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February 19, 2012

Love Crimes in George Orwell's _Nineteen Eighty-Four_

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Students,

Below, please . . .

. . . the note-taker/scribe from each group should retype the question your group discussed today in class and provide an answer with quotations from the text to support your answers. You MUST put the page number (or, paragraph number if there are no page numbers) in parentheses after any quotation used.

Enter your work on this text as prescribed in class. For example:

Remember: I have to "approve" all comments so you won't see it immediately after posting. After hitting submit, you should see a screen that confirms this.

We are beginning to use some concepts in our discussions that you may or may have had practice using before. I want to be sure that you have a clear understanding of the words we use in class (no more blank stares!) so be sure you are looking up words you don't feel you yet "own" (means, making it a part of your personal vocabulary) by utilizing your dictionaries to the fullest.

Dr. Hobbs

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To see other English-Blog entries on the subject of Literature, please click HERE.

Posted by lhobbs at February 19, 2012 07:49 PM

Readers' Comments:

Diego Pestana
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 435 – Literary Criticism
March 26, 2012
Understanding Nineteen Eighty-Four by Understanding 1949: New Historicism and George Orwell
In his essay entitle “Witness Against the Beast,” E.P. Thompson analyzes the historical context and influence surrounding William Blake's poem “London.” Through an analysis of Blake's wording in the final draft of the poem, compared to earlier drafts, Thompson is able to decipher possible messages that Blake may have intended in his writing of the poem. Thompson does a meticulous job in understanding word choices on Blake's part in certain passages of the poem. And it is from these word choices that Thompson is able to analyze their larger meaning in the context of the environment that surrounded Blake during his writing of “London.” A similar task can be undertaken when it comes to George Orwell's novel Nineteen Eighty-Four. In the same way that Thompson analyzes political, social, and economic factors that were in place during Blake's writing of his poem, an analysis of the historical context surrounding Orwell's writing of his novel can assist in developing a greater understanding on Orwell's purpose and meaning in writing Nineteen Eighty-Four, which was finally published in 1949 after a couple of years of writing.
In his book, Thompson specifically points out Blake's intentional choice in including the word “charter'd” in the beginning of the poem. Thompson then writes about the connotations that surrounded “charter'd” at the time of Blake's writing. According to Thompson, “'Charter'd' arose in Blake's mind in association with 'cheating' and with the 'little blasts of fear' of the 'hireling'” (534). Thus, by Blake's intentional word choice of “charter'd,” Thompson is able to demonstrate that “London” is meant to be read as more than a one-dimensional poem. Thompson continues, throughout the piece, to analyze context surrounding the word “charter'd” including even other circumstances in which Blake makes economic statements that are related to ideas con-notated with the word “charter'd.” So, in a similar fashion in which Thompson uses contextual information to support his idea that “London” is a device in which Blake makes commentary on the economic and social conditions in England at the time, it is possible to examine wording and other devices employed in Nineteen Eighty-Four to discover what Orwell meant to accomplish in publishing the novel.
Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-Four is one of the greatest examples of dystopia in literary history. The novel surrounds a man named Winston Smith and his experiences that he has living in Airstrip One, a totalitarian region in which the moves and actions of all its citizens are meticulously monitored to ensure that the government maintains total control over its subjects. The novel chronicles Smith's struggle to comply with the demands of the society that engulfs him while pursing an emotional relationship with a woman named Julia – a relationship that would endanger both Smith and Julia if the authorities were ever to learn of it. By understanding the context surrounding Orwell's construction of the novel's plot will assist in understanding any possible meaning the novel may have.
The novel, published after two years of work, was released just a few years after World War II. A major characteristic of World War II was the totalitarian nature of the government of Nazi Germany. Against the backdrop of one history's most notorious authoritarian regimes, Orwell, an Englishman himself, could be understood to have been commentating on the nature of intrusive, dictatorial government he would have witnessed during his life in Nazi Germany. And because he was English, and England was one of the primary opponents of Nazi Germany in World War II, it is even more understandable that Orwell would seek to commentate on the government against which his country went to war against. In order to properly apply New Historicism to Nineteen Eighty-Four, a recognition and analysis of these historical factors is required.
In order to write a proper New Historicist analysis of Nineteen Eighty-Four, a couple of devices would have to be employed. Orwell's novel is known for the vocabulary used by the novel's dystopian government. Words like “doublethink” and “Big Brother” have become commonplace in today's vernacular. Therefore, in order to apply New Historicism properly, an analysis of these words that Orwell came up with would be necessary to understand any message that Orwell attempts to convey through his portrayal of government in the novel. Another analysis that would assist in providing a well-rounded New Historicist application to the novel would be an analysis of Orwell's love story between Smith and Julia, which is paramount in the novel. By understanding the nature of Smith and Julia's emotional relationship, and why Orwell portrays it as “forbidden” by the government, a deeper understanding of how Orwell employs the theme of love can be understood. And this understanding, in turn, will add to a greater New Historicist understand of Nineteen Eighty-Four.

Works Cited
Orwell, George. Nineteen Eighty Four. 1949. New York: The New American Library, 1961. Print
Thompson, E.P. “Witness Against the Beast.” 1993. Literary Theory: An Anthology. 2nd ed. Eds. Julie Rivkin and Michael Ryan. Malden : Blackwell, 2004. 533-48. Print.

Posted by: Diego Pestana at March 26, 2012 02:07 PM

Jasmine Charlton
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210 CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
21 October 2013

Question: What can Winston remember of his early life?

Answer: In the 60th Anniversary edition of the book, “Nineteen Eighty-four” written by George Orwell, Mr. Winston is currently under the watchful eyes of the big brothers while he is retrieving the fading past he once knew. In the state that the world is in history is fading, historical records disappearing, and country names changing. Although his memory of anything, “beyond the late fifties” (Orwell 28) started to faded Winston still had strong memory of his mother who was “ tall, statuesque, and silent with slow movements and fair hair who had disappeared when he was ten or eleven years old” (Orwell 25). On the other hand, he barely remembered his father and little sister. His father was, “ dark, thin, always dressed in neat dark clothes, thin soles in his shoes, and wearing spectacles” (Orwell 25), but only remembered his little sister’s, “ large watchful eyes” (Orwell 26). One of his earlier memories was, “ an air raid which took everyone by surprise which he correlates to the atomic bomb fallen on Colchester” (Orwell 28). From the Atomic Bomb attack, he does not remember much but “ his fathers hand clutching his own as they hurried down into some deep place of the earth” (Orwell 28-29). If someone were to ask him who was fighting whom he would not know because, “there are no external records that you could refer to”(Orwell 28).

Posted by: Jasmine Charlton at October 22, 2013 12:21 PM

Regina Green
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
22 October 2013

Question: Can the telescreen completely shut off? How does the telescreen differ from our television?

Answer: No, the telescreen could never be completely shut off. They are different from our televisions because they see and hear everything that you do and say. Orwell says, "so long as he remained within the field of vision which the metal plaque commanded, he could be seen as well as heard" (3). In other words, they have no privacy.

Posted by: Regina Green at October 22, 2013 01:10 PM

Jalisa Lowe
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
23 October 2013

Question: How does the instructor encourage her audience to touch their toes?

Answer: The instructor encourages the comrades to touch their toes by embarrassing them, calling their names out over the telescreen. The instructor yells, “6079 Smith W! Yes, you! Bend lower, please! That’s better, comrade” (Orwell 32). The instructor also intimidates the comrades by explaining that she is thirty-nine, has four kids, and can still touch her toes. The instructor states, “I’m thirty-nine and I’ve had four children. Now look. She bent over again. You see my knees aren’t bent. You can all do it if you want to” (Orwell 32).

Posted by: Jalisa Lowe at October 22, 2013 06:43 PM

Diana Shoemaker
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
23 October 2013

Question: Ch. 4 What happens to people who displease the Party?

Answer: People who displease the Party would disappear. It is never known if they are dead or not. People can disappear in large quantities. The novel states “people who had incurred the displeasure of the Party simply disappeared and were never heard of again” (Orwell 44).

Posted by: Diana Shoemaker at October 22, 2013 08:19 PM

Vera Smirnova
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01

Question# 21: Why are the children disappointed?

Answer:
Their dad was not able to take them to see the hanging of the prisoners.

Posted by: Vera Smirnova at October 22, 2013 08:21 PM

Kerriann Salatti
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
23 October 2013

Question: How many buildings like there can Winston see from his window? Which is the most frightening?

Answer: From the roof of Victory Mansions you can see four buildings simultaneously. “They were the homes of the four Ministries between which the attire apparatus of government divided.” (4) They were made up of The Ministry of Truth, Ministry if Peace, Ministry of Plenty, and Ministry of Love. “The ministry of Lose was the really frightening one. There were no windows in it at all.” (4)

Posted by: Kerriann Salatti at October 22, 2013 09:38 PM

Joe Rulli
Dr. Hobbs
ENG210 Love and Desire in Literature CA01
22 October 2013

Question 26. What is the only thing people can call their own?

Answer: "Nothing was your own except the few cubic centimeters inside your head' (Orwell 26).

Posted by: joe Rulli at October 22, 2013 09:52 PM

Jocelyne Hilary
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature

22nd October 2013

Question: Part 1-Chapter 3 “Of what does Winston think when in his dream he sees the girl throw off all her clothes in one graceful motion?”

Answer: The girl initially overwhelmed Winston in his dream, when she had thrown off her clothes. However, he was not overwhelmed in a negative way; on the contrary, he was in awe of her. He particularly admired the way in which she had thrown off her clothes. Winston was reminded of Shakespeare looking at her, her grace and carelessness of what’s going on in the surrounding world really captivated him.

Posted by: Jocelyne Hilary at October 22, 2013 10:08 PM

Dana DeLosa
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01: Love and Desire in Literature
22 October 2013

Question: “Part 1 / Chapter 2: Who is at Winston’s door and why?”

Answer: When Winston opened his door, he found “Mrs. Parsons, the wife of a neighbor on the same floor” (Orwell 18). Mrs. Parson came to Winston’s door because her “kitchen sink was full nearly to the brim with filthy greenish water” (Orwell 19).

Posted by: Dana DeLosa at October 22, 2013 10:54 PM

Lindsey Thilmony
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
22 October 2013

Question: Part 1 Chapter 3: Why is the Past to be wiped away?

Answer: The past is to be wiped away because the past has been full of lies. The book states, “And if all others accepted the lie which the Party imposed — if all records told the same tale — then the lie passed into history and became truth” (Orwell 30). Lies should not be told to the public, and the Party is trying to change society into believing the truth.

Posted by: Lindsey Thilmony at October 22, 2013 10:59 PM

McKenzie Burns
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 Love and Desire in Literature CA01
22 October 2013

Question #13: What are the three slogans of the party etched on Miniture?

Answer: "War is peace. Freedom is slavery. Ignorance is strength" (Orwell 3).

Posted by: McKenzie Burns at October 22, 2013 11:07 PM

Deirdre Rowan
Dr. Hobbs
English 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
22 October 2013

Question #1: When does the story begin? What kind of day is it? How have the clocks been changed?

Answer: 1984 begins on "a bright cold day in April, and the clocks were striking thirteen" (1). The clocks now have an extra hour, meaning that there are twenty-six hours in a day. April is a month that is associated with spring and warmth in the Northern Hemisphere, so to say that it was cold in England at this time is unusual.

Posted by: Deirdre Rowan at October 22, 2013 11:37 PM

Alexia Chambers
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and desire in literature CA02
22 October 2013
Question:
33.What change has there been in emotion since Winston’s mother died?
Answer:
Winston is from a time where emotions were notoutlawed. As he is thinking about his family a big revelation comes to him. “[…] belonged to the ancient time, to a time when there was still privacy, love, and friendship, and when the members of a family stood by one another without needing to know the reason.” (Orwell 30) When he was younger emotions were a normal part of life but now there is no love because of the fear of being put to death because of a feeling or a thought.

Posted by: Alexia Chambers at October 22, 2013 11:40 PM

Ashley Johnson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
23 October 2013

Using the online book (ebooks.adelaide.edu)

Question 35:
Why does Winston sleep without nightclothes?

Answer:
Winston sleeps without nightclothes because buying a pair of pyjamas is expensive and he receives a small amount of coupons per year. Being a member of the Outer party, he “received only 3,000 clothing coupons annually, and a suit of pyjamas was 600.” (Orwell)

Posted by: Ashley Johnson at October 23, 2013 12:20 AM

Camila Pinzon
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
6 October 2013

Question: Part 1 / Chapter 4: What are some of the jobs of the Ministry of Truth other than the Records Department?

Answer: During my reading of Nineteen Eighty-four on the Kindle version, the Records Department had accompanying ministries. For example, the Ministry of Plenty is to overview the economic statuses and statistics of any rationing and shortages. The Ministry of Peace creates weapons of war, for instance Winston recalls the accomplishments of Comrade Oglivy. “At nineteen he had designed a hand-grenade which had been adopted by the Ministry of Peace and which, at its first trial, had killed thirty-one Eurasian Prisoners in one burst” (Orwell loc. 740). Ministry for internal purposes ran messages to refer to other articles that needed to be rewritten.

Work Cited:
Orwell, George. Nineteen Eighty-Four. South Australia: Creative Commons Licence, n.d. University of Adelaide, 7 Feb. 2013. Web. 22 Oct. 2013.

Posted by: Camila Pinzon at October 23, 2013 04:39 AM

Stephanie Gilbert
Dr. Hobbs
Eng-210CL Love and Desire in Literature-CA01
23 October 2013


7. Chapter 1: Where does the fruity voice come from?

The voice came from an, “oblong metal plaque that looked like a dulled mirror which was formed on the right hand wall’s surface. (Orwell pg. 1)”

Posted by: Stephanie Gilbert at October 23, 2013 09:37 AM

Salvatore Christlieb
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
Dr. Hobbs
23 October 2013

Question: How long has Big Brother (BB) existed in the Party histories?
Answer: It is unknown how long Big Brother has been in existence because there is no exact indication within 1984. However, a slight indication is given in chapter 4 as Winston was thinking, the narrator states, “the Ninth Three-Year Plan” (Orwell 40). The Ninth Three-Year plan can be utilized in a multiplication problem. Three multiplied by nine is twenty-seven. One can infer twenty seven years or more is how long the Party has been in power, therefore, Big Brother may have been set up then. Although, a slight problem occurs, there is no indication that Big Brother really exists. Big Brother is similar to propaganda set up by the Party that is meant to persuade and control the people of Oceania.


References
Orwell, George. 1984: A Novel. New York, N.Y., U.S.A.: Harcourt Brace, 1983. Print.

Posted by: Salvatore Christlieb at October 23, 2013 11:18 AM

Connor Schaefer
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL- CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
23 October 2013

Question: What is the caption beneath the large poster on the wall?

Answer: Winston Smith comes across a poster while he is trying to avoid the vile wind. He comes across the poster when he enters the Victory Mansions. The poster is so big that it could never be displayed indoors. It was very colorful and had a large face on it. He thought the poster eyes followed him throughout the house. Orwell states, “BIG BROTHER IS WATCHING YOU, the caption beneath it ran” (1). That is what the caption states under the poster. This could mean a couple things. The poster could be of a family member that wants another family member to feel as if he is being watched. It could also mean that someone will always be watching you. That is what the poster is that Smith found.

Posted by: Connor Schaefer at October 23, 2013 11:56 AM

Connor Schaefer
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL- CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
23 October 2013

Question: What is the caption beneath the large poster on the wall?

Answer: Winston Smith comes across a poster while he is trying to avoid the vile wind. He comes across the poster when he enters the Victory Mansions. The poster is so big that it could never be displayed indoors. It was very colorful and had a large face on it. He thought the poster eyes followed him throughout the house. Orwell states, “BIG BROTHER IS WATCHING YOU, the caption beneath it ran” (1). That is what the caption states under the poster. This could mean a couple things. The poster could be of a family member that wants another family member to feel as if he is being watched. It could also mean that someone will always be watching you. That is what the poster is that Smith found.

Posted by: Connor Schaefer at October 23, 2013 11:56 AM

Regina Green
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
23 October 2013

Question: For whom does Winston think he is writing his diary?

Answer: Winston thinks he is writing his diary to O'Brien. Winston felt as though he needed to be writing to someone to have a purpose for writing the diary. Orwell says, "to O'Brien; it was like an interminable which no one would ever read, but which was addressed to a particular person and took its color from that fact" (81). He felt that O'Brien was someone he could trust even though they had never verbally spoke in person.

Posted by: Regina Green at October 23, 2013 01:10 PM

Morgan Salter
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
25 October 2013
Question: How does the social structure of the Party maintain control?
Answer: The Party maintained control through telescreens, schooling, and simple methods of observational integration into society. For example, control over the proles “was not difficult. A few agents of the Thought Police moved always among them, spreading false rumors and marking down and eliminating the few individuals who were judged capable of becoming dangerous” (Orwell 71). The Party simply stripped the society of any members who could possibly rebel against the government in order to maintain control.

Posted by: Morgan Salter at October 23, 2013 04:27 PM

Jasmine Collins
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL: Love and Desire in Literature CA01
23 October 2013
Question: Part 1 / Chapter 1: Describe Winston (Be specific) Why doesn’t Winston take the lift?
Answer: Winston Smith had his “chin nuzzled into his breast in an effort to escape the vile escape the vile wind” (Orwell 1). He was rushing to escape the wind and get back to his apartment. Winston does not take the lift because, “even at the best of times it was seldom working, and at present the electric current was cut off during daylight hours” (Orwell 1).

Posted by: Jasmine Collins at October 23, 2013 05:01 PM

Maria Benkirane

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 210 CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature

22 Octobre 2013

Question: Who is Parsons? Describe him.

Answer: Parsons are Winston's neighbors in the same floor and apartment building. Parsons was Winston's former employee in the ministry of Truth: "He was Fattich but active man of paralyzing stupidity, a mass of imbecile enthusiasms" (Orwell 19). Parson's children are junior spies, who kept bothering Winston about committing thoughtcrimes. They were very agitated when Winston came in the apartment, because they wanted to see a hanging at the park. This describes what the children are like and even the mother is afraid of her own children.

Posted by: maria benkirane at October 23, 2013 07:41 PM

Maria Benkirane

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 210 CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature

22 Octobre 2013

Question: Describe the canteen?

Answer: The canteen is located deep underground with a low ceiling and very noisy as it gets crowded. It smells like the grill and metallic smell coming out of it. Orwell describes the place as, "From the Grill at the counter the steam of stew came pouring forth, with a sour metallic smell which did not quite overcome the fumes of Victory Gin" (42) . There is also a bar at the other side of the room, and Gin is sold there for ten cents the large portion.

Posted by: maria benkirane at October 23, 2013 08:11 PM

Jordan Dadez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
22 October 2013

Question: Why is it difficult for Winston to climb the stairs?

Answer: Winston Smith lives on the seventh floor in flat in London. He cannot take the lift because it seldom works. If it were currently operational, he still cannot use it because the electricity is turned off during the day for economical purposes. Winston Smith must take the stairs, but it is difficult for him to do so because he has “ [. . .] a varicose ulcer above his right ankle [. . .]” (Orwell 1).

Posted by: Jordan Dadez at October 23, 2013 09:10 PM

Jordan Dadez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
23 October 2013

Question: How does the destruction of desires and human relationships destroy humanity?

Answer: In Winston Smith’s world, all desires should be rendered obsolete. The only desire that should exist should be the constant desire to please Big Brother. Humanity does not exist anymore because desire does not exist anymore. Desire meant many things before the time of Big Brother. One could desire another human being, basic necessities, or materialistic things. Now all one desires is the ability to please Big Brother, and this is done through destroying human relationships. Human relationship create humanity, but now it is too risky to create relationships for they could ultimately be one’s demise. Parsons informs Winston of his daughter reporting someone who stood out to the Thought Police. He said, “She spotted he was wearing a funny kind of shoes- said she’d never seen anyone wearing shoes like that before. So the chances were he was a foreigner. Pretty smart for a nipper of seven, eh?” (Orwell 50). The destruction of desires leads to the destruction of human relationships because if the desire to help out fellow brothers and sisters is gone, why would human relationships persist?

Posted by: Jordan Dadez at October 23, 2013 09:12 PM

Diana Shoemaker
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
25 October 2013

Question: Chapter 7: For whom does Winston think he is writing his diary?

Answer: He thinks he is writing his diary for O’Brien. In the novel it states, “He was writing the diary for O’Brien — to O’Brien; it was like an interminable letter which no one would ever read, but which was addressed to a particular person and took its color from that fact” (Orwell 80-81).

Posted by: Diana Shoemaker at October 23, 2013 09:37 PM

Jasmine Charlton
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
23 October 2013

Question: What is a streamer? Who warns Winston?

Answer: In Chapter eight, a streamer is a “nickname which, for some reason, the proles applied to rocket bombs"[Orwell 74]. Whiles Winston was walking the streets and enjoying the air a by standing prole dressed “in a concertina-like black suit” [Orwell 74] warned him of the streamer by yelling, “ Streamer! Look out, guv’nor! Bang over’ead! Lay down quick”[Orwell 74]. No one knew how the prole knew of the impending attack, but society of that time knew that the “proles were nearly always right when they gave you a warning of this kind” (Orwell, 24]. The accuracy of the Proles were one to be recommended to the point that people think they have a built in instinct which told them in advance that a streamer or rocket was heading their way even though it is said to travel faster than sound [Orwell 74].

Posted by: jasmine Charlton at October 23, 2013 11:01 PM

Jasmine Charlton
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
23 October 2013

Question: What is a streamer? Who warns Winston?

Answer: In Chapter eight, a streamer is a “nickname which, for some reason, the proles applied to rocket bombs"[Orwell 74]. Whiles Winston was walking the streets and enjoying the air a by standing prole dressed “in a concertina-like black suit” [Orwell 74] warned him of the streamer by yelling, “ Streamer! Look out, guv’nor! Bang over’ead! Lay down quick”[Orwell 74]. No one knew how the prole knew of the impending attack, but society of that time knew that the “proles were nearly always right when they gave you a warning of this kind” (Orwell, 24]. The accuracy of the Proles were one to be recommended to the point that people think they have a built in instinct which told them in advance that a streamer or rocket was heading their way even though it is said to travel faster than sound [Orwell 74].

Posted by: jasmine Charlton at October 23, 2013 11:01 PM

Kerriann Salatti
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
25 October 2013

Question: What is the Party’s attitude toward the proles?

Answer: The party’s attitude toward the proles was that they could get away with basically anything. They had no morals and dint have to follow the norms of society. They were seen equal to animals. There slogan was “Proles and animals are free.” (64)

Posted by: Kerriann Salatti at October 24, 2013 11:55 AM

Lindsey Thilmony
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
24 October 2013

Question: What words does he read on the coin?

Answer: As Winston took the coin out of his pocket, “The face gazed up at him, heavy, calm, protecting, but what kind of smile was hidden beneath the dark mustache” (Orwell 92)? The words on the coin are war is peace, freedom is slavery, and ignorance is strength.

Posted by: Lindsey Thilmony at October 24, 2013 04:25 PM

Lindsey Thilmony
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
24 October 2013

Question: What words does he read on the coin?

Answer: As Winston took the coin out of his pocket, “The face gazed up at him, heavy, calm, protecting, but what kind of smile was hidden beneath the dark mustache” (Orwell 92)? The words on the coin are war is peace, freedom is slavery, and ignorance is strength.

Posted by: Lindsey Thilmony at October 24, 2013 04:25 PM

Jalisa Lowe
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
25 October 2013

Question: What is the significance of the picture showing the three men at the social function in New York?

Answer: The picture Winston found was of Jones, Aaronson, and Rutherford. These three men “were executed, and their fate was recorded in the Party histories, a warning to posterity” (Orwell 69). By examining the picture, Winston discovered that all three men confessions had to be false. Winston states, “The point was that at both trials all three men had confessed that on that date they had been on Eurasian soil. They had flown from a secret airfield in Canada to a rendezvous somewhere in Siberia, and had conferred with members of the Eurasian General Staff, to whom they had betrayed important military secrets . . . There was only one possible conclusion: the confessions were lies” (Orwell 69). Winston came to the realization that convicting people of crimes they did not commit could be used against the party, and could possibly destroy them. Winston also came to the realization that history could be rewritten so many times to the point that no one will ever know the truth. (Orwell 69-70)

Posted by: Jalisa Lowe at October 24, 2013 08:26 PM

Hector Rosario
ENG 210CL CA01
Professor Hobbs
October 24, 2013

71) How many proles are there?
The proles make up about eighty-five percent of the population of Oceania. Although being so massive, they lack the ability to think freely and revolt due to the restrictions by the Party. Orwell hints to their power in numbers by stating "But the proles, if only they could somehow become conscious of their own strength, would have no need to conspire. They needed only to rise up and shake themselves like a horse shaking off flies" (Orwell, page 69).

Works Cited

Orwell, George, and Erich Fromm. 1984: a novel. New York, N.Y.: Signet Classic, 1984. Print.

Posted by: Hector Rosario at October 24, 2013 09:59 PM

Allison Knipe
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
24 October 2013

Question: 9. Part 1 / Chapter 1: What is the word on the flapping poster?

The word on the flapping poster was that of which represented the government. The poster was "torn at one corner, flapped fitfully in the wind, alternately covering and uncovering the single word INGSOC" (Orwell 3). Many of these posters were flying everywhere to remind people that they are always watching.

Posted by: Allison Knipe at October 24, 2013 10:09 PM

Allison Knipe
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
24 October 2013

Question: 79. Part 1 / Chapter 7: What does Winston decide?

Winston is writing his diary to O'Brien and he expresses, "Freedom is the freedom to say that two plus two make four. If that is granted, all else follows" (Orwell ebook). He realizes that the real truth needs to be granted, the truth needed to be defended.

Posted by: Allison Knipe at October 24, 2013 10:25 PM

Deirdre Rowan
Dr. Hobbs
English 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
24 October 2013

Question #76:What happened the leaders of the revolution by 1960?

Answer: Big Brother is the only revolutionary leader who was not "wiped out once and for all... [T]he rest had by that time been exposed as traitors and counter-revolutionaries" (75). The other leaders were either eliminated or brainwashed because their views of revolution stood in opposition to those of Big Brother's.

Posted by: Deirdre Rowan at October 25, 2013 12:06 AM

Joe Rulli
Dr. Hobbs
ENG210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
25 October 2013

Question 74: What does Winston think are the only characteristics of Party life?

Answer: Besides from insecurity and cruelty, more so its stinginess and restlessness.

Posted by: Joe Rulli at October 25, 2013 12:31 AM

Alexia Chambers
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and desire in literature CA02
25 October 2013
Question:
87. Part 1 / Chapter 8: What picture does Winston recognize? Has Winston ever heard the church bells ringing?
Answer:
In the Picture Winston recognized a building that used to be a church, he never knew it was a church but the old man told him about it and even started to sing a nursery rhyme about the bells ringing. Just before Winston leaves the shop he can’t stop thinking about the song. “it was curious but when you said it to yourself you had the illusion of actually hearing bells, the bells of a lost London that still existed somewhere or other, disguised and forgotten. From one ghostly steeple after another, he seemed to hear them pealing forth. Yet so far as he could remember he had never in real life heard church bells ringing.” Winston has never heard the bells ring from St Clement’s.

Posted by: Alexia Chambers at October 25, 2013 12:55 AM

Ashley Johnson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
25 October 2013

Using the online book (ebooks.adelaide.edu)

Question 95:
What does Winston discover at Mr. Charrington’s shop?

Answer:
Winston discovers a framed picture of a building on Mr. Charringtons wall. Upon further inspection, he recognizes the building. Winston figured out the location where the demolished building was, it was “in the middle of the street outside the Palace of Justice.” (Orwell)

Posted by: Ashley Johnson at October 25, 2013 01:17 AM

Dana DeLosa
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01: Love and Desire in Literature
24 October 2013

Question: “Who is Winston afraid of and why?”

Answer: Winston fears the “girl with the dark hair” (Orwell 61). When she sat next to him, he felt a “horrible pang of terror”; he believes that the dark haired girl works as an amateur spy for the Thought Police (Orwell 61). Winston worries that she has been following him for days and does not know if she saw him commit a “facecrime” (Orwell 62).

Posted by: Dana DeLosa at October 25, 2013 09:52 AM

Jasmine Collins
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL: Love and Desire in Literature CA01
25 October 2013
Question: Part 1 / Chapter 5: What is the “ideal” type as described by the Party? If you are familiar with history, does it remind you of anything?
Answer: The ideal type described by the Party is, “tall muscular youths and deep-bosomed maidens, blond-haired, vital, sunburnt, carefree” (Orwell 53). This reminds me of the Holocaust when Hitler wanted a specific race to dominate. Especially with the blonde hair.

Posted by: Jasmine Collins at October 25, 2013 10:11 AM

Connor Schaefer
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL- CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
25 October 2013

Question: Who is Syme? What does he want from Winston?

Answer: Syme is not a friend of Winston. He is a comrade. He is a philologist. He is also a specialist in Newspeak. Syme is a small individual with huge eyes. He is smaller than Winston is, and he has dark hair. He asked Winston for something. Syme asked Winston, “I wanted to ask you whether you’d got any razor blades” (Orwell 43). Syme just wants to know if Winston has extra razor blades he can use. Razor blades are hard to come by at this point. Winston lies about having extra razor blades. He has been using the same razor blade for months. He does not want to give away his spare blades. That is what Syme asked Winston.

Posted by: Connor Schaefer at October 25, 2013 10:19 AM

Salvatore Christlieb
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
Dr. Hobbs
25 October 2013

Question: Why does Winston wonder about church bells ringing in London?
Answer: Winston didn’t believe that church bells were actually ringing because he never heard them before. As the narrator claims, “Yet so far as he could remember he had never in real life heard church bells ringing” (Orwell 88). The Party definitely controls everything, for church bells not to ring in London that must mean the Party has censored religion for so long that few people remember what they sound like. Therefore, Winston questions the church bells ringing.


References
Orwell, George. 1984: A Novel. New York, N.Y., U.S.A.: Harcourt Brace, 1983. Print.

Posted by: Salvatore Christlieb at October 25, 2013 11:11 AM

Deirdre Rowan
Dr. Hobbs
English 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
25 October 2013

Question #110: From whom has Winston rented a room? Why?

Answer: Winston rented "the shabby little room above Mr. Charrington’s shop" (136) from Mr. Charrington because it was one of the few places that did not have a telescreen. Winston wanted privacy "for the purpose of a love affair" (137) with Julia.

Posted by: Deirdre Rowan at October 25, 2013 02:47 PM

Morgan Salter
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
28 October 2013

Question: How old is Julia? Where does she work? Why might this be significant in understanding her character?

Answer: Julia is twenty-six years old and works “on the novel-writing machines in the Fiction Department” (Orwell 130). Working in this field of occupation meant operating machinery which would write and produce novels for the public. This might be significant in understanding her character because, like all other young women in this society, she demonstrates the stereotype of citizens willingly and blindly propelling the tyrannical government. Her dedication and service to the printing company, although she knows the books are “rubbish”, shows her lack of involvement and passion for standing up against the governing power.

Posted by: Morgan Salter at October 25, 2013 02:49 PM

Jasmine Charlton
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
25 October 2013

Question: Do women in the party wear makeup? Why or why not?

Answer: In part, two chapter four of the text, the women in the party did not wear make up because they did not want to be tempting to the men. An example of this can be how aroused Winston became when Julia put make up on her face, because “he never before seen or imagined a woman of the party with cosmetics on her face”[Orwell 126]. The women in the party also did not wear make to reduce their sexuality, and to be viewed as equal rulers to the men of the party.

Posted by: Jasmine Charlton at October 25, 2013 09:16 PM

Regina Green
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
26 October 2013

Question: Have any changes have taken place in Winston? If so, what? How does this affect our understanding of him now?

Answer: A lot of changes have taken place in Winston. Orwell says, "Winston had dropped his habit of drinking gin at all hours. He seemed to have lost the need for it. He had grown fatter, his varicose ulcer had subsided, leaving only a brown stain on the skin above his ankle, his fits of coughing in the morning had stopped" (150). Winston seemed to be a lot happier with life. Even with those changes he also found his normal life and routine away from Julia tolerable as well. Any chance he gets he thinks about Julia. He always looks forward to the next time they will be able to meet. Now that Winston feels that his life has purpose he does not mind the grueling work he is forced to do.

Posted by: Regina Green at October 26, 2013 04:58 PM

Kerriann Salatti
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
28 October 2013

Question: 102 Part 2 / Chapter 2: Where does the couple meet? How was it arranged?
Answer: The couple meets in London at Victory Square and hides in the wood and brush so that they wouldn’t be seen.(104) They arranged to meet there while sitting at a table together in the lunchroom.

Posted by: Kerriann Salatti at October 26, 2013 07:32 PM

Stephanie Gilbert
Dr. Hobbs
Eng-210-CL Love and Desire in Literature-CA01
27, October, 2013


57. Part 1 / Chapter 5: What does Syme work on? What is his remark about the language?
Syme is working on a dictionary in news speak. His remark about the News speak language is “that we are getting the language into its final shape the shape it’s going to have when nobody speaks anything else. When were finished with it people like you will have to learn it all over again you think I dare say that our chief job is inventing new words. But not them every day we are cutting the language down to the bone (Orwell pg. 45).”

109. Part 2 / Chapter 3: What is Julia’s attitude toward the Party? Why does she feel that way?
Julia’s attitude towards the party is very cynical, she despises and hates the party as well. Because it has affected her life in every way possible.

Posted by: Stephanie Gilbert at October 27, 2013 12:03 PM

Rache Robinson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
27 October 2013

Question: What does Winston decide?

I am using Planetebook.com version of 1984. Winston decides that he is writing the diary to O'Brien because he feels that this man is against the Party as well. In Part 1 Chapter 7, it states, "He knew, with more certainty than before, that O'Brien was on side. He was writing the diary about O'Brien-to O'Brien" (103).

Posted by: Rache Robinson at October 27, 2013 05:14 PM

Rache Robinson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
27 October 2013

Question: How do Winston and Julia spend their time? How does it fit in with what is allowed?

I am using the Planetebooks.com version of 1984. Winston and Julia spend their time together by having conversation about their opposition of the Party and engaging in intimate activities. This fits in with what is allowed because Julia found a hiding place for them to converse without being heard. In Part 2 Chapter 2, Julia says to Winston, "Never mind, dear. There's no hurry. We've got the whole afternoon. Isn't this a splendid hideout" (152).

Posted by: Rache Robinson at October 27, 2013 05:19 PM

Jalisa Lowe
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
28 October 2013

Question: Who has vanished? Why is this troubling? What does it mean when someone vanishes?

Answer: After following a strange man in the woods, Parson’s daughter and two other girls decided to report the man over to the patrols. They believed he was the enemy due to the fact “he was wearing a funny kind of shoes-said she’s never seen anyone wearing shoes like that before” (Orwell 50). When someone vanishes, he or she is used as an example to others for what will happen to them. Oceania was at war; therefore, everyone who was “different” was the enemy.

Posted by: Jalisa Lowe at October 27, 2013 06:11 PM

Vera Smirnova
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
25 october 2013

Question #59
What does Syme say the whole purpose of Newspeak is?

Syme told Winston that the purpose of Newspeak is to narrow the range of thought. There would be one word to express every concept, so the thought crime would be impossible.

Posted by: Vera Smirnova at October 27, 2013 07:12 PM

Monica Guirguis
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire Literature
24 October 2013

Question: What is Winston’s job?
Answer: Winston goes to his job at the ministry of truth in the records where he works with a speakwrite which is a machine that types and destroys obsolete documents, He updates Big Brother’s orders and party records so that he can match a new development. Winston has to change the record of a speech that in December 1983, the speech known as Comrade Withers. According to page 68 “Winston pulled the speakwrite towards him, blew the dust from its mouthpiece, and put on his spectacles (Orwell, 68). This shows this was Winston Job and what he did for living and not only that but how old the machine became as he used it everyday.

Posted by: Monica Guirguis at October 27, 2013 07:21 PM

Monica Guirguis
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire Literature
24 October 2013
Question: Does Winston believe in Goldstein? Why, or why not?

Answer: Winston believes in Goldstein because the fact that Julie tries to tell them that Goldstein is an enemy and he tells her that she is speaking nonsense and that she is foolish. According to page 146 “ The tales about Goldstein and his underground army, she said, were simply a lot of rubbish which the party has invented for its own purposes and which you had to pretend to believe in” (Orwell 146). The Hatred of Julie toward Goldstein is big and something that Julie uses to get Winston to hate him but Winston believes in Goldstein no matter what Julie says about him.

Posted by: Monica Guirguis at October 27, 2013 08:01 PM

Allison Knipe
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
27 October 2013

Question: 111. Part 2 / Chapter 4: When Julia arrives, what does she have in her bag?

After Julia arrives, "She fell on her knees, threw open the bag, and tumbled out some spanners and a screwdriver that filled the top part of it. Underneath were a number of neat paper packets. The first packet that she passed to Winston had a
strange and yet vaguely familiar feeling." Winston curiously observed each of the objects and unwrapped the various food items.

Posted by: Allison Knipe at October 27, 2013 08:05 PM

Monica Guirguis
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire Literature
24 October 2013
Question: How does the social structure maintain control ?

Answer: Winston disbelieves that these claims are not true, but he has no way to know for sure if they are true or not. Party claims to have built cities, the electricity works, buildings that are no longer there, and people live in deficiency and worry. According to page 76 “In the end the Party would announce that two and two made five, and you would have to believe it” (Orwell, 76). Party’s claims that it has improved the reading rate, decreased the infant mortality rate, and have given the city better food and shelter could be imaginary.

Posted by: monica guirguis at October 27, 2013 08:17 PM

Vera Smirnova
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
22 October 2013

Question #123: Does Julia believe in Goldstein? Why or why not?

Julia does not believe in Goldstein. She believes that Goldstein does not exist. That it is only tales about him and an underground army that Party created for its own purpose.

Posted by: Vera Smirnova at October 27, 2013 08:21 PM

Alexia Chambers
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and desire in literature CA02
27 October 2013
Question:
125 Part 2/Chapter 5: To whom does Julia give credit for the invention of the airplane? What does this tell us about her? Does she care about who gets credit for such historical factoids? Why, or why not?
Answer: I am using the Signet Classics version of the book. Julia believes the party invented the airplane, which Winston knows is false. “Often she was ready to accept the official mythology, simply because the difference between truth and falsehood did not seem important to her.” (153) She does not really care who receives credit for what because it does not directly affect her life. She always responds with “Who cares?”

Posted by: Alexia Chambers at October 27, 2013 10:39 PM

Salvatore Christlieb
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
Dr. Hobbs
27 October 2013

Question: At what does Julia throw her shoe at? Why?

Answer: Julia wakes up from a nap after having sex with Winston and she throws her shoe at a rat that crept into the room. As Winston inquired of Julia after the deft movement, she exclaimed, “'a rat. I saw him stick his beastly nose out of the wainscoting” (Orwell 127). Julia and Winston were having sex in a hostel and it seemed as though it was abandoned and rat infested. However, they did not discover this until after they had sex.

References
Orwell, George. 1984: A Novel. New York, N.Y., U.S.A.: Harcourt Brace, 1983. Print.

Posted by: Salvatore Christlieb at October 27, 2013 11:30 PM

Maria Benkirane

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 210 CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature

27 Octobre 2013

Question: Does Julia arrange for more meetings? Why, or why not?

Answer: After returning to London, Julia arranges more meetings with Winston in the City: "She had named a place where they could meet after work, four evenings hence. It was a street in one of the poorer quarters" (Orwell 212). They met in a destroyed church and Julia and Winston talk more about their personal life. The rest of the days, they meet in the streets but not more than 30 minutes every time, because it was dangerous when the patrol was there: "There were evenings when they reached their rendezvous and then had to walk past one another with a sign, because a patrol had just come around the corner or a helicopter was hovering over head" (114). Julia had much experience with these kinds of meetings, because as a patrol was coming closer, she was able to talk without moving her lips. The party did not allow sex, because they wanted people to put that frustration onto the enemies and have that intense love towards Big brother.

Posted by: maria benkirane at October 27, 2013 11:51 PM

Dana DeLosa
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01: Love and Desire in Literature
28 October 2013

Question: ” What does the girl provide as a treat? Why is it special?”

Answer: Julia, the girl, brought chocolate to her meeting with Winston; however, this chocolate did not taste like the “dull-brown crumbly stuff, that tasted like the smoke of a rubbish fire” (Orwell 121). This chocolate tasted like a “memory which he could not pin down, but which was powerful and troubling” (Orwell 121). Julia acquired this delicious chocolate via the black market.

Posted by: Dana DeLosa at October 28, 2013 01:20 AM

Ashley Johnson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
28 October 2013
Using the online book (ebooks.adelaide.edu)
Question 108
Part 2 / Chapter 3: How old is Julia? Where does she work? Why might this be significant in understanding her character?
Answer:
Julia is twenty-six years old, and she works “on the novel-writing machines in the Fiction Department.” (Orwell) This information may be significant in understanding her character because she is young and carefree. She knows how to bend the system in her favor and the state of the government does not seem to affect her.

Posted by: Ashley Johnson at October 28, 2013 01:34 AM

Camila Pinzon
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
13 October 2013

Question: Part 2 / Chapter 5: What new poster is displayed all over London? What is its significance/purpose?
Answer: While reading off the University of Adelaide’s kindle version of George Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty-four. I read during the preparations for Hate Week, a new poster of a Eurasian soldier, and a submachine gun on his hip had multiplied its way around London, so much that it had even been more numerous than the Big Brother portraits. Throughout this time, many bombings have occurred in playgrounds, and film theatres taking away hundreds of young innocent lives. People viewed this new poster and took out their anger by tearing down scores of these posters and burning them. As Winston described the poster he said, “It had no caption, and represented the monstrous figure of a Eurasian soldier, three or four meters high, striding forward with expressionless Mongolian face and enormous boots and a submachine gun pointed from his hip. From whatever angle you looked at the poster, the muzzle of the gun, magnified by the foreshortening, seemed to be pointed straight at you” (Loc 2319). It signified the mass amount of damage Eurasia has been able to do to Oceania, the large stature of the soldier represented the power Eurasia has. Whichever angle a citizen looks at it is subliminally demonstrating and planting into their head that Eurasia is targeting them, and there is no hiding.

Work Cited:
Orwell, George. Nineteen Eighty-Four. South Australia: Creative Commons Licence, n.d. University of Adelaide, 7 Feb. 2013. Web. 22 Oct. 2013.

Posted by: Camila Pinzon at October 28, 2013 02:31 AM

Kaitlin Millner
28, October, 2013
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL
LOVE AND DESIRE IN LITERATURE

part 1 /chapter 1: Does Winston have any food? What does he drink? What does he smoke?

Winston does have some food but not much. He works with what he has. When he drinks he likes to drink gin and when he smokes he smokes cigarets.

Posted by: Kaitlin Millner at October 28, 2013 04:47 AM

Kaitlin Millner
28, October, 2013
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL
LOVE AND DESIRE IN LITERATURE

part 1 /chapter 1: Does Winston have any food? What does he drink? What does he smoke?

Winston does have some food but not much. He works with what he has. When he drinks he likes to drink gin and when he smokes he smokes cigarets.

Posted by: Kaitlin Millner at October 28, 2013 04:48 AM

Kaitlin Millner
28, October, 2013
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL
LOVE AND DESIRE IN LITERATURE

part 1 /chapter 1: Does Winston have any food? What does he drink? What does he smoke?

Winston does have some food but not much. He works with what he has. When he drinks he likes to drink gin and when he smokes he smokes cigarets.

Posted by: Kaitlin Millner at October 28, 2013 04:51 AM

Hector M. Rosario
ENG210CL CA01
Professor Hobbs

101) Who makes plans for the meeting? What are the plans?

Winston makes plans with the dark-haired girl. While they are eating, they plan a meeting in Victory Square. They understand the risks as there are plenty of telescreens, but believe they will be able to hide from them with help from the crowds.

Posted by: Hector Rosario at October 28, 2013 08:49 AM

Lindsey Thilmony
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
28 October 2013

Question: Part 2 / Chapter 2: Where does the couple meet? How was it arranged?

Answer: Winston and the girl meet in the woods. Julia gives Winston directions to get on a train to get the countryside, and they have a secret rendezvous.

Posted by: Lindsey Thilmony at October 28, 2013 09:52 AM

Joe Rulli
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 Love and Desire in Literature CA01
28 October 2013

Question 117: Who has vanished? Why is this troubling? What does it mean when some one vanishes?

Answer: The Newspeak expert Syme has vanished. This is troubling because he in Part 1 of the book he tells Winston all about Newspeak and all of it's troubling facts such as it loses words instead of gains them, and that everyone will be fluent in this new language by the year 2050. Syme may have knew too much about this information, and is most likely why he has vanished. When some one vanishes, usually it means the Party was on to them and he has probably been vaporized, and no one may speak his name again.

Posted by: Joe Rulli at October 28, 2013 10:08 AM

Jasmine Collins
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL: Love and Desire in Literature CA01
28 October 2013
Question: Part 2 / Chapter 2: How do Winston and Julia spend their time? How does it fit in with what is allowed?
Answer: Winston and Julia spend most of their time in a clearing in the woods. It was described that, “they were only making conversation” (Orwell 106), but after that they started to kiss. Women and men are not allowed to have this type of relationship, unless they are married. So their relationship does not fit in with what is allowed because they are having a secret meeting about the Party and participating in intimate activities.

Posted by: Jasmine Collins at October 28, 2013 10:16 AM

Jasmine Collins
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL: Love and Desire in Literature CA01
25 October 2013
Question: Part 1 / Chapter 5: What is the “ideal” type as described by the Party? If you are familiar with history, does it remind you of anything?
Answer: The ideal type described by the party is, “tall muscular youths and deep-bosomed maidens, blond-haired, vital, sunburnt, carefree” (Orwell 53). This reminds me of the Holocaust when Hitler wanted a specific race to dominate. Especially with the blonde hair.

Posted by: Jasmine Collins at October 28, 2013 10:17 AM

Jasmine Collins
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL: Love and Desire in Literature CA01
23 October 2013
Question: Part 1 / Chapter 1: Describe Winston (Be specific) Why doesn’t Winston take the lift?
Answer: Winston Smith had his “chin nuzzled into his breast in an effort to escape the vile escape the vile wind” (Orwell 1). He was rushing to escape the wind and get back to his apartment. Winston does not take the lift because, “even at the best of times it was seldom working, and at present the electric current was cut off during daylight hours” (Orwell 1).

Posted by: Jasmine Collins at October 28, 2013 10:18 AM

Kaitlin Millner
28 October 2013
Dr.Hobbs
Eng 210 CL

70. Part 1/chapter 7: according to Winston, where does the only hope lie?


"If there is hope it lies in the proles." - Wintston
If there was hope, it must lie in the proles, because only there, in those swarming disregarded masses, eighty-five per cent of the population of Oceania, could the force to destroy the Party ever be generated.

Posted by: Kaitlin.millner at October 28, 2013 10:44 AM

Diana Shoemaker
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
28 October 2013

Question: Ch.4 While Winston is turned towards the window, what does J do?

Answer: Instead of being naked, she had put on makeup. The novel states “She had painted her face. She must have slipped into some shop in the proletarian quarters and bought herself a complete set of make-up materials. Her lips were deeply reddened, her cheeks rouged, her nose powdered; there was even a touch of something under the eyes to make them brighter. It was not very skilfully done, but Winston’s standards in such matters were not high” (Orwell 126).

Posted by: Diana Shoemaker at October 28, 2013 10:46 AM

Connor Schaefer
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL- CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
28 October 2013
Question: Where does Julia say they can meet once again? When and why?
Answer: Julia and Winston meet in a forest like area. When traveling to the secret location, the author describes them going through tree lines and bushes. The author applies here that the location is a forest. Julia tells Winston that they can meet at the same location only once more. She states, “It’s generally safe to use any hide-out twice. But not for another month or two, of course” (Orwell 112). Julia explains here how it is never a good idea to meet up in the same location more than twice. She thinks they can meet in the same location again, but they should wait a month or two before meeting in that location. The next time Winston and Julia planned on meeting was at a busy road that they could quickly talk. They would not be able to communicate for more than a quarter of an hour, but it was a way to meet up. Julia thinks they can meet in the forest once again, but not for another month or two. She thinks it is important to wait before going to the same location twice.

Posted by: Connor Schaefer at October 28, 2013 04:22 PM

Jordan Dadez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
28 October 2013

Question: Do women in the Party wear makeup? Why, or why not?

Answer: Proletariats are the only women who wear makeup. Most of the proles who do wear makeup are prostitutes. Women in the Party do not wear makeup because “Chastity was as deeply ingrained in them as Party loyalty” (Orwell 60). Sex is illegal, so everything that accompanies sex is illegal as well. Anything that can be used to create desire, such as makeup, is illegal. Since the Party women are the epitome of chastity, they do not wear makeup.

Posted by: Jordan Dadez at October 28, 2013 10:46 PM

Erica Bodden
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
28 October 2013

Question: What happens when all corrections are made in the Times?

Answer: In the Ministry of Plenty all sources of information are monitored, controlled, revised and summited if they are best suited to the party. Winston witness the destruction of any type of work once it is “corrected”. He described the ordeal, “As soon all the corrections which happened to be necessary in the Times had been assembled and collected that number would be reprinted, the original copy destroyed and the corrected copy placed in its stead”(Orwell,39). Therefore the ministry is able to choose which lies they want to become truth.

Posted by: Erica Bodden at October 28, 2013 10:47 PM

Erica Bodden
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
28 October 2013

Question: Is Winston attracted to the room? What doesn’t the room have? What is the proprietor real name?

Answer: Winston made another risky move by going on the outside of town. He returned to Mr.Churrtington’s shop, the same place he found the diary he purchased previously. During his second visit he found himself buying another item that would be considered questionable to the party. Mr.Churrington also took the pleasure to show him around his shop. He has a spare room that appealed to Winston. Being in the room seemed familiar to him, “In the room awakened in him a sort of nostalgia, a sort of ancestral memory” (Orwell, 96). The fact the room had no telescreen was the most appealing to him. For a moment he felt like he could be safe and have privacy once in his life.

Posted by: Erica Bodden at October 28, 2013 10:59 PM

Jordan Dadez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
28 October 2013

Question: When young Winston went home after devouring the chocolate, what does he find? Why is this even important to his personal development? In other words, how has/did this affect him?

Answer: When Winston came home after several hours, he realized his mother and little sister had disappeared. This is important to Winston’s personal development because this moment shaped his whole outlook on life. It is the reason why he does what he does in the present because of what had happened in the past. When “[. . .] you [love] someone, you [love] him, and when you [have]nothing else to give, you still [give] him love” (Orwell 146). Winston grew up in a world where this does not matter. Actions do not matter. Inactions do not matter. The Party has taken away the ability to fight because they have taken away the things that are worth fighting for. They have taken away love, freedom, and passion while making it extremely clear that no matter what one does, one will always vanish from history.

Posted by: Jordan Dadez at October 29, 2013 12:20 AM

Jasmine Charlton
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210 CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
28 October 2013

Question: Do these states drop atomic bombs? Why, or why not? Why is this significant?

Answer: The various states all possess a series of deadly weapons, but atomic bombs, first appeared in the early nineteen forties but were not used until and since the nineteen fifties”[Orwell 172-173]. Although the states do not drop any more atomic bombs, they still decided to make them and store them in case the need for them ever arises like they assume it would sooner or later.

Posted by: Jasmine Charlton at October 29, 2013 08:30 AM

Matt Nicholson-Lewis
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
October 29 2013

Question #138: To what question does Julia say, “No,” why is this significant?

Winston and Julia are being asked what they would give up. They are asked such things as “to commit acts of sabotage which may cause the death of hundreds of innocent people?” (Orwell 152) showing what lengths they will go to. Also, Winston is expected to answer for both him and Julia showing the gender discrepancy in the novel. So when Julia jumps in and says “No!” (Orwell 152). It emphasizes the fact that Julia strongly does not want to be away form Winston for any reason. Winston has to think about his answer but eventually agrees with Julia.

Posted by: Matt Nicholson-Lewis at October 29, 2013 10:37 AM

Jalisa Lowe
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
30 October 2013

Question: What is the third chapter of the book about? Summarize and explain.

Answer: War was a norm for people living in Oceania, Eastasia, and Eurasia. All three states have been at war for the past twenty-five years. There is no cause for why the war is going on, they just continue to fight. Neither of the states will be able to destroy one another because they are too much alike. It is normal for one’s allies to commit “acts as raping, looting, the slaughter of children, the reduction of whole populations to slavery, and reprisals against prisoners” (Orwell 164), rather than the enemy. The purpose of the war is not to kill people, but to destroy products of human labor. The narrator states, “War, it will be seen, not only accomplishes the necessary destruction, but accomplishes it in a psychologically acceptable way” (Orwell 170). There can never be a declared winner of the war; therefore, it does not matter the status of the war, as long as it continues. The narrator states, “A peace that was truly permanent would be the same as a permanent war” (Orwell 177), hence the “party slogan: WAR IS PEACE” (Orwell 177).

Posted by: Jalisa Lowe at October 29, 2013 07:04 PM

Deirdre Rowan
Dr. Hobbs
English 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
29 October 2013

Question #148:With what country is Oceania at war with now? What is the purpose of this/why is this significant?

Answer: Oceania is now at war with Eastasia. Big Brother has so much influence over the masses that the demonstrators did not notice "the speaker had switched from one line to the other actually in midsentence, not only without a pause, but without even breaking the syntax" (181). Common history, knowledge, and "political literature of five years was now completely obsolete" (182) and need to be edited to maintain the Party's control over the populace.

Posted by: Deirdre Rowan at October 29, 2013 08:19 PM

Maria Benkirane

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 210 CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature

29 Octobre 2013

Question: Do women in the Party wear makeup? Why, or why not?

Answer: Winston did not usually see with women at the party with makeup on; However, Julia had make up on, and Winston notices her wonderful and astonishing beauty: "Her lips were deeply reddened, her cheeks rouged, her nose powdered, there was even a touch of something under the eyes to make them brighter" (Orwell 126). He thought that she looks so feminine and the change surprised him greatly.

Posted by: maria benkirane at October 29, 2013 09:39 PM

Allison
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
29 October 2013

Question: 147. Part 2 / Chapter 8: Who leaves first? What is the purpose of this/why is this significant?

Winston leaves first because O'Brien tells him to. He states, "Yes, I knew the last line. And now, I am afraid, it is time for you to go. But wait. You had better let me give you one of these tablets" (Orwell ebook). The ordeal was over and O'Brien needed to get back to work, however he made Winston leave.

Posted by: Allison Knipe at October 29, 2013 11:33 PM

Vera Smirnova
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
29 October 2013

Question #151: What is the title of Goldstein's book? Why is this significant?

The title of the book is The Theory and Practice of Oligarchical Collectivism. The most important part of the book is about the war. It is significant, because it explains the meaning of the slogan "WAR IS PEACE". It is describing the ignorance of people to the life in other places.


------------------------------

Vera, you are missing your in-text, parenthetical citation for this answer. Page number(s)?

Posted by: Vera Smirnova at October 29, 2013 11:58 PM

Lindsey Thilmony
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
29 October 2013

Question: Part 2 / Chapter 9 What was the purpose of war in the past? What are the characteristics of war now? Summarize and explain.

Answer: The purpose of war in the past was, “no more than a continuous shortage of consumption of goods, and the occasional crash of a rocket bomb which may cause a few scores of death” (Orwell 165). The purpose of war in the future, “is a war for labor power” (166 Orwell).

Posted by: Lindsey Thilmony at October 30, 2013 12:25 AM

Diana Shoemaker
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
30 October 2013


Question: 164. Part 2/Ch. 9 What do Winston and Julia decide to do about the book? Why is this significant?

Answer: Winston and Julia decide to read the book. The novel states “‘You read it,’ she said with her eyes shut. ‘Read it aloud. That’s the best way. Then you can explain it to me as you go’” (Orwell 184). Julia is speaking to Winston and is saying that they should read the book out loud and then discuss it later on. Winston then began to read the book. It is significant because the words in the book that he is saying seem to be like his own thoughts that he is speaking out loud.

Posted by: Diana Shoemaker at October 30, 2013 12:31 AM

Alexia Chambers
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and desire in literature CA02
29 October 2013
Question:
149. Part 2 / Chapter 9 What does Winston receive at the rally? What is the purpose of this/why is this significant? Answer:
Winston received a book, this book was The Theory and Practice of Oligarchical Collectivism by Emmanuel Goldstein. This book was branded an illegal book written by the enemy, Goldstein, it explains the workings of the party and obviously, if he were caught with this book he would be arrested.


------------------------------

Alexia, you are missing your in-text, parenthetical citation for this answer. Page number(s)?

Posted by: Alexia Chambers at October 30, 2013 12:35 AM

Dana DeLosa
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01: Love and Desire in Literature
29 October 2013

Question: “To whom is a toast made? What is the purpose of this/Why is this significant?”

Answer: O’Brien makes a toast to “health” and to “our Leader: Emmanuel Goldstein” (Orwell 170). The purpose of this quote is that it reveals Julia and Winston’s entrance into the Brotherhood (Orwell 171).

Posted by: Dana DeLosa at October 30, 2013 12:46 AM

Ashley Johnson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
30 October 2013

Using the online book (ebooks.adelaide.edu)

Question:
Part 2 / Chapter 8: What does O’Brien tell Winston and Julia about the Brotherhood? Why is this significant?

Answer:
O’Brian tells Winston and Julia that the brotherhood exists, but there is no way to determine how many people are actually in the brotherhood. O’Brian states that he “cannot tell you whether it numbers a hundred members, or ten million.” (Orwell) He also says that they will be in contact with other members but the members will be renewed often. This is significant because if they are caught they won’t be able to reveal much about the organization because they have been kept in the dark.

Posted by: Ashley Johnson at October 30, 2013 01:17 AM

Camila Pinzon
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
29 October 2013

Question: Part 1 / Chapter 8: What does Winston think about after his conversation with the old man in the pub?

Answer: While reading off the University of Adelaide’s kindle version of George Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty-four. Winston makes his way into a pub, after following an old gentleman whom he believes will be able to remember how Oceania was prior to the Revolution. After politely conversing with him and buying many litres of beer and several questions later, Winston began to take note of all the old man’s answers. He only seemed to recall small details from his sister in-law’s funeral to the taste and price of beer. As Winston reflected on their conversation he thought, “The few scattered survivors form the ancient world were incapable of comparing one age with another. They remembered a million useless things [. . . ] but all the relevant facts were outside of their vision. [. . .] memory failed and written records were falsified” (Loc 1445). Through this, Winston came to a conclusion, with age the few survivors of the “ancient world” (Loc 1445) only seemed to remember what mattered most to them such as, memories that brought out intense emotions and senses all of his questions of wanting to know whether society was truly awful prior to the Party will not be answered. Even with age, memory fails, documents are then fabricated, and the Party’s claim of how the world was before are the only claim “valid” enough to take into consideration. Therefore, trusted to be true.

Work Cited:
Orwell, George. Nineteen Eighty-Four. South Australia: Creative Commons Licence, n.d. University of Adelaide, 7 Feb. 2013. Web. 22 Oct. 2013.

Posted by: Camila Pinzon at October 30, 2013 02:15 AM

Camila Pinzon
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
29 October 2013

Question: Part 2 / Chapter 9 What is the most powerful weapon possessed by all three states? Who discovered it? Why is this significant?

Answer: While reading off the University of Adelaide’s kindle version of George Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty-four. Winston begins to read The Theory and Practice of Oligarchical Collectivism, by Emmanuel Goldstein. In chapter three, War is Peace, he discovers that all three states already possess a weapon more powerful than any of their present research could create nor discover; it was the atomic bomb. According to Goldstein, “The Party according to its habit, claims the invention for itself” (Loc 3033). While he believes that the party did not truly discover, its significance is much greater. All three states continue to manufacture and store atomic bombs. Each state has a plan to form a friendship pact with a rival state after a series of well-planned fighting and bargaining. While, they maintain the friendship pact continue to manufacture atomic bombs, once the time is right, attack so any counterattacks will be impossible. Then, they conquering state will sign a friendship pact with the remaining state and follow the same process until they are the reigning state.

Work Cited:
Orwell, George. Nineteen Eighty-Four. South Australia: Creative Commons Licence, n.d. University of Adelaide, 7 Feb. 2013. Web. 22 Oct. 2013.

Posted by: Camila Pinzon at October 30, 2013 02:50 AM

Hector M. Rosario
ENG210CL CA01
Professor Hobbs

136) What is the conspiracy called? Why is this significant?
The conspiracy is called "the Brotherhood" (Orwell, page 171). It is significant because it represents the underlying of each party. O'Brien calls a toast in the beginning to their leader, Emmanuel Goldstein. When asked the questions of what they are prepared to do, Julia and Winston say yes to everything except for separating and never seeing one another again.

Posted by: Hector Rosario at October 30, 2013 08:33 AM

McKenzie Burns
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 Love and Desire in Literature CA01
30 October 2013

Question #68: Why have Katherine and Winston separated?

Answer: They have separated because they could not produce any children. "The Party did not permit divorce, but it rather encouraged separation in cases where there were no children" (Orwell 58). They were together for 15 months and they tried to produce children, but it was more of a duty for Winston, so he did not enjoy himself. Katherine tried and tried to produce children, but after a while she gave up. "But luckily no child appeared, and in the end she agreed to give up trying, and soon afterwards they parted" (Orwell 59).

Posted by: McKenzie Burns at October 30, 2013 10:00 AM

Joe Rulli
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
30 October 2013

Question 134: Why is Martin asked to sit down? Why is this significant?

Answer: Winston and Julia go to O'Brien's house, together. Winston tells O'Brien they are there to become part of the Brotherhood. As the three are about to start discussing the Brotherhood, O'Brien tells Martin to sit down with them. This is significant because it shows that Martin is now part of the Brotherhood, and also O'Brien's valet.


------------------------------

Joe, you are missing your in-text, parenthetical citation for this answer. Page number(s)?

Posted by: Joe Rulli at October 30, 2013 10:06 AM

Salvatore Christlieb
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
Dr. Hobbs
30 October 2013

Question: In what does Winston decide hope lies? What does it mean/why is this significant?

Answer: Winston decided that, “if there was hope, it lay in the proles. You had to cling on to that” (Orwell 196). Winston believed this because he wanted, “a world of sanity” (Orwell 196). The narrator further states Winston’s belief, “where there is equality there can be sanity. Sooner or later it would happen” (Orwell 196). This is significant because Winston no longer cares for his own life and he has become loyal to the party via submission. He believes that he will never see the sane and equal world but, he believes that someday there will be. He feels as though he will never see this world but, he wants it for the future.


References
Orwell, George. 1984: A Novel. New York, N.Y., U.S.A.: Harcourt Brace, 1983. Print.

Posted by: Salvatore Christlieb at October 30, 2013 11:18 AM

Morgan Salter
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
1 November 2013

Question: Why does O’Brien want to convince Winston that two plus two equals five? Why is this significant?

Answer: O’Brien wants to convince Winston that two plus two equals five to demonstrate the Party’s control over all aspects of life and their ability to virtually make any regulation or truth that they wish. After taking Winston captive and beginning interrogation, O’Brien forces Winston to admit to the false algebraic equation “2+2=5”. O’Brien tells him that not only does it not matter what Winston believes to perceive, but that “if the Party says that it is not four but five” (Orwell 249) then five is the correct answer. This is significant because it further illuminates the tyrannical control over the government in their society which prohibits individuality and unique thought.

Posted by: Morgan Salter at October 30, 2013 02:22 PM

Stephanie Gilbert
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210-CL Love and Desire in Literature-CA01
30 October 2013

Part 2 / Chapter 6: Whom does Winston meet face to face at the Ministry? What is the person’s position? Is s/he an equal to Winston? Why, or why not?
Answer: Winston comes face to face with O’Brien. He is in the inner party as Winston says. He is not an equal to Winston. Because straight away when O’Brien starts speaking to Winston, Winston becomes intimated. The moment he becomes intimated O’ Brien is saying that “I was reading one of your Newspeak articles in the times the other day. You take a scholarly interest in Newspeak, I believe?” This therefore can be interpreted as a man who has power and or authority and is higher up than Winston is.

------------------------------

Stephanie, you are missing the page number(s) for your last quoted passage

Posted by: Stephanie Gilbert at October 30, 2013 02:26 PM

Connor Schaefer
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL- CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
30 October 2013
Question: What does O’Brien promise to send them? What is the purpose of this/ Why is this significant?
Answer: O’Brien promised to send Winston a copy of Goldstein’s book. Orwell clearly states, “Meanwhile I shall send you a copy of the book” (157). Here, O’Brien is telling Winston that he will send him the book. Orwell does not give a clear understanding of what Goldstein’s book consist of, but the reader can assume that is has to do with the Brotherhood. O’Brien mentions how the book is very hard to get a copy of because the Thought Police are destroying them as fast as they are creating them. He also mentions how the book is indestructible because everyone has the book memorized. Winston is receiving the book to memorize and learn about the Brotherhood. This is significant because once Winston receives the book it will give the reader an understanding of what Brotherhood is. Winston will be getting a copy of Goldstein’s book once O’Brien can get a copy.

Posted by: Connor Schaefer at October 30, 2013 03:32 PM

Ashley Johnson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
30 October 2013

Using the online book (ebooks.adelaide.edu)

Question:
Part III / Chapters 1-3: What is the number of the room where the guards take some of the prisoners? How do many of them react to this?

Answer:
101 is the number of the room where the guards take some of the prisoners. Some of the prisoners were frightened. One of the female prisoners had turned pale and seemed to shrivel up when she was being taken to the room. (Orwell pt. 3 Ch. 1) Another prisoner, Emaciated in appearance, was also ordered to go to room 101. The skull-faced prisoner cried out and begged saying, “You don’t have to take me to that place! Haven’t I told you everything already? What else is it you want to know? There’s nothing I wouldn’t confess, nothing!” (Orwell Pt. Ch.) They all seem to be afraid of room 101.

------------------------------

Ashley, you are missing the page number(s) for your last quoted passage

Posted by: Ashley Johnson at October 30, 2013 04:30 PM

Jasmine Charlton
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
30 October 2013

Question: “Quoting from the text, list all of the things to which Winston confess to in Chapter TWO. How many things are there?

Answer: After constant questioning and beating Winston finally gave in and confessed twelve offenses whether they were true or not. Winston confessed to, “the assassination of eminent party members, the distribution of seditious pamphlets, embezzlement of public funds, sale of military secrets, and sabotage”[Orwell 216]. Winston also confessed to, “being a spy in the pay of the Eastasian Government since 1968, a religious believer, an admirer of capitalism, and a sexual pervert” [Orwell 216]. Although this may have been true he confessed, “ he was in personal contact with Goldstein and was apart of an underground organization” [Orwell 216]. Lastly, he confessed to “murdering his wife, but the questioners probably already knew that Winston's wife was not deceased”[Orwell 216].

Posted by: jasmine Charlton at October 31, 2013 09:12 AM

Regina Green
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
31 October 2013

Question: What questions are asked of Julia and Winston? What is the purpose of this? Why is this significant?

Answer: When Julia and Winston go to O'Brien's to find out if the Brotherhood is real. When they are told it is, they want to join it. O'Brien goes down a list a questions to see if they are really ready to make the commitment. The questions they were asked were along the lines of if they were willing to die, kill others, partake in acts that could kill innocent people, go against foreign power, weaken the party by manipulating people's thoughts, change their identities, and if they were okay with never seeing each other again. O'Brien then proceeded to tell them how things would be once they did join the Brotherhood. A lot of the things that they will be asked to do are things that are at a high risk for them getting caught. They will only know a handful of people they will know of so once they are caught there won't be many names to name, if any at all. O'Brien says, "probably you will not even betray me. BY that time I may be dead, or I shall have become a different person, with a different face" (Orwell 175). So, the questions were to make sure that they would be prepared to handle all that they would be asked to do and to make them understand that they will not always be working with the same people or with each other. To make them understand that their lives will always be at risk and once they are caught there is no way out.

Posted by: Regina Green at October 31, 2013 01:36 PM

Maria Benkirane

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 210 CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature

31 Octobre 2013

Question: Quoting from the text, list all of the things to which Winston confesses to in Chapter Two. How many things are there?

Answer: After describing the scene of the beating that Winston was going through, Orwell wrote the eight crimes that Winston confessed of committing, "He confessed to the assassination of eminent party member, the distribution of seditious pamphlets, embezzlement of public funds, sale of military secrets, sabotage of every kind. He confessed that he had murdered his wife, although he knew, and his questioner must have known, that his wife was still alive. He confessed that for years he had been in personal touch with Goldstein and had been a member of an underground organization which had included almost every human being he had ever known" (216). Winston had to figure out what they needed and wanted to here from him in the hope for the beating to stop.

Posted by: maria benkirane at October 31, 2013 04:12 PM

Allison Knipe
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
31 October 2013

Question: 30. Part III / Chapters 1-3: What is “solipsism”? What might this word have to do with this
part of the novel? Explain.

Solipsism is the theory that only the self exists, or can be proved to exist (Webster's). This means very into themselves, or self-absorbed. This part of the novel shows this because Winston is becoming more independent and into himself while he tries to bring Big Brother down.

------------------------------

Allison, where is your evidence from text to prove the claim in your last statement? Also, you are missing your in-text, parenthetical citation for this answer. Page number(s)?

Posted by: Allison Knipe at October 31, 2013 05:33 PM

Kerriann Salatti
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
1 November 2013

Questions: 18. Part III / Chapters 1-3: If the purpose of torture at the Ministry of Love is not to obtain confessions alone, what is the true purpose? Why is this significant? Explain.
Answer: “Shall I tell you why we brought you here? To cure you! To make you Sane!” (225) The prisoner were not brought because they cared about their confessions or to torture them they wanted to get inside their heads to be able to control them. It was to make them think that it didn’t matter what they thought they saw or felt because it didn’t make it true.

Posted by: Kerriann Salatti at October 31, 2013 06:14 PM

Jordan Dadez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
31 October 2013

Question: According to O’Brien, what else does the Party have planned for its citizens? Why is this significant? Explain.

Answer: The Party does not wish to destroy those who have differing views from them. They want to convert them to see like The Party does. O’Brien says, “We do not merely destroy our enemies; we change them” (Orwell 226). They cannot kill their enemies without changing their point of view because then they become martyrs for their cause. Instead, The Party brainwashes them until they love Big Brother before they are killed. This is significant because there will never be a rebellion or martyrs. There is no way for the public to rise above Big Brother.

Posted by: Jordan Dadez at October 31, 2013 06:21 PM

Deirdre Rowan
Dr. Hobbs
English 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
31 October 2013

Question #23: Why doesn’t The Party simply eliminate rebellious members? Why does it go to all of this trouble? Explain the significance of their stance.

Answer: The Party knows that information will leak about their methods with prisoners, so they to make sure that the information that does come out is in their favor. It converts them and then erases all evidence of their existence. They know that people can "carry rebellion locked up in his skull" (255), so by cleansing the mind, the Party can take out enemies without controversy.

Posted by: Deirdre Rowan at October 31, 2013 10:04 PM

Alexia Chambers
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and desire in literature CA02
30 October 2013
Question:
Part III / Chapters 1-3: Where is Winston as this section of the novel opens? What is his number?
Answer:
Winston is in a prison cell his number is 6079

------------------------------

Alexia, you are missing your in-text, parenthetical citation for this answer. Page number(s)?

Posted by: Alexia Chambers at November 1, 2013 12:38 AM

Joe Rulli
Dr. Hobbs
ENG210 CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
1 November 2013

Question 32. What does Winston believe will defeat the Party? Who disagrees with him and why?

Answer: After many days of torture in the Ministry of Love, O'Brien and himself eventually get to have a conversation. A lot is said in this conversation, as Winston and O'Brien are very honest with each other about the Party and O'Brien's betrayal of Winston. Winston believes that the "spirit of man" will overcome the Party's ideology. O'Brien of course disagrees with him strongly on this, saying that the Party is too powerful already.

Posted by: Joe Rulli at November 1, 2013 10:05 AM

Diana Shoemaker
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
1 November 2013

Question: Part III Ch. 1-3: What is the last question that Winston asks O’Brien in Chapter Two/ Part Three? What is O’Brien’s answer? What is the significance of this?

Answer: At the end of Chapter Two Part Three, Winston asks O’Brien “What is in Room 101?” (Orwell 260). O’Brien then answers Winston by saying that Winston knows what is in that room because everyone else does. The novel says “The expression on O’Brien’s face did not change. He answered drily:‘You know what is in Room 101, Winston. Everyone knows what is in Room 101’ (Orwell 260). It is significant and ironic because O’Brien told Winston that he could ask him any question that he wanted, then he did not even answer Winston’s answer completely. It is also stated that life is a riddle. It is almost like Winston has to figure out what is in that room like a riddle.

Posted by: Diana Shoemaker at November 1, 2013 10:15 AM

Salvatore Christlieb
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
Dr. Hobbs
1 November 2013

Question: Why, according to O’Brien, is Winston in the Ministry of Love? What must he do while there? Will he be able to leave? If so, how?
Answer: According to O’Brien, Winston is in the Ministry of Love for not controlling his memories. As O’Brien states, “you have not controlled it. That is what has brought you here. You are here because you have failed in humility, in self-discipline” (Orwell 222). Winston will have the ability to leave only if he becomes sane. O’Brien further states, “You must humble yourself before you can become sane” (Orwell 222). He has to go through the tortuous motions to become a full-fledged believer in the party before he is released into the world. He will be there for as long as it takes.

References
Orwell, George. 1984: A Novel. New York, N.Y., U.S.A.: Harcourt Brace, 1983. Print.

Posted by: Salvatore Christlieb at November 1, 2013 11:31 AM

Deirdre Rowan
Dr. Hobbs
English 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
1 November 2013

Question #8: Review, think about, and then describe Winston’s character in
Nineteen Eighty-Four as it relates to his attitude toward the Party. In what ways might his fatalistic streak contribute to his ultimate
downfall?

Answer: Winston's intense paranoia about the Party eventually catching and punishing him leads him to take unnecessary risks. He firmly believes that the thoughtcrime “DOWN WITH BIG BROTHER” will bring a swarm of the Thought Police because "sooner or later they were bound to get you" (19). Winston decides to write down the rest of his opinion: "theyll shoot me i don’t care theyll shoot me in the back of the neck i dont care down with big brother they always shoot you in the back of the neck i dont care down with big brother ——" (19) because he accepts his grim moira without question.

Posted by: Deirdre Rowan at November 1, 2013 02:33 PM

Morgan Salter
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
4 November 2013

Question: After his first formal meeting with O’Brien, Winston receives a book, ostensibly written by Emmanuel Goldstein. In reading passages from this book, Winston is further enlightened as to “how” the current society came into being. Focus on these passages, and in particular, on the theory of the High, Middle, and Low classes (Orwell 179). If true, what does this theory hold for the proles? Is Winston’s plan for the proles now altered? Why or why not?

Answer: After a formal meeting with O’Brien, Winston receives a book by Emmanuel Goldstein that breaks down how the society came into existence. One particular aspect of this book Winston found especially interesting was the theory of the High, Middle, and Low classes. It was written that “they have been subdivided in many ways, they have borne countless different names, and their relative numbers, as well as their attitude toward one another, have varied from age to age; but the essential structure of society has never altered” (Orwell 184). If this theory is in fact true, Winston’s plan for the proles to overthrow the tyrannical government is now virtually impossible. By law of this philosophy, members of each class are not permitted to advance or change social status; therefore, the proles are restricted to life in the Middle class.

Posted by: Morgan Salter at November 1, 2013 04:51 PM

Dana DeLosa
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01: Love and Desire in Literature
1 November 2013

Question: “Find the section in Part III where O’Brien says “And above all we do not allow the dead to rise up against us.” What does he mean by this? Explain.”

Answer: While torturing Winston, O’Brien being reflecting on history’s mistake of allowing enemies of the regimes to become martyrs (Orwell 255). O’Brien says tell Winston “above all we do not allow the dead to rise up against us” because he intends to scare him into submission (Orwell 256). Further, he wants to make Winston explicitly aware that he “will be annihilated in the past as well as the in the future” (Orwell 256).

Posted by: Dana DeLosa at November 1, 2013 06:51 PM

Lindsey Thilmony
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
31 October 2013

Question: Part III / Chapters 1-3: Why doesn’t The Party simply eliminate rebellious members? Why does it go to all of this trouble? Explain the significance of their stance.

Answer: The Party is power hungry. It goes through all the trouble of torturing humans that disobey the Party because saying you obey is not enough. O’Brien says to Winston,” Power is inflicting pain and humiliation. Power is in tearing human minds to pieces and putting them together again in new shapes of your own choosing” (Orwell).

Posted by: Lindsey Thilmony at November 1, 2013 08:12 PM

Jasmine Charlton
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
1 November 2013

Question: “Describe the role that O’Brien plays in Winston’s life. Why do you think that initially, Winston is drawn to O’Brien? Why does he implicitly trust him? Despite the enormous dangers involved?

Answer: O’Brien played a significant role in Winston's life, not because of his powerful persona, but because they had the same mindset. I saw the tremendous toll O’Brien was taking on Winston when the book said, “a wave of admiration, almost of worship, flowed out from Winston toward O’Brien”[Orwell 155]. Winston was immediately drawn to him because of the fact that he was against the party like he was and because of the powerful rays conveying from him. Winston also immediately trusted O’Brien because like the book says, “ whiles he looks at O’Brien he forgets the shadowy figure of Goldstein because he was focused on O’Brien’s powerful shoulders, and his blunt featured face, so ugly yet so civilized” [Orwell 155]. Lastly he trusted him although the danger was high because he thought it impossible for O’Brien to be defeated due to his persona and stature.

Posted by: jasmine Charlton at November 2, 2013 11:03 AM

Stephanie Gilbert
Dr. Hobbs
ENG-210CL-Love and Desire in Literature-CA01
31, October, 2013


Part III / Chapters 1-3: What does reintegration mean? According to O’Brien, what are the
three stages in Winston’s reintegration? Explain what each stage means.

Answer: Reintegration means a restoration to a unified state. O’Brien’s reintegration rules are learning, understanding, acceptance and learning from what you have done, understanding that it was wrong, and acceptance of you did and that the crime is punishable.

Whole Novel: In the edition of the nineteen eighty-four text ordered for this course, Erich Fromm’s afterword, from pages 280 to 292 describes 1984 as a warning Indeed throughout the text Orwell plants both subtle and overt warnings to the reader what do you think are of the larger issues at hand here?

“Can human nature be changed in such a way that man will forget his longing for freedom, for dignity, for integrity, for love that is to say, can man forget that he is human? (Pg. 284)”

From my anthropological point of view it is not possible for man to forget he is human, however from my philosophical, psychological and religious point of view this is a tricky question. In our society today it would be possible for man to forget he was human because our history shows we have done so many things that are inhumane, unethical, and politically wrong. I believe to an extent that one never forgets he is human; however that can be changed in the hands of a corrupt group of people. It has been seen in religious and political history that even though a person can be corrupt they still feel and know they are human, but with corruption and torture they may act inhuman. Longing for freedom is a human condition, and can be seen in history with the prison camps during the many wars. The prisoners don’t seem to give up their desperate need to be free. The documentaries show the dignity and the love they still have for each other. People who want individualism and freedom must be willing to fight and risk their lives to protect these values. According to Orwell’s description the government still has control over the people. As a society we need to not trust everything we are told and that we need to research for ourselves. So I don’t think human nature can be changed so that man will forget his longings.

Posted by: Stephanie Gilbert at November 3, 2013 10:18 AM

Allison Knipe
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
3 November 2013

Question:12. Whole Novel: Early on in the novel, readers learn of Winston’s belief in the proles as a liberating force. What accounts for Winston’s almost blind faith in the proles? What are some of the characteristics of the proles that, in Winston’s eyes, make them the ultimate means for overthrowing Big Brother?

Winston writes, "If there was hope, it MUST lie in the proles, because only there in those swarming disregarded masses, 85 per cent of the population of Oceania, could the force to destroy the Party ever be generated. The Party coul not be overthrown from within. Its enemies, if it had any enemies, had
no way of coming together or even of identifying one another" (Orwell ebook). He believes that the proles aren't human. There is a way that they can overpower Big Brother.

Posted by: Allison Knipe at November 3, 2013 01:16 PM

Matt Nicholson-Lewis
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
3 November 2013

Question #61: What is Parson’s attitude towards his sweet children, especially his daughter?

Parson is very proud of both his children for the attitudes they portray. His son for his “Mischievous” (Orwell 50) attitude, but it is his daughter who he is most proud of. This is shown when he says “slipped away from the hike, and spent the whole afternoon following a strange man” (Orwell 50). This quote is showing that he extremely proud of his daughter for leaving the group and going after a man who may have done something wrong.

Posted by: Matt Nicholson-Lewis at November 3, 2013 02:08 PM

Matt Nicholson-Lewis
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
3 November 2013

Question #114: At what does Julia throw her shoe at? Why?

Julia throws her shoe at “A rat” (Orwell 126). The reason she throw her shoe was it was very close to her, and also because she saw “him stick his beastly nose out of the wainscoting.” (Orwell 127).

Posted by: matt Nicholson-Lewis at November 3, 2013 02:53 PM

Matt Nicholson-Lewis
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
3 November 2013

Question #16: What was the Inquisition? What does O’Brien say was the errors of the Inquisition? How has it been corrected, in his opinion?

The inquisition “set out to eradicate heresy, and ended by perpetuating it.” (Orwell 226). The reason it failed according to O’Brien was that it “killed its enemies in the open, and killed them why they were still unrepentant” (Orwell 226). This is explaining why the government in this story keep everything as quiet as possible.

Posted by: matt Nicholson-Lewis at November 3, 2013 04:49 PM

Matt Nicholson-Lewis
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
3 November 2013

Question #9: Discuss Winston as a heroic figure. What qualities do conventional heroes usually possess. Now, consider Winston. What qualities does Winston possess that could define him as a hero? Are there conventional heroes in the story, or not? If not, why? If so, who?

Heroes have many traits, but the main traits are there willingness to sacrifice themselves to safe others. Winston has some traits of a hero in his curiosity of the government, and his drive to join the “brotherhood”. However, his attitude at the end of the book does not have the traits of a hero. In some ways he is similar to Frodo off “Lord Of The Rings”, in how eventually the great power eventually breaks him down, and you realize that he never really stood a chance to stand against the one true power. Winston shows this when he says “Do it to Julia! Do it to Julia! Not me!” (Orwell 256). This is Winston giving upon his heroic journey, and when the government has finally breaks him.

Posted by: Matt Nicholson-Lewis at November 3, 2013 06:21 PM

Maria Benkirane

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 210 CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature

3 Novembre 2013

Question: During Winston;s interrogation, O'Brien explains that whereas preceding totalitarian regimes ha failed, The party was truly successful in its consolidation of power (Orwell 226). How, according to O'brien, does the party as an oligarchy differ from Nazism or Russian Communism? how does he define the role of the martyr, both in terms of The party and the other totalitarian systems?

Answer: According to O'brien, the party as an oligarchy differs from Nazism and Russian communism because the Russian acted more harshly and violently towards heresy. Orwell described the way the russians acted saying, " before they exposed their victims to public trial, they deliberately set themselves to destroy their dignity. They wore them down by torture and solitude until they were despicable , cringing wretches, confessing whatever was put into their mouths, covering themselves with abuse [ . . . ] the dead med had become Martyrs and their degradation was forgotten (Orwell 226). The party has made their system better, because they know how to get rid of their enemies without turning them into Martyrs. O'Brien says that they do not let that happen here. they do not let them confess something that is not true. They make them true and they do not allow any of the dead man to haunt them back and revolt against them.

Posted by: maria benkirane at November 3, 2013 06:39 PM

Jalisa Lowe
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
1 November 2013

Question: What reason does O’Brien give for Winston’s bring brought to the Ministry of Love? Explain. Why is this significant?

Answer: When Winston was asked why people are brought to the Ministry of Love, he answers, “To make them confess” (Orwell 225). O’Brien explains to Winston that he is wrong and for him to guess again. Winston try’s again, and this time he says, “To punish them” (Orwell 225). O’Brien becomes furious and shouts “No! Not merely to extract your confession, nor to punish you” (Orwell 225). O’Brien explains to Winston that he is brought there to be cured. O’Brien states, “Shall I tell you why we have brought you here? To cure you! To make you sane!” (Orwell 225). O’Brien tells Winston they do not care about the things he has done. They only cared about curing him. O’Brien explains to Winston that everyone who leaves the Ministry of Love leaves being cured. (Orwell 225) This is significant because not too long ago O’Brien explained to Winston that he was on Winston’s side and that Big Brother had to be overthrown. O’Brien obviously lied to Winston just so Winston could trust him, and confess to all the crimes he committed to O’ Brien.

Posted by: Jalisa Lowe at November 3, 2013 06:49 PM

Jalisa Lowe
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
4 November 2013

Question: Early on in the novel, readers learn of Winston’s belief in the proles as a liberating force. What accounts for Winston’s almost blind faith in the proles? What are some of the characteristics of the proles that, in Winston’s eyes, make them the ultimate means for overthrowing Big Brother?

Answer: Winston seemed blind to the true intentions of the proles when he confessed everything to O’Brien when he went over to his house. He believed O’Brien was against Big Brother. When Winston was, sent to the Ministry of Love he believed the reason him and Julia was caught was because they overslept; when it was O’Brien who turned them in. When Winston was at the Ministry of Love he thought of O’Brien more than he thought of Julia. He loved O’Brien and believed O’Brien was on his side until he realized O’Brien was the cause for his capture. Winston states, “It was O’Brien who was directing everything. It was he who set the guards onto Winston and who prevented them from killing him. It was he who decided when Winston should scream with pain, when he should have a respite, when he should be fed, when he should sleep, when the drugs should be pumped into his arm. It was he who asked the questions and suggested the answers. He was the tormentor, he was the protector, he was the inquisitor, he was the friend” Orwell 217). Winston believed the proles could overthrow Big Brother because they are the ones who know the exact truth. They know whether Big Brother exists, and the truth to it all.

Posted by: Jalisa Lowe at November 3, 2013 06:58 PM

Alexia Chambers
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and desire in literature CA02
3 November 2013
Question:
15. Whole Novel: During Winston’s interrogation, O’Brien explains that whereas preceding totalitarian regimes had failed, The Party was truly successful in its consolidation of power (Orwell 226). How, according to O’Brien, does the The Party as an oligarchy differ from Nazism or Russian Communism? How does he define the role of the martyr, both in terms of The Party and the other totalitarian systems?
Answer:
O’Brien says they are different because all other totalitarian groups would kill in front of the public and make martyrs out of the victims The Party does the opposite they kill in secret away from the public eye and make everyone believe the person that was killed never existed. This way people cannot try and rise against The Party because they don’t know what is happening. “The first thing for you to understand is that in this place there are no martyrdoms. You have read of the religious persecutions of the past. In the Middle Ages there was the Inquisitlon. It was a failure. It set out to eradicate heresy, and ended by perpetuating it. For every heretic it burned at the stake, thousands of others rose up. Why was that? Because the Inquisition killed its enemies in the open…Naturally all the glory belonged to the victim and all the shame to the Inquisitor who burned him.”

Posted by: Alexia Chambers at November 3, 2013 08:00 PM

Erica Bodden
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
3 November 2013

Question: Why has Winston been so busy? What is the purpose of this/why is this significant?
Answer: Winston is now a member of the Brotherhood. The Brotherhood is the secret organization founded by the ideas and beliefs of Goldstein. After finally getting conformation that O’Brein is one of them. Winston’s new mission is to take orders from the Brotherhood now. O’Brein informs him that his new oath entails, “That you will be fighting in the dark. You will always be in the dark”(Orwell,174). Winston now has the copy of Goldstein book.

Posted by: Erica Bodden at November 3, 2013 08:03 PM

Erica Bodden
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
3 November 2013

Question: If the purpose of torture at the Ministry of Love is not to obtain confessions alone, what is the true purpose? Why is this significant? Explain.
Answer: According to O’Brien the purpose of the Ministry of Love is not to torture and collect confessions. O’Brien states, “We do not merely destroy our enemies; we change them”(Orwell,253). The Ministry aims to wash the minds free of all thoughts, until the only thing left are empty shells. The significance of cleaning the mind is to gain complete obedience to the party, O’Brein tells Winston “When finally you surrender to us it must be of your own free will”(Orwell,255). Therefore torture is not merely physical but mainly focusing on changing and influencing the inner mind. O’Brein tortured Winston until he believed 2+2 was 4 and not 5 because he said so and not because it was logical.

Posted by: Erica Bodden at November 3, 2013 08:33 PM

Erica Bodden
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
3 November 2013

Question: Discuss the significance and nature of Winston’s dreams. Dissect/Deconstruct the dream wherein O’Brien claims that they “shall meet in a place where there is no darkness” (Orwell 22), and the dream in which Winston’s mother and sister disappear (Orwell 26). What are the underpinnings of these dreams? What deeper meanings do they hold? Why do you think the author devotes as much time as he does to Winston’s dreams?

Answer: Throughout the novel the mention of Winston’s occurring dreams is used to display an important source of information Orwell wants his readers to comprehend. The first dream mentioned is his dream about O’Brien. This reoccurring dream has taken place in the time span of seven years, always in the same place, always hearing the same voice, and saying the same thing. The voice says to him, “We shall meet in the place where is no darkness” (Orwell, 25). Winston believes the voice is O’Brien’s. Winston at the time had no idea the meaning behind these dreams until it finally occurred. He did in fact meet O’Brien in the place where there is no darkness; also known as the Ministry of Love. Winston’s dream about O’Brien could have been a foreshadowing of him being caught by the Thought police. His hatred toward the party could have triggered this dream because there is no safe place one can hide out.
On the other hand, Winston’s dream about his mother have been distorted through the years of living in the lies of Big Brother. Whether his dreams were actual memories or fictional accounts are not clear. Winston had a dream that his mother and sister were sinking into the unknown and it was all his fault. These dreams surfaced from the guilt for leaving his family and never knowing what happened to them. He once had a family that he only remembers subconsciously because the party does not stand for love. The party stands for,” a World of fear and treachery and torment, a world of trampling and being trampled upon, a world which will grow not less but more merciless as it refines itself” (Orwell, 267).

Posted by: Erica Bodden at November 3, 2013 09:21 PM

Connor Schaefer
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL- CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
1 November 2013
Question: Why, according to O’Brien, is Winston in the Ministry of Love? What must he do while there? Will he be able to leave? If so, how?
Answer: The principal reason why Winston is in the Ministry of Love is to be cured. He is also they to be made sane. O’Brien states, “We do not merely destroy our enemies; we change them”(Orwell 226). O’Brien is explaining to Winston that when they capture someone that is considered an enemy they do not harm them in any way. They are trying to help the enemy. While he is at the Ministry of Love, he will be getting treatments to be cured. The interrogation is an example of a treatment. Winston will get to leave eventually. He will only get to leave if they feel that he has been cured and is sane. He will have to stay at the Ministry of Love until then. That is why Winston is at the Ministry of Love.

Posted by: Connor Schaefer at November 3, 2013 09:23 PM

Connor Schaefer
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL- CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
1 November 2013
Question: Why, according to O’Brien, is Winston in the Ministry of Love? What must he do while there? Will he be able to leave? If so, how?
Answer: The principal reason why Winston is in the Ministry of Love is to be cured. He is also they to be made sane. O’Brien states, “We do not merely destroy our enemies; we change them”(Orwell 226). O’Brien is explaining to Winston that when they capture someone that is considered an enemy they do not harm them in any way. They are trying to help the enemy. While he is at the Ministry of Love, he will be getting treatments to be cured. The interrogation is an example of a treatment. Winston will get to leave eventually. He will only get to leave if they feel that he has been cured and is sane. He will have to stay at the Ministry of Love until then. That is why Winston is at the Ministry of Love.

Posted by: Connor Schaefer at November 3, 2013 09:23 PM

Destiny Hubbard
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
3 November 2013

Question: What happens to memory and history in the novel, Nineteen Eighty-Four?
Answer: In Nineteen Eighty-Four, memory is erased from every textbook and history is rewritten to go with more recent events: “You remembered huge events which had quite probably not happened. . . and there were long blank periods to which you could assign nothing” (Orwell 28).

Posted by: Destiny Hubbard at November 3, 2013 10:07 PM

Destiny Hubbard
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
3 November 2013
Question: What happened to the leaders of the revolution by 1960?
Answer: All of the leaders were either eliminated or brainwashed due to their views that stood directly in opposition of Big Brother. The only leader to not be “wiped out once and for all” was Big Brother (Orwell 75).

Posted by: Destiny Hubbard at November 3, 2013 10:08 PM

Destiny Hubbard
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
3 November 2013
Question: Does Julia arrange for more meetings? Why or why not?
Answer: Julia arranges more meetings with Winston in the City in “a place where they could meet after work” (Orwell 212). The party did not allow for sex between the people because they wanted the people to be frustrated and have all their love to be put toward Big Brother.

Posted by: Destiny Hubbard at November 3, 2013 10:08 PM

Vera Smirnova
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
03 November 2013

Question #2: In Nineteen Eighty-Four, what technologies are available? How does technology affect the Party’s ability to control its citizens? In what ways does the Party employ technology throughout the narrative? Explain the implications.

The technology plays an important role throughout the story. The central goal of the technology is to control the people. The cameras are everywhere. Even in the forest you can be heard, and your voice would be identified. Any suspicious move would make you a rebellious person, and you would be vaporized. The helicopters are snooping to the windows. The Party uses technology to change the news, language, and history. Big Brother controls everything, and technology is his tool.

Posted by: Vera Smirnova at November 3, 2013 10:42 PM

Lydia R Santana
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desires in Literature
21 October 2013

Question Part 1/ Chapter 2:What is the bad news on the telescreen?

Answer: The bad news is that the chocolate rations would be reduced from thirty grams to twenty. This is stated on page 26, "Bad news coming, thought Winston. And sure enough, following gory description of the annihilation of a Eurasia army, with stupendous figures killed and prisoners, came the announcement that as from next week, the chocolate ration would be reduced from thirty grams to twenty"(Orwell 26).

Posted by: Lydia Santana at November 3, 2013 11:27 PM

Camila Pinzon
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
29 October 2013

Question: Whole Novel: Given Winston’s own acknowledgment that he is under constant surveillance, and that it would only be a matter of time before the Thought Police caught him, no one in his world could be trusted. Prior to his capture, which character or characters did you envision as betraying Winston? How did you foresee his ultimate demise? Did you, on the contrary, feel that by some chance he would overcome the forces aligned against him, and fulfill his wish to conquer The Party?

Answer: During my time reading George Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty-four through the University of Adelaide’s Kindle version, I was first put off by the impression that Winston would slip up whether it be through facecrime as he thought in front of Parson or his sneaky remorseless children. Parson said it himself to Winston during the work lunch hour how proud he was of his children’s training, learning, and skills. “That’s a first-rate training they give them in the Spies nowadays [. . .] What d’you think’s the latest thing they’ve served them you with? Ear trumpets for listening through keyholes! My little girl brought one home the other night – tried it out on our sitting-room door, and reckoned she could hear twice as much as with her ear to the hole. Of course it’s only a toy, mind you. Still, gives ‘em the right idea, eh?” (Loc 989). I gave much credit to those children of Parsons’ with their quick wits to uncover traitors of The Party, especially since they neighbored Winston’s apartment.

Ultimately, I pictured Winston surviving his journey in discovering the truth and at least make some progress in defeating The Party. During his time with Julie and their secret sessions in the room above Mr. Charrington’s shop, I had hope that Winston would live out his days with his true love. It seemed they had it all figured out with their secretive meetings and even spoiling each other. For instance, Julie managed to smuggle riches from the Inner Party and was ready to share with Winston. “Real sugar. Not saccharine, sugar. And here’s a loaf of bread – proper white bread, not our bloody stuff – and a little pot of jam. And here’s a tin of milk” (Loc 2181). While reading this, I saw a glimmer of hope in their wretched reality. Julie was able locate real “luxuries,” such as sugar and bread. Hence, it must be foreshadowing to a hopeful future where they will locate real “facts” which are so rare for them. They will be able to discover others like them who believe in love, they may even recruit a few good friends and not comrades; the same way Julie gathered her goodies from the Inner Party.


Work Cited:
Orwell, George. Nineteen Eighty-Four. South Australia: Creative Commons Licence, n.d. University of Adelaide, 7 Feb. 2013. Web. 22 Oct. 2013.

Posted by: camila pinzon at November 4, 2013 01:48 AM

Dana DeLosa
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01: Love and Desire in Literature
04 November 2013

Question: “Whole Novel: From her first appearance as “the dark-haired girl,” through to the end of the novel, Julia is a key figure in Nineteen Eighty-Four. Trace the path of Julia in relation to Winston’s life; in what ways does she influence him? Did you trust her, initially? Overall, do you feel she had a positive or negative impact upon him? As with ALL homework questions for this course, use quoted passages from the actual text (with MLA in-text/parenthetical citations) to support your answer; No drop quotes. All quoted material must have a proper lead-in device and a lead out statement.”

Answer: When the novel begins, the relationship between Winston and Julia cannot be described as a friendship, let alone a romantic involvement. Winston first loathes the sight of Julia because he believes she works for the Thought Police as an amateur spy and is going to report him for his face and thought crime (Orwell 61). Upon seeing her in the bar Winston feels a “horrible pang of terror” (Orwell 61). As the novel progress however their relationship evolves. One day when the two meet again, Julia falls on and reinjures her arm; Winston, despite his internal debate, offers her his arm to help her (Orwell 106). During this interaction, Julia gives Winston a note that she, “I love you” (Orwell 108). This sparks the pairs relationship. Winston and Julia later arrange a meeting outside of town so that they can engage in coitus (Orwell 120). During this meeting the pair begin to fall in love. Finally, in the end of the novel the pair join the Brotherhood together and refuse “separate and never see each other again” (Orwell 173). Initially Orwell portrays Julia in a way that leads them to believe she is untrustworthy; however throughout the novel she is shown as helping Winston to become emboldened and ultimately helps him to join the rebellion.

Posted by: Dana DeLosa at November 4, 2013 08:48 AM

McKenzie Burns
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 Love and Desire in Literature CA01
4 November 2013

Question #100: Part 2 / Chapter 1: What does the girl’s note to Winston say? Is this a surprise turn in the story, thus far? Why, or why not? How does Winston feel about it?

Answer:The girl's not to Winston says "I love you" (Orwell 95). Yes it is a surprise turn in the story because Winston is thinking that she is part of the Thought Police or of the Brotherhood. He has suspected her to be a spy and this note meant death to him. Winston was very stunned to have read the words I love you in the note. He had to be careful with showing his interest because it was too dangerous to do otherwise.

Posted by: McKenzie Burns at November 4, 2013 08:49 AM

Hector M. Rosario
ENG 210CL CA01
Professor Hobbs

6) What is Big Brother? What role does Big Brother play in Nineteen Eighty-Four? What effect does he/it have on Winston? Is Winston's obsession with Big Brother fundamentally similar to or different with his obsession with O'Brien. Explain.

According to Winston, "Big Brother is the embodiment of the Party" (Orwell, page 259). They are the "law" in Oceania and control the population. Big Brother's role in the novel is to keep the people in check, making sure there is no resistance to the rule of the Party. His obsession with Big Brother is similar to that of his with O'Brien, which began with the dream about the place where there is no darkness. He ultimately dug to deep which also happened with his obsession with Big Brother.

Posted by: Hector Rosario at November 4, 2013 09:42 AM

Jocelyne Hilary
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature

4th November 203

Question: Part 1-Chapter 8 “How does one’s own body betray a person?”

Answer:
An individual’s body can betray them through not being able to perform when most needed. It is mentioned that at the time at which you should be at your best, or requiring all your will, your body can go into a state of inertia by freezing. This is not convenient and a betrayal on the behalf of your body because, although you have the mental and spiritual will, the physical will doesn’t allow this to be demonstrated.

Posted by: Jocelyne Hilary at November 4, 2013 10:50 AM

Matt Nicholson-Lewis
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
3 November 2013

Question #16: What was the Inquisition? What does O’Brien say was the errors of the Inquisition? How has it been corrected, in his opinion?

The inquisition “set out to eradicate heresy, and ended by perpetuating it.” (Orwell 226). The reason it failed according to O’Brien was that it “killed its enemies in the open, and killed them why they were still unrepentant” (Orwell 226). This is explaining why the government in this story keep everything as quiet as possible.

Posted by: Matt Nicholson-Lewis at November 4, 2013 11:07 AM

Salvatore Christlieb
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
Dr. Hobbs
4 November 2013

Question: Whole Novel: Discuss Winston as a heroic figure. What qualities do conventional heroes usually possess? Now, consider Winston. What qualities does Winston possess that could define him as hero? Are there any conventional heroes in this story, or not? If not, why? If so, who (and why)? As with ALL homework questions for this course, use quoted passages from the actual text (with MLA in-text/parenthetical citations) to support your answer; No drop quotes. All quoted material must have a proper lead-in device and a lead out statement.


Answer: Conventional heroes are characters that are good until the end of a novel or story. They follow through with their plan and they are not conflicted. Winston is not the conventional hero because he contradicts himself, his beliefs, and he accuses his loved one, Julia, of being evil and tempting. Winston ultimately falls into loyalty of Big Brother at the end of 1984. O’Brien, the inner party member who was watching Winston, converts Winston to be loyal to Big Brother. Once Winston was in the Ministry of Love, he was tortured and O’Brien transformed his beliefs because he thinking and participating in thought crime. There are no heroes in this novel because no characters are fully good with single beliefs unchanged. Characters such as Julia break the law constantly and it is looked down upon by the Party but, it is not by Winston. However, Winston may think she is awesome for breaking the law, but, he cannot do it himself without questioning his actions. For instance, when Winston goes to see the old man who sold the diary to him, Winston has an argument with himself and is conflicted about seeing the old man. He was not going to break any law but, he was scared he was to be accused of doing so. As the narrator explains, “hurriedly, lest he should have time to become frightened, he descended the steps and crossed the narrow street. It was madness, of course. As usual, there was no definite rule against talking to proles...but it was far too unusual an action to pass unnoticed” (Orwell 77). Moving on to the matter of Julia, Winston was sold out by Julia as O’Brien states, “she betrayed you, Winston. Immediately” (Orwell 231). Julia lost her beliefs and she cannot be argued as a hero for doing so. Therefore, no main characters are heroes within this novel.

References
Orwell, George. 1984: A Novel. New York, N.Y., U.S.A.: Harcourt Brace, 1983. Print.

Posted by: Salvatore Christlieb at November 4, 2013 11:12 AM

Allison Knipe
Anastasia Delgado
Jasmine Collins
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
4 November 2013

Question: 20. . Whole Novel: During his final encounter with O’Brien, Winston argues that, if all else fails, the inherent nature of the individual-the “spirit of man”-is strong enough to
undermine a society such as that created by The Party. Do you agree or disagree with
this statement? Is Winston’s belief applicable to the world we live in today? Can you
cite examples in our own recent history that support or dismiss Winston’s belief in the
resiliency and righteousness of the human spirit? What are they?

Our group disagrees with this statement because throughout the novel, the "spirit of man" is lost. The Party tries and succeeds in wiping the spirit of man from individuals. Examples in our own recent history is the passing of bills and laws that many people do not agree this. This is going against their spirit of man and sense of individuality and survival. Even Winston gets his spirit wiped by the end of the novel. His survival and spirit remains strong up until the end of the novel. In the end, "He loved Big Brother" (Orwell 266). Throughout the novel, he fought and fought but his spirit was not strong enough to overpower The Party.

Posted by: Allison Knipe at November 4, 2013 11:13 AM

Jocelyne Hilary
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature

4th November 203

Question: 121. Part 2 / Chapter 5: Does Julia believe in Goldstein? Why, or why not?

Answer:
Julia does not believe in Goldstein, she believes that his tales are fictional and that they “were simply a lot of rubbish “ (pg 126). Julia cannot bring herself up to believe in Goldstein’s tale , because she believes that the party had made all of it up for their selfish motives and trying to force everyone to believe in this idea too. The possibility of an opposition organization even existing is an absurd idea to Julia, hence why she completely brushes off what Goldstein had shared.

Posted by: Jocelyne Hilary at November 4, 2013 11:13 AM

Diana Shoemaker
Camila Pinzon
Ashley Johnson
Lauren Rhodes
Group 4
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
4 November 2013

Question 20. Whole Novel: During his final encounter with O’Brien, Winston argues that, if all else fails, the inherent nature of the individual-the “spirit of man”-is strong enough to undermine a society such as that created by The Party. Do you agree or disagree with this statement? Is Winston’s belief applicable to the world we live in today? Can you cite examples in our own recent history that support or dismiss Winston’s belief in the resiliency and righteousness of the human spirit? What are they? As with ALL homework questions for this course, use quoted passages from the actual text (with MLA in-text/parenthetical citations) to support your answer; No drop quotes. All quoted material must have a proper lead-in device and a lead out statement.

Answer: In regards to Winston’s belief that the “spirit of man” is strong enough to undermine a society such as that created by The Party, we disagree that the “spirit of man” is enough. Winston believed that if he was strong enough, clever enough, and he could eventually overthrow the government and allow for human kind to be able to think for themselves. Winston’s belief can be applicable in the world that we live in today, but that does not always mean that it will be enough and we can come across situations similar to Winston’s where it is not enough. A recent example would be when the government shut down, no matter how many Americans wanted the government to open up even if it was more people than who were actually in charge (like The Party) they could not change what was happening. Winston had failed to overthrow the Party when O’Brien showed Winston what he had done to himself, “This is what you accepted when you set yourself up against the Party. It was all contained in that first act. Nothing has happened that you did not foresee” (Orwell 273). O’Brien stated that Winston knew from the start that Winston would not be able to overthrow something has strong and powerful as the government.

Posted by: Diana Shoemaker at November 4, 2013 12:07 PM

Diana Shoemaker
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
4 November 2013

Question: 24. Whole Novel: Refer back to Winston’s conversation with the old man at the pub (Orwell 78). Why is Winston so determined in his approach to the old man? What is Winston hoping to learn from him? Was he successful? Why, or why not?

Answer: Winston is determined to have a conversation with the old man at the pub because he probably knows about the past due to his age. Winston wanted to learn about the past in hopes that what the Party is saying about the past is false and he could get the true history before the Party changed the history to what they wanted it to be. He was unsuccessful because the man barely remembers. The novel explains Winston’s feelings by stating “A sense of helplessness took hold of Winston. The old man’s memory was nothing but a rubbish heap of details” (Orwell 92). This quotation shows how the old man could not remember exactly what the past was like and Winston was unsuccessful because of it.

Posted by: Diana Shoemaker at November 4, 2013 01:27 PM

Connor Schaefer
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL- CA01 Love and Desire in Literature
4 November 2013

Question: Discuss the idea of Room 101 in Nineteen Eighty-Four, the place where everyone meets his or her worst fear. Keeping in mind that, for most of Winston’s time at the Ministry of Love, he does not know what he will find in Room 101. What role does that uncertainty play in making Room 101 frightening? Does the cage of rats break Winston’s spirit, or does it merely play a symbolic role? Explain.

Answer: Room 101 is not described throughout most of the book. It comes into play in the third part of the book. The room does not have a description for the most part. Winston does not know what is in the room so that make him feel like the room is even worse than it could be. I think the cage of rats did break Winston because he brings Julia into the picture now. He says,“ Do it to Julia! Do it to Julia! Not me! Julia! I don’t care what you do to her. Tear her face off, strip her to the bones. Not me! Julia! Not me!” (Orwell 256). Here, Winston does not want to get eating alive. He thinks Julia should get eaten alive then himself. The rats scare Winston to the point that he does not want to go through the pain. This could show how his spirit has been broken.

Posted by: Connor Schaefer at November 4, 2013 04:23 PM

Jordan Dadez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
04 November 2013

Question: Give Winston’s own acknowledgement that is under constant surveillance, and that it would only be a matter of time before the Though Police caught him, no on in his world could be trusted. Prior to his capture, which character or characters did you envision as betraying Winston? How did you foresee his ultimate demise? Did you, on the contrary, feel that by some chance he would overcome the forces aligned against him, and fulfill his wish to conquer The Party?

Answer: Before I finished the novel, the character that I envisioned giving Winston Smith away was Julia. Even though she tells him that she hates the Party, I still suspected her as being a member of the Thought Police, especially when she sent him the note; however, my suspicions quickly changed when O’Brien suddenly took an interest in Winston. He gives Winston his address, and by doing so, he implants in Winston’s mind an implied secret message. Winston and Julia show up to his house, and O’Brien describes to them what will happen in their mission. The whole speech conveys a message of hopelessness against the Party. I knew it was O’Brien when he says, “You will work for a while, you will be caught, you will confess, and then you will die. [. . .] We can only spread our knowledge outwards from individual to individual, generation after generation” (Orwell 156). He outlines what is going to happen to Winston and Julia, but last statement does not make sense. If every person that is part of the Brotherhood will be caught, will confess, and be put to death, then the knowledge cannot ever spread from individual to individual, let alone a generation. No one is surviving to spread the knowledge. Winston should have been smart enough to catch on to the flaw in his logic, but he was so enamored to fight back that he walked straight into O’Brien’s trap.

Posted by: Jordan Dadez at November 4, 2013 08:42 PM

Jocelyne Hilary
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature

4th November 203

Question: "Compare Ampleforth's and Parson's reactions to their arrests. Difference?"

Answer: The main difference in the reactions of the two above characters, is the fact that one knows he is guilty and accepts it, whereas the other is arrested and he isn't even aware of his crime.

Ampleforth comes to the realization that he is responsible for the one crime he thinks exists, thought crime. Ampleforth realizes he is guilty of this crime because he had mentioned God in his poem.

On the contrary, Parson is oblivious as to why he has been arrested. He has no recollection of the crime he supposedly committed. Parson convinces himself that he is responsible for it somehow and accepts that he will be punished. He hopes that the party punishes him fairly with, whatever is deemed fit for the crime he can’t remember to have committed.

Posted by: Jocelyne Hilary at November 4, 2013 10:11 PM

Kaitlin Millner
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL - Love & Desire
November 5, 2013

#25.Part III Chapter 1-3

Question: What is Winston's attitude towards O'Brien during this part of the story.

I believe that Winston's attitude towards O'Brien during this part of the story is excitement. This can be proven from when Winston hears O’Brien’s voice promise to meet him “in the place where there is no darkness.” This help Winston look forward to his feature. Both Winston and O'Brien gain a special kinda of relationship towards eachother.

Posted by: kaitlin.millner at November 5, 2013 01:07 PM

Regina Green
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
5 November 2013

Question: How does Winston react to the first pain he suffers? Why? What is his original intent?

Answer: When the guard first hit Winston in the elbow, he immediately fell to the floor. Orwell says, "One question at any rate was answered. Never, for any reason on earth, could you wish for an increase of pain" (239). All Winston wanted was for the pain to stop. Winston originally thought he would be able to handle whatever they were going to do to him but, he did not realize what was really coming his way.

Posted by: Regina Green at November 5, 2013 01:12 PM

Kaitlin Millner
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL-Love and Desire
5 November 2013

Question 119. Part II chapter 5: Do Julia and Winston meet during the month of June? Why or why not?

No, Julia and Winston do not meet during the month of June. They meet one day when Winston is walking towards the mens room and see's tall Julia who has fallen. He falls in love right away and gets to know her more.

Posted by: kaitlin.millner at November 5, 2013 01:47 PM

Kaitlin Millner
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210 CL-Love & Desire
5 Novemeber 2013

Question: 70. Part 1/Chapter 7: According to Winston, where does the only hope lye?

"If there is hope {wrote Winston} it lies in the proles"- Winston wrote. If there was hope, it must lie in the proles, only because only there in those swarming disregarded masses, eighty-five per cent of the population of Oceania, could force to destroy the Party ever be generated.

Posted by: kaitlin.millner at November 5, 2013 01:57 PM

Kaitlin Millner
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL-Love and Desire
5 November 2013

Question 10: Whole Novel: Compare and contrast these other character's in Winston's world: Parson, Syme, Obrien.

O’Brien - A mysterious, powerful, and sophisticated member of the Inner Party whom Winston believes is also a member of the Brotherhood, the legendary group of anti-Party rebels.

Syme - An intelligent, outgoing man who works with Winston at the Ministry of Truth. Syme specializes in language. As the novel opens, he is working on a new edition of the Newspeak dictionary. Winston believes Syme is too intelligent to stay in the Party’s favor.

Parsons - A fat, obnoxious, and dull Party member who lives near Winston and works at the Ministry of Truth. He has a dull wife and a group of suspicious, ill-mannered children who are members of the Junior Spies.

Posted by: kaitlin.millner at November 5, 2013 02:09 PM

Kelly Scott
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
21 October 2013

Question: How does the Party destroy history and maintain power?

Answer: The Party destroys history by disposing of documents. It is Winston’s job to sit in a cubicle and put old documents, which no longer have meaning in the eyes of the Party, in a hole that diminishes them forever. The holes were described as, “When one knew that any document was due for destruction, or when one saw a scrap of waste paper lying about, it was an automatic action to lift the flap of the nearest memory hole and drop it in, whereupon it would be whirled away on a current of warm air to the enormous furnaces which were hidden somewhere in the recesses of the building” (Orwell, 33). It was also Winston’s job to “alter” history to meld with what Big Brother thought was fitting and true. Big Brother and the Party have complete control and power over the area through Newspeak words, brainwashing through telescreens, altering history, and destroying the past through mechanisms such as the memory holes.

Posted by: Kelly Scott at November 5, 2013 02:56 PM

Kelly Scott
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
23 October 2013

Question: What does Winston think when he sees the dark-haired girl outside Mr. Charrington’s shop?

Answer: Winston becomes paralyzed when he first sees the dark-haired girl outside Mr. Charrington’s shop. Soon after, he stormed away so feverously that he hadn’t even realized he was walking in the wrong direction. Winston’s thoughts were described as, “There was no doubting any longer that the girl was spying on him. She must have followed him here, because it was not credible that by pure chance she should have happened to be walking on the same evening up the same obscure back street, kilometers distant from any quarter where Party members lived” (Orwell, 89). This scene drove him to the point where he considered smashing her head in with a cobblestone.

Posted by: Kelly Scott at November 5, 2013 02:57 PM

Kelly Scott
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
25 October 2013

Question: When Julia arrives, what does she have in her bag?

Answer: When Julia arrived at the room, she was carrying a tool bag. When she revealed what was in her bag, first were spanners, or wrenches, and a screwdriver. These were probably in the bag to disguise what was underneath as she walked through the town. Underneath the tools lay packets of paper. She explained what was in them, “Real sugar. Not saccharine, sugar. And here’s a loaf of bread – proper white bread, not our bloody stuff – and a little pot of jam. And here’s a tin of milk” (Orwell, 124). She had smuggled in all of this food for them. She was mostly proud that she snuck a kilo of Inner Party coffee to Winston. Also, she brought tea. She was proud to say it was real tea, not blackberry leaves.

Posted by: Kelly Scott at November 5, 2013 02:57 PM

Kelly Scott
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
28 October 2013

Question: What has happened to the word “science”? What is the purpose of this/why is it significant?

Answer: The word “science” does not exist in terms of Newspeak. Science was an old term that was to be forgotten about. It is described in chapter nine of Book two as, “The empirical thought, on which all scientific achievements of the past were founded, is opposed to the most fundamental principles of Ingsoc” (Orwell, 171). Science would not match up with this political ideology, known as Ingsoc. The Party controls everything by ridding the area of information that does not match up with their theories or “truths,” which is why “science” no longer exists.

Posted by: Kelly Scott at November 5, 2013 02:58 PM

Kelly Scott
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
30 October 2013

Question: Find the section in Part III where O’Brien says “And above all, we do not allow the dead to rise against us.” What does he mean by this?

Answer: It is in chapter two of Part III that O’Brien states, “And above all, we do not allow the dead to rise against us” (Orwell, 227). He states this because he does not want Winston to dwell on memories of history. O’Brien states, “You will be lifted clean out from the stream of history. We shall turn you into gas and pour you into the stratosphere. Nothing will remain of you: not a name in a register, not a memory in a living brain. You will be annihilated in the past as well as in the future. You will never have existed” (Orwell, 227). The people in this time are not allowed to have any thoughts about the past, which the Party disagrees with or does not match up with what the Party sees as truth. People from the past are not going to have anything to do with the future whatsoever. This is why O’Brien states that Winston will be destroyed from the past and the future. Once people are gone, they never have anything to do with current times again. History will not dwell on in the future – it will have ceased to exist.

Posted by: Kelly Scott at November 5, 2013 02:59 PM

Kelly Scott
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
1 November 2013

Question: After his first formal meeting with O’Brien, Winston receives a book, ostensibly written by Emanuel Goldstein. In reading passages from this book, Winston is further enlightened as to “how” the current society came into being. Focus on these passages, and in particular, on the theory of High, Middle, and Low classes (Orwell, 179). If true, what does this theory hold for the proles? Is Winston’s plan for the proles now altered? Why or why not?

Answer: In chapter nine of Book II, a passage from Goldstein’s book reads, “The aims of these three groups are entirely irreconcilable. The aim of the High is to remain where they are. The aim of the Middle is to change places with the High. The aim of the Low, when they have an aim – for it is an abiding characteristic of the Low that they are too much crushed by drudgery to be more than intermittently conscious of anything outside their daily lives – is to abolish all distinctions and create a society in which all men shall be equal” (Orwell, 179). The proles are the low men on the totem pole when it comes to this way of life. The Inner Party and Outer Party are above them, but Winston believes that someday the proles could rise above them. The proles, in Winston’s eyes, are still human and possess human emotions. If Goldstein’s book is true, then the proles really do not stand a chance against the Party. It is stated in the book, “Of the three groups, only the Low are never even temporarily successful in achieving their aims” (Orwell, 179). It is also stated, “Below that [Outer Party] come the dumb masses whom we habitually refer to as ‘the proles,’ numbering perhaps eight five percent of the population. In the terms of our earlier classification, the proles are the Low, for the slave populations of the equatorial lands, who pass constantly from conqueror to conqueror, are not a permanent or necessary part of the structure” (Orwell, 185). This chapter in Goldtein’s book gave Winston no “new knowledge.” It only reworded what it was that Winston already knew. Winston believes that sanity is not statistical. It is described as, “There was a truth and there was an untruth, and if you clung to the truth even against the whole world, you were not mad” (Orwell, 193).

Posted by: Kelly Scott at November 5, 2013 02:59 PM

Lindsey Thilmony
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
5 November 2013

Question: In the final analysis, how accurate was Orwell in his Vision of the future? In what ways does our contemporary society compare to his idea of society in Nineteen Eighty-Four?

Answer: One way Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty-Four’s society is similar to today is the way the public is not allowed to speak, let alone think their own mind. Today many people are afraid to speak their mind because we live in a judgmental world. If you speak your mind there is a risk of being scolded, and a chance that your opinion is wrong. Even though opinions are neither true or false, everyone has a right to state their opinion. But like Winston and everyone who lives in Nineteen Eighty-Four’s world we shrink under the pressure of everyone’s eyes on us when we want to speak our mind.

Posted by: Lindsey Thilmony at November 5, 2013 03:18 PM

Regina Green
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
5 November 2013

Question: The world in which Winston lives is replete with contradictions. For example, a major tenