncomfortable because five years has pass since either have seen each other from the time of their last affair; Gatsby and Daisy are both equally full of embarrassment. “For half a minute there was not a sound. Then from the living-room I heard a sort of choking murmur and part of a laugh, followed by Daisy's voice on a clear artificial note: "I certainly am awfully glad to see you again.” (92). Gatsby makes a smart "questioning" remark, “We’ve met before,” (92) to that, Daisy replies “We haven’t met for many years,” and from there the intense conversation takes off. Eventually, things between the two improve, and they both spend a vast amount of time alone since away Nick sneaks. Nick finally comes back, interrupting the flow of the deep conversation between Gatsby and Daisy, which leads to Gatsby asking both Nick and Daisy to come back to his house because he wants to show Daisy his success. The meeting shifts to Gatsby house, where he then turns the conversation between Daisy and himself, to a ‘show-and-tell’. Jay hopes his riches will win Daisy back; he believes she left him because he was not rich enough. The setting of the rest of the get-together is in the apartment of the house where Gatsby stays, Nick tries to leave, but they refuse to let him. Gatsby then invites a young man, Ewing, to come play the piano, the two continue back into their passionate discussion, and soon forget about Nick. This allows Nick to slip away once again leaving the both of them alone.

Posted by: Julia Della Penna at September 30, 2013 10:38 AM

Salvatore Christlieb
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
Dr. Hobbs
30 September 2013

Question: When does James Gatz change his name? Why?

Answer: James Gatz changed his name “at the age of seventeen and at the specific moment that witnessed the beginning of his career” (Fitzgerald 98). Furthermore, Gatsby did not accept “his parents at all” (Fitzgerald 98). It is believed by Nick that Gatsby had the name ready for quite some time due to his poor relationship with his parents. His parents were “unsuccessful farm people” (Fitzgerald 98). Therefore, Gatsby wanted to make more money and knew had he could do so. The name change occurred out of rebellion towards his parents and it was a risk that he took. Businessmen need to take risks to change the change their situation for better or worse and Gatsby did so.

References
Fitzgerald, F. Scott. The Great Gatsby. New York: Scribner, 2004. Print.

Posted by: Salvatore Christlieb at September 30, 2013 10:42 AM

Salvatore Christlieb
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
Dr. Hobbs
30 September 2013

Question: When does James Gatz change his name? Why?

Answer: James Gatz changed his name “at the age of seventeen and at the specific moment that witnessed the beginning of his career” (Fitzgerald 98). Furthermore, Gatsby did not accept “his parents at all” (Fitzgerald 98). It is believed by Nick that Gatsby had the name ready for quite some time due to his poor relationship with his parents. His parents were “unsuccessful farm people” (Fitzgerald 98). Therefore, Gatsby wanted to make more money and knew had he could do so. The name change occurred out of rebellion towards his parents and it was a risk that he took. Businessmen need to take risks to change the change their situation for better or worse and Gatsby did so.

References
Fitzgerald, F. Scott. The Great Gatsby. New York: Scribner, 2004. Print.

Posted by: Salvatore Christlieb at September 30, 2013 10:42 AM

Anastasia Delgado
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
29 September 2013

62. What does this line from the novel mean?: “the vitality of his illusion had gone beyond daisy beyond everything.”

This line comes from Nick on page 95. He notes that it has been five years since Gatsby had last seen Daisy. The illusion Nick is in reference to the obsession and dream Gatsby has created about Daisy. It is no longer just about getting Daisy. Gatsby has put in an incredible amount of work into meeting her again so he can commence his plan. Nick is saying that beyond all the flaws Daisy may have Gatsby sees beyond it. He has a “creative passion” in chasing after her. He throws lavish parties and has gains an incredible amount of wealth just to see her in hopes that he could win her heart again.

Posted by: Anastasia Delgado at September 30, 2013 10:51 AM

Abdulaziz Alsaif
Dr. Hobbs
English -210 CL - CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
30 September 2013
Question #60:
What did Gatsby do to impress Daisy?

Answer:
Once Gatsby has seen Daisy, they could not stop talking to each other, and once the rain has stopped, Gatsby asked Daisy and nick to come back with him to his mansion. Gatsby tries to impress Daisy by his Luxurious lifestyle that he lives. As she walks the towards the house, “Daisy admired this aspect or that of the feudal silhouette against they sky, admired the gardens, the sparkling odor of jonquils and frothy odor of hawthorn and plum blossoms and pale gold odor of kiss-me-at-the-gate. (F. Scott 90). He also tries to impress Daisy when he says “I’ve got a man in England who buys me clothes. He sends over a selection of things at the beginning of each season, spring and fall.” (F. Scott 92).

Posted by: abdulaziz alsaif at September 30, 2013 11:15 AM

Erica Esqueda
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
30 September 2013
Question: 79. Chapter 5: Why does Gatsby get so many phone calls? What does this say about him?
At the beginning of chapter 5, Gatsby is having a conversation with Nick about when he and Daisy can come over for tea. Gatsby then goes on to mention and ask Nick about his job and points out that Nick does not make much money with his current job. So, Gatsby offers to him that there may be “a little business on the side” (Fitzgerald 82) that may interest him. He then says, “It wouldn’t take up much of your time and you might pick up a nice bit of money,” (Fitzgerald 83). He also mentions that it is rather confidential. This situation can somewhat explain why Gatsby gets so many phone calls. All of his phone calls are usually not very clear, and the topic is never fully discovered. Therefore, this leads us to believe that Gatsby may be involved in some type of illegal business and he just does not want to get caught, which explains his secretiveness when it comes to his mysterious phone calls. Being the one who throws such large parties for so many guests, one can also assume that this business may have to do with alcohol. These parties were taking place during the prohibitions, therefore, Gatsby was doing something that was not completely legal in order to throw such extravagant parties with alcohol. All of the phone calls he received were most likely linked to this.

Posted by: Erica Esqueda at September 30, 2013 11:16 AM

Andrew Milljour
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
September 28 2013

Question: How does Myrtle react to Tom’s arrival? (#15)

Answer: (I am using the Kindle Fire version of the book) When Myrtle first sees Tom in the car garage she smiles and shows that she is happy to that Tom is there. She then walks through her husband as though he is not there and speaks to her husband while facing Tom (Fitzgerald location 310).

Posted by: Andrew Milljour at September 30, 2013 11:54 AM

Alexia Chambers
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and desire in literature CA02
30 September 2013
Question:
106. Chapter 7: What has increased Tom’s hatred of Gatsby?
Answer:
Originally, Tom was angry with Gatsby because he and Daisy knew each other and Tom thinks women should not be left running around alone. Now his anger for Gatsby has increased because he knows Daisy is having an affair with Gatsby behind Tom’s back. “She had told him that she loved him, and Tom Buchanan saw.” After this, Tom decided everyone would go into town. Tom knew something was not right with Gatsby for a while but this had just confirmed that he and Daisy were having an affair. After they are leaving to go back home Tom sees the accident at Wilson’s garage and decides to stop in. When they tell him it was a yellow car that had his Myrtle he thinks it was Gatsby who ran her over and is even more angry at him.

Posted by: Alexia Chambers at September 30, 2013 03:31 PM

Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
30 September 2013
Question: Why does Fitzgerald list all of Gatsby's party guests?

Answer: The author wants to show us that people who came to the party are not Gatsby's friends. They were "all well dressed, solid and prosperous Americans" (Fitzgerald 33). The guests were more interested in Gatsby's figure because of the gossips. They "came and went like months" (Fitzgerald 31).

References:

Fitzgerald, F. Scott. Three novels of F. Scott Fitzgerald. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1925. Print.

Posted by: Vera Smirnova at September 30, 2013 06:13 PM

Vera Smirnova
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
30 September 2013

Question: What is the significance of "blocks" Biloxi?

Answer: As I think, a significance of "blocks" Biloxi is to show Daisy's relationship with Tom. She remembers an insignificant event that happened on her wedding instead of remembering the ceremony.

Posted by: Vera Smirnova at September 30, 2013 06:26 PM

Jasmine Charlton
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210 CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
30 September 2013

Question: “ What is the significance of Nick’s thirtieth birthday?

Answer: The significance of Nick’s birthday was not the fact that he was turning thirty, but instead the realization that he is now entering a new decade or a new phase of his life. This period Nick speaks can be one that many younger males fear that is the time to slow down and start settling down. Nick in the book even describes how horribly this new decade is going to be for him with the, “loneliness, thinning list of single men, a thinning briefcase of enthusiasm, and thinning hair” (Fitzgerald 135). The way F. Scott Fitzgerald describes turning thirty he almost makes it seems like it is the end of the world or the dark ages that should be feared by many.

Posted by: jasmine Charlton at September 30, 2013 10:58 PM

Regina Green
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 Love and Desire in Literature CA01
01 October 2013

Question: Pay attention to Nick's judgements. What do they reveal about his character that he does this (especially in relation to his opening comments)?

Answer: Nick's judgements show that he is not used to being a crowed area. As he was looking around he seemed to pay attention to every detail. Everything about the party was either fascinating to him or made him feel uncomfortable. "As soon as I arrived I made an attempt to find my host" (Fitzgerald 42). He did not know he would see anyone he knew at the party so he at least wanted to meet the man that invited him. As soon as he found Jordan, he clung to her like a lost puppy dog.

Posted by: Regina Green at October 1, 2013 01:14 PM

Regina Green
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love in Desire in Literature CA01
01 October 2013

Question: What accomplishment/claim to fame of Meyer Wolfshiem's does Gatsby describe to Nick? How does Nick react? What is Gatsby's relation to him?

Answer: Gatsby says that Wolfshiem is a gambler. Gatsby says, "He's the man who fixed the World's Series back in 1919." This surprised Nick. He had never thought that one man could have fixed the World's Series. Gatsby had met Wolfshiem after the war.

Posted by: Regina Green at October 1, 2013 01:22 PM

Regina Green
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
01 October 2013

Question: Why does Tom refer to the liaison between Daisy and Gatsby in terms of intermarriage?

Answer: Tom refers to the liaison between Daisy and Gatsby in terms of intermarriage because after being told to calm down he felt as though he was supposed to be calm about something that he felt was absurd. Tom says, "Nowadays people begin by sneering at family life and family institutions, and the next they'll throw everything overboard" (Fitzgerald 130). He just felt that they had no right to tell him to calm down when he felt that he had every right to be mad.

Posted by: Regina Green at October 1, 2013 01:30 PM

Stephanie Gilbert
Dr. Hobbs
ENG-210CL-CA01- Love and Desire in Literature
1 October 2013

The Ironic situation: Is that Nick interprets that Tom and Wilson are going through the same predicament. The predicament being that Wilson just found out about his wife’s infidelity with another man. “Wilson had discovered that Myrtle had had another life apart from him in another world, and shock made him physically sick. Nick stared at him that at Tom, who had made a parallel discovery an hour before.” Nick realized that Tom, Gatsby, and Daisy are going through the same situation.

Posted by: stephanie gilbert at October 1, 2013 02:37 PM

Diana Shoemaker
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
2 October 2013

Question: Chapter 7: Why does Tom insist that Daisy and Gatsby drive home together?

Answer: Gatsby tries to get Daisy to tell Tom that she never loved him. Daisy says that it would be a lie if she were to say that she never loved Tom. Tom then goes on to tell everyone about a bootlegging business that Gatsby had. Gatsby tried to defend himself to Daisy, but she did not seem to care. Tom said Daisy and Gatsby could drive home together because he realizes that he does not have to worry about them. Tom told Daisy and Gatsby to ride home together. Tom said “Go on. He won’t annoy you. I think he realizes that his presumptuous little flirtation is over” (Fitzgerald 86). Tom does not see Gatsby as a threat and humiliates both Gatsby and Daisy by saying this. Tom feels he has taken control of their relationship.

Posted by: Diana Shoemaker at October 1, 2013 03:15 PM

Morgan Salter
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
2 October 2013
Question: Why are Tom and Daisy reconciled?
Answer: During an eventful outing into town there is a dramatic discussion involving Nick, Gatsby, Tom, Daisy, and Jordan. During this conversation, Tom confronts Daisy and Gatsby about their love affair and demands that Gatsby cease involvement and communication in Daisy’s life to which Gatsby responds with full disclosure about the couple’s feelings. Daisy was pressured into admitting she never loved Tom, but eventually owned up to her genuine feelings for the man, disappointing Gatsby and conversely easing Tom’s anger. Although these “words seemed to bite physically into Gatsby” (Fitzgerald 132), they reconciled Tom and Daisy’s animosity at this point in the argument. Daisy announced her love, or past love, for Tom which gave him hope that he would not lose her and could possibly better their relationship.

Posted by: Morgan Salter at October 1, 2013 04:46 PM

Jalisa Lowe
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
2 October 2013

Question: What does Gatsby think about Daisy’s relationship with Tom?

Answer: During an outing with Tom, Daisy, Nick, and Jordan, Gatsby and Tom engaged in an altercation. After Tom questioned Gatsby about his past, and made accusations about Daisy and Gatsby relationship, Gatsby expressed his true feelings to Tom. Gatsby stated to Tom, “Your wife doesn’t love you. She’s never loved you. She loves me” (Fitzgerald 130). Jumping up with excitement, Gatsby continued, “She only married you because I was poor and she was tired of waiting for me. It was a terrible mistake, but in her heart she never loved any one except me” (Fitzgerald 130). Tom and Gatsby continued to argue back and forth until eventually everyone left.

Posted by: Jalisa Lowe at October 1, 2013 06:07 PM

Deirdre Rowan
Dr. Hobbs
English 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
1 October 2013

Question 91: What was Gatsby’s reaction to Daisy’s
child?

Answer: Pammy Buchanan is the offspring of Tom and Daisy Buchanan, but ironically she is the least mentioned character in the book. She is almost never talked about and chapter seven is her only flesh and blood appearance. Daisy might have never told Gatsby about Pammy, so his reaction is understandable: "Afterward he kept looking at the child with surprise. I don’t think he had ever really believed in its existence before (119)."

Knowing that Daisy has a biological child, Gatsby knows that at some point, she had sex with Tom and may have a closer relationship with him than Gatsby would like to think about.

Posted by: Deirdre Rowan at October 1, 2013 07:32 PM

Maria Benkirane

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 210 CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature

1 Octobre 2013

Question: What is Daisy's reaction to both men?

Answer: With the fighting and competition going on, Daisy feels more and more attached towards Tom because she had to admit that she loved him: "Oh, you want too much, I love you now- isn't that enough? I can't help what's past" (Fitzgerald 132). Gatsby couldn't believe what she is saying which made him physically ill. he then sakes if he could speak to her alone but then she says, "Even alone I can't say I never loved Tom, It wouldn't be true" (133). Tom even lets her ride with Gatsby on the way back to prove that it does not hurt or bother him at all, since he is sure that Daisy will be his forever. Daisy was yelling for all of that to stop because she was so confused by everything going on. She was begging them to leave and go back to the city. She did not know what to do or say anymore.

Posted by: maria benkirane at October 1, 2013 07:59 PM

Salvatore Christlieb
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
Dr. Hobbs
1 October 2013


Question: What is Daisy’s reaction to both men?


Answer: Daisy’s reaction to both men was astonishment. Tom and Gatsby were having petty argument after petty argument until a social volcano erupted. This social volcano occurred shortly after they went to town. As Tom, Daisy, Jordan, Nick, and Gatsby were all having whiskey at a table, Tom started questioning Gatsby about his past. As Tom exclaimed “I suppose the latest thing is to sit back and let Mr. Nobody from Nowhere make love to your wife. Well, if that’s the idea you can count me out” (Fitzgerald 130). This is an example situational irony because Tom has a mistress and he is having a temper tantrum about his wife sleeping with another man. Furthermore, Tom is very brutish and does not care about Daisy up until this moment where he feels that is losing a competition; Daisy being the prize. Tom and Gatsby were competing for her love and her reaction was that she loved both men. As she told both Gatsby and Tom “I did love him once—but I loved you too” (Fitzgerald 132). Daisy was frustrated on who to choose. The entire time that the group was interacting Daisy could not stop looking at Gatsby and flirting with him. Moreover, Nick and Jordan had to witness this love triangle and its difficulties. Daisy reaction of astonishment then turned to terror, as Nick describes the situation, “I glanced at Daisy, who was staring terrified between Gatsby and her husband” (Fitzgerald 134). This feeling of terror came about because of regret and Daisy was unable to choose a side, it was true. She did love both men; it can be argue that she loved both equally and could not make a decision. Her reaction to the argument evolved from astonishment, to terror and then to fear. She eventually chooses Tom.

References
Fitzgerald, F. Scott. The Great Gatsby. New York: Scribner, 2004. Print

Posted by: Salvatore Christlieb at October 1, 2013 08:02 PM

Emily Paulino
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
1 October 2013

Question: 93. Chapter 7. Why do the four drive into the city on such a hot afternoon?

Answer: Gatsby, Daisy, Tom, Jordan, and Nick all drive into the city because Daisy decided to cut the tension between Gatsby and Tom. Gatsby wanted Daisy to tell Tom that she didn’t love him and that she loved Gatsby instead, she felt pressured so she yelled out that she wanted to go to the city.

Posted by: Emily Paulino at October 1, 2013 08:04 PM

Joe Rulli
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
1 October 2013

Question 101. Why does Gatsby view Daisy's child with surprise?

Answer. Daisy's child does not play a big role through the book The Great Gatsby. She is introduced in chapter 1 and then she is absent in the story until chapter 7. When Gatsby sees her, he is shocked because he could not picture Daisy with a child with anyone else but himself. Daisy's daughter not only shows that Daisy went on with her life when her and Gatsby went there separate ways, but it also shows that she was in love with another man during that time and they made a life together. For Gatsby, it is hard to fathom that Daisy could have another child with another man.

Posted by: Joe Rulli at October 1, 2013 08:43 PM

Kerriann Salatti
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
2 October 2013

Questions: Compare George Wilson and Tom? What did each man learn about his wife and how did they react?

Answer: Tom learned that his wife and Gatsby were once in love and Gatsby was still in love with Daisy. Daisy had been having an affair with Gatsby recently and no longer wanted to be with Tom. Tom became very angry at first but then as the argument when on he believed Daisy wouldn’t leave him in the end and they just had a temporary fling. (Fitzgerald 131-133) Wilson finds out the infidelity of is wife Myrtle and decides to move away out west with her. He tries to get Tom to sell him his car to make money to leave. (Fitzgerald 123)

Posted by: Kerriann Salatti at October 1, 2013 08:52 PM

Allison Knipe
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01
1 October 2013

Question: 94. Chapter07: What does Gatsby think about Daisy’s relationship with Tom?

Gatsby obviously believes that Daisy should not be with Tom. Him and Tom butt heads often. Gatsby even exclaims, “She never loved you, do you hear?” he cried. “She only married you because I was poor and she was tired of waiting for me. It was a terrible mistake, but in her heart she never loved any one except me!” (Fitzgerald ebook). For the most part, Gatsby had kept in his dishonorable feelings however, once Tom started picking a bone, Gatsby fought back and defended himself.

Posted by: Allison Knipe at October 1, 2013 09:00 PM

Matt Nicholson-Lewis
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
1 October 2013

Question # 20: Describe the “valley of ashes.” What does it look like and what does it represent?

The “valley of ashes” is halfway from New York to West Egg and is described in the text as “a fantastic farm where ashes grow like wheat into ridges and hills and grotesque gardens” (Fitzgerald 23). This passage is explaining an area that is viewed very negatively by the author and represents a place where people do not like to even drive past, let alone live near.

Posted by: Matt Nicholson-Lewis at October 1, 2013 09:46 PM

Matt Nicholson-Lewis
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
1 October 2013

Question # 53: Nick says, “There are only the pursued, the pursuing, the busy and the tired.” What does Nick mean? How does each character in the novel fit into this scheme?

From this quote you can say that Gatsby is the “pursuing”. This is shown when Gatsby asks “if you’ll invite Daisy to your house some afternoon and then let him come over” (Fitzgerald 78). From this we can also determine that Daisy is the pursued person. The “busy” person in the novel would be Nick, explained when he says “ I had no girl whose disembodied face floated along the dark cornices” (Fitzgerald 80). This is saying than he has no girl that he “loves” at this moment in time, and is to busy to search out “the one”.

Posted by: Matt Nicholson-Lewis at October 1, 2013 09:47 PM

Matt Nicholson-Lewis
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
1 October 2013

Question # 111: Why does Nick change his feelings toward Jordan?

His Feelings change towards Jordan when he realizes it is his thirtieth Birthday, and that the world of the rich is not for him anymore. Also, Jordan lack of thought for the person hit by the car shows him that he does not think of her the same way as he once did. This is shown in the text “Won’t you come in, Nick? No, thanks. I was feeling sick and wanted to be alone” (Fitzgerald 142). Jordan does not even seemed bothered by the person who has been hit on the road that evening, and it is this moment when Nick realizes that he does not want to take this path of only thinking of one’s self interest’s.

Posted by: Matt Nicholson-Lewis at October 1, 2013 09:48 PM

McKenzie Burns
Dr. Hobbs
ENG CA01 Love and Desire in Literature 210CL
1 October 2013

Question #39: Nick thinks he is one of the few honest people he knows, why? Do you think he is honest?

Answer: Nick believes that he is one of the few honest people he knows because he is very blunt when he has something to say. He does not beat around the bush. For example, when he is talking about Jordan Bakers driving, he says "you're a rotten driver, either you ought to be more careful, or you oughtn't to drive at all" (Fitzgerald 58). I believe that he is very honest as well. Along with his bluntness, he was also very genuine to meeting Gatsby. He did not just use him for a party like a lot of the rest of the people that were there. A lot did not know him, or even try to introduce themselves to him.

Posted by: McKenzie Burns at October 1, 2013 09:54 PM

Jocelyne Hilary
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature

1st October 2013

Question:#103 What ironic situation is occurring on the drive to town?

Answer: Tom Buchanan has been portrayed in the novel, as someone who is in control of his surroundings. He is proud of his name and wealth, and this pride and narcissism consequently made him someone who is not easily threatened. The irony in this chapter however, is that Tom feels like he is losing grip on what he once thought secure. Tom learns from Wilson, that his mistress Myrtle will be moving away with him. Myrtle's plan of moving away with her husband is a reminder to Tom, of the fact that his wife Daisy has been leading a secret life of her own and is distancing herself. Tom suddenly feels threatened by his loss of control in the situation and slightly by Gatsby.

Furthermore, to complicate the situation, there are misunderstandings that occur that foreshadow later events. Wilson believes that Gatsby's car belongs to Tom, while simultaneously Myrtle mistakes Jordan for Daisy.

Posted by: Jocelyne Hilary at October 1, 2013 10:11 PM

Hector M. Rosario
ENG 210CL CA01
Professor Hobbs

Question 119) What do you think Tom and Daisy were saying to each other in the kitchen? Do you think that Tom knew Daisy was driving the "death car"? Why, Why not?

Tom and Daisy were at rock bottom at this point of their relationship. They must have been talking about what the next step in their relationship is. Tom must have asked if what she said about Gatsby is true. Had she truthfully never loved him? Could their relationship have been a lie all along? Daisy must have said the truth about Jay and Tom. She must have reiterated she loved Tom now and they need to get back to being happy. I do not think Tom knew Daisy was driving the "death car." If so, the scene would have been much different. Although Tom was in shock Daisy said she never loved him and did love Gatsby, it was ironic because Tom had a thing for Myrtle.

Posted by: Hector Rosario at October 1, 2013 10:14 PM

Lindsey Thilmony
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire of Literature
1 October 2013

Question: Why does Tom’s defense of family life amuse Nick?

Answer: Toms’ little monologue about family is contradictory to how he lives his own life. Tom is not faithful to Daisy and when he figures out Gatsby and Daisy’s affair, he is bamboozled. Nick is amused by Tom’s hypocrisy. Nick thinks, “Angry as I was, as we all were, I was tempted to laugh whenever he opened his mouth. The transition from libertine to prig was so complete” (Fitzgerald 130).


Posted by: Lindsey Thilmony at October 1, 2013 10:49 PM

Flavia Vazquez
D. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
Question 44: "What does Tom do when he and Daisy return from their honeymoon?"
Answer: He gets into a car accident with one of the chambermaids of the Santa Barbara Hotel.

Posted by: Flavia Vazquez at October 1, 2013 10:53 PM

Flavia Vazquez
D. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature

Question: "What happens on the way home from New York?"

Answer: On the way home, Daisy was driving Gatsby's car and she accidentally ran over Myrtle Wilson who died instantly.

Posted by: Flavia Vazquez at October 1, 2013 10:56 PM

Flavia Vazquez
D. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature

Question 96: "What happens on the way home from New York?"

Answer: On the way home, Daisy was driving Gatsby's car and she accidentally ran over Myrtle Wilson who died instantly.

Posted by: Flavia Vazquez at October 1, 2013 10:57 PM

Camila Pinzon
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
1 October 2013

Question 99 Chapter 7: When does Tom realize that Daisy loves Gatsby?
Answer: During a hot summers day, Daisy invited Gatsby over for lunch with Nick, Jordan, and Tom. However, during Gatsby’s visit Daisy is not being very conspicuous of her affection toward Gatsby. The long-longing looks and tone of voice the way she speaks to him to Nick and Jordan it was very clear. It was only a matter of time before Tom caught on to the secret affair that has been occurring behind his back. After lunch, the men and women are in the living room lost in their own conversations. Daisy, on the other hand, is hot and restless from the heat she shouts out a suggestion to go to town and at that moment she and Gatsby lock eyes, revealing to Tom her love for him. “Their eyes met, and they stared together at each other alone in space. With an effort, she glanced down at the table. ‘You always look so cool,’ she repeated, She had told him [Gatsby] that she loved him, and Tom Buchanan saw. He was astounded” (Fitzgerald 119). Tom at this moment seemed to have his eyes opened to a something he had known all along, though, up until this moment it had all clicked together.

Posted by: camila pinzon at October 2, 2013 12:45 AM

Erica Bodden
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
2 October 2013


Question: What is Nick’s attitude toward Gatsby?

Answer: Chapter 7 can be considered one of the climatic points in the novel. In this chapter, all secrets are revealed. Tom learns of the emotional affair Gatsby and his wife Daisy have been carrying on. Declarations of love and the nonexistence of love were made. “I never loved him she said, with perceptible reluctance” (Fitzgerald 132). In the midst of this heated affair, Nick and Jordan sat silently in the background watching everything unravel; As each event played out Nick’s affection and understanding for Gatsby diminished slowly. It was like looking at someone but nothing about him was visibly recognizable. “ That unfamiliar yet recognizable look back again in Gatsby’s face”(Fitzgerald,134). Gatsby’s love for Daisy was over whelming. His love for her was like the green light of hope that never happened.

Posted by: Erica Bodden at October 2, 2013 12:59 AM

Julia Della Penna
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
2 October 2013

Question 102: Why does Gatsby object to letting Tom drive his car?

Answer: The reason why Gatsby objects to letting Tom drive his car is that Gatsby wants to impress Daisy with everything he does and with all the things he owns, to prove he fits in with the wealthy class with Daisy, including his car. Letting Tom drive the vehicle Gatsby picked out for himself just to impress Daisy would be absurd. As quoted, “Well, you take my coupe and let me drive your car to town.” The suggestion was distasteful to Gatsby. “I don't think there’s much gas,” he objected.”(Fitzgerald, 121). Tom, metaphorically and literally, is trying to take Gatsby place by driving his car, but Gatsby makes excuses not to let him get behind the wheel of his car.

Posted by: Julia Della Penna at October 2, 2013 01:49 AM

Dana DeLosa
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01: Love and Desire in Literature
30 September 2013

Question: “ Chapter 7: If Daisy says she’s never loved Tom, is there someone whom she thinks she loves?”

Answer: Daisy falls victim to the pressure of her love for Gatsby, and proclaims that she never loved Tom; however, after gaining self-confidence in the intense argument, she looks at Gatsby and says, “I did love him once” (Fitzgerald 142). Daisy is currently in love with Gatsby (Fitzgerald 142). They blatantly display their love through verb proclamations as well as gestures such as staring “together at each other, alone in space” and insisting on driving with each other in separate cars (Fitzgerald 126).

Posted by: Dana DeLosa at October 2, 2013 02:01 AM

Ashley Johnson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
2 October 2013

Question 107:
Chapter 7: Why does Tome refer to the liaison between Daisy and Gatsby in terms of intermarriage?

Answer: Tom refers to the Liaison in terms of intermarriage because their relationship is on the same level as a black and white couple and as we know Tom is a racist. Tom feels that a black and white couple is unnatural just like Gatsby and Daisy being together.

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Kaitlin Millner
2 October 2013
Dr. Hobbs
ENG CL210

Question 115 Chapter 7: Describe Daisy and Gatsby's new relationship.


Gatsby is trying his hardest to get Daisy's attention and to stop all the drama and gossip relating the two. There fore Gatsby lets go one of his servant who he had thoughts on spreading false news on them. Daisy stays true to her love and plays it cool with Gatsby and does not want anything more then just being dear friends. But as for Gatsby his love grows more and more stronger for Daisy.

Posted by: Kaitlin Millner at October 2, 2013 08:56 AM

Kaitlin Millner
2 October 2013
Dr. Hobbs
ENG CL210

Question 115 Chapter 7: Describe Daisy and Gatsby's new relationship.


Gatsby is trying his hardest to get Daisy's attention and to stop all the drama and gossip relating the two. There fore Gatsby lets go one of his servant who he had thoughts on spreading false news on them. Daisy stays true to her love and plays it cool with Gatsby and does not want anything more then just being dear friends. But as for Gatsby his love grows more and more stronger for Daisy.

Posted by: Kaitlin Millner at October 2, 2013 08:56 AM

Hector M. Rosario
ENG 210CL CA01
Professor Hobbs

Q. 131) Who is Henry C. Gatz?
Henry C. Gatz is Jay Gatsby's father. Upon hearing of the death, he sent a telegram from a town in Minnesota. He was hoping to postpone the funeral. He is described by Fitzgerald as "a solemn old man, very helpless and dismayed, bundled up in a long cheap ulster against the warm September day" (page 167). Also, when Mr. Gatz was asked a question and was referred to as "Mr. Gatsby" he quickly corrected the error.

Posted by: Hector Rosario at October 2, 2013 10:56 AM

Erica Esqueda
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
2 October 2013
Question: 113. Chapter 7: Why are Tom and Daisy reconciled?
In chapter 7, a few significant things happen that lead to Tom and Daisy’s reconciliation. For example, Tom has already begun to suspect that there is something going on between Gatsby and Daisy, therefore, he decides to confront Gatsby about it. He begins to point out inconsistencies in Gatsby’s background at Oxford, and him being dishonest about the way he earns his money. As their argument got heated, Gatsby blurts out to Tom, “Your wife doesn’t love you. She’s never loved you. She loves me,” (Fitzgerald 130). As this is all happening, Daisy is listening intently to what Tom is saying about Gatsby and his shady business ventures, leading Daisy to think twice about her romance with Gatsby. The conversation gets to a point where they all decide to leave and go back home. On their way home, Daisy and Gatsby are driving by Wilson’s garage and their car hits Myrtle, killing her. Gatsby says that daisy was driving and is willing to take the blame for her crime. This shows that Gatsby truly does love Daisy. However, Daisy realizes that she will be better off with Tom because her life will not be full of unknown risks and she will have much more stability in her life than she would if she would choose Gatsby, and also knows that Gatsby will clean up the mess she has created by causing Myrtle’s death. The scene at the end of the chapter has Tom and Daisy at the table and it is mentioned that “There was an unmistakable air of natural intimacy about the picture, and anybody would have said that they were conspiring together,” (Fitzgerald 145). Although Tom and Daisy had problems, they both knew very well they had Gatsby in common to clean up their messes.

Posted by: Erica Esqueda at October 2, 2013 11:08 AM

Abdulaziz Alsaif
Dr. Hobbs
English -210 CL - CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
02 September 2013

Question # 99: When does tom first realize that Daisy loves Tom?

Answer:
As Gatsby, Daisy, Tom, Nick, Jordan left Tom’s house as they were having dinner, they headed to Tom’s apartment in New York. At the apartment, the conversation gets very tense as Gatsby brings up the topic of how he loves Daisy. Tom does not take the topic well as he shows how bad of a person Gatsby is trying to start a problem in Tom’s house and what he does for money. Once Daisy shows that she loves Gatsby, Tom has a feeling that he was going to lose her, he kept asking her about some times that they spent with each other and if she loved him back then, she is very confused and nervous. In the text, she tells Gatsby that he was asking too much as she says, “Oh, you want too much!” she cried to Gatsby. “I love you now-isn’t that enough? I can’t help what’s past.” She began to sob helplessly. “I did love him once-but I loved you too.” (F. Scoot 132). This is when Tom realized that Daisy loved him when he was with her.

Posted by: abdulaziz alsaif at October 2, 2013 11:08 AM

Allison Knipe
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
2 October 2013

Question: 136. Chapter 9: Why do Tom and Daisy leave?

After Gatsby was shot, Tom ducked out. Tom and Daisy packed up their things and fled from the situation. Nick had, "called up Daisy half an hour after we found him, called her instinctively and without hesitation. But she and Tom had gone away early that afternoon, and taken baggage with them" (Fitzgerald ebook). This showed that even Daisy did not truly love Gatsby. She did not call Gatsby, she did not call Nick, she just got up and left because she couldn't sacrifice her money or life with Tom. Once Gatsby was gone for good, Tom could keep Daisy and she would keep putting on an act for him so that she could have a happy, rich life.

Posted by: Allison Knipe at October 2, 2013 11:14 AM

Rache Robinson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
2 October 2013

Question: Why is Myrtle upset when she sees Tom and Jordan.

Answer: Myrtle is upset when she sees them because she found that her husband was having an affair with his mistress, and Tom found out that Myrtle was living another life. In Chapter 7, it states, "He had discovered that Myrtle had some sort of life apart from him in another world and the shock had made him physically sick" (132).

Posted by: Rache Robinson at October 2, 2013 11:16 AM

Monica Guirguis
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire Literature
30 September 2013
Question:
Why does Gatsby offer Nick Work? How does Nick feel about this?
Answer:
Gatsby offers Nick work because he wants Nick to bring Daisy over his house and arrange a meeting. Even though Nick feels offended because Gatsby offers him money, he still follows through with the plan to bring Daisy and as Nick follows the plan the moment where Daisy and Gatsby its very awkward in the room. According to page 67 “Gatsby, pale as death, with his hands plunged like weights in his coat pockets, was standing in a puddle of water glaring tragically into my eyes” (Fitzgerald,67). Gatsby is breaking down of emotions as he meets Daisy, at one point Gatsby walks out of the room and feels this was a mistake to bring Daisy over his house. Nick tries calm Gatsby down and just to go and talk to Daisy because he is acting childish.

Posted by: Monica Guirguis at October 2, 2013 11:41 AM

Destiny Hubbard
Dr. Hobbs
2 October 2013

Question 14: How does Nick meet Tom’s mistress?
Answer: He went along with Tom to New York by train. When they stopped, Tom gave Nick no choice but to follow him. Nick expresses that he has “no desire to meet her [Tom’s mistress]”, but yet, and still he did (pg. 24).

Posted by: Destiny Hubbard at October 2, 2013 11:51 AM

Destiny Hubbard
Dr. Hobbs
2 October 2013
Question 75. Why does Gatsby deliver so many goods and services to Nick’s house?
Answer: Gatsby asks Nick to help him set up an event, tea, so that Daisy would come to it. He overdoes everything to impress Daisy—he cut his grass, lit up his house, and had a pantry of “twelve lemon cakes” (pg. 84).

Posted by: Destiny Hubbard at October 2, 2013 11:51 AM

Destiny Hubbard
Dr. Hobbs
2 October 2013
Question 91: What was Gatsby’s reaction to Daisy’s child?
Answer: Gatsby was shocked and could not believe his eyes when he saw her child. After all, his dream was to marry Daisy and just be together. In a way his lifelong dream to be with her was shattered because of this child.

Posted by: Destiny Hubbard at October 2, 2013 11:52 AM

Morgan Salter
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
4 October 2013
Question: What does Wilson do (after the death of Myrtle)?
Answer: After the tragic and sudden death of his wife, Myrtle, Wilson practically loses his mind. He frantically investigates his memory until he comes to the, however untrue, conclusion that Myrtle was having an affair with Gatsby when “she ran out to speak to him and he wouldn’t stop” (Fitzgerald 137). Enraged with this assumption, Wilson goes over to Gatsby’s home and shoots him by the pool. After the murder, Wilson proceeded to end his own life bringing what he believed was justice to Myrtle’s heartbreaking death.

Posted by: Morgan Salter at October 2, 2013 02:48 PM

Connor Schaefer
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL- CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
2 October 2013

“That was it. I’d never understand before. It was full of money-that was the inexhaustible charm that rose and fell in it, the jingle of it, the cymbals’ song of it. . . high in a white place the king’s daughter, the golden girls. . . .”

“. . .it occurred to me that there was no difference between men, in intelligence or race, so profound as the difference between the sick and the well.”

Question: Which of these statements about other characters’ reactions to Myrtle’s death is true?

Answer: Myrtle’s death was very tragic to Tom in The Great Gatsby. Tom had an affair with Myrtle, so her death did bother him. Out of the two statements above, I believe the second statement shows the reactions of other people’s emotions when they find out the Myrtle has been killed. In the book, this statement is when Tom discovers George and Myrtle want to move out to the west. Fitzgerald says, “He had discovered that Myrtle had some sort of life apart from him in another world, and the shock had made him physically sick” (124). At this point, Tom sees his life going downhill. His wife and his mistress are both leaving his life. He has the feelings when he finds out that Myrtle has died. The second quote can relate to other character’s expressions because it shows how Tom’s and George can be similar in certain ways, and they both want to have Myrtle. During the scene of the second statement, Tom’s emotions turn to sadness. That is why the second quote is going is more related to Myrtles death.

Posted by: Connor Schaefer at October 2, 2013 04:12 PM

Lydia R Santana
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 21OCL Love and Desires in Literature
02 October 2013

Question 109:What is the significance of Nick's thirtieth birthday?

Answer:What was significant about Nick's thirtieth birthday, is that he realized that maybe his dreams don't have a promising future. He knew he wanted to be a bond's man and he doesn't seem to be successful. He lives in a cottage in West Egg, while his neighbors were extremely wealthy. He comes to realize where he is in life and I don't believe that he is happy about it. Nick states,"[I] just remembered that today's my birthday.' I was thirty. Before me stretched the portentous, menacing road of a new decade. [. . .] Thirty-- the promise of a decade of loneliness, a thinning list of single men to know, a thinning briefcase of enthusiasm, thinning hair.[F]ormidable stroke of thirty died away with the reassuring pressure of her hand"(Fitzgerald 135-136).

Posted by: Lydia Santana at October 2, 2013 07:26 PM

McKenzie Burns
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
2 September 2013

Question #64: What did Dan Cody do for Gatsby?

Answer: Dan Cody was a millionaire yacht captain that took Gatsby under his wing and gave him a job on board. Before Cody passed, him and Gatsby were best friends. "He used to be my best friend years ago" (Fitzgerald 93).

Posted by: McKenzie Burns at October 2, 2013 10:44 PM

Stephanie Gilbert
Dr.Hobbs
Eng-210CL-CA01- Love and Desire in Literature
3,October,2013


Chapter 8
128. How does Nick’s statement “You’re worth the whole bunch put together” show a change in Nick from the beginning of the novel?

Nick’s statement “You’re worth the whole damn bunch put together.” He basically changes his opinion of Gatsby. For example when Nick explains, “I’ve always been glad I said that. It was the only compliment I ever gave him, because I disapproved of him from the beginning to end.” By Nick saying this, it shows a change of heart in Nick.

Posted by: Stephanie gilbert at October 3, 2013 08:28 AM

Kelly Scott
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
25 September 2013

Question: Describe Mr. Wilson and Myrtle. Do they seem to fit the setting?

Answer: Mr. Wilson is a middle class man who runs a worn down auto shop. He loves Myrtle, and deep down I believe he wishes Myrtle loved him in return. Myrtle has no desire to be with Mr. Wilson because he does not meet her needs financially or sexually. Myrtle states, “The only crazy I was was when I married him. I knew right away I made a mistake” (Fitzgerald, 35). These feelings lead her to Tom Buchanan, who she sees on the side. They do not seem to fit the setting because they seem poorer than the rest of their community, such as Tom, Daisy, and Gatsby. They are all well to do while the Wilson’s live in the beat up auto shop.

Posted by: Kelly Scott at October 3, 2013 12:43 PM

Kelly Scott
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
30 September 2013

Question: Describe Gatsby and Daisy’s new relationship.

Answer: In chapter seven, Daisy is very confused. She does not know whom she wants in terms of Gatsby or Tom. Deep down, she has always loved Gatsby, and she displays this affection throughout the chapter. A particular scene in chapter seven proves this, “As he [Tom] left the room again she got up and went over to Gatsby and pulled his face down, kissing him on the mouth. ‘You know I love you,’ she murmured” (Fitzgerald, 116). She wanted to pursue a relationship with him until her, Gatsby, Tom, Jordan, and Nick went into town. It was then that Tom realized the affair between Gatsby and Daisy. Gatsby told Daisy to explain to Tom that she never loved him, and she tried to admit it but realized it was not true. When Gatsby asked to see her alone, she replied with, “Even alone I can’t say I never loved Tom, it wouldn’t be true” (Fitzgerald, 133). Soon after this occurred, they all went back home. On their way, Daisy hit Myrtle in the car that her and Gatsby were driving in. The accident caused Myrtle to die instantly. Gatsby was the only one who knew at this time that Daisy was the one who hit Myrtle. Everyone else assumed Gatsby had been driving. When Tom returned home with Daisy, Gatsby hid in the bushes outside to make sure Tom did not try to hurt Daisy. Gatsby explained the situation to Nick, and it is obvious that Gatsby still believes that he has a chance with Daisy. However, it also becomes clear that Daisy no longer shows interest in Gatsby whatsoever.

Posted by: Kelly Scott at October 3, 2013 12:55 PM

Kelly Scott
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
27 September 2013

Question: What does Gatsby reply when Nick asks him how he makes his money? Why does Nick find that significant?

Answer: Gatsby did not tell the truth when he explained to Nick how he made his money. Gatsby originally told Nick that he inherited his money from his deceased family. However, in chapter five, Nick catches Gatsby in the white lie. As they are leaving Nick’s house to tour Gatsby’s, Gatsby states, “It took me just three years to earn the money that bought it [his house]” (Fitzgerald, 90). Nick replies quickly, “I thought you inherited your money?” (Fitzgerald, 90) Gatsby responds automatically with the fact that he lost a lot of money in the panic of the war. Nick presumed with asking questions, and he felt that Gatsby had no idea what he was saying after Nick asked about what business he was in. It was almost as if Gatsby knew he had been caught, and he kept thinking of ways to correct himself, but in actuality he was just digging himself into a deeper hole of nonsense.

Posted by: Kelly Scott at October 3, 2013 01:08 PM

Emily Paulino
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
3 October 2013

Question: 130. Chapter 9: Why couldn't Nick get anyone to come to Gatsby's funeral?

Answer: The reason Nick couldn't get anyone to come to Gatsby's funeral because no one really cared to know Gatsby. All that people cared about was the parties that he threw. Also, Gatsby was known to be a murderer because no one actually knew that Daisy killed Mertle. Gatsby put the blame on himself to keep Daisy safe. Daisy didn't attend the funeral either because she decided to be with Tom and not Gatsby.

Posted by: Emily Paulino at October 3, 2013 05:38 PM

McKenzie Burns
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
3 September 2013

Question #118: Describe the fight between Gatsby and Tom. What do these men think of each other? How are they similar and how are they different?

Answer: The fight that is happening between the two men are about how Daisy is in love with Gatsby and Tom will not stand for it any longer. Tom started it by asking Gatsby "what kind of row are you trying to cause in my house anyhow?" (Fitzgerald 129). Tom just added fuel to the fire by telling Gatsby that he has to throw big parties and show off his money in order to have friends. Gatsby's response to Tom's outburst was "your wife doesn't love you, she"s never loved you. She loves me" (Fitzgerald 130). He continued his argument by telling Tom that the only reason that Daisy married him was because she was tired of waiting for him to have money and that Tom was just a convenience for her. These men completely despise one another. The way they are alike is that they both love Daisy and want her to be with them. The way that they differ is that Daisy admits to loving Gatsby and Tom, but "admits" she is only in love with Tom now.

Posted by: McKenzie Burns at October 3, 2013 07:03 PM

Kerriann Salatti
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
4 October 2013

Question: Why is the book Gatsby’s father shows Nick important to the novel?

Answer: The book is important in the novel because inside of it Gatsby wrote notes to him self and goals he wanted to set. These were his guidelines to becoming a better man and living and better future than what his parents had set for him. Gatsby’s dad had said, “Jimmy was bound to get ahead. He always had some resolves like this or something. Do you notice what he’s got about improving his mind?” (Fitzgerald 173)

Posted by: Kerriann Salatti at October 3, 2013 08:38 PM

McKenzie Burns
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
3 September 2013

Question #134: What does Nick say about people like Daisy and Tom?

Answer: The way Nick felt about Daisy and Tom was not highly at all. He was disgusted at the thought of them after they did not show up for Gatsby's funeral, especially Daisy. He said that they were careless people. "They smashed up things and creatures and then retreated back into their money or their vast carelessness, or whatever it was that kept them together, and let other people clean up the mess they had made" (Fitzgerald 179). By saying this, Nick means that people like them do not take responsibility for actions they have done. They use people just to get what they want. Once that option is no longer, they go back to being comfortable in their materialized lives.

Posted by: McKenzie Burns at October 3, 2013 08:39 PM

Lauren Rhodes
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02: Love and Desire in Literature
30 September 2013

Question: How does Nick describe Tom Buchanan?

We learn that Nick knows Tom from his college years. Nick explains "He had changed since his New Haven years. Now he was a sturdy straw haired man of thirty with a rather hard mouth and a supercilious manner." (11 Fitzgerald)

Nick also explains that Tom has a cruel body and a gruff voice. We also learn that some people like him, and other hate his guts.

Posted by: Lauren Rhodes at October 3, 2013 09:20 PM

Lauren Rhodes
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02: Love and Desire in Literature
30 September 2013

Question:What is Daisy's real response to the party, according to Nick?

After Gatsby claimed Daisy did not like the party, Nick replied with "of course she did" (116 Fitzgerald) to try to cheer Gatsby up. Gatsby insists that she did not have a good time. He then went on to say how "she doesn't understand [. . .] she used to be able to understand. We'd sit for hours" (116 Fitzgerald).

Posted by: Lauren Rhodes at October 3, 2013 09:27 PM

Lauren Rhodes
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02: Love and Desire in Literature
30 September 2013

Question: If Daisy says she never loved Tom, is there someone whom she thinks she loves?

Daisy is torn between the two men she loves, Gatsby and Tom. In the beginning she tells Tom to "take Nick and Jordan. We'll follow you in the car" (128 Fitzgerald). Meaning that she wants to be alone with Gatsby. Then while in a confrontation between Tom and Gatsby, Daisy claims that she "never loved Tom" (139 Fitzgerald) Throughout the whole chapter, we see that Daisy is torn between the two men she supposedly loves.

Posted by: Lauren Rhodes at October 3, 2013 09:36 PM

Kaitlin Millner
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL
3 October 2013


126 Chapter 8: How are seasons used in constructing this novel?


The seasons construct this novel in many ways. The story starts off late spring transitioning into summer. During these two seasons its all about nature, how the earth is blossoming, and everything comes to life and new begging’s. The new begging for summer is compared to Gatsby’s attempt to new begging’s with Daisy. For example, when Gatsby moved into a mansion just to be closer to Daisy. But, when summer ends and fall takes approach, things fall apart and Gatsby does not get the chance to share his love with Daisy and they can only be friends. The season loses it touch plants start to die and trees become bare.

Posted by: kaitlin Millner at October 3, 2013 09:50 PM

Jordan Dadez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 Love and Desire in Literature CA01
3 October 2013

Question: What is the purpose of Nick’s last meeting with Jordan?

Answer: The purpose of Nick’s last meeting with Jordan is to further illustrate the fact that these characters are shallow and not even death can change that. Jay Gatsby was one of Jordan’s closest friends, and her lifestyle has not changed. After the small talk has ended, she informs Nick that she is engaged, but the conversation takes a hypocritical turn. Jordan says, “I thought you were rather an honest, straightforward person. I thought it was your secret pride” (Fitzgerald 177). The fact that she made this statement just proves that she is a shallow and selfish being. Nick is obviously the most caring out of the group. Jordan is simply looking for a new source to fuel her lifestyle, and it is now her fiancé.

Posted by: Jordan Dadez at October 3, 2013 10:26 PM

Kylie Fagan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
3 October 2013

Question #5: How does Daisy react to the phone calls from Tom's woman in New York?

Answer:I feel that as if Daisy tries to hide her true feelings about the phone calls that Tom receives from his mistress in New York. I say this because in the book it describes her reaction as so: "As if his absence quickened something within her, Daisy leaned forward again, her voice glowing and singing" (Fitzgerald 14). Also, it seems as if she is totally trying to ignore what is happening and tries to act oblivious because she immediately changes the subject and starts rambling on at the table to Nick and Miss Baker. Then she excuses herself from the table a few minutes later to go talk to Tom. You can tell that Daisy is very bothered by the situation, but from the text it is a little hard to gather how she compltely feels.

Posted by: Kylie Fagan at October 3, 2013 10:31 PM

Deirdre Rowan
Dr. Hobbs
English 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
3 October 2013

Question 122: Why did Myrtle run?

Answer: When Tom Buchanan stops by Wilson's Garage on his way to the city, he was driving Gatsby's vehicle. When Daisy takes the car back home, Myrtle thinks that Tom is still driving. "It was the man in that car. She ran out to speak to him and he wouldn’t stop" (159). George is planning to move West so he can hold on to Myrtle. Myrtle runs to the car in order to keep living the high life with Tom that she could not do with George.

Posted by: Deirdre Rowan at October 3, 2013 10:37 PM

Joe Rulli
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
3 October 2013

Question: How does Fitzgerald achieve a melancholic mood in the beginning of chapter 8?

Answer: Chapter 8 begins with Nick waking up after a long, crazy night the night before. Myrtle is hit by Gatsby's car and dies, and Tom finds out about Daisy's affair with Gatsby. After this crazy night, Nick goes to Gatsby's house because he feels he has to give him some sort of advice. He tells him he should leave town because he could get in trouble because his car hit Myrtle and killed her, although he was not driving. Fitzgerald achieves this melancholic mood because everything from the night before seems so unreal, and Nick knows theres more to come, kind of like the eye of the storm.

Posted by: Joe Rulli at October 3, 2013 11:43 PM

Paula Pion
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210Cl CA02
3 October 2013

Question 68: “What is the meeting between Gatsby and Daisy like initially?”

Answer: I am using the public domain ebook version of The Great Gatsby located on the lib guide to answer this question. The meeting between Daisy and Gatsby was a little tense and awkward at first because Gatsby was growing impatient for Daisy’s arrival, plus it was a gloomy day. When Nick pulled Gatsby aside, Nick told him he needed to stop acting like a child ,and Daisy is equally as embarrassed as him so he should just go suck it up and make the best of the situation (Fitzgerald 94).

Posted by: Paula Pion at October 4, 2013 12:01 AM

Vanessa Parkin
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
3 October 2013

Question 4: Chapter 1: Who is Jordan Baker? What does Nick find appealing about her?

Jordan Baker is a tennis player. Nick, the narrator, meets Jordan through his cousin Daisy. Nick finds Jordan’s assertiveness appealing. She comes across as aggressive and the type to be direct. Although, Nick realizes that she is actually very dishonest.

Posted by: Vanessa Parkin at October 4, 2013 01:12 AM

Paula Pion
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210Cl CA02
3 October 2013

Question 111: “Why does Nick change his feelings toward Jordan?”

Answer: I am using the public domain eBook version of The Great Gatsby located on the libguide to answer this question. Nick’s feeling towards Jordan changes after the accident, because he realizes Jordan is another rich girl who does not care about what happens around her. Nick does not say, but he does include Jordan with the rest of “them” when he says he is fed up on page 152. Them being self-absorbed rich folk.

Posted by: Paula Pion at October 4, 2013 01:16 AM

Vanessa Parkin
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
3 October 2013

Question 116: Chapter 7: Compare George Wilson and Tom. What did each man learn about his wife and how did they each react?

Tom realizes that Daisy is still in love with Gatsby. He then becomes confident to think that his wife would not leave him. Daisy is a catholic. “She’s a Catholic and they don’t believe in divorce” (Fitzgerald 33). When George Wilson finds out about his wife’s affair, he realizes that she does not love him. He tries his best to keep her away from Tom, and wants to take them out west.

Posted by: Vanessa Parkin at October 4, 2013 01:19 AM


Vanessa Parkin
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
3 October 2013

Question 89: Chapter 6: How did the Gatsby measure the success of his party?

Gatsby’s only reason for throwing huge parties is Daisy. He measures his success on how much she enjoys herself while at his party. He does not necessarily care about the other hundreds of guests. His only purpose is to impress and court Daisy.

Posted by: Vanessa Parkin at October 4, 2013 01:25 AM

Dana DeLosa
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01: Love and Desire in Literature
03 October 2013

Question: “Who is Dan Cody and what is his role in Gatsby’s life?”

Answer: Gatsby describes Dan Cody as his “best friend” from “years ago” (Fitzgerald 93). When Dan Cody suspiciously died, he left Gatsby the sum of “twenty-five thousand dollars”; however, he never received the money (100). Finally, Dan Cody serve as an a role model to Gatsby in that he behaves exactly how Gatsby does not want to; Gatsby credits his refrain from alcohol to the images of Cody engrossed in it with women (Fitzgerald 99).

Posted by: Dana DeLosa at October 4, 2013 02:05 AM

Connor Schaefer
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL- CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
4 October 2013

Question: Why did Nick take care of Gatsby’s funeral?


Answer: This is a very simple question. One of the things that Nick always wondered about Gatsby is how he is always alone. Gatsby always has people at his house celebrating. Even though hundreds of people came to his parties, he was not close friends with any of the people that attended. The main reason why Nick took care of Gatsby’s funeral was that Gatsby did not have anyone else to fulfill such a task. Even though Gatsby threw all of those parties, people did not seem to care about Gatsby. Out of the hundreds of people that would attend his parties, not one could come to his funeral. One of the few people that came to his funeral was his own father. Fitzgerald states, “The minister glanced several times at his watch, so I took him aside and asked him to wait for half an hour. But it wasn’t any use. Nobody came” (174). In this scene, Nick is at the cemetery waiting to see if anyone will show up, but no one comes. The only people there were Nick, Gatsby father, and a guy Nick met at one of Gatsby’s parties. This shows that many people may have just liked Gatsby for his money, including Daisy. Once he died, she did not go out of her way to come give Gatsby her goodbyes. Unfortunately, Nick conducted Gatsby’s funeral because he was all alone in the world.

Posted by: Connor Schaefer at October 4, 2013 02:47 AM

Jasmine Collins
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL: Love and Desire in Literature CA01
04 October 2013
Question 98: Chapter 7: How are Daisy and Tom alike?
Answer: They are alike because they both are cheaters. Tom has been cheating on Daisy with Myrtle, and Daisy with Gatsby. When Catherine spoke, “Neither of them can stand the person they’re married to” (Fitzgerald 33), at the party, she was talking about Myrtle and Tom and justifying why they were together at this party. They are both unhappy in their lives, but refuse to change. In addition, they are alike because they both lose control easily. When Daisy is yelling at Tom, “Please have a little self-control” (Fitzgerald 129), she was losing control over her feelings for Tom and Gatsby. That is why it was so easy for Tom to persuade her. Tom lost control when he said, “I suppose the latest thing is to sit back and let Mr. Nobody from Nowhere make love to your wife” (Fitzgerald 130). He had enough with Daisy flirting with Gatsby. Another reason would be that they are both materialistic. Tom wanted a grand house so he can brag, and Daisy likes to be showered in expensive gifts.

Posted by: Jasmine Collins at October 4, 2013 06:31 AM

Jasmine Collins
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL: Love and Desire in Literature CA01
04 October 2013
Question 133: Chapter 9: What happens between Nick and Jordan Baker?
Answer: Nick and Jordan decide to separate. Nick was the one that decided to call it off. Jordan’s reply was, “was engaged to another man” (Fitzgerald 177). I feel, as Jordan is a little bitter about the situation because she tells Nick, “I don’t give a damn about you now” (Fitzgerald 177). This comment does little to Nick, and he is just fine that he got it out of the way and he can now move on with his life.

Posted by: Jasmine Collins at October 4, 2013 06:45 AM

Kylie Fagan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
4 October 2013

Question:Explain the significance of the green light.

Answer: I feel that the book implies that the significance of the green light at the end of Daisy's dock is a symbol of Gatsby's hope to be with Daisy. Every time at night when he goes out on his dock he stares at this light that just has this amazing glow to it, and I think that it symbolizes Gatsby's dream of forever being with Daisy. "Possibly it had occured to him that the colossal significance of that light had now vanished forever. Compared to the great distance thathad separated him from Daisy it had seemed very near to her, almost touching her. It had seemed as close as a star to the moon. Now it was again a green light on a dock. His count of enchanted objects had diminished by one" (Fitzgerald 93).

Posted by: Kylie Fagan at October 4, 2013 09:01 AM

Kylie Fagan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
4 October 2013

Question: Why does Gatsby view Daisy's child with surprise?

Answer: I believe that Gatsby views Daisy's child with such surprise, because he did not actually believe that she was real. I think that he is so in love with Daisy that he almost didn't want to believe that she actually had a child with someone else. The book doesnt really describe this part in detail and there are only a few sentences written about it, but that is my opinion about it.

Posted by: Kylie Fagan at October 4, 2013 09:09 AM

Desiree Jaramillo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
25 September 2013

Question 1: “How does Nick describe himself at the beginning of the book?”

Answer: In the first pages of the book, Nick refers to a lesson his father taught him that he carried with him for the rest of his life. His father taught him to not judge others by his own standards because he will only misinterpret them and misunderstand them. He then goes further to explain how he originated in the west, and moved east in following the dream that many Americans in that time era followed. Everybody wanted to live the wealthy, party life, and New York was just the place to do it.

Posted by: Desiree Jaramillo at October 4, 2013 09:34 AM

Desiree Jaramillo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
27 September 2013

Question76: “Describe the effect of rain on the plot.”

Answer: The day of Gatsby’s and Daisy’s meeting, it begins raining. However, this does not scare Gatsby away from the idea of rekindling his true love. He actually just casually states that, “‘One of the papers said they thought the rain would stop about four,’” (84). I believe this portrays the determination that Gatsby has in his love for Daisy. As the meeting continues the rain gradually begins to lift; as does the tension between Gatsby and Daisy. It leads the audience to believe that the storm has passed and all remains blissful for the pair.

Posted by: Desiree Jaramillo at October 4, 2013 09:36 AM

Desiree Jaramillo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
30 September 2013

Question 93: “Why do the four drive into the city on such a hot afternoon?”

Answer: In chapter 7, everybody shows up at the Buchanans’ house for lunch. This is when Daisy and Gatsby can hardly stay away from each other and Tom begins to suspect infidelity. When Daisy begins whining that she is bored and wants to go into the city, she is completely focused on Gatsby. As Tom witnesses this, he begins itching for a confrontation with Gatsby. It is as if he wants to Gatsby to lose control because he says, “‘Come on, Daisy… I’ll take you in this circus wagon,” (121). This is when Daisy volunteers to go with Gatsby and has no other explanation except for the fact that she would rather ride with Gatsby and not her husband.

Posted by: Desiree Jaramillo at October 4, 2013 09:37 AM

Diego Pestana
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 – Love and Desire in Literature
1 October 2013
#14
Q: How does Nick meet Tom's mistress?
A: Nick meets Tom's mistress when Tom takes him out to go to a party which he is brining Myrtle, his mistress, to. Nick first meets her when Tom gets off the train with him and tells him, “'I want you to meet my girl'” (Fitzgerald). It was then at Myrtle's husband's garage, George Wilson, that Nick first sees Myrtle. When he first sees her he remarks, “I heard footsteps on a stairs and in a moment the thickish figure of a woman blocked out the light from the office door” (Fitzgerald).

Work Cited
Fitzgerald, Scott. The Great Gatsby. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1925

Posted by: Diego Pestana at October 4, 2013 09:47 AM

Abdulaziz Alsaif
Dr. Hobbs
English -210 CL - CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
04 October 2013

Question #123: Why does Wilson believe that Gatsby killed Myrtle?

Answer:
Wilson believed that Gatsby killed his wife when he started to realize how some night she was leaving him and coming home with swollen nose. That narrator explains this in the text, “He believed that Mrs. Wilson had been running away from her husband, rather than trying to stop any particular car.”(F. Scott 158-159). Wilson was sure that his wife was leaving him for the person who was driving the yellow car, that is Gatsby who murdered her and did not even stop on purpose. At this point, Wilson was sure that Gatsby murdered her and wanted to get revenge because he was so uneasy about what Gatsby has done.

Posted by: abdulaziz alsaif at October 4, 2013 09:56 AM

Diego Pestana
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 – Love and Desire in Literature
1 October 2013
#66
Q: What does Gatsby want from Daisy?
A: Gatsby wants Daisy to come over to his house after reuniting with her at Nick's place. Gatsby is still in love with Daisy and loves to be in her company. After a while at Nick's place, Gatsby says to Nick, “'I want you and Daisy to come over to my house'” (Fitzgerald). And it is at Gatsby's mansion that he shows Daisy his clothes (which she cries at the sight of) and clippings that he had kept of her. This is Gatsby's way of trying to get Daisy to fall in love with him again.

Work Cited
Fitzgerald, Scott. The Great Gatsby. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1925

Posted by: Diego Pestana at October 4, 2013 09:56 AM

Diego Pestana
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 – Love and Desire in Literature
1 October 2013
#114
Q: Who is Trimalchio? Explain how this describes Gatsby.
A: Trimalchio is what Nick refers to Gatsby as when his parties stop. In the beginning of the chapter, Nick remarks, “The lights in his house failed to go on one Saturday night—and, as obscurely as it begun, his career as Trimalchio was over” (Fitzgerald). Historically, Trimalchio is a fictional character from Ancient Rome who attained wealth through hard work. This describes Gatsby as he also worked (with Wolfsheim) to attain the wealth that allowed him to throw the extravagant parties that he hoped Daisy would stumble into.

Work Cited
Fitzgerald, Scott. The Great Gatsby. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1925

Posted by: Diego Pestana at October 4, 2013 10:02 AM

Diego Pestana
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 – Love and Desire in Literature
1 October 2013

#141
Q: What is the irony of Mr. Gatz's comment about James J. Hill?
A: When Mr. Gatz is talking to Nick about Gatsby, Mr. Gatz remarks, “'If he'd of lived he'd of been a great man. A man like James J. Hill.'” (Fitzgerald). The irony is that Gatsby arguably did live the life of a great man even though it was cut short. In his life, Gatsby was able to attain wealth and power through his hard work, like James J. Hill. However, because Mr. Gatz wasn't involved in Gatsby's life, he was not aware of the influence that Gatsby had.

Work Cited
Fitzgerald, Scott. The Great Gatsby. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1925

Posted by: Diego Pestana at October 4, 2013 10:07 AM

Christopher Holtzhower
ENG 210 CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
Dr. Burgsbee Hobbs
3 October 2013
Question #57: What does Jordan tell Nick about Daisy, Gatsby, and Tom?
Answer: Jordan tells Nick several things about each of the above characters. Jordan informs Nick about how Gatsby and Daisy had a relationship before she met Tom. After Gatsby was deployed to the war in Europe, Daisy married Tom. Jordan also tells Nick that she believes Gatsby bought his mansion on the West Egg just to be closer to Daisy. Jordan then tells Nick that Tom has not been faithful to Daisy, as he has a mistress.

Posted by: Christopher Holtzhower at October 4, 2013 10:27 AM

Jennifer Schubin
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
4 October 2013

Question 16: Describe George Wilson. How does he react to Tom’s arrival?
Answer: Mr. Wilson is a quiet man who is poor and lives with his wife above the repair garage that George, Mr. Wilson, owns. The area is described in the book as, “approached by a trail of ashes; the third was a garage Repairs. GEORGE B. WILSON. Cars bought and sold.” Mr. Wilson was quickly excited about seeing Tom because Mr. Wilson is trying to buy Tom’s car and sell it to make more money.

Posted by: Jennifer Schubin at October 4, 2013 10:57 AM

Jennifer Schubin
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
4 October 2013

Question 65: What is Daisy’s opinion of Gatsby’s party and how does it affect him?

Answer: Daisy does not like the party. She thinks the event is outlandish and immature. Gatsby is convinced , “she didn’t like it…She didn’t have a good time.” Gatsby want to make her understand why he throws parties at all. Nick tells him, “[You] Can’t repeat the past” and Gatsby tells Nick, “Why of you can!”

Posted by: Jennifer Schubin at October 4, 2013 11:00 AM

Regina Green
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
5 October 2013

Question: What two emotions are pulling Mr. Gatz?

Answer: The two emotions that are pulling Mr. Gatz are happiness and sadness. He is happy and proud that his some accomplished so much in the time he had been alive but he was sad that his son was gone. Mr. Gatz says, " Of course we was broke up when he run off from home, but I see now there was a reason for it. He knew he had a big future in front of him. And ever since he make a success he was very generous with me" (Fitzgerald 172). This shows that Mr. Gatz had great gratitude for what his son had accomplished. He just wishes his son was still alive to continue his great successes.

Posted by: Regina Green at October 5, 2013 05:33 PM

Monica Guirguis
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire Literature
30 September 2013

Question:
How are Daisy and Tom alike?

Answer: Daisy and Tom are alike because they both love wealthy and material things from the world. They are both also alike because they are carless and don’t care about anything. According to page 155 “ They weren’t happy, and neither of them had touched the chicken or the ale- and yet they weren’t unhappy either, there was an unmistakable air of natural intimacy about the picture and anybody would have said they were conspiring together”(Fitzgerald, 155. This showed that they were not satisfied with their lives and they weren’t going to be happy till this feeling was gone out of them.

Posted by: Monica Guirguis at October 6, 2013 12:00 AM

Monica Guirguis
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire Literature
30 September 2013

Question:
How are Daisy and Tom alike?

Answer: Daisy and Tom are alike because they both love wealthy and material things from the world. They are both also alike because they are carless and don’t care about anything. According to page 155 “ They weren’t happy, and neither of them had touched the chicken or the ale- and yet they weren’t unhappy either, there was an unmistakable air of natural intimacy about the picture and anybody would have said they were conspiring together”(Fitzgerald, 155. This showed that they were not satisfied with their lives and they weren’t going to be happy till this feeling was gone out of them.

Posted by: Monica Guirguis at October 6, 2013 12:02 AM

Flavia Vazquez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature

Question 146: Why does Nick call Tom and Daisy "careless people"?

Answer: After Gatsby died, Daisy and Tom moved away with their daughter and Daisy did not visit or even send flowers. She did not care that Gatsby lost his life trying to protect her.

Posted by: Flavia Vazquez at October 6, 2013 07:21 PM

Vera Smirnova
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
4 October 2013
Question: #137 How does Nick reacts to the phone call revealing Gatsby's criminal activities?

Answer:
When Nick hears the phone ring he thinks it is Daisy, but it was not her. It dissapointes Nick, but even worse the call makes the fact that the man who called did not even know about Gatsby's death. He only needs help from him. When the person who called hears that Gatsby is dead he just hangs out the phone.Nick realizes that his attempts to call someone on the funerual are futile.

Posted by: Vera Smirnova at October 6, 2013 08:28 PM

Maria Benkirane

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 210 CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature

7 Octobre 2013

Question: Who attended Gatsby's funeral? How and why is this significant?

Answer: Other than Nick, the Minster, Owl eyes and some servants, Gatsby's father came to the funeral. Henry Gatz came all the way from Minnesota to attend his son's funeral, telling Nick that he is proud of his son and that he always believed he would achieve great things. This is significant because all those people who attended his amazing parties did not attend the funeral. They do not care about Gatsby, except all the parties that he threw: " I began to look involuntarily out the windows for other cars. So did Gatsby's father [ . . . ] The minister glanced several times at his watch, so I took him aside and asked him to wait for half an hour. But it wasn't any use. Nobody came" (Fitzgerald 174). This is also significant because it shows that Gatsby did not really have any real close friends who loved him for who he is.

Posted by: maria benkirane at October 6, 2013 08:41 PM

Monica Guirguis
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire Literature
30 September 2013

Question:
How are Daisy and Tom alike?
Answer: Daisy and Tom are alike because they both love wealthy and material things from the world. They are both also alike because they are carless and don’t care about anything. According to page 155 “ They weren’t happy, and neither of them had touched the chicken or the ale- and yet they weren’t unhappy either, there was an unmistakable air of natural intimacy about the picture and anybody would have said they were conspiring together”(Fitzgerald, 155. This showed that they were not satisfied with their lives and they weren’t going to be happy till this feeling was gone out of them.

Posted by: Monica Guirguis at October 6, 2013 09:19 PM

Morgan Salter
Dr. Hobbs
English 210 CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
7 October 2013
Paul writes about an unconditional love between God, the creator, and his children. This pure love that Paul describes has no bounds and no stipulations, however does require characteristics of a selfless bond. As it is written, God possesses this love for all of His creation and we, as his children, are called to also love one another in such a way. Paul’s depicted model of a heavenly, agape love is present in the father-son relationship between Jay Gatsby and his father Mr. Gatz through the characteristics of infinite love and endurance. When Gatsby was young, he left home to make more of his life and be successful. Although his family was distraught about his leaving, they understood that “there was a reason for it. He knew he had a big future in front of him” (Fitzgerald 172). Following Gatsby’s sudden death at the end of the novel, Nick plans a funeral for his friend to which he becomes acquainted with Mr. Gatz. After his son’s abandonment of his family, their lack of frequent communication, and the time they spent apart he attended the funeral and expressed his undying love for his son. His presence at the funeral directly depicts a passage from 1 Corinthians 13:7-8 stating: “Love bears all things, believes all things, hopes all things, endures all things. Love never ends.” Mr. Gatz’s love for his son endured the heartbreak and disappointment of losing him, but never ended. Mr. Gatz never gave up on his son, never resented him, and never lost faith in Gatsby despite his decision to venture out into the world. This relationship between Mr. Gatz and Jay Gatsby directly corresponds to Paul’s letter to the Corinthians through his father’s, like God’s, unconditional love for his son regardless of their hardships endured.

Works Cited
"1 Corinthians 13 (English Standard Version)." BibleGateway. Crossway Bibles, 2001. Web. 6 Oct. 2013. .
Fitzgerald, F. Scott. The Great Gatsby. New York, NY: Scribner, 1996. Print.

Posted by: Morgan Salter at October 6, 2013 10:13 PM

Morgan Salter
Dr. Hobbs
English 210 CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
7 October 2013
Paul writes about an unconditional love between God, the creator, and his children. This pure love that Paul describes has no bounds and no stipulations, however does require characteristics of a selfless bond. As it is written, God possesses this love for all of His creation and we, as his children, are called to also love one another in such a way. Paul’s depicted model of a heavenly, agape love is present in the father-son relationship between Jay Gatsby and his father Mr. Gatz through the characteristics of infinite love and endurance. When Gatsby was young, he left home to make more of his life and be successful. Although his family was distraught about his leaving, they understood that “there was a reason for it. He knew he had a big future in front of him” (Fitzgerald 172). Following Gatsby’s sudden death at the end of the novel, Nick plans a funeral for his friend to which he becomes acquainted with Mr. Gatz. After his son’s abandonment of his family, their lack of frequent communication, and the time they spent apart he attended the funeral and expressed his undying love for his son. His presence at the funeral directly depicts a passage from 1 Corinthians 13:7-8 stating: “Love bears all things, believes all things, hopes all things, endures all things. Love never ends.” Mr. Gatz’s love for his son endured the heartbreak and disappointment of losing him, but never ended. Mr. Gatz never gave up on his son, never resented him, and never lost faith in Gatsby despite his decision to venture out into the world. This relationship between Mr. Gatz and Jay Gatsby directly corresponds to Paul’s letter to the Corinthians through his father’s, like God’s, unconditional love for his son regardless of their hardships endured.

Works Cited
"1 Corinthians 13 (English Standard Version)." BibleGateway. Crossway Bibles, 2001. Web. 6 Oct. 2013. .
Fitzgerald, F. Scott. The Great Gatsby. New York, NY: Scribner, 1996. Print.

Posted by: Morgan Salter at October 6, 2013 10:13 PM

Jennifer Schubin
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
7 October 2013

Question 44: :What does Tom do when he and Daisy return from their honeymoon?

Answer: Tom started to have an affair with Myrtle. Tom gets caught after a while, and talks to Daisy about staying together. Tom’s pleats “ I’m going to take better care of you from now on.”

Posted by: Jennifer Schubin at October 7, 2013 10:16 AM

Flavia Vazquez
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
Test part 2

Answer:

For this second part of the test, I picked Mr. Gatz and his son James (Gatsby). In the text, The Great Gatsby, we see at the end how his father came to see his dead son after reading the news in a newspaper. His love for his son was like Paul’s theory of agape. This is because according to Paul, agapaic love is:
(…) love that is unconditional in the sense that its origin and continuance does not depend on the lovableness of the person loved; love that can transform the person loved; love that is exemplified in God’s relationship to humankind and that humans are summoned to display towards each other. Unlike Platonic eros, this agapaic love is “down-to-earth” and pragmatic. And unlike Aristotelian friendship, this agapaic love does not depend on the lovableness of the loved one (Paul 29).
Gatsby’s father, Mr. Gatz, shows this love because even though his son ran away, ashamed of their financial conditions, he never stopped loving Gatsby. Mr. Gatz held on to his son through a book of Gatsby, and a picture he sent the father once. “Jimmy sent me this picture… Jimmy sent it to me. I think it’s a very pretty picture. It shows up well” (Fitzgerald 172). Mr. Gatz love for James was unconditional; he loved his son no matter what, and I believe this was because he always knew that James would strive for more than he had at that time. Gatsby went back to see his parents and bought them a house. In a way, he loved his parents too, but he was not willing to live his whole life under poverty, even if he had to do terrible things to accomplish his desires, he would do it. Gatsby’s parents did not know where the money came from, and they had not interest in his money, as to other parents would have. This is the reason Mr. Gatz love for James was agapaic.

Works Cited
Fitzgerald, F. Scott. The Great Gatsby. New York: Scribner, 1925.
Paul, Saint. "Early Christian Views of Love ." n.d.

Posted by: Flavia Vazquez at October 7, 2013 10:34 AM

Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
7 October 2013

Question 44: :What does Tom do when he and Daisy return from their honeymoon?
Answer: Tom started to have an affair with Myrtle. Tom gets caught after a while, and talks to Daisy about staying together. Tom’s pleats “ I’m going to take better care of you from now on.”

Posted by: Jennifer Schubin at October 7, 2013 11:13 AM

Aye’Kendria George
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
24 September 2013

Question: When Nick told Gatsby that “you can’t repeat the past”, Gatsby replied, “Why of course you can!”, Do you with Nick or Gatsby?
Answer: I agree with nick you cannot repeat the past but things from your past can catch up with your future and you may feel like it is the same thing all over again. You can live your future based on your past but it is never really the same.
Fitzgerald, F. Scott, and Matthew J. Bruccoli. The Great Gatsby. New York, NY: Scribner, 1996. Print.

Posted by: Kendria George at October 7, 2013 11:13 AM

Matt Nicholson-Lewis
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
7 October 2013

Question #138:
What is the significance of Mr. Gatz’s arrival?

The arrival of Mr. Gatz allows you to see deeper into Gatsby’s life before he became rich. Mr Gatz is a modest man who comes from a middle class background. He indicates that Gatsby was always meant for greater things. It also shows Gatsby’s tendency to not always tell the truth as he claims to Nick that he has no family earlier in the novel.

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*NOTE* The deadline for this particular assignment has now passed. Any comments listed below are *ONLY* for the reposting of comments that I specifically asked to be revised or are ones from non-student posters. Any 'student' posts below that missed the assignment deadline will not get credit for the assignment. ~ Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: Matt Nicholson-Lewis at October 7, 2013 11:21 PM

Emma De Rhodo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love & Desire in Literature
10 February 2014

QUESTION #3: How does Nick describe Tom Buchanan?

ANSWER: When Nick first describes Tom Buchanan, from what he remembers of him from their years together at New Haven, he says that the man has had many physical successes (Fitzgerald 6). He mentions that Tom “has been one of the most powerful ends that ever played football at New Haven—a national figure in a way” (Fitzgerald 6). Furthermore, Nick says that Tom’s family was rich (Fitzgerald 6). When Nick actually sees Tom again, he describes him as having “a cruel body” (Fitzgerald 7). Nick says that he presents himself in a way which shows he is very full of himself. Then, when he speaks about Tom’s voice, he says that it is “a gruff husky tenor” and that it contained some “paternal contempt” (Fitzgerald 7).

Posted by: Emma De Rhodo at February 8, 2014 11:02 PM

Marie Ryan
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 210Cl Love & Desire in Literature CA01
8 February 2014

Question: For any quoted passages, be prepared to identify who is speaking, to whom the passage is being spoken to (if applicable), and what the context of the situation is, i.e., answer the reporters questions. What's going on? " I hope she'll be a fool- that's the best thing a girl can be in this world, a beautiful little fool... You see I think everything's terrible anyhow... And I know. I've been everywhere and seen everything and done everything."

Answer: In this passage Daisy is speaking to Nick about her daughter. Daisy is telling Nick while he is over for dinner about she wishes they knew each other better and that she has become very skeptical. As a result she says this about her daughter. To support this the author writes, "Well, I've had a very bad time, Nick, and I'm pretty cynical about everything" (Fitzgerald 21).

Posted by: Marie Ryan at February 8, 2014 11:20 PM

Christopher Lavie Mienandy
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210 Love and Desire in Literature CA01
9 February 2014


QUESTION #17: Describe the Buchanan’s house.

ANSWER: The Buchanan’s house seems to be big and nicely designed. The house is described as a mansion of a particular style: “Their house was even more elaborate than I expected, a cheerful red-and-white Georgian Colonial mansion, overlooking the bay.” (Fitzgerald 6). The Buchanan’s family lives in East Egg, a wealthy place next to water: “The lawn started at the beach” (Fitzgerald 6). The Buchanan’s house also has French windows, which purpose is to enlighten the house with natural sunlight

Posted by: christopher lavie mienandy at February 9, 2014 01:21 PM

Alison Schucht
Dr. Burgsbee L. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
9 February 2014

QUESTION #5:
How does Daisy react to the phone calls from Tom's woman in New York?

ANSWER:
At first when the phone rings, Daisy does not seem to care about the phone calls. However, when her and Nick step outside to talk, Daisy accuses Nick of not attending Tom and Daisy's wedding. He states that he was still in war, then Daisy proceeds to say, "Well, I've had a very bad time, Nick, and I'm pretty cynical about everything" (Fitzgerald 21). Although she did not seem fazed at the time of the phone call, she speaks how she truly feels to her cousin, Nick, which she happens to call a bad time.

Posted by: Alison Schucht at February 9, 2014 01:28 PM

Kyle McLeish
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love & Desire in Literature
9 February 2014

Question 10. Describe Nick. What facts do you know about him, and what do you infer about him? What kind of narrator do you think he will be?

Answer:
Nick is a man that is most likely in his late twenties or early thirties. He has just recently moved to New York and lives in West Egg (Fitzgerald 5). Nick is in New York to work in with bonds. Nick leaves in a small house in between two massive mansions. Nick also was in the war (Fitzgerald 6). Nick is a smart man that is trying to find his way in New York City. At the end of the chapter we find that he has moved to New York to escape a broken off engagement (Fitzgerald 20.) Nick will be the narrator for the book and I feel it will be interesting to see how everyone acts through his eyes. He is a small timer in a pond with very big fish.

Posted by: Kyle McLeish at February 9, 2014 05:26 PM

Hosameddine Elnehmani
Dr. B. Lee Hobbes
ENG-210 Love and desire in Literature CA01
10 February 2014

QUESTION # 22
How does Nick react to Jordon?

ANSWER:
The translation I used is “The Sexual Drama of Nick and Gatsby Edward Wasiolek, University of Chicago.” According to Patricia Pacey Thornton she calls Nick and Jordon “androgynous twins.” They cannot be called the opposite sex since they seem to have equal divided between them masculine and feminine genes. Nick immediately feels that he is attracted to Jordon. I also understood that he feels that he recognizes her from somewhere, but he cannot remember where.

Posted by: Hosameddine at February 9, 2014 07:25 PM

Anthony Jannetta
Dr. Lee B. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
10 February 2014

QUESTION #22:
Chapter 1: How is Gatsby introduced into the novel?

Answer:
Gatsby is introduced into the novel as someone different from other people. Indeed, the narrator says “only Gatsby, the man who gives his name to the novel, was exempt from my reaction” (Fitzgerald 2). We feel like he is different, he describes him as someone with “successful gestures” (Fitzgerald 2), as someone “gorgeous” (Fitzgerald 2), who has an extreme sensitivity and who is “romantic” (Fitzgerald 2). Also he appears like someone mysterious, someone we cannot approach, when he vanished at the end of the chapter.

Posted by: Anthony Jannetta at February 9, 2014 10:04 PM

Trey Griseck
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG. 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
9 February 2014

Question #7
Notice how many times Fitzgerald uses the words hope, or dream. Why does he do this?

Answer:
In chapter one of the book The Great Gatsby, Fitzgerald uses the words hope and dream numerous amounts of times. He does this because one of the main themes of this story is the meaning of an individual’s dream or the American dream as a whole. The book focuses on these people think there is something as living a perfect life when it is not possible to. So when he talks about hopes and dreams, a majority of the time it is relating to how these people feel about living a full life like you dream. In the book, people’s hopes and dreams become very misleading into their individual opinions of what a dream really is. In the end, this is what destroys them.

Posted by: Trey Griseck at February 9, 2014 10:52 PM

Daniella Zacarias
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
Love and Desire in Literature (CA01)
9.2.2014
Question #8
8:
Chapter 1: Nick starts the novel by relaying his father’s advice “Whenever you feel like criticizing anyone, just remember that all the people in this world haven’t had the advantage that you’ve had.” Does he reserve judgment in the novel?

ANSWER:
For the most part, Nick does reserve judgement in the novel; I believe that Fitzgerald created Nick’s character with the intent of having a non-judgemental narrator. It is evident with his opening statement; “Whenever you feel like criticizing anyone, just remember that all the people in this world haven’t had the advantage that you’ve had.” (Fitzgerald 1). Nick pretty much tells things as they were with no input of his own opinions; he is essentially just narrating the facts with no judgement.

Posted by: Daniella Zacarias at February 9, 2014 11:28 PM

Pauline Helgesson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
9 February 2014

Question #1

Chapter 1: How does Nick describe himself at the beginning of the book?

ANSWER:

Nick Carraway begins the book by commenting on himself. Carraway comes from the middle class background and characterizes himself as both highly moral and highly tolerant. He calls himself as a guide and a pathfinder. His father taught him not to pass judgment on other people. The father's advice to Nick during his younger and more vulnerable years is to remember the benefits you have had when he feels like criticizing anyone.

"Whenever you feel like criticizing any one,” he told me, “just remember that all the people in this world haven't had the advantages that you’ve had” (Fitzgerald 1).

I believe that this statement that Nick's father tells him in early childhood, has a huge influence on him. Such a great role model as a father always has a significant impact on their children's behaviors and personalities.

Posted by: Pauline Helgesson at February 9, 2014 11:48 PM

Devon Bell
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210 Love and Desire in Literature CA01
9 February 2014
Question #9
Pay attention to time. What is the day and year during the first scene at Daisy’s house?

Answer:

I thought, in the spring of twenty-two. The practical thing was to find rooms in the city (Gatsby par. 5). The year was 1922 he had decided that he would rent the house in West Egg at this time.
The First scene that took place at Daisy’s home was in the evening, for Nick would be attending dinner at her home. The day in which Nick drove to Daisy’s residence was during the summertime on a Saturday, it was a rather nice day. Tom and Miss Baker sat at either end of the long couch and she read aloud to him from the Saturday Evening Post (Gatsby).

Posted by: Devon Bell at February 10, 2014 01:01 AM

Denzel Williams
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01
10 February 2014

Question #13: What does Tom's behavior reveal about his character?

Answer: Daisy's wife, known as Mr. Tom Buchanan can be seen as a complex or arduous character to understand off the bat. upon his first encounter with him Nick describes him to be a man of a dominating aura, aggressive and filled with arrogance. He made note that Mr. Buchanan would say things such as "Now, don't think my opinion on these matters is final"... "Just because i'm stronger and more of a man than you are"(Fitzgerald 8). Mr. Buchanan can also be very boastful and overbearing, grabbing Nick and moving him around the estate or free willingly interjecting into any conversation. Lastly, something spotted about Mr. Buchanan's behavior is he is slightly secretive at dinner there is a strange occurrence when the telephone rings at dinner. "The butler came back and murmured something to Tom's ear whereupon Tom frowned, pushed back his chair and without a word went inside" (Fitzgerald 11). Mr. Buchanan cannot yet be figured out in the first few readings but more shall be revealed about him soon hopefully.

Posted by: Denzel Williams at February 10, 2014 01:33 AM


William Fumero
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210cl
2/9/14


4.) Describe Tom. What is your first impression of him?

Tom seems to live a life that most people would want to have. He’s sharp, affluent, educated, and an all-around embodiment of what most people in America would strive to be. His personality suits him, and it’s the type of personality that usually comes with the amount of wealth he has accumulated. It may not be very admirable to some, but with the right amount of acceptance and knowledge of the person, most people would learn to look past it and see the bright and wise individual for who he is.

Posted by: William Fumero at February 10, 2014 01:43 AM

Allison Grohovsky
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love & Desire in Literature
10 February 2014

QUESTION #14 How does the narrator describe Gatsby?

Answer: Nick admires Gatsby highly, despite the fact that Gatsby represents everything Nick scorns about New York. Gatsby clearly poses a challenge to Nick’s customary ways of thinking about the world, and Nick’s struggle to come to terms with that challenge inflects everything in the novel. Gatsby is a mysterious figure for Nick, since Nick knows neither his motives, nor the source of his wealth, nor his history, and the object of his yearning remains as remote and nebulous. "It was an extra- ordinary gift for hope, a romantic readiness such as I have never found in any other person and which it is not likely I shall ever find again." (Fitzgerald 2).

Posted by: Allison Grohovsky at February 10, 2014 08:39 AM

Shamera Bryant
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire in Literature CA01
10 February 2014
Question #21:
What did Miss Baker tell Nick about Tom?
Answer:
Miss Baker told Nick that Tom had another woman who lived in New York. In the text it goes on to say how Tom left the table and then the others started to hold a conversation with Miss baker informing Nick that “Tom’s got some woman in New York” (Fitzgerald 14).

Posted by: Shamera Bryant at February 10, 2014 09:01 AM

Shamera Bryant
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire in Literature CA01
10 February 2014
Question #21:
What did Miss Baker tell Nick about Tom?
Answer:
Miss Baker told Nick that Tom had another woman who lived in New York. In the text it goes on to say how Tom left the table and then the others started to hold a conversation with Miss baker informing Nick that “Tom’s got some woman in New York” (Fitzgerald 14).

Posted by: Shamera Bryant at February 10, 2014 09:01 AM

Franck Bayebanen
Dr. Bursgbee L. Hobbs
English 210CL Love and Desire CA01
10 February, 2014


Nick is one of the main character in book he lives in New York the West Egg. He went to Yale and obviously likes literatures. He was a soldier during World War 1. He broke up with his fiancé and decided to move out to New York. The one thing I know is that he is obviously very rich.

Posted by: Franck Bayebanen at February 10, 2014 09:35 AM

Franck Bayebanen
Dr. Bursgbee L. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love & Desire in Literature
12 February, 2014


Question: Why does the owl-eyed man describe Gatsby as a real Belasco?

Answer:
The owl- eyed man intention is to underline the fact that Gatsby is promoting an artificial world, but his books are real “Absolutely real- have pages and everything. I thought they’d be a nice durable cardboard” (Fitzgerald 47). The term Belasco is here ironically false. In fact the owl- eye man is saying that the books have more genuine than Gatsby his self. During the 20th century it was common for people to have fake libraries in their houses. Gatsby library is not false at all, the books are real, and therefore the library is probably the only thing we can trust and believe in Gatsby’s house.

Posted by: Franck Bayebanen at February 10, 2014 11:39 AM

Trey Griseck
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG. 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
10 February 2014

Question #23
How does Nick meet Tom’s mistress?

Answer:
“Though I was curious to see her, I had no desire I had no desire to meet her but I did. I went up to New York with Tom on the train one afternoon and when we stopped by the ashheaps he jumped to his feet and, taking hold of my elbows, literally forced me from the car, saying I want you to meet my girl” (Fitzgerald 24). Nick travels with Tom on a train into New York City. The train eventually stops at a place called The Valley of Ashes. In the Valley of Ashes Tom introduces Nick to Myrtle which she lives here with her husband whose name is George. This is how Nick meets Tom’s mistress.

Posted by: Trey Griseck at February 10, 2014 04:50 PM

Alison Schucht
Dr. Burgsbee L. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
10 February 2014

QUESTION #43:
Describe the two ways in which Nick differs from the other guests at the party.

ANSWER:
According to Nick, he was one of the few guests who had actually been invited (Fitzgerald 45). "People were not invited-they went there" (Fitzgerald 45). The first way Nick differs from the other guests is because he was one of a few who actually received an invitation.

The second way that Nick differs from the other guests is that he respects Gatsby along with his property while others are drunk and treat Gatsby's place as if it is an amusement park. "There was dancing now on the canvas in the garden, old men pushing young girls backward in eternal graceless circles, superior couples holding each other torturously..." (Fitzgerald 51). Nick is observing the actions of these people at this point of the story and sees how child-like they are acting, which is unlike him.

Posted by: Alison Schucht at February 10, 2014 06:08 PM

Kyle McLeish
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love & Desire in Literature
10 February 2014

Question Chapter 2:What are the eyes of Doctor T.J. Eckleburg?

Answer:
The eyes of Doctor Eckleburg are on a billboard that is used as an advertisement for his business. The eyes are blue and are very large. They have a pair of extremely large yellow glasses surrounding them without a nose (Fitzgerald 23).

Posted by: Kyle McLeish at February 10, 2014 07:38 PM

Anthony Jannetta
Dr. Lee B. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
12 February 2014

QUESTION #35:
Chapter 2: What did Mrs. Wilson buy while she was out with Tom and Nick?

ANSWER:
While she was out with Tom and Nick, Mrs. Wilson bought a dog. Indeed, we notice that Mrs. Wilson said: “I want to get one of those dogs” (Fitzgerald 27). Tom gave her the money and she bought an Airedale.

Posted by: Anthony Jannetta at February 10, 2014 11:43 PM

Christopher Lavie Mienandy
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210 Love and Desire in Literature CA01
11 February 2014


QUESTION #33:
Who did Tom take Nick to meet?

ANSWER:
Tom took Nick to meet his mistress, Myrtle Wilson: “I want you to meet my girl” (Fitzgerald 24). “I first met Tom Buchanan’s mistress” (Fitzgerald 24). Tom and Nick go visit her while she is with her husband near New York.

Posted by: christopher lavie mienandy at February 11, 2014 12:19 AM

Hosameddine Elnehmani
Dr. B. Lee Hobbes
ENG-210 Love and desire in Literature CA01
12 February 2014

QUESTION # 39
Chapter 2: What reason did Myrtle give for marrying George Wilson?

ANSWER:
Myrtle had always believed, and thought that George Wilson was a man breeding. Catherine had informed Myrtle that she was not enforced to marry him. Myrtle had responded, “I married him because I thought he was a gentleman,” (Fitzgerald 34)

Posted by: Hosameddine at February 11, 2014 07:54 PM

Rosa Esquivel
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 201CL Love and Desire in English Literature CA 01
11 February 2014

QUESTION #29:
Describe the “valley of ashes.” What does it look like and what does it represent?

ANSWER:
The valley of ashes is described as an ugly and dull place where the poor live. It seems to look like a dump that is full of people with unhappy lives. “This is a valley of ashes – a fantastic farm wehre ashes grow like wheat into ridges and hills and grotesque gardens, where ashes take the forms of houses and chimneys and rising smoke and finally, with a trancedent effort, of men who move dimly and already crumbling thought the powdery air” (Fritzgerald, 35). The valley of ashes represents a life the lower class live in. They work hard, but cannot make it out and live a better life.

Posted by: Rosa Esquivel at February 11, 2014 08:56 PM

Pauline Helgesson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
11 February 2014

Question #37

Chapter 2: Be able to identify/describe Catherine and Mr. & Mrs. McKee.

ANSWER:

Catherine is Myrtle Wilson's sister that lives in downtown. She has bright red hair and wears a great deal of makeup. Mr. and Mrs. McKee are a horrid couple and friends of Myrtle from New York. Mr. McKee is kind and feminine, and Mrs. McKee is shrill and very loud. They live in the same apartment building as Tom in New York City.

Posted by: Pauline Helgesson at February 11, 2014 10:10 PM

Daniella Zacarias
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
Love and Desire in Literature (CA01)
11.2.2014
Question #41
41:
Chapter 3: Where is Gatsby’s mansion located? What makes his location different from the counter location across the water?
Gatsby’s mansion is located on West Egg in Long Island. This is inferred because Nick states that Gatby is his neighbour; and we know that Nick lives in West Egg after a conversation between him and Jordan Baker.
“You live in West Egg,” she remarked contemptuously. “I know somebody there. [. . .] You must know Gatsby.”
To which Nick narrates, “Before I could reply that he was my neighbour dinner was announced.” (Fitzgerald 11).
As to what makes his location in West Egg different from East Egg; it is assumed from Nick’s description that of the two locations that West Egg was the up and coming area when it came to monetary wealth, while East Egg was for the established rich. It is also know that West Egg still had parts of it which weren’t up to millionaire standard.
“My own house was an eyesore, but it was a small eyesore, and it had been overlooked, so I had a view of the water, a partial view of my neighbor’s lawn, and the consoling proximityof millionaires – all for eighty dollars a month.” (Fitzgerald 5).

Posted by: Daniella Zacarias at February 11, 2014 10:26 PM

Marie Ryan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire in Literature
11 February 2014

Question: What did Tom do to Myrtle when she mentioned Daisy's name?

Answer: When Myrtle mentioned Daisy's name Tom hit her. The passage from the text that supports this is, "Making a short deft movement Tom Buchanan broke her nose with his open hand" (Fitzgerald 41)

Posted by: Marie Ryan at February 11, 2014 11:40 PM

Chelsea Dickenson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire in Literature CA01
11 February 2014

Question 11: What image does the author use to describe Jordan Baker? What does it mean?
Answer: Chapter one of the Great Gatsby begins with the introduction of some of the main characters having a gathering at the narrator’s second cousins house. We are introduced to the narrator himself, Nick, his cousin, Daisy, her husband Tom and their friend Jordan Baker. The author does a great job at giving imagery to their looks, but in a way, that expresses their individual personalities as well. For example, the author gives this particular image to describe Jordan Baker, Daisy’s friend, “She was extended full length at her end of the divan, completely motionless, and with her chin raised a little, as if she were balancing something on it which was quite likely to fall. If she saw me out of the corner of her eyes she gave no hint of it” (Fitzgerald 7). Solely from this description, the author is trying to convey the fact that Jordan is in fact snooty and comes from an extremely wealthy family.

Posted by: Chelsea Dickenson at February 12, 2014 12:09 AM

Will Fumero
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL
2/11/14


46.) Chapter 3: What is the significance of the owl-eyed man?

Answer:
The owl-eyed man has apparently been able to see through Gatsby, as if he can tell that his life, for the most part, may just be unreal or fabricated at best. Surely we can see his parties through the writing, and clearly determine that the lifestyle itself may just be too good to be true. Aside from what he says about Gatsby and his books, he does not give Nick or the reader any more insight about him. He may well play a more significant role in the future, but for now, all we can deduce is that he probably knows more about Gatsby than we do.

Posted by: William Fumero at February 12, 2014 12:11 AM

Chelsea Dickenson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire in Literature CA01
11 February 2014

Question: How does Myrtle behave as the party progresses?
Answer: In the beginning of the party, Myrtle seemed to be more loving and level headed toward everyone who attended the party. As the night went on, her mood shifted tremendously. “With the influence of the dress her personality had also undergone a change. The intense vitality that had been so remarkable in the garage was converted into impressive hauteur” (Fitzgerald 16). As the night went on, Myrtle and Tom began to speak of their spouses more and more which created a lot of tension in the air. Eventually, with the combination of liquor and the discussions of their collapsing love lives, Myrtle started to show hostility towards Tom about Daisy. This anger resulted in Tom breaking Myrtle’s nose because she spoke of Daisy in an offensive way.

Posted by: Chelsea Dickenson at February 12, 2014 12:42 AM

Denzel Williams
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01
12 February 2014

Question 25:Describe George Wilson. How does he react to Tom’s arrival?

Answer: Upon the arrival at George Wilson's garage, Nick describes the place to be run down and abandoned looking. George Wilson's physical appearance himself is said to be " a blonde, spiritless man, anemic and faintly handsome" (Fitzgerald 28). When he sees Tom and Nick he is somewhat hopeful at first. He inquires about a car that he has been waiting for Tom to sell him. Besides this, Mr.Wilson isn't all too excited to see Mr.Buchanan, and plays out a mellow demeanor while Tom and Nick are visiting.

Posted by: Denzel Williams at February 12, 2014 12:50 AM

Devon Bell
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210 Love and Desire in Literature CA01
11 February 2014
Question #24
How does Myrtle react to Tom’s arrival?

Answer:

Myrtle reacts to Tom’s arrival in a quite flirty fashion. She smiled slowly and, walking through her husband as if he were a ghost, shook hands with Tom, looking him flush in the eye. Then she wet her lips (Gatsby par 9). She is obviously very excited to see him. She must have known what he wanted, while the husband is simply blind and confused as to what is taking place. Tom wants to see Myrtle on a more personal level, and tells her to get on the next train.

Posted by: Devon Bell at February 12, 2014 06:45 AM

Peter Grana
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
Love and Desire in Literature
11, February 2014
Question #44
What does the owl-eyed man find extraordinary about the books in Gatsby’s library? Why does it matter?

Answer:
The Owl-eyed man found that Gatsby’s books were in fact “real” or real “printed-matter”. “’Absolutely real-have pages and everything. I thought that they’d be nice and durable cardboard. As a matter of fact, they’re absolutely real. Pages and-Here!” (Fitzgerald 72). Nick and Jordan were looking to find the party host Gatsby, and while searching the bar as well as the veranda, they went to the library but found the Owl-eyed spectacle man instead.

Posted by: Peter Grana at February 12, 2014 09:17 AM

Emma De Rhodo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love & Desire in Literature
12 February 2014

QUESTION #28: Why did Tom break Myrtle’s nose? How is this consistent with the author’s description of him in Chapter I? Judging by his treatment of Myrtle and his wife Daisy, what seems to be Tom’s attitude toward women?

ANSWER: After the people at the party had gotten drunk, Tom and Myrtle are speaking (Fitzgerald 37). Myrtle keeps repeating “Daisy!” when the two were talking about if Myrtle should be able to mention Daisy (Fitzgerald 37). Then, Tom breaks the woman’s nose (Fitzgerald 37). This action certainly seems to match the description of Tom made by Nick in the beginning of the story; as Nick mentioned he has “the appearance of always leaning aggressively forward” and has “a cruel body” (Fitzgerald 7). By breaking Myrtle’s nose, one can see that Tom used violence, and he used violence on a woman not even for an appropriate reason. Tom seems to be, as Nick describes him in general, supercilious, and he is obviously supercilious towards women if he feels he can act as he did towards them (Fitzgerald 7). Since, according to Merriam-Webster’s Online Dictionary, supercilious means, “having or showing the proud and unpleasant attitude of people who think that they are better or more important than other people,” I believe this is an accurate way to describe a man who has been violent to a woman, a gender which in the past has been treated as less important (“Supercilious”).

Work Cited
“Supercilious.” Merriam-Webster.com. Merriam Webster, 2014. Web. 12 Feb. 2014.

Posted by: Emma De Rhodo at February 12, 2014 12:46 PM

Trey Griseck
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG. 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
12 February 2014

Question #79
Who is Klipspringer?

Answer:
One summer Gatsby had numerous amounts of people over to his house and had extraordinary hospitability service that everyone seemed to enjoy very much. “A man named Klipspringer was there so often and so long that he became known as “the boarder,” I doubt if he had any other home” (Fitzgerald 63). Klipspringer is known as the freeloader that basically lives at Gatsby mansion, he takes advantage of the guests at Gatsby’s house and treats the hosts very rude. Gatsby passes away and Klipspringer disappears. Klipspringer did not go to Gatsby’s funeral but he does manage to give Nick a call asking about his shoes that he had left at Gatsby’s mansion.

Posted by: Trey Griseck at February 12, 2014 01:45 PM

Trey Griseck
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG. 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
12 February 2014

Question # 119
What is Daisy’s reaction to both men?

Answer:
Daisy is now torn between two men that she is madly in love with which are Tom and Gatsby. She has to finally make a decision between the two men. Daisy loves both of the men, since Gatsby was without money so she decides to marry Tom for his wealth. She knows that a permanent relationship with Gatsby, so “she feels that she needs Tom because he is just as careless as she is,” (Fitzgerald 121) which makes her feel that they should be together. She eventually learns to love Tom. Throughout the marriage, she still never let go of the love she had for her first true love, which was Gatsby.

Posted by: Trey Griseck at February 12, 2014 01:50 PM

Franck Bayebanen
Dr. Bursgbee L. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love & Desire in Literature
14 February, 2014


Question #69:
Who is Mr. Wolfsheim?
Answer:
We don’t know much about Mr. Wolfsheim he appears to be a business associate of Gatsby. Therefore at one point Mr. Wolfsheim starts to tell a story about a man called Rosy. Wolfsheim describes Rosy as Gangster. Plus the way Rosy died is strange “they shot him 3 times in his full belly and drove away” (Fitzgerald p.70). This confidence is confusing because what kind of businessman is Gatsby if he has an associate like Mr. Wolfsheim.

Posted by: Franck Bayebanen at February 12, 2014 07:31 PM

Kyle McLeish
Dr. B.Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love & Desire in Literature
12 February 2014

Question 66 Ch.4 According to Jordan, what did Daisy do on her wedding day? Why? What does this reveal about Daisy?

Answer:
On the day of her wedding Daisy married Tom and went off on their life together (Fitzgerald 76). The day before though, Jordan found Daisy drunk in her room clutching a note. Daisy told Jordan to go tell everyone that the wedding was off and Daisy was giving the $350,000 pearls back. Jordan went and got the maid and put Daisy in a bath and cleaned her up. Jordan couldn't read the note as it was balled up in the bath (Fitzgerald 76). This reveals that Daisy knowingly went into the marriage with Tom unhappy. She also knows that Tom has other women and she just goes along with it and doesn't stand up for herself.

Posted by: Kyle McLeish at February 12, 2014 08:22 PM

Pauline Helgesson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
12 February 2014

Question #83

Chapter 5: How long did it take Gatsby to make the money to buy the mansion?

ANSWER:

The twelve-bedroom mansion located in West Egg was one of the biggest expenses in Gatsby's life. The mansion had facilities like poolrooms, dressing rooms, and music rooms. It took Gatsby three years to make money in order to buy the house.

“Well, this would interest you. It wouldn’t take up much of your time and you might pick up a nice bit of money. It happens to be a rather confidential sort of thing” (Fitzgerald 83).

In this passage, Gatsby is trying to hint that the business he is involved in is very questionable, maybe even illegal. It took him only three years to earn the money for the mansion.

Posted by: Pauline Helgesson at February 12, 2014 09:43 PM

Pauline Helgesson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
12 February 2014

Question #105

Chapter 6: What is Daisy’s real response to the party, according to Nick?

ANSWER:

Nick observed that Daisy did not enjoy the party in Gatsby’s mansion. She thought it was tasteless, classless, and more like an amusement park. She seemed to be very disgusted by all the fake people and fake personalities that were celebrating. According to Nick, Daisy felt offended by the party. The only part that she enjoyed was the short time she spent alone with Mr. Gatsby.

“But the rest offended her and inarguably, because it wasn’t a gesture but an emotion. She was appalled by West Egg, this unprecedented “place” that Broadway had begotten upon a Long Island fishing village appalled by its raw vigor that chafed under the old euphemisms and by the too obtrusive fate that herded its inhabitants along a short cut from nothing to nothing. She saw something awful in the very simplicity she failed to understand” (Fitzgerald 107)

This passage shows how Daisy rejects West Egg since it lacks the superficiality of the social conventions.

Posted by: Pauline Helgesson at February 12, 2014 09:43 PM

Alison Schucht
Dr. Burgsbee L. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
13 February 2014

QUESTION #67:
Why does Gatsby want to have tea with Daisy in Nick's house? Why doesn't Gatsby ask Nick for this favor himself? Why did Gatsby want Daisy to see his house?

ANSWER:
Gatsby wants to have tea with Daisy in Nick's house because he imagines a scenario to be more private with Daisy in Nick's house as opposed to being in his own home where people are constantly in and out of his home. He also wants Daisy to see his home, which is right next door to Nick's home: "'He wants her to see his house' she explained. 'And your house is right next door'" (Fitzgerald 84).

Gatsby did not ask Nick for the favor himself because "he's afraid, he waited so long" (Fitzgerald 84). According to Jordan Baker, Gatsby though Nick would be offended (Fitzgerald 84).

"Gatsby bought that house so that Daisy would be just across the bay" (Fitzgerald 83). Gatsby wants Daisy to see his house because of the fact that he bought the house to be close in distance to Daisy and so that Daisy could see his wealth.

Posted by: Alison Schucht at February 13, 2014 06:35 PM

Alison Schucht
Dr. Burgsbee L. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
13 February 2014

QUESTION #118:
What does Gatsby think about Daisy's relationship with Tom?

ANSWER:
Gatsby thinks that Daisy's relationship with Tom is not genuine and that she is, in fact, still in love with him. When they all go out to town, an argument breaks out between Tom and Gatsby: "'She never loved you, do you hear?' he cried. 'She only married you because I was poor and she was tired of waiting for me. It was a terrible mistake, but in her hear she never loved anyone except me!'" (Fitzgerald 137). Clearly by what Gatsby says here, he believes that the relationship between Daisy and Tom is not real.

Posted by: Alison Schucht at February 13, 2014 06:48 PM

Christopher Lavie Mienandy
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210 Love and Desire in Literature CA01
14 February 2014


QUESTION #87:
What is Gatsby’s real name and where is he from?

ANSWER:
Jay Gatsby’s real name is James Gatz and he is from North Dakota: “James Gatz of North Dakota” (Fitzgerald 98). Gatsby changed his name when he was only seventeen of age.

Posted by: christopher lavie mienandy at February 14, 2014 12:39 AM

Peter Grana
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
Love and Desire in Literature
11, February 2014
Question #106
What does Gatsby tell Nick he wants Daisy to do?
Answer:
To relive their former love affair years before, Gatsby tells Nick he wants Daisy to leave Tom and rekindle their love for one another. “’I wouldn’t ask too much of her,’ I ventured. ‘You can’t repeat the past.’ ‘Can’t repeat the past?’ he cried incredulously. ‘Why of course you can!’” (Fitzgerald 170). Gatsby, smitten with love and obsession with getting Daisy back, believe with his will that Daisy could leave Tom out of love and hope for a relationship.

Posted by: Peter Grana at February 14, 2014 07:32 AM

Peter Grana
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
Love and Desire in Literature
11, February 2014
Question #44
What does the owl-eyed man find extraordinary about the books in Gatsby’s library? Why does it matter?

Answer:
The Owl-eyed man found that Gatsby’s books were in fact “real” or real “printed-matter”. “’Absolutely real-have pages and everything. I thought that they’d be nice and durable cardboard. As a matter of fact, they’re absolutely real. Pages and-Here!” (Fitzgerald 72). Nick and Jordan were looking to find the party host Gatsby, and while searching the bar as well as the veranda, they went to the library but found the Owl-eyed spectacle man instead.

Posted by: Peter Grana at February 14, 2014 07:34 AM

Emma De Rhodo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 CA01 Love & Desire in Literature
14 February 2014

QUESTION #114: Chapter 6: When Nick told Gatsby that “you can’t repeat the past”, Gatsby replied, “Why of course you can!” Do you agree with Nick or Gatsby?

ANSWER: I agree with Nick in general when he makes this statement since no one can actually ever re-do the actions he has already done. Also, Nick mentions that he thinks “that he wanted to recover something, some idea of himself perhaps, that had gone into loving Daisy” (Fitzgerald 110). I believe with Nick in this way; I think that if Gatsby put enough effort into trying to do so, he could be, once again, who he was before he loved Daisy.

Posted by: Emma De Rhodo at February 14, 2014 08:31 AM

Emma De Rhodo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 CA01 Love & Desire in Literature
14 February 2014

QUESTION #84: Chapter 5: What did Gatsby do to impress Daisy?

ANSWER: Nick is informed that the tea party that was planned was planned in order for Jay Gatsby to have a time with Daisy (Fitzgerald 78). The day of tea, flowers were brought to Nick’s house in order to impress Daisy; “The flowers were unnecessary, for at two o’clock a greenhouse arrived from Gatsby’s” (Fitzgerald 84). Furthermore, Gatsby says he desires to give Daisy a tour of his house (Fitzgerald 89).

Posted by: Emma De Rhodo at February 14, 2014 08:32 AM

Emma De Rhodo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love & Desire in Literature
12 February 2014

QUESTION #28: Why did Tom break Myrtle’s nose? How is this consistent with the author’s description of him in Chapter I? Judging by his treatment of Myrtle and his wife Daisy, what seems to be Tom’s attitude toward women?

ANSWER: After the people at the party had gotten drunk, Tom and Myrtle are speaking (Fitzgerald 37). Myrtle keeps repeating “Daisy!” when the two were talking about if Myrtle should be able to mention Daisy (Fitzgerald 37). Then, Tom breaks the woman’s nose (Fitzgerald 37). This action certainly seems to match the description of Tom made by Nick in the beginning of the story; as Nick mentioned he has “the appearance of always leaning aggressively forward” and has “a cruel body” (Fitzgerald 7). By breaking Myrtle’s nose, one can see that Tom used violence, and he used violence on a woman not even for an appropriate reason. Tom seems to be, as Nick describes him in general, supercilious, and he is obviously supercilious towards women if he feels he can act as he did towards them (Fitzgerald 7). Since, according to Merriam-Webster’s Online Dictionary, supercilious means, “having or showing the proud and unpleasant attitude of people who think that they are better or more important than other people,” I believe this is an accurate way to describe a man who has been violent to a woman, a gender which in the past has been treated as less important (“Supercilious”).

Work Cited
“Supercilious.” Merriam-Webster.com. Merriam Webster, 2014. Web. 12 Feb. 2014.

Posted by: Emma De Rhodo at February 14, 2014 08:33 AM

Marie Ryan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire in Literature
14 February 2014

Question: What is Daisy's opinion of Gatsby' party and does it affect him?

Answer: At first both Daisy and Gatsby are embarrassed. The passage that supports this is, "You're just embarrassed, that's all, and luckily I added: Daisy's embarrassed too" (Fitzgerald 93). However toward the end of it they both loosen up a bit. Daisy is very happy to see Gatsby again, and therefore, is enjoying his party. In support of this she says, I'd like to just get one of those pink clouds and put you in it and push you around" (Fitzgerald 99) While Gatsby is very happy to see Daisy as well he can't help but doubt how long this will last/ if he will be able to see her again. In support of this Nick says, "...I saw that the expression of bewilderment had come back to Gatsby's face, as though a faint doubt had occurred him about his present happiness" (Fitzgerald 101).

Posted by: Marie Ryan at February 14, 2014 12:01 PM

Christopher Lavie Mienandy
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210 Love and Desire in Literature CA01
15 February 2014


QUESTION #125:
Why does Gatsby view Daisy’s child with surprise?

ANSWER:
I think that Gatsby never thought that Daisy has a child. He probably never imagined that Daisy could have been pregnant during these five years without him. It is a surprise, a shock for Jay Gatsby to see that this child is not his: “Afterward he kept looking at the child with surprise. I do not think he had ever really believed in its existence before”. (Fitzgerald 117).

Posted by: christopher lavie mienandy at February 15, 2014 02:27 PM

Hosameddine Elnehmani
Dr. B. Lee Hobbes
ENG-210 Love and desire in Literature CA01
17 February 2014

QUESTION # 75
Chapter 4: where did Gatsby study after the war? How long was he there?

ANSWER:
As Gatsby said, “I was brought up in America but educated at Oxford, because all my ancestors have been educated there for many years. It is a family tradition.” (Fitzgerald 65). Gatsby had studied in Oxford University, and had only studied in Oxford for a short time, as he had traveled to many other places.

Posted by: Hosameddine at February 16, 2014 11:51 AM

Franck Bayebanen
Dr. Bursgbee L. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love & Desire in Literature
17 February, 2014

Question chapter 7: What did Wilson do to myrtle? Why?

Answer:
Wilson just found out that myrtle had an affair “I just got wised up to something funny the last two days” (Fitzgerald p.124). That is the reason he wants to take her away and therefore he needs money. Myrtle wants to leave him and go with somebody else. Wilson needs tom’s car in order to take Myrtle away. Tom decides to provide his car to Wilson “I’ll let you the car,” said Tom. “I’ll send it over tomorrow afternoon.” (Fitzgerald p. 124). In order to make sure she doesn't go away, Wilson decides to lock her in the apartment. She will finally dies when Daisy hits her accidentally

Posted by: Franck Bayebanen at February 16, 2014 03:36 PM

Hosameddine Elnehmani
Dr. B. Lee Hobbes
ENG-210 Love and desire in Literature CA01
17 February 2014

QUESTION #122
Chapter 7: How are Daisy and Tom alike?

ANSWER:
Tom and Daisy are alike in the way they act as they are careless people, especially after they got married. They both would go partying, but I personally did not find that Tom, and Daisy shared love. Daisy always defends Gatsby with his decisions that he takes. On the other hand, Tom is annoyed and disagrees with Gatsby. Gatsby goes on and tells Tom “What’s been going on” so, Tom vigorously wants to hear about it. Tom turns to Daisy sharply. “You’ve been seeing this fellow for five years?” “Not seeing,” said Gatsby. “No, we couldn’t meet. Nevertheless both of us loved each other all that time, old sport, and you didn’t know.” (Fitzgerald 131). Tom was shocked, and still believes that Daisy loves him.

Posted by: Hosameddine at February 16, 2014 04:17 PM


Will Fumero
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210cl
2/16/14

Question 107: Plato held that reality was an imperfect reflection of an ideal, permanent realm. With this in mind, what would you say nick means when he says Jay Gatsby sprang from his Platonic conception of himself?”

Answer:
Jay Gatsby lived in his own fantasy. He essentially “lived his own dream” by having all the money, cars, and clothes as well as having all the people utter his name in the same conversation as success. Whatever life he lived beforehand was probably not as lavish or extraordinary as it was later on, and as evidenced back in chapter 3 with the party, Gatsby seemed to have everything on point with the teenage boy’s fantasy about having a big house, parties, and all the women.
One must understand that Gatsby never thought of himself as a normal person, and that he really thought himself as divine and extraordinary. He lived a life that suited his self-perception, and one that fit the description. He himself doesn’t give much detail about his past or where exactly he came from, all we knew in the beginning is that he was a person of class and status, as well as an immense amount of wealth. It is only in this chapter we learn of his aid from Cody (pg. 106-107) and how that in itself was the reason why Gatsby came to be what he is now, and he didn’t even get the guy’s inheritance.

Posted by: William Fumero at February 16, 2014 08:07 PM


Will Fumero
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210cl
2/16/14

Question 104: When does James Gatz change his name? Why?

He changed his name at age 17 (pg. 104) and at the beginning of his career when came across Cody. From that day forward he was no longer the boy he knew before, and this was the start of his new life. He learned many things from Cody, and even got a formal education. Even though he didn’t obtain his inheritance (pg. 107), he took with him many things that helped him to go on and be successful.

Posted by: William Fumero at February 16, 2014 08:12 PM

Kyle McLeish
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love & Desire in Literature
16 February 2014

Question 112 Ch6. Why did Daisy and Tom find Gatsby's party loathsome?

Answer:
Daisy and Tom found Gatsby's party loathsome due to the amount of drinking and the heavily intoxicated people that where at the party. They also didnt like that uninvited people came to the party (Fitzgerald 101). Some of the people that attended the party where not as privileged people as they were use to being around.

Posted by: Kyle McLeish at February 16, 2014 08:16 PM

Rosa Esquivel
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA 01
13 February 2014

QUESTION #124:
Why is Myrtle Wilson upset when she sees Tom and Jordan?

ANSWER:
Myrtle is upset because she thought Jordan was Tom’s wife when in reality Daisy is. “Her expression was curiously familiar – it was an expression I had often seen on women’s faces but on Myrtle Wilson’s face it seemed purposeless and inexplicable until I realized that her eyes, wide with jealous terror, were fixed not on Tom but Jordan Baker, whom she took to be his wife” (Fitzgerald, 112).

Posted by: Rosa Esquivel at February 16, 2014 09:12 PM

Anthony Jannetta
Dr. Lee B. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
14 February 2014

QUESTION #71:
Chapter 4: What does Mr. Wolfsheim tell Nick about Gatsby?
ANSWER:
Mr. Wolfsheim tell Nick that Gatsby is “the kind of man you’d like to take home and introduce to your mother and sister” (Fitzgerald 72).

Posted by: Anthony Jannetta at February 16, 2014 09:36 PM

Anthony Jannetta
Dr. Lee B. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
17 February 2014

QUESTION #126:
Chapter 7: Why does Gatsby object to letting Tom drive his car?
ANSWER:
Gatsby objects to letting Tom drives his car because he does not want anyone (even less his love’s husband) to drive it. According to him, “the suggestion was distasteful” (Fitzgerald 121).

Posted by: Anthony Jannetta at February 16, 2014 09:37 PM

Daniella Zacarias
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
Love and Desire in Literature (CA01)
16.2.2014
Question #129
129:
Chapter 7’: Why is Nick pleased with Gatsby’s honesty about Oxford?
ANSWER:
Nick is pretty much non-judgemental throughout the story, however, it seems that he does take sides. When it comes to Tom Buchannan and Jay Gats by, Nick favours Jay Gatsby. At the beginnings of the story Nick resents Gatsby’s closed personality, however, during chapter 7 Gatsby says admits to having been to Oxford, but not really being an “Oxford man.”
“I [Nick] wanted to get up and slap him on the back. I had one of those renewals of complete faith in him that I’d experienced before.” (Fitzgerald 129).

Posted by: Daniella Zacarias at February 16, 2014 10:45 PM

Marie Ryan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire in Literature
16 February 2014

Question: Which of these statements about other characters' reactions to Myrtle's death is true.

Answer: Tom didn't have much of a reaction at first. Prof of this can be found on page on 146, "Myrtle Wilson's body lay wrapped in a blanket and then in another blanket as though she suffered from a chill in the hot night lay on work table by the wall and Tom, with his back to us, was bending over it, motionless." (Fitzgerald 146). The next thing Tom did, after finding out what car it was, is go talk to Wilson. Evidence of this is, " That yellow car I was driving this afternoon wasn't mine, do you hear? I haven't seen it all afternoon" (Fitzgerald 148). Lastly, after leaving the seen Tom began to cry. The passage that supports this is, "In a little while I heard a low husky sob and saw that the tears were overflowing down his face" (Fitzgerald 149).

Posted by: Marie Ryan at February 16, 2014 11:02 PM

Shamera Bryant
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire in Literature CA01
17 February 2014
Question #68:
What does Tom do when he and Daisy return from their honeymoon?
Answer:
When the two returns from their honeymoon Tom has an affair with a chambermaid of the Santa Barbara Hotel. “The girl who was with him got into the papers, too, because her arm was broken-she was one of the chambermaids in the Santa Barbara Hotel” (Fitzgerald 77).

Posted by: Shamera Bryant at February 17, 2014 01:41 AM

Devon Bell
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210 Love and Desire in Literature CA01
14 February 2014
Question #78
What is Jordan Baker’s occupation? Nicks? Gatsby’s?

Answer:
Jordan Baker is a professional golfer “Sorry you didn’t win.” That was for the golf tournament. She had lost in the finals the week before (Gatsby 42-43). Nick is a bondsman. “What you doing, Nick” “I’m a bond man.” Who with?” (Gatsby 10). Tom asked Nick what he did for a living, Nick replied; however, he became annoyed when tom stated he never heard of the company, which Nick worked for. At this point in the story, Gatsby’s occupation is unknown, although some believe him to be a bootlegger “He’s a bootlegger,” said the young ladies, moving somewhere between his cocktails and his flowers (Gatsby 61).

Posted by: Devon Bell at February 17, 2014 02:54 AM

Devon Bell
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210 Love and Desire in Literature CA01
17 February 2014
Question #113
How did Gatsby measure the success of his party?

Answer:

Gatsby measured his success of his party based off whether Daisy had a good time or not. All Gatsby truly cared about was impressing Daisy. He wanted her to have a good time. If Daisy in fact enjoyed herself, then by all means, the party went well. If Daisy had a rather displeasing time, then the party was a failure. “She didn’t like it,” he said immediately. “Of course she did.” “She didn’t like it,” he insisted. “She didn’t have a good time.” (Gatsby 109)

Posted by: Devon Bell at February 17, 2014 03:21 AM

Peter Grana
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
Love and Desire in Literature
11, February 2014
Question #
What does the line from the novel mean?: “The vitality of his illusion had gone beyond Daisy beyond everything.”
Answer:
The line pertains to the fact that Gatsby was lost in love again after finding Daisy again. The illusion of experiencing love once again after meeting her was returned. “He had thrown himself into creative passion, adding to it all the time, decking it out with every bright feather that drifted his way. No amount of fire or freshness can challenge what a man will store up in his ghostly heart.” (Fitzgerald 148).

Posted by: Peter Grana at February 17, 2014 09:20 AM

Alison Schucht
Dr. Burgsbee L. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
17 February 2014

QUESTION #160:
Why do Tom and Daisy leave?

ANSWER:
In this chapter, it is not stated as to why Tom and Daisy decide to leave the East Egg. Shortly after Gatsby's death, Nick called over to Daisy only to find out that "she and Tom had gone away early that afternoon, and taken baggage with them" (Fitzgerald 172). There was no address, no returning date, and no destination information as to where the two went (Fitzgerald 172). However, I believe Tom and Daisy left because Tom was uncomfortable with the fact that Daisy was still in love with Gatsby, therefore he did not want her near Gatsby.

Posted by: Alison Schucht at February 17, 2014 06:50 PM

Shamera Bryant
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire in Literature CA01
17 February 2014
Question #154:
Why couldn’t Nick get anyone to come to Gatsby’s funeral?
Answer:
No one showed up to Mr. Gatsby’s funeral because he had no friends. Tom and Daisy were out of town. In the text it says “But she and Tom had gone away early that afternoon, and taken baggage with them” (Fitzgerald 164). Mr. Wolfsheim couldn't attend because he was caught up in some business. He says in a letter he writes to Mr. Carraway “I cannot come down now as I am tied up in some very important business and cannot get mixed up in this thing now” (Fitzgerald 166). Gatsby does have his father still alive, who is nearly unable to walk.

Posted by: Shamera Bryant at February 17, 2014 06:57 PM

Chelsea Dickenson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire in Literature CA01
17 February 2014

Question: Why does Fitzgerald list all of Gatsby’s party guests?
Answer: The author of The Great Gatsby does a great job at describing the type of individuals that are attending Gatsby’s party. He lists all of the guest’s full names to depict exactly how shallow these people are. They all come from rich backgrounds that only appear at the scene for a great time and free beverages, not to see Jay Gatsby himself. By listing the complete name of everyone, the author is trying the deliver the message that these people have no connection to Gatsby; they are simply described as "moths coming to the flame" (Fitzgerald 74).

Posted by: Chelsea Dickenson at February 17, 2014 07:20 PM

Chelsea Dickenson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire in Literature CA01
17 February 2014

Question: What happens on the way home from New York?
Answer: On the way home from New York, Jordan, Tom, and Nick discover that Myrtle was ran over by a car that proceeded to speed away, fleeing the accident. Myrtle, Tom’s Mistress, died as a result of this hit-and-run. “The “death car,” as the newspapers called it, did not stop; it came out of the gathering darkness, wavered tragically for a moment, and then disappeared around the next bend”… His eyes would drop slowly from the swinging light to the laden table by the wall, and then jerk back to the light again, and he gave out incessantly his high, horrible call: “Oh, my Ga-od! Oh, my Ga-od! oh, Ga-od! oh, my Ga-od!”” (Fitzgerald 149).

Posted by: Chelsea Dickenson at February 17, 2014 07:42 PM

Marie Ryan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire in Literature
18 Feb 2014

Question: How does T.J Eckleberg affect Mr. Wilson?

Answer: T.J Eckleberg affects Mr. Wilson because he believes that the T.J Eckleberg's eyes on the advertisement are actually the eyes of God. The passage that supports this is, " ...Michaelis saw with a shock that he was looking at the eyes of Doctor T.J. Eckleberg which had just emerged pale and enormous from the dissolving night. God see's everything, Wilson repeated" (Fitzgerald 167)

Posted by: Marie Ryan at February 18, 2014 10:10 AM

Daniella Zacarias
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
Love and Desire in Literature (CA01)
18.2.2014
Question #152
152:
Chapter 8: How does Nick’s statement “You’re worth the whole bunch put together” show a change in Nick from the beginning of the novel?
ANSWER:
“I’ve always been glad I said that. It was the only compliment I ever gave him, because I disapproved of him from beginning to end.”(Fitzgerald 154). After having complimented Gatsby, Nick expresses his disapproval of him (not dislike, just disapproval). In a way, Nick’s compliment shows his compassion towards a man who has been in search of the love of his life, only to find her corrupted by money.

Posted by: Daniella Zacarias at February 18, 2014 03:43 PM

Trey Griseck
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG. 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
18 February 2014

Question #162
What is the significance of Mr. Gatz Arrival?

Answer:
“It was Gatsby’s father, a solemn old man, very helpless and dismayed, bundled up in a long cheap ulster against the warm September day. His eyes leaked continuously with excitement” (Fitzgerald 167). The significance of Mr. Gatz arrival was that it was Gatsby’s father. Gatsby was known to not have any family, as Nick was planning where Gatsby should be buried he is surprised to see Gatsby’s father. Nick finds Mr. Gatz going around his son’s house admiring the accomplishments that his son has done and received. His arrival is so significant because of the fact that no one knew that Gatsby’s father existed, so when he showed up it really caught everyone by surprise.

Posted by: Trey Griseck at February 18, 2014 06:00 PM

Christopher Lavie Mienandy
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210 Love and Desire in Literature CA01
18 February 2014

QUESTION #155:
Who is Henry C. Gatz?

ANSWER:
In chapter 9, Nick gets a telegram sent from Minnesota by Henry C. Gatz. He is Gatsby’s father: “I think it was on the third day that a telegram signed Henry C, Gatz arrived from a town in Minnesota […] it was Gatsby’s father.” (Fitzgerald 167). Mr. Gatz heard that his son was dead by reading the newspapers: “I saw it in the Chicago newspaper” (Fitzgerald 167).

Posted by: christopher lavie mienandy at February 18, 2014 07:29 PM

Chelsea Dickenson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire in Literature CA01
18 February 2014

Question 151: Who is Dan Cody and what is his significance in Gatsby’s life?
Answer: After the accident with Gatsby, Daisy, and Myrtle, Nick visits Jay at his house to discuss with Gatsby about his life. “It was this night that he told me the strange story of his youth with Dan Cody — told it to me because “Jay Gatsby.” had broken up like glass against Tom’s hard malice, and the long secret extravaganza was played out” (Fitzgerald 189). The man by the name of Dan Cody is the reason behind Jay Gatsby’s success today. Gatsby was born into this world as James Gatz who as he got older, worked on Lake Ontario where he originally met Mr. Cody. Dan Cody was a wealthy copper mogul who owned a yacht and upon meeting Gatsby, took him under his wing as his own personal assistant. Gatsby fell in love with the luxury and wealth that Cody’s life consisted of. After Dan Cody passed away, Jay Gatsby inherited a great amount of money and was since then determined to become a successful man.

Posted by: Chelsea Dickenson at February 18, 2014 08:57 PM

Hosameddine Elnehmani
Dr. B. Lee Hobbes
ENG-210 Love and desire in Literature CA01
19 February 2014

QUESTION # 175
Chapter 9: What happens between Nick and Jordan Baker?


ANSWER:
At first, they had a conversation on the phone, which it did not end up good. She goes later on and tells him she was engaged to another man. When they met, he had acted as in a surprise mood, but as he said, “I doubted that, though there were several she could have married at a nod of her head, but I pretended to be surprised.” (Fitzgerald 177). They shook hands. Later on, she reminds him of a conversation they had before about driving a car. “You said a bad driver was only safe until she met another bad driver? Well, I met another bad driver, didn’t I? I mean it was careless of me to make such a wrong guess. I thought it was your secret pride.” (Fitzgerald 177).

Posted by: Hosameddine at February 18, 2014 09:12 PM

Pauline Helgesson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
18 February 2014

Question #164

Chapter 9: What two emotions are pulling Mr. Gatz?

ANSWER:

Proudness and sadness are the two emotions that are pulling Mr. Gatz in chapter 9. He felt pride of his son for achieving material wealth, and sadness because of his death. As a dad, he was very proud of what his son had accomplished so early in life. That fact made it even harder for him when he passed away in such a brutal way, and in that young age.

“If he’d of lived, he’d of been a great man. A man like James J. Hill. He’d of helped build up the country” (Fitzgerald 168). This quote clearly shows the father's pride of his son. He truly believed that his son's expertise and knowledge would have helped to build up the country.

Posted by: Pauline Helgesson at February 18, 2014 09:24 PM

Allison Grohovsky
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love% Desire in Literature
18 Feb 2014

Question #85: What had the green light on the dock meant to Gatsby?

Answer: To Gatsby, the green light represents his dream, which is Daisy. To get her would be completing Gatsby’s American Dream. The first time the green light is seen in the novel is also the first time Nick sees Gatsby. The green light is described as ‘minute and far away’ which makes it appear impossible to reach. This will prove to be true for Gatsby. The green light also represents society’s desire and the seeming impossibility of achieving the materialistic American Dream.
"He hadn't once ceased looking at Daisy, and I think he revalued everything in his house according to the measure of response it drew from her well-loved eyes. Sometimes, too, he stared around at his possessions in a dazed way, as though in her actual and astounding presence none of it was any longer real. Once he nearly toppled down a flight of stairs." (Fitzgerald 5.112)

Posted by: Allison Grohovsky at February 18, 2014 10:17 PM

Allison Grohovsky
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love & Desire in Literature
18 Feb 2014

Question:#144 What does Gatsby tell nick about his past?

Answer: Gatsby, told Nick about courting Daisy in Louisville in 1917. He said that he loved her for her youth and vitality, and idolized her social position, wealth, and popularity. He added that she was the first girl to whom he ever felt close and that he lied about his background to make her believe that he was worthy of her. Eventually, he continued, he and Daisy made love, and he felt as though he had married her. She promised to wait for him when he left for the war, but then she married Tom.

"He stayed there a week, walking the streets where their footsteps had clicked together through the November night and revisiting the out-of-the-way places to which they had driven in her white car." (Fitzgerald 8.28) This explains the pain Gatsby feels once Daisy has left him.

Posted by: Allison Grohovsky at February 18, 2014 10:43 PM

Anthony Jannetta
Dr. Lee B. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
19 February 2014

QUESTION #146:
Chapter 8: Why did Myrtle run?
ANSWER:
Myrtle ran because she wanted to “speak to him” (Fitzgerald 159). Indeed when she saw Tom’s car, she wanted to leave her husband and go with Tom. But it was not Tom driving, so the car kept going and did hit her.

Posted by: Anthony Jannetta at February 18, 2014 10:46 PM

Brianne M. Waller
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
18 February 2014

Question: Why is the book that Gatsby’s father shows Nick important to the novel?

Answer: Gatsby’s father shows Nick Hopalong Cassidy which has Gatsby’s personal schedule in it. This book is so significant to this novel because it shows Gatsby’s desire to accomplish the “American Dream”. You could tell Gatsby’s father truly cared even after all this time after he stated, “The poor son-of-a-bitch”.

Posted by: Brianne M. Waller at February 18, 2014 10:48 PM

Kyle McLeish
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love & Desire in Literature
18 February 2014

Question #148 Ch 8 What does Wilson do (after the death of Myrtle)?

Answer:
He talks to his friend and they come to the realization that she was running away from her husband when Myrtle died. Wilson thinks she was killed, that her death wasn't an accident (Fitzgerald 158).

Posted by: Kyle McLeish at February 18, 2014 10:52 PM

Allison Grohovsky
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love & Desire in Literature
18 February 2014

Question #109 What parallel is suggested by the fact that Gatsby never gets the inheritance bequeathed to him by Cody?

Answer: Gatsby believed in the promise of his inheritance, yet, Dan Cody's mistress got it instead. This indicates that Gatsby will also not be able to get Daisy.
The inheritance and a future with Daisy both seemed like forgone conclusions to Gatsby, but he did not take in to consideration the motives and actions of other people. Dan Cody wanted to leave his money to Gatsby, but the mistress intervened and took it away.
"He talked a lot about the past, and I gathered that he wanted to recover something, some idea of himself perhaps, that had gone into loving Daisy. His life had been confused and disordered since then, but if he could return to a certain starting place and go over it all slowly, he could find out what that thing was… "(Fitzgerald 6.132)
Gatsby can't deal with what his life's become, but instead of wanting to change it going forward, he wants to head back to the past.

Posted by: Allison Grohovsky at February 18, 2014 11:09 PM

Franck Bayebanen
Dr. Bursgbee L. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love & Desire in Literature
19 February, 2014
Question: How are season used in constructing this novel?
Answer:
The season obviously has an important place in the characters action. It even looks like the characters plan to things according to the season. For instance Daisy example is important to underline: “ Through this twilight universe Daisy began to move again with the season; suddenly she was again keeping half a dozen dates” ( Fitzgerald p.151).

Posted by: Franck Bayebanen at February 19, 2014 12:07 AM

Meshayla Williams
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG. 210CL Love and Desire in Literature

Question #15
From where did the narrator come and why?

Answer:
The narrator comes from the Midwest to make his fortune working in the bond market. “Instead of being the warm center of the world, the middle west now seemed like the ragged edged of the universe , so I decided to go east and learn the bond business” (Fitzgerald, 3).

Posted by: Meshayla Williams at February 19, 2014 01:44 AM

Meshayla Williams
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG. 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
10 February 2014

Question #42
Why does Gatsby throw huge, expensive parties for people he
does not even know?

He just wants to impress them because there was a rumor spreading around that he killed a man, and he does not want anyone to believe that so he throws big parties. He also wants to show off to everyone how rich he is. “I think he killed a man” (Fitzgerald,4).


Posted by: Meshayla Williams at February 19, 2014 01:48 AM

Meshayla Williams
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG. 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
10 February 2014

Question #42
Why does Gatsby throw huge, expensive parties for people he
does not even know?

Answer:
He just wants to impress them because there was a rumor spreading around that he killed a man, and he does not want anyone to believe that so he throws big parties. He also wants to show off to everyone how rich he is. “I think he killed a man” (Fitzgerald,4).


Posted by: Meshayla Williams at February 19, 2014 01:48 AM

Meshayla Williams
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG. 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
12 February 2014

Question #64
What does Gatsby tell Nick about himself?

Answer:
Gatsby tells nick about his past although it does not add up to him, he also tells him about going to oxford and collecting jewels.
“I am the son of some wealthy people in the Middle West all dead now. I was brought up in America but educated at Oxford, because all my ancestors have been educated there for many years. It is a family tradition” (Fitzgerald, 65).


Posted by: Meshayla Williams at February 19, 2014 01:53 AM

Meshayla Williams
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG. 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
12 February 2014


Question #115
What was Gatsby’s reaction to Daisy’s child?

Answer:
He was in shock, and could not believe it was real, and he looked at her surprised.
“Afterward he kept looking at the child with surprise. I don’t think he had ever really believed in its existence before” (Fitzgerald, 117).

Posted by: Meshayla Williams at February 19, 2014 01:56 AM

Meshayla Williams
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG. 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
17 February 2014

Question #158
What does Nick say about people like Daisy and Tom?

Answer:
That even if they’re not in love they will always be together despite their feelings.
“They were careless people, Tom and Daisy they smashed up things and creatures and then retreated back into their money or their vast carelessness, or whatever it was that kept them together, and let other people clean up the mess they had made” (Fitzgerald, 179).

Posted by: Meshayla Williams at February 19, 2014 01:58 AM

Denzel Williams
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01

Question #77: Nick says " There re only the pursued, the pursuing, the busy and the tired." What does Nick mean? How does each character in the novel fit into this schema?

Answer: After he has ridden with Gatsby, hearing Gatsby's history, met Meyer Wolfcheim, listened to the exotic song of the "Sheik of Araby," and talked with Jordan Baker, a phrase beats in Nick's mind,

"There are only the pursued, the pursuing, the busy and the tired."

His meeting with all these people and all those who frequent Gatsby's "splendid roadhouse," give Nick this perception of the world. These people fit into one of four types: They are either those who "pursue" others in romantic hopes of love like Gatsby, or they are "pursued" as Daisy is by Gatsby; there are those who are "busy" like Tom Buchanan, who fills his life with money and women, or those who attend Gatsby's parties, arriving with the names of great American capitalists. And, then, there are the "tired," the effete, such as Jordan Baker, who is detached from the others; or there is Meyer Wolfscheim who has now has "little to say."

Posted by: Denzel Williams at February 19, 2014 06:04 AM

Denzel Williams
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01

Question #111:

Answer: Tom first meets Gatsby when Tom stops by for a drink at Gatsby's house, accompanied by Mr. and Mrs. Sloane. Gatsby seems quite nervous when he meets him and their first meeting is very awkward. When he tells Tom that he knows Daisy, Tom becomes quite suspicious. The two kind of brush each other off externally while deep inside they feel some sort of suspicion about one another. "He had control of himself now, and he wanted to see more of Tom"(Fitzgerald) says Nick in describing Gatsby at one point during the encounter. Meanwhile, when they receive the invite to dinner and agree to go Tom turns and responds: "My God, I believe the man's coming, Doesn't he know she doesn't want him?"(Fitzgerald). Already Tom has negative connotations about Gatsby somewhat as well.

Posted by: Denzel Williams at February 19, 2014 06:12 AM

Paige Fowler
Dr.B.Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire
19 February 2014
Question #163
What is the irony of Mr. Gatz’s admiration of the house?
Mr Gatz’s at first has a lot of pride for his son. The house symbolizes Gatsby’s success. Even though the house was made for Daisy, it was this very same house that brought Gatsby so much pain and unhappiness because all he wanted was daisy. “His pride in his son and his son’s possession was continually increasing and now he had something to shoe me” (Fitzgerald 172).

Posted by: paige fowler at February 19, 2014 08:13 AM

Emma De Rhodo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire in Literature
19 February, 2014

QUESTION #161: How does Nick react to the phone call revealing Gatsby’s criminal activities?

ANSWER: In Chapter 9, a person from Chicago called, and Nick thought he was going to answer Daisy’s call when he picked up the phone (Fitzgerald 166). However, the person on the phone was a male, and he tells Nick that his name is Slagle (Fitzgerald 166). This man mentions that someone is in trouble because “they picked him up when he handed the bonds over the counter” (Fitzgerald 166). After Slagle says this, he keeps talking to Nick, believing he is Gatsby, and Nick seems to get nervous because he “interrupted breathlessly” (Fitzgerald 166). Gatsby obviously had been helping Young Park with “hand[ing] the bonds over the counter” since Slagle, thinking Nick was Gatsby, was telling Nick about the consequences of this man's certain deed, and Nick seemed to respond to this situation in a flustered or nervous way (Fitzgerald 166).

Posted by: Emma De Rhodo at February 19, 2014 08:26 AM

Peter Grana
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
Love and Desire in Literature
18, February 2014
Question #147
“Why does Wilson believe that Gatsby killed Myrtle?”
Answer:
When Myrtle was killed being run over by a car, Wilson witnessed the car being driven was a yellow specific car. An when Tom talked to Wilson he told him it was Gatsby’s car because he was the owner and was inspired out of jealousy said it was him because Gatsby was seeing his wife. “’Then he killed her,’ said Wilson. His mouth dropped open suddenly. ‘Who did?’ ‘I have a way of finding out.’ ‘You’re morbid, George,’ said his friend.” (Fitzgerald 242).

Posted by: Peter Grana at February 19, 2014 09:25 AM

Paige Fowler
Dr.B.Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire
17 February 2014
Question #108
What is ironic about Dan Cody?
The irony presented in Chapter 6 with Dan Cody is that he is a wealthy man. He had everything but, as a heavy drinker therefor, he let a bad woman into his life. “And it was from Cody that he inherited money- a legacy of twenty-five thousand dollars. He didn’t get it” (Fitzgerald 100). Just like Dan Cody, Gatsby became wealthy and he too was unhappy in his wealth. Gatsby didn’t drink because he didn’t want to end up like Dan Cody with a bad woman but, just like Cody he to let a bad woman into his life and died.

Posted by: paige fowler at February 19, 2014 10:06 AM

-----------------


*NOTE* 19 February 2014.

The deadline for your HOMEWORK QUESTIONS has now passed.

Any comments listed below are *ONLY* for the posting of the essay question portion of the test, i.e., part II of quiz/test #2.

It is due by class time, Monday, 24 February 2014.

Any homework posts appearing below that missed the assignment deadline will NOT get credit for the assignment.


~ Dr. Hobbs


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Posted by: Dr. Hobbs at February 19, 2014 12:36 PM

Paige Fowler
Dr.B.Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire
17 February 2014
Question #128
What is the significance of “blocks” Biloxi?
The significance of the “blocks” is that when Daisy is reminiscing about her wedding, it was a very hot day and a man by the name of Biloxi fainted. He stayed at daisy’s house for three weeks. Daisy father told him to get out and right after he did, daisy father died. “And he stayed three weeks, until Daddy told him he had to get out. The day after he left Daddy died.” (Fitzgerald 126).

Posted by: paige fowler at February 19, 2014 08:58 PM

Will Fumero
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210cl
2/16/14

Question 159: What is the significance of Nick’s taking charge of Gatsby’s funeral arrangements?

Answer:
Nick became so close to Gatsby over a prolonged period of time. He felt that he was the only one who could do him that favor, because he was really the only person who got to know the “real” Gatsby at that point. As hinted on pg. 175, Nick is the receptionist and coordinator for everything revolving around Gatsby. No one, not the woman he loved or the people he catered to, attended his funeral or gave him any thought.

Posted by: William Fumero at February 20, 2014 01:04 AM

Denzel Williams
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01
20 February, 2014

Question #149: How does Fitzgerald achieve a melancholic mood in the beginning of this chapter?

Answer: The beginning of chapter eight is introduced with a sleepless night of Nick Carraway. He defines his sleep as "tossing half-sick between grotesque reality and savage, frightening dreams(Fitzgerald 147). Later when Gatsby arrives he reveals to Nick that nothing happened in a disappointed manner almost. "Nothing happened, 'he said Wanly' "I waited and about for o'clock she came to the window and stood there for a minute and then turned out the light" (Fitzgerald 147). From the audience's point of view this could be seen as a sad play of dramatic irony; for we know Daisy and Tom may have come to some agreement of temporary resolution while Gatsby hopefully awaits a sign from her. The rest of the night Nick and Gatsby search through the cold empty house for cigarettes. The description of Gatsby house too plays a slight role in setting a melancholy mood for most of the house is deserted, empty and cold. " We pushed aside curtains that were like pavilions, and felt over innumerable feet of dark wall for electric light switches- once I tumbled with a sort of splash upon the keys of a ghostly Piano. There was an inexplicable amount of dust everywhere, and the rooms were musty as though they hadn't been aired for many days"(Fitzgerald 148). The men find two stale cigarettes and sit in to drawing-room. "We sat smoking out into the darkness"Fitzgerald 148).

Posted by: Denzel Williams at February 20, 2014 11:53 PM

Alison Schucht
Dr. Burgsbee L. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
22 February 2014

QUESTION #15:
In his homage to Eros, Agathon mischievously brags about his own attributes (youth, looks, etc.) because, by all accounts, he is a very attractive individual. Agathon’s apparent narcissism is evident. Work with this idea of self-love in F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby. Are there any characters guilty of narcissism in the narrative? If so, who and why? You must first begin by defining the term and expressing it in your own language/voice (use the passages from the Symposium text, if necessary, to support your definition). Then show how the stipulations of your definition apply to the characters from The Great Gatsby that you have chosen. If narcissism exists, how/why is it significant to the story?

ANSWER:
Narcissism can be defined, in a broad term, as the excessive love of one’s self. Narcissists have a rather ethnocentric attitude in regards to their surrounding of people. Narcissism is a personality disorder in affected people, therefore, this disorder has a few symptoms. For example, grandiosity, lack of empathy, and using other people are a few of the main symptoms of narcissism. Although there are quite a few characters in this novel who portray an excessive self-love, this definition does not fit anyone better than our one and only, Jay Gatsby. Jay Gatsby is a narcissist because of his grandiosity, his lack of empathy, and his consistent use of people to get what he desires.

An example of grandiosity as portrayed by Jay Gatsby can be seen when Nick received his first invitation to Gatsby’s party. A man in a robin’s egg blue formally delivered an invitation directly to Nick that was signed in “a majestic hand” of Jay Gatsby (Fitzgerald 45). This shows that Gatsby makes everything grand, even when delivering an invitation to his next-door neighbor.

Gatsby’s lack of empathy is evident when the huge fight occurs in the city between him and Tom. “Just tell him the truth—that you never loved him—and it’s all wiped out forever” (Fitzgerald 139). Here, Gatsby is demanding Daisy to tell Tom that she never loved him, but only Gatsby. Again, Gatsby is only concerned with himself, and at this moment of time he is certainly not concerned about Tom’s, or even Daisy’s, feelings.

Finally, it is obvious that Gatsby uses Nick to hopefully, once again, have Daisy in his life. “’He wants to know—‘ continued Jordan “—if you’ll invite Daisy to your house some afternoon and then let him come over’” (Fitzgerald 83). Gatsby did not even have the audacity to ask Nick himself, and clearly he is using Nick to reach out to Daisy.

Although there are many more examples in the novel of Gatsby’s narcissist behavior, it is obvious from these three points that Gatsby can, indeed, be considered a narcissist because of his grandiosity, his lack of empathy, and his consistent use of people for his own gain.

Posted by: Alison Schucht at February 22, 2014 09:01 AM


Trey Griseck
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG. 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
23 February 2014
Test #2-Question #7
In the story The Great Gatsby, the two characters Nick Carraway and Jordan Baker have a different type of relationship. As first proposed by Phaedrus in all relationships there are usually a lover and a beloved. Meaning that the lover is the individual that is doing all of the caring and affection in the relationship while the beloved is the individual that is in the relationship that is not showing much affection nor is he or she showing that they care any about the relationship as a whole. Nick and Jordan Baker’s relationship have one thing in common which is that they both “hate careless people.” Therefore, at this point in their relationship you think the two are going to be a great couple. Jordan Baker is a professional golfer so her life is very rich and glamorous as it is. This lifestyle automatically attracts Nick to her. They relate her to Daisy because of the way Jordan acts. She is clever, rude, deceptive, and careless. Which she has already told Nick she strongly dislikes about people. Nick says, “She’s not only a cheat at golf, but she is a cheat at life” (Fitzgerald). I believe that Nick Carraway is the lover in the relationship while Jordan Baker is the beloved. I have this opinion about the two because Nick shows more interest in the relationship than Jordan does. He shows affection to her making sure that even throughout her rich, glamorous life she has love from a man that cares about her. Jordan is once again rich and has no care in the world because she is a professional athlete and feels that she does not need a man but of course, she will take one if he is willing to spoil her and love her. Therefore, I feel that in this relationship between the two Nick Carraway is the lover while Jordan Baker is the beloved.

Works Cited
Fitzgerald, F. Scott. "The Great Gatsby." n.d.

Posted by: Trey Griseck at February 23, 2014 04:47 PM

Daniella Zacarias
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
Love and Desire in Literature (CA01)
23.2.2014
TEST Question #5
5:
Discuss the concept of the Lover and the Beloved, as first proposed by Phaedrus in Plato’s Symposium, in F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby.
You must first begin by defining the terms and expressing them in your own language/voice (use passages) from the text to support your definitions).
Then show how the stipulations of each definition apply to the characters, George Wilson and Myrtle Wilson (use quoted passages from the text to support your claim).
Which character plays which role (primarily) in the relationship? Why is this significant to the story?
ANSWER:
The concept of Loved and their Beloved can be defined as a dichotomy; “a lover is a more divine thing than a beloved, for he has the God within him.” (Plato 9). A lover is defined as a form of Heavenly love (or Heavenly Aphrodite), and it is a dichotomy of the beloved. Then the beloved must be the lover’s opposite, a Common love.
Simply explained the Lover is the giver in the relationship and placed above the beloved, because their love is closer to that of the Gods. The beloved receives more than they can give because the lover is the one who gives the beloved more affection and passes on more knowledge.
The “love triangle” between George, Myrtle, and Tom is a clear definition of Phaedrus’ Lover/Beloved dichotomy;
George is the lover of Myrtle; his love for Myrtle is almost heavenly. He does not get angry at her for cheating and is patient when she lies about visiting her sister in New York. He also does not expect his love to be reciprocated in the way or amount. When Doctor Eckleburg asks Tom if George has any objections to Myrtle’s affair, Tome replies with; “Wilson? He thinks she goes to see her sister in New York. He’s so dumb he doesn’t know he’s alive.”(Fitzgerald 26). The reader then discovers that Wilson does suspect that Myrtle is having an affair, but instead of being angry, he plans to move out West.
Myrtle is the lover of Tom Buchanan, or rather what Tom represents, which is money, wealth, and social status. Myrtle and Tom represent the Common Aphrodite. “Aphrodite Pandemus is truly pandemian [common to all people] and acts in any sort of way. And here you have the one whom good-for-nothing human beings have as their love. Those who are of the same sort as this Eros are [. . .] in love with the stupidest there can be, for they have an eye only to the act and are unconcerned with whether it is noble or not.”(Plato 10-11.)


Works Cited

Fitzgerald, Frances Scott. The Great Gatsby. New York: Scribner, 2004. Print.
Plato. Symposium. Chicago: University of Chicago, 1986. Print.

Posted by: Daniella Zacarias at February 23, 2014 07:32 PM

Anthony Jannetta
Dr. Lee B. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
24 February 2014

QUESTION #4:
Discuss the concept of the Lover and the Beloved, as first proposed by Phaedrus in Plato’s Symposium, in F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby. You must first begin by defining the terms and expressing them in your own language/voice (use passages from the text to support your definitions). Then show how the stipulations of each definition apply to the characters Tom Buchanan and Daisy Buchanan (use quoted passages from the text to support your claim). Which character plays which role (primarily) in the relationship? Why is this significant to the story?

ANSWER:
The concept of the Lover and the Beloved proposed by Phaedrus in Plato’s Symposium says that, in a love relation, there are always the lover and the beloved. By “lover”, Phaedrus is talking about the one who loves, the giver of love. By “beloved”, Phaedrus is describing the one who is loved, the taker of love. In short, he defines a relationship as the connection between one person who loves and another person who is loved. To him, relationship goes in one way (from the lover to the beloved). In other words, the lover is ready to love without expecting anything in return and the beloved is ready to receive love without giving anything in return.
This love relation applies perfectly to the relationship between Tom Buchanan and Daisy Buchanan. To me, Daisy seems to be the lover and Tom seems to be the beloved. I think that way because, in the story, we notice that Tom can do whatever he wants, and Daisy will still be next to him to “love” him. For example, she suspected Tom to see someone at the beginning of their relationship, she used to ask herself: “Where’s Tom gone?” (Fitzgerald 77). She might also know that Tom was with “one of the chambermaids in the Santa Barbara Hotel” (Fitgerald 77) when Tom ran into a wagon. Even if she knows he is cheating on her, she is still with him and she still loves him. It is significant to the story because we notice that this situation is changing when Tom learns his wife got feelings for Gatsby. As soon as he feels like she is not his lover (he is not her beloved), he starts panicking and make “a small investigation of his past” (Fitzgerald 122). We notice that when Tom feels like he is losing the one who loves him, he completely changes and express a feeling he never had shown before: “I’m going to take better care of you from now on” (Fitzgerald 133). Tom realized he was not fair with Daisy since the beginning of their relationship and he promises he would change for her (to make her stay with him).

Posted by: Anthony Jannetta at February 23, 2014 08:50 PM

Rosa Esquivel
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
24 February 2014
A Trusting and Strong Love
QUESTION # 22: Storge Love. You know from our multiple class discussions that storge love is familial love, i.e., the type of affection expressed by a parent towards his/her child. It is different from agape love, but, it too has certain characteristics. If you need to know more, you have my permission to get “filled-in” a bit better by visiting Wikipedia and reading the entries under these terms: (first) “The Four Loves” and (second) “Storge”. Work with this idea of storge in F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby. Are there any characters performing storge WELL in the narrative? If so, who, and why? You must first begin by defining the term and expressing it in your own language/voice (you may quote from Wikipedia – in this one-time instance – to support your definition). Then show how the stipulations of your definition apply to the character/s from The Great Gatsby that you have chosen. If storge love exists, how/why is it significant to the story?
ANSWER: The best way to describe storge love is that a parent has towards their child. It is the love where the bond is very strong. It is a love that is hard to break or take away; however, it is not unconditional. Storge love can be described as affectionate and kind, but this type can be ruined if one does enough harm the friend, parent, etc.. According to Wikipedia, “Storge or affection is a wide – ranging force which can apply between family members, friends, and pets and owners, companions or colleagues; it can also blend with and help underpin other types of tie such as passionate love or friendship” (Wikipedia). It seems as though Daisy and Jordan have a relationship of storge love because they are good friends. It also seems as though Daisy trusts Jordan with a lot of things and it is the reason as to why Jordan knows so much about Daisy. The relationship between Daisy and Jordan is important in the story because them being so close allows Jordan to let Nick know what is going on. “Tom’s got some woman in New York” (Fitzgerald, 29). At the beginning of the story, Jordan gives Nick information that allows Nick, and the reader know what kind of person Tom is and his relationship with Daisy. Daisy and Nick also have a relationship of storge love it is evident because they are family. This relationship is important in the story because Daisy and their relationship open the door for Nick to have a variety of relationships with all the characters. Their relationship is also very important to the story because their relationship is what allowed Gatsby to get close to Daisy again. “I called up Daisy from the office next morning and invited her to come to tea (Fitzgerald, 80). The storge love Daisy and Nick have allowed her to not suspect her cousin was up to something and it brought her to her meeting with Gatsby. Throughout the story there were many relationships, but many were of desire and greed, therefore do not fit with storge love.

Works Cited
Fitzgerald, F. Scott. The Great Gatsby. New York: SCRIBNER, 1992. Print.
“Storge.” Wikipedia. n.p., 18 Feb. 2014. Web. 21 Feb. 2014.

Posted by: Rosa Esquivel at February 23, 2014 08:58 PM

Christopher Lavie Mienandy
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210 Love and Desire in Literature CA01
23 February 2014

Essay question for test #2:

QUESTION #2:
Discuss the concept of the Lover and the Beloved, as first proposed by Phaedrus in Plato’s Symposium, in F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby. You must first begin by defining the terms and expressing them in your own language / voice (use passages from the text to support your definitions). Then show how the stipulations of each definition apply to the characters Jay Gatsby and Daisy Buchanan (use quoted passages from the text to support your claim). Which character plays which role (primarily) in the relationship? Why is this significant to the story?

ANSWER:
According to Phaedrus, it is better being the lover than being the beloved. For him, the gods favor those who are willing to make sacrifices and even die for the ones they love. Therefore, Phaedrus gives the example of Achilles who will avenge his lover Patroclus and follow him in the afterlife: “he dared to choose to come to the aid of his lover Patroclus, and with his vengeance accomplished, he dared not only to die on his behalf but to die after him who had died” (Plato 241). The lover is F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby is Gatsby himself. Towards the end of the novel, Gatsby protects his beloved Daisy by letting people think that he killed Myrtle. Eventually, Gatsby dies because of his love for Daisy: “Was Daisy driving? Yes, but of course I’ll say I was” (Fitzgerald 143).
Jay Gatsby made his fortune in order to impress Daisy after he came back from the war. In the book, it is easy to understand that Gatsby is always looking for Daisy. Indeed, Jay Gatsby organized a fake random meeting with her with the complicity of Jordan and Nick. Daisy is the object of desire, but obviously, she does not love Gatsby, as he wants her to love him: “Oh, you want too much! I love you now isn’t that enough?” (Fitzgerald 132). Therefore, Gatsby plays the primarily role of the lover in this story. The plot is articulated around him and his love for Daisy Buchanan. Even though Gatsby finally understand, that Daisy is superficial: “Her voice is full of money” (Fitzgerald 120); he keeps trying to amaze her and remain blind to her real personality. This can be seen as a dichotomy and is significant to the story. To me, the most striking example of this dichotomy is when Daisy does not even show up for Jay Gatsby’s funerals: “The minister glanced several times at his watch, so I took him aside and asked him to wait for half an hour. But it wasn’t any use. Nobody came “(Fitzgerald 174)

Posted by: christopher lavie mienandy at February 23, 2014 10:41 PM

Marie Ryan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire in Literature
23 February 2014

6) Discuss the concept of Lover and Beloved, as first proposed by Phaedrus in Plato’s Symposium, in F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby. You must first begin by defining the terms and expressing them in your own language/voice (use passages from the text to support your definitions). Then show how the stipulations of each definition apply to the characters Nick Carraway and Jay Gatsby (use quoted passages from the text to support your claim). Which character plays which role primarily in the relationship? Why is this significant to the story?

In Plato’s Symposium, Phaedrus uses the term lover and beloved to explain his view on love. The lover is the giver, the one in the relationship who does more or appears to care more. In support of this Phaedrus says, “Love will make men dare to die for their beloved-love alone…” (Plato 6)The beloved is the taker, the one who would rather receive than give. In support of this, Phaedrus says, “…because he showed no spirit; he was only a harp-player, and did not dare like Alcestis to die for love, but was contriving how he might enter hades alive…” (Plato 7).
Both of these definitions can be applied to the charters Nick Carraway and Jay Gatsby from F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby. Nick is a giver in the sense that he invited Daisy to tee so, that Gatsby could see her. In support of this Nick says to Gatsby, “I’m going to call up Daisy tomorrow and invite her over for tea” (Fitzgerald 87). However, Nick is also a taker because he allows Gatsby to do a bunch of things for him, such as take Nick up in his plane, without offering much of anything. Gatsby is a taker because he wants Daisy to say that she never loved Tom and she always loved him. However, he is also a giver because he welcomed Nick into his home by inviting him to one of his lovely parties. Evidence to support this is, “…the honor would be entirely Gatsby’s, it said, if I would attend his “little party” that night” (Fitzgerald 45).
In Gatsby and Nick’s relationship, Nick is the beloved and Gatsby is the lover. This is because Gatsby offers so much to Nick, and Nick basically fakes being friends with him until Gatsby is killed. This is when Nick realizes that Gatsby was a decent person and he really did see him as a friend. This is important to the story because if Nick had realized earlier that he saw Gatsby as a friend things may have gone differently in the end. For example, Nick may have been able to convince Gatsby not to say anything to Tom while they were in New York City. Therefore, Daisy would not have been so upset and want to drive home. Consequently, she would not have run over Myrtle with the car.

Work Cited
Fitzgerald, F. Scott. The Great Gatsby. New York: Scribner, 2003. Print.
Plato. Symposium. Trans. Benjamin Jowett. The Internet Classics Archive. Web. 28 January 2014.

Posted by: Marie Ryan at February 23, 2014 11:11 PM

Will Fumero
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210cl
2/20/14

Question 159: Discuss how the concept of love as a biochemical “balance”, as first proposed by Eryximachus in Plato’s Symposium, is connected to the following idea in F. Scott Fitzgerald’s “The Great Gatsby”: when one has love, that person has access to the piece of mind that it yields. You must first begin by articulating the particulars of Eryximachus’s theory and then expressing them in your own language/voice (use passages from the text to support your definitions). Then show how the idea of balance and peace of mind applies to love felt by the characters Jay Gatsby and Daisy Buchanan in their relationship (used quoted passages from the text to support your claim). Are these characters really balanced? Do these characters really have “peace of mind”? If so, why is this significant to the story? If not, what does this say about Eryximachus’s theory?
Answer:
To begin with this response, it should be noted that both Gatsby and Daisy were two unhappy individuals who were at some point unsatisfied with their previous lives. Gatsby never had peace of mind because he longed for a woman that simply got away from him before he could make his move, plus he was unhappy with his former humble living conditions as hinted in chapter 6 (pgs. 104-106). Daisy found anything a woman would’ve wanted in Tom, wealth and status, which was most likely something she didn’t have before and probably longed for. According to Eryximachus, taken from his medical/scientific perspective, love can be derived from his education in the scientific field.
One Example he gives of such balance comes jowett’s version on page 11, where he brings up the topic seasons and the effects of the climate. Whenever the weather calls to be hot or cold, rainy or dry, etc., it all comes together as a form of natural love that helps balance out the environment in order to sustain the life that exists within it. The synthetic and more controlled form of this love, referred to as common, would most likely bring up some undesired effects and unwanted results. these results for the most part would prove to be destructive and unsuccessful, making the said romance a failure.
This would be the case for the relationship between Gatsby and Daisy, a relationship that was pursued both selfishly and passionately by Jay himself. He was in many ways obsessed with Daisy, and couldn’t bear to live his life without her when one really thinks about it. You also look at the lavish and ostentatious lifestyle he lived and pursued and ponder as to how ambitious of a man he really was. You can admire his determination, but he obviously did not have a stable mindset when approaching her, and realistically he never would have obtained her. Daisy herself was a changed individual, having been married for some time and having issues of her own. Both of these characters were the imbalanced forces of nature that Eryximachus was referring to, proving his theory right.

Posted by: William Fumero at February 24, 2014 02:26 AM

Meshayla Williams
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG. 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
24 February 2014

Question#21.
Discuss how the concept of love as a biochemical “balance,” as first proposed by
Eryximachus in Plato’s Symposium, is connected to the following idea in F. Scott Fitzgerald’s
The Great Gatsby: when one has love, that person has access to the peace of mind it yields.
You must first begin by articulating the particulars of Eryximachus’s theory and then
expressing them in your own language/voice (use passages from the text to support your
definitions). Then show how the idea of balance and peace of mind applies to the love felt by
the characters Nick Carraway and Jordan Baker in their relationship (use quoted
passages from the text to support your claim). Are these characters really “balanced”? Do
these characters truly have “peace of mind”? If so, why is this significant to the story? If not,
what does this say about Eryximachus’s theory?
Answer:
Eryximachus theory is a concept that express the balance of love two opposite people can have and it can result to harmony. Such as, in Plato’s Symposium the love he expresses to other people at the party and in his life gave him a different outlook on love. Which leads to the Great Gatsby, there was plenty of Eryximachus theory expressed through love as a balance and peace of mind. As far as the relationship between Nick Carraway and Jordan Baker, it showed a content and engaged relationship. They were two opposite people and had different thoughts on the way of life but yet the two characters seemed to fall for each other opposite ways. Nick was a quiet, open mind and easy going type of person, and being peace mined surely amounts to him. “Of course I knew what they were referring to, but I wasn’t even vaguely engaged” (Fitzgerald, 19). This quote shows how he rather keeps peace by ignoring that conversation and not being involved even though he knows everything they were talking about.
Jordan on the other hand, is seen as a young sophisticated liveliness person; who is careless of other people and worries mainly about herself. However, Nick sees the charm in her and admires her inner self, “Her gray sun-strained eyes looked back at me with polite reciprocal curiosity out of a wan, charming, discontented face” (Fitzgerald,11). Throughout the story nick shows his characteristics more openly, and he expresses being a peace mined person by the way he talks about Jordan and the love he shows her. Nick seems to be the only character that has a complete balance in his life. Jordan is very dishonest and tries to bend the truth just to get by although, her dishonesty leads her to success in life. This clearly shows a balance in the relationship Nick and Jordan have because one needs the other to further their love and it is what truly makes their love stronger. Overall, Eryximachus’s theory plays a huge role in the story line because all these different personalities are getting involved with each other but in the end its creating something bigger that what it should express, which is how Eryximachus’s is defined; to create harmony.


Works Cited
Fitzgerald, F. Scott, and Matthew J. Bruccoli. The Great Gatsby. New York, NY: Scribner, 1996. Print.

Posted by: Meshayla Williams at February 24, 2014 02:42 AM

Paige Fowler
Dr.B.Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire
23February 2014
Test2 Part 2
Question #17. Discuss how the concept of love as a Biochemical ‘balance,' as first proposed by Eryximachus in Plato's Symposium, is connected to the following thought in F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby: when one has love, that person has access to the peace of mind it yields. You must first begin by articulating the particulars of Eryximachus's theory and then expressing them in your own language/voice (use passages from the text to support your definitions). Then show how the idea of balance and peace of mind applies to the love felt by the characters Tom Buchanan and Myrtle Wilson in their relationship (use quoted passages from the text to support your claim). Are these characters really "balanced"? Do these characters have "peace of mind"? If so, why this is significant to the story? If not, what does this say about Eryximachus's theory?
Eryximachus theory comes from a Medical standpoint. That love is a Biochemical balance that should bring out good things and not bring out "illnesses" about the body. The balance of love seems to be that if the gratification of love is mutual; then this good among the body. However, if it is for one self-benefit this is not good and considered ‘unbalanced'. "The nature of the bodies has this double Eros, for the health and the sickness of the body are agreement different and dissimilar; and the dissimilar desires and love dissimilar things"(Plato's 247 PDF - Translation of Plato's _Symposium_ by Seth Bernadotte (1986). The body requires several contributors found in other people in order to be considered ‘balanced'. Individuals with similar attributes find it difficult to be completely balanced. Whereas, different experience and different personalities; come together to make a perfect balance. Not too much or too little of something it is just right.
"For harmony is consonance and consonance are a kind of agreement, but impossible to derive agreement from different things as long as they are different and impossible intern to fit together the differing or nonagreeing." (Plato's 248 PDF - Translation of Plato's _Symposium_ by Seth Bernadotte (1986)). Eryximachus uses the example of music to illustrate the compatibility that needs to be there in order for love to flourish. That both individuals have to be decent, in order to obtain the satisfaction of love from each other. It is impossible to be harmonious with one another if one or both has obstacles (marriages) that stand in the way. With the right biochemical balance, this person is then said to have a ‘peace of mind'.
In the scandalous relationship of Tom Buchanan and Myrtle Wilson they both strive for a balance in their lives but are both held back by a preexisting factor. Tom and Myrtle are both married, but seems to be unbalanced as an individual in their marriage. Tom is married to Daisy but is not fully ‘balanced' with her. He seeks for a sense of authority, and for someone to appreciate all the good things he can buy, and he finds this in Myrtle. On the other hand, Myrtle is not happy in her marriage to her husband because he cannot give her the things she desires. Tom, on the other hand is rich and can supplies the lifestyle in which she desires. "Neither of them can stand the person they married to" (Fitzgerald 33). In the affair Tom properly had a ‘piece of mind' because he "had his cake and ate it too" meaning he had Daisy whom he loved for social and physical reasons, and he also had Myrtle who fulfilled the sense of satisfaction that daisy did not give him. According to Eryximachus, Tom does not have a ‘piece of mind' because he is not properly balanced. However, Myrtle will never have peace of mind because she will always be inferior to Daisy, for example, Toms breaks Myrtle noise for mentioning Daisy's name. (Fitzgerald 37). The person that she needs to be ‘balance' will never be with her and, therefore cannot have peace of mind. In conclusion, this relationship shows that Eryximachus theory of love as a biochemical ‘balance' can be possible. This theory explains that if the two individuals are in the best position to be balanced and is without prior confliction. Only then is peace of mind obtained.

Work Cited:
Fitzgerald, F. Scott. Three Novels: The Great Gatsby. New York: Scribner, 1953. Print.Book
PDF - Translation of Plato's _Symposium_ by Seth Bernadete (1986)

Posted by: paige fowler at February 24, 2014 03:29 AM

Chelsea Dickenson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire in Literature CA01
23 February 2014

Question 1: In St. Paul’s First Letter to the Corinthians, Paul spells out, specifically, the requirements for love, especially when it falls under the category of Agape love, a.k.a. Divine Love. Work with this idea of agape love in F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby. We understand that agape love is an ideal. However, if we had to choose one character from The Great Gatsby that best exemplified the traits of agape love a.) who would it be? b.) who is the agape love directed towards, i.e. who is receiving it? Remember there are many characters in the story to consider.
Answer: In St. Paul’s First Letter to the Corinthians, Paul expresses the requirements of Agape love. In his writing, he articulates Divine Love as:
"Love suffereth long, and is kind; love envieth not; love vaunteth not itself, is not puffed up, 13:5doth not behave itself unseemly, seeketh not its own, is not provoked, taketh not account of evil; 13:6rejoiceth not in unrighteousness, but rejoiceth with the truth; 13:7beareth all things, believeth all things, hopeth all things, endureth all things (Kirby 13)."
In other words, this kind of love is unconditional and contains no limits. Such ideal love is found in many relationships including one that is found in F. Scott Fitzgerald’s text, The Great Gatsby. A relationship between two great friends is a situation that exemplifies this form of love extremely well. Typically, a true friendship between two beings has the particular qualifications Paul expresses himself regarding Agape love. The relationship amongst Nick Carraway and Jay Gatsby is one of the specific kinships that meet the requirements of Divine Love throughout the novel. In particular, Nick expresses agape love towards Gatsby in a limitless sense. For example, Jay Gatsby told Nick that he was not who he said he truly was. To others, Mr. Gatsby held a high position in society due to his earnings and “success”. According to Gatsby, he attended a very wealthy University where he earned his degree and went on to eventually receive medals for his doings. During the novel, the reader finds out this simply is not the case. After hearing that Gatsby had been fibbing to the individuals that surrounded him, including Daisy, Nick’s very own cousin, Nick still continued to carry on with their close friendship and never once questioned this decision. This exemplifies unconditional love. No matter the circumstances, Nick loved Gatsby aside from what others perceived him as and proceeded to stand by him until the very end. Even following his death, Nick Carraway felt he needed to help Gatsby and grant him the honor he deserved. “All this part of it seemed remote and unessential. I found myself on Gatsby’s side, and alone (Fitzgerald 289).” Despite the actuality that Jay was alone and was truly loved by none, Nick continued to show his appreciation of their friendship and did not allow outside influences to affect his love for Gatsby.


Works Cited

1.) Fitzgerald, F. Scott. The Great Gatsby. New York: Scribner, 2004. Print.
Bloom, Harold. F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby. Infobase, 2006. Google EBook

2.) Kirby, Peter. "Historical Jesus Theories." Early Christian Writings. 2014. 24 Feb. 2014


Posted by: Chelsea Dickenson at February 24, 2014 03:58 AM

Denzel Williams
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01
24 February 2014

Subjective Test Portion
Question #14: Discuss the concept of profane/ common love and the sacred/ heavenly love, as first proposed by Pausanias in Plato’s Symposium, in F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby. You must first begin by defining the terms and expressing them in your own language/ voice (Use passages from the text to support your definitions). Then show how the stipulation for one of these types of love applies to the relationship between the characters Nick caraway and Jordan Baker (use quoted passages from the text to support your claim). Would the relationship be labeled differently if examined from the opposite characters point of view, i.e., would one character see the love as vulgar/ common and the other as chaste/ heavenly? If so, why is this significant to the story?
Answer: In Plato’s Symposium Pausanias does in fact, give two opposing or differing types of love. One being the offspring of the common goddess Aphrodite is essentially “common love”. In the passage, it is phrased “This love has no discrimination, being such, as the meaner sort of men feel and is apt to be of women as well as of youths, and is of the body rather than of the soul- the most foolish beings are the objects of this love which desires only to gain an end but never thinks of accomplishing the end nobly, and therefore does good and evil quite indiscriminately” (Symposium). Heavenly love, on the other hand, is that which holds great value and cherishes the mind, body and spirit of a lover. In the case of Nick Carraway and Jordan Baker, Two young individuals linked through a mutual bond between Daisy and Tom, both feel some type of way toward each other. The feeling, however, for these two however would best fall under the description of Pausanias’s common love. Upon meeting first sight of her Nick Carraway already feels a physical attraction to her. “She was a slender, small-breasted girl, with an erect carriage, which she accentuated by throwing her body backward at the shoulders like a young cadet. Her gray sun-strained eyes looked back at me with polite reciprocal curiosity out of a wan, charming, discontented face" (Fitzgerald 11). Nick’s initial attraction to Daisy was based on the profaneness of her appearance. Later in the story, though, Nick’s attraction to Daisy slowly diminishes as he comes to learn more about her true nature. Jordan Baker instinctively avoided clever, shrewd men, and now I saw that this was because she felt safer on a plane where any divergence from a code would be thought impossible. She was incurably dishonest. She wasn't able to endure being at a disadvantage and, given this unwillingness, I suppose she had begun dealing in subterfuges when she was very young in order to keep that cool, insolent smile turned to the world and yet satisfy the demands of her hard, jaunty body. (Fitzgerald 158). It is apparent that Nick’s love for Jordan was not really love but in reality just a strong physical desire and slight liking for her cleverness as well. If to be viewed from Jordan’s point of view, however, it would be heavenly love. Jordan tends to play around like she barely has time on her hands for anyone yet she is very affectionate toward Nick showing that she cares more than she shows on the usual. Here is one conversation that elicits Jordan’s feelings towards Nick.
“I’ve left Daisy’s house,” she said. “I’m at Hempstead, and I’m going down to Southampton this afternoon.”

Probably it had been tactful to leave Daisy’s house, but the act annoyed me, and her next remark made me rigid.

“You weren’t so nice to me last night.”

“How could it have mattered then?”

Silence for a moment. Then:

“However— I want to see you.” “I want to see you, too.” “Suppose I don’t go to Southampton, and come into town this afternoon?”

“No— I don’t think this afternoon.”
(Fitzgerald 155)
This could not really be interpreted as crucially significant to the story due to that fact that it is an external or side relationship happening in the story and has no kind of direct relationship to Daisy, Gatsby or Tom. This is solely an experience for Nick Carraway himself.

Works Cited
1.) Fitzgerald, F S. The Great Gatsby. New York: Scribner Paperback Fiction, 1995. Print.
2.) Plato, The Symposium. Translated by Christopher Gill. Harmondsworth: Penguin Books, 1999.

Posted by: Denzel Williams at February 24, 2014 04:18 AM

Denzel Williams
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01
24 February 2014

Subjective Test Portion
Question #14: Discuss the concept of profane/ common love and the sacred/ heavenly love, as first proposed by Pausanias in Plato’s Symposium, in F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby. You must first begin by defining the terms and expressing them in your own language/ voice (Use passages from the text to support your definitions). Then show how the stipulation for one of these types of love applies to the relationship between the characters Nick caraway and Jordan Baker (use quoted passages from the text to support your claim). Would the relationship be labeled differently if examined from the opposite characters point of view, i.e., would one character see the love as vulgar/ common and the other as chaste/ heavenly? If so, why is this significant to the story?
Answer: In Plato’s Symposium Pausanias does in fact, give two opposing or differing types of love. One being the offspring of the common goddess Aphrodite is essentially “common love”. In the passage, it is phrased “This love has no discrimination, being such, as the meaner sort of men feel and is apt to be of women as well as of youths, and is of the body rather than of the soul- the most foolish beings are the objects of this love which desires only to gain an end but never thinks of accomplishing the end nobly, and therefore does good and evil quite indiscriminately” (Symposium). Heavenly love, on the other hand, is that which holds great value and cherishes the mind, body and spirit of a lover. In the case of Nick Carraway and Jordan Baker, Two young individuals linked through a mutual bond between Daisy and Tom, both feel some type of way toward each other. The feeling, however, for these two however would best fall under the description of Pausanias’s common love. Upon meeting first sight of her Nick Carraway already feels a physical attraction to her. “She was a slender, small-breasted girl, with an erect carriage, which she accentuated by throwing her body backward at the shoulders like a young cadet. Her gray sun-strained eyes looked back at me with polite reciprocal curiosity out of a wan, charming, discontented face" (Fitzgerald 11). Nick’s initial attraction to Daisy was based on the profaneness of her appearance. Later in the story, though, Nick’s attraction to Daisy slowly diminishes as he comes to learn more about her true nature. Jordan Baker instinctively avoided clever, shrewd men, and now I saw that this was because she felt safer on a plane where any divergence from a code would be thought impossible. She was incurably dishonest. She wasn't able to endure being at a disadvantage and, given this unwillingness, I suppose she had begun dealing in subterfuges when she was very young in order to keep that cool, insolent smile turned to the world and yet satisfy the demands of her hard, jaunty body. (Fitzgerald 158). It is apparent that Nick’s love for Jordan was not really love but in reality just a strong physical desire and slight liking for her cleverness as well. If to be viewed from Jordan’s point of view, however, it would be heavenly love. Jordan tends to play around like she barely has time on her hands for anyone yet she is very affectionate toward Nick showing that she cares more than she shows on the usual. Here is one conversation that elicits Jordan’s feelings towards Nick.
“I’ve left Daisy’s house,” she said. “I’m at Hempstead, and I’m going down to Southampton this afternoon.”

Probably it had been tactful to leave Daisy’s house, but the act annoyed me, and her next remark made me rigid.

“You weren’t so nice to me last night.”

“How could it have mattered then?”

Silence for a moment. Then:

“However— I want to see you.” “I want to see you, too.” “Suppose I don’t go to Southampton, and come into town this afternoon?”

“No— I don’t think this afternoon.”
(Fitzgerald 155)
This could not really be interpreted as crucially significant to the story due to that fact that it is an external or side relationship happening in the story and has no kind of direct relationship to Daisy, Gatsby or Tom. This is solely an experience for Nick Carraway himself.

Works Cited
1.) Fitzgerald, F S. The Great Gatsby. New York: Scribner Paperback Fiction, 1995. Print.
2.) Plato, The Symposium. Translated by Christopher Gill. Harmondsworth: Penguin Books, 1999.

Posted by: Denzel Williams at February 24, 2014 04:18 AM

Kyle McLeish
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210 CA01 Love and Desire
23 February 2014

13. Discuss the concept of the profane/common love and the sacred/heavenly love, as first proposed by Pausaniasin Plato’s Symposium, in F. Scott Fitzgerald’sThe Great Gatsby. You must first begin by defining the terms and expressing them in your own language/voice (use passages from the text to support your definitions). Then show how the stipulations for one of these types of love applies to the relationship between the characters Nick Carraway and Jay Gatsby(use quoted passages from the text to support your claim). Would the relationship be labeled differently if examined from the opposite characters point of view, i.e., would one character see the love as vulgar/common and the other as chaste/heavenly? If so, why is this significant to the story?

Answer:

The profane love or common love is when you see an attractive woman on the street. You love her for her physical appearance, but you have no connection to her mentally. The love is just physical and requires no chemistry or connection. This kind of love applies towards both men and women. Sacred or heavenly love is a kind of love when you are in a relationship, and you are truly in love with your partner. This sacred love is for when you have a total connection with a person both physically and mentally. Sacred love is for when you are in a relationship and you feel that the other person is someone you want to marry and live the rest of your life with them. Every person goes through life experiencing both kinds of love. Many relationships are common love, but you find sacred love by going through the common love.
The relationship of Nick and Gatsby in the book is a form of common love. Nick feels like Gatsby and Nick do not have a type of relationship where he could be Gatsby’s friend for the rest of his life (Fitzgerald, 65). In Nick’s opinion, Gatsby is the kind of relationship that you see your friend a lot, but you struggle to build a deeper connection with them. Gatsby has many hidden agendas, and this type of relationship is hard to attach to long term. However, if you looked at the relationship from Gatsby’s perspective you could say the relationship was sacred love or heavenly love. Nick was always there for Gatsby and would help Gatsby with whatever he needed. In the end after Gatsby has passed away, Nick was the only one that was handling the funeral arrangements and trying to get Gatsby’s friends to attend the funeral (Fitzgerald 170). The different views on their relationship are significant to the story based on how each individual interacted with one another. If the characters had a different relationship developing, the story and plot would have changed. If Nick and Gatsby had a different relationship or treated each other differently, the story would have not been the same and would have most likely had a different outcome.

Posted by: Kyle McLeish at February 24, 2014 05:04 AM

Devon Bell
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210 Love and Desire in Literature CA01
24 February 2014
Question: #19
Discuss how the concept of love as a biochemical “balance,” as first proposed by
Eryximachus in Plato’s Symposium, is connected to the following idea in F. Scott Fitzgerald’s
The Great Gatsby: when one has love, that person has access to the peace of mind it yields.
You must first begin by articulating the particulars of Eryximachus’s theory and then
expressing them in your own language/voice (use passages from the text to support your
definitions). Then show how the idea of balance and peace of mind applies to the love felt by
the characters George Wilson and Myrtle Wilson in their relationship (use quoted
passages from the text to support your claim). Are these characters really “balanced”? Do
these characters truly have “peace of mind”? If so, why is this significant to the story? If not,
what does this say about Eryximachus’s theory?
Answer:
The concept of love as a biochemical balance is connected to The Great Gatsby through George and Myrtles relationship. Eryximachus’s theory states that one must understand how to recognize love. The best physician is he who is able to separate fair love from foul, or to convert one into the other; and he who knows how to eradicate and how to implant love (Plato lines 471-473). A living being must develop a way to identify whether love is proper or tainted. That creature must then be able to acquire a process that can transform one love to the other. At the end, the one displaying the love must know how to continue or let go.
George and Myrtle’s relationship has a strong lack of balance and peace of mind. The love felt between these two characters is rather conflicted. George has a concrete love for Myrtle while she has her eyes on Tom. There is no true peace between them; they value the relationship differently. “It does her good to get away.” Doesn’t her husband object?” “Wilson? He thinks she goes to see her sister in New York (Fitzgerald 26). Eryximachus’s theory is still, in fact, credible. This just goes to show that there is no true love with George and Myrtle. The two of them display the lover and beloved concept, George being the lover while Myrtle is the beloved. The two of them once loved; however, they fail to realize when it is time to give up. The theory can only help those who are in love or have the potential to be in love. Myrtle destroys the chances George and herself have at developing a real sense of love. They also fail at being able to turn the negative properties of their relationship into positives, which is a crucial reason as to why the marriage is doomed to fall apart.

Works Cited
Fitzgerald, Francis. The Great Gatsby. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1925.
Plato. "The Symposium." Jowett, Benjamin. The Symposium. South Australia: eBooks@Adelaide, 2012.

Posted by: Devon Bell at February 24, 2014 06:07 AM

Shamera Bryant
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire in Literature CA01
24 February 2014
Question #12:
Discuss the concept of the profane / common love and the sacred / heavenly love, as first
proposed by Pausanias in Plato’s Symposium, in F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby. You
must first begin by defining the terms and expressing them in your own language/voice
(use passages from the text to support your definitions). Then show how the stipulations for
one of these types of love apples to the relationship between the characters George Wilson
and Myrtle Wilson (use quoted passages from the text to support your claim). Would the
relationship be labeled differently if examined from the opposite characters point of view,
i.e., would one character see the love as vulgar/common and the other as chaste/heavenly? If
so, why is this significant to the story?
Answer:
Pausanias explains love as the wisdom and purity of heavenly love. It’s presented to us in the sense that wisdom is a more common form of love than any other. He is one who believes that heavenly love and wisdom go correspond. Heavenly love is a more long lasting love since it’s understood that agape love comes from God who is everlasting. Wisdom and a common love are similar but inflict. Common love being sexual desires which wisdom conflicts. This love is physically with the body not so much as the soul while heavenly love is pure. In Gatsby, it was all about common love for the majority of the characters.
Myrtle and George is an unhappy married couple in the great Gatsby. Myrtle seems to be a more materialistic woman, who fells George cannot support her enough. George is more content although suspecting an affair from his wife more than he had before. In the text, it says “She had changed her dress to a brown figured muslin, which stretched tight over her rather wide hips” (Fitzgerald 27). She later changes into something more attractive for Tom as we suspect. Tom, on the other hand, loves Myrtle and is so naïve to her cheating that he only think she goes to the city to see her sister. It later explains how Myrtle only married George because she thought he was a gentleman. She says “I married him because I thought he was a gentleman,” she said finally. “I thought he knew something about breeding, but he was not fit to lick my shoe” (Fitzgerald 34).
This would be showing an example of common love if one had to be picked. She married him because of his physical appearance and what she thought he was able to do for her. In a sense, this would not be considered love at all.


Citation
Fitzgerald, Scott. The Great Gatsby. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1925.

Posted by: Shamera Bryant at February 24, 2014 08:16 AM

Emma De Rhodo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire in Literature CA01
24 February 2014

QUESTION #18: Discuss how the concept of love as a biochemical “balance,” as first proposed by Eryximachus in Plato’s Symposium, is connected to the following idea in F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby: when one has love, that person has access to the peace of mind it yields. You must first begin by articulating the particulars of Eryximachus’s theory and then expressing them in your own language/voice (use passages from the text to support your definitions.) Then show how the idea of balance and peace of mind applies to the love felt by the characters Tom Buchanan and Daisy Buchanan in their relationship (use quoted passages from the text to support your claim). Are these characters really “balanced”? Do these characters truly have “peace of mind”? If so, why is this significant to the story? If not, what does this say about Eryximachus’s theory?

ANSWER: When Eryximachus makes his speech in Symposium, he mentions that “harmony is composed of differing notes of higher or lower pitch which disagreed once, but are now reconciled by the art of music; for if the higher and lower notes still disagreed, there could be no harmony” (Stevenson 11). The different “notes” definitely describe how unalike Tom and Daisy are, personality-wise, and this may be mentioned at some point in the book but proves to be quite obvious to the reader throughout the story. Even though they are so different and Eryximachus’s theory mentions, “in music there is the same reconciliation of opposites,” the two obviously are not “balanced” or happy. This can be proven by their cheating on one another. It can be assumed that Daisy and Gatsby kissed or acted upon their love for one another in a different way when Nick mentions at the end of the day of the tea party that he left where they were, “leaving them there together” (Fitzgerald 96). It can be assumed that Tom cheated on Daisy when Jordan is talking to Nick and says that after Tom was involved in a car wreck, a female was mentioned in the newspaper as well as he was since she was with him during the wreck. Apparently this woman “was one of the chambermaids in the Santa Barbara Hotel” (Fitzgerald 77).
Furthermore, these two characters will probably never have complete “peace of mind” after their dramatic experiences involving the people whom they had affairs with and for other reasons. Overall, I do not think that these two characters are “balanced” or will ever actually have “peace of mind,” therefore, Eryximachus’s theory may only be true in some cases. In the case of Tom and Daisy Buchanan, his theory does not apply. Though there may be some point in the book in which the characters are talked about as being “opposites,” their relationship does not seem like it will ever be what they each want it to be (Stevenson 11).

Works Cited
Fitzgerald, F. Scott. The Great Gatsby. New York: Charles Scriber’s Sons, 1925. Print.
Stevenson, Daniel C. Plato. Symposium. 360 B.C.E. Trans. Benjamin Jowett. The Internet Classics Archive. Web Atomics, 1994. Web. 5 Feb. 2014. http://classics.mit.edu/Plato/symposium.html.

Posted by: Emma De Rhodo at February 24, 2014 09:19 AM

Peter Grana
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
Love and Desire in Literature
19, February 2014
Question #9
Discuss the concept of the profane/common love and the scared/heavenly love, as first proposed by Pausanias in Plato’s Symposium, and in F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby. You must first begin by defining the terms and expressing them in your own language/voice (use passages from the text to support your definitions). Then show how the stipulations for one of these types of love apply to the relationship between the characters Jay Gatsby and Daisy Buchanan (use quoted passages from the text to support your claim). Would the relationship be labeled differently if examined from the opposite characters point of view, i.e., would one character see the love as vulgar/common and the other as chaste/heavenly? If so, why is this significant to the story?
Answer:
Pausinas described Common love as only a kind of love that is keen on the open-mindedness of the individual towards whom they would like to associate love with. Said person finds attraction through of the body than what the mind has to offer to make sexual affection more of the center of attraction. On the other hand, heavenly love is the divine love that aims to find beauty in more of a mindful and spiritual sense. Those who engage in heavenly love look to see maturity as well as a beauty in the intelligence of the mind. Which is a much more feasible approach in contrast to the erotic nature of common love. An example given in the Symposium is said, “Take, for example, that which we are doing, drinking, singing, and talking- these actions are not in themselves good or evil, but they turn out in this or that way according to the mode of performing them; and when they are good, and when wrongly done they are evil…” (Plato 77,78). This example plays into how Gatsby may exhibit common love towards Daisy than the perceived “heavenly love”. Pertaining to the affair of Jay Gatsby and Daisy Buchanan, both areas can most likely be found to have the qualities of both Heavenly and Common love. “’She never loved you, do you hear!’ he cried. ‘She only married you because I was poor and she was tired of waiting for me. It was a terrible mistake, but in her heart she never loved anyone accept me!’” (Fitzgerald 200). Through this quote, it can be perceived by what Gatsby is getting the best of himself. This I believe is a common love scenario that he is utilizing against Tom in order to add insult to injury to his marriage. He believe there is love, but when in the end Daisy goes back to Tom, their marriage prevails and that actual love is not there anymore as assumed. The protagonist, Nick Carraway, has a point of view in the story that interprets a third person party who examines the actions of both characters while they return to their former love affair. Pretty much his opinion and experience is already well documented in Gatsby, however the point of view in other characters minds could be altered such as Tom’s view who can be seen with dissatisfaction out of possibly losing his wife and being outplayed by Gatsby’s money and charms. It is hard to find that Gatsby and Daisy’s love affair are seen as either a vulgar or chaste relationship. Tom may interpret it as vulgar out of spite for the affair, and Gatsby may find the affair to be a divine love for Daisy again, but it makes most sense that the love affair is seen as a common love that was revisited out of the belief that Daisy would leave Tom for Gatsby which would never amount to reality. It was an attempt to bring back a former love that just did not exist anymore. This is significant because maybe Gatsby just is not realizing that a bond of marriage and love are things that cannot simply be broken by love of another. The commitment to marriage is the devotion of love to another, and I believe that Daisy may still love Gatsby but cannot leave her husband for Jay because of this devotion.
Works Cited
Fitzgerald, Scott. The Great Gatsby. New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1925

Posted by: Peter Grana at February 24, 2014 09:22 AM

Kara K. Marino
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG-210cl Love and Desire in Literature CA01
24 February 2014

QUESTION #20:
Discuss how the concept of love as a biochemical “balance,” as first proposed by Eryximachus in Plato’s Symposium, is connected to the following idea in F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby: when one has love, that person has access to the peace of mind it yields. You must first begin by articulating the particulars of Eryximachus’ theory and then expressing them in your own language/voice. Then how the idea of balance and peace of mind applies to the love felt by the characters Nick Carraway and Jay Gatsby in their relationship. Are these characters really “balanced”? Do these characters truly have “peace of mind”? If so, why is this significant to the story? If not what does this say about Eryximachus’s theory?

ANSWER:
In F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby, the concept of love as a biochemical balance, first described by Eryximachus in Plato’s Symposium, is connected to the idea: when one has love, that person has access to the peace of mind and balance it yields. Eryximachus stated, “Love is not merely an affection of the soul of man towards the fair, or towards anything, but is to be found in the bodies of all animals...” (Plato 10). This connects to the concept presented in The Great Gatsby, because with love their body is whole and they find balance. People without love are injured, not complete, and unhealthy. People who experience love find a balance between body and soul; they find that they are whole and have a certain peace of mind. Love is a driving force for all aspects of life including music, athletics, and the seasons.
This idea of having balance and peace of mind does apply to the love felt by both characters Nick Carraway and Jay Gatsby in their relationship. Jay Gatsby has been head over heels in love with Daisy since the day they met. He had to go off to war, leaving Daisy behind. After leaving Daisy, Gatsby never had peace of mind “He talked a lot about the past, and I gathered that he wanted to recover something, some idea of himself perhaps, that had gone into loving Daisy. His life had been confused and disordered since then...”(Fitzgerald 110). Eryximachus says that love affects all aspects of life in in this case that is absolutley accurate. Gatsby life might as well have not been real. It was all a rich boy act put on to persuade Daisy’s love. Gatsby never finds a balance either. Daisy never goes back to him and unfortunately his life was wasted.

Posted by: Kara Marino at February 24, 2014 09:30 AM

Emma De Rhodo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire in Literature CA01
24 February 2014

QUESTION #18: Discuss how the concept of love as a biochemical “balance,” as first proposed by Eryximachus in Plato’s Symposium, is connected to the following idea in F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby: when one has love, that person has access to the peace of mind it yields. You must first begin by articulating the particulars of Eryximachus’s theory and then expressing them in your own language/voice (use passages from the text to support your definitions.) Then show how the idea of balance and peace of mind applies to the love felt by the characters Tom Buchanan and Daisy Buchanan in their relationship (use quoted passages from the text to support your claim). Are these characters really “balanced”? Do these characters truly have “peace of mind”? If so, why is this significant to the story? If not, what does this say about Eryximachus’s theory?

ANSWER: When Eryximachus makes his speech in Symposium, he mentions that “harmony is composed of differing notes of higher or lower pitch which disagreed once, but are now reconciled by the art of music; for if the higher and lower notes still disagreed, there could be no harmony” (Stevenson 11). The different “notes” definitely describe how unalike Tom and Daisy are, personality-wise, which may be mentioned at some point in the book but proves to be quite obvious to the reader throughout the story. Even though they are so different and Eryximachus’s theory mentions, “in music there is the same reconciliation of opposites,” the two obviously are not “balanced” or happy. This can be proven by their cheating on one another. It can be assumed that Daisy and Gatsby kissed or acted upon their love for one another in a different way when Nick mentions at the end of the day of the tea party that he left where they were, “leaving them there together” (Fitzgerald 96). It can be assumed that Tom cheated on Daisy when Jordan is talking to Nick and says that after Tom was involved in a car wreck, a female was mentioned in the newspaper as well as he was since she was with him during the wreck. Apparently this woman “was one of the chambermaids in the Santa Barbara Hotel” (Fitzgerald 77).
Furthermore, these two characters will probably never have complete “peace of mind” after their dramatic experiences involving the people whom they had affairs with and for other reasons. Daisy does not run away with Gatsby; she chooses to stay with the man she is married to, however, she does not seem as if she will ever be completely happy bound to Tom for the rest of her life. Overall, I do not think that these two characters are “balanced” or will ever actually have “peace of mind,” therefore, Eryximachus’s theory may only be true in some cases. In the case of Tom and Daisy Buchanan, his theory does not apply. Though there may be some point in the book in which the characters are talked about as being “opposites,” their relationship does not seem like it will ever be what they each want it to be (Stevenson 11).

Works Cited
Fitzgerald, F. Scott. The Great Gatsby. New York: Charles Scriber’s Sons, 1925. Print.
Stevenson, Daniel C. Plato. Symposium. 360 B.C.E. Trans. Benjamin Jowett. The Internet Classics Archive. Web Atomics, 1994. Web. 5 Feb. 2014. http://classics.mit.edu/Plato/symposium.html.

Posted by: Emma De Rhodo at February 24, 2014 08:35 PM

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*NOTE* The deadline for this particular assignment has now passed. Any comments listed below are *ONLY* for the reposting of comments that I specifically asked to be revised or are ones from non-student posters. Any 'student' posts below that missed the assignment deadline will not get credit for the assignment. ~ Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: Dr. Hobbs at February 26, 2014 07:36 AM

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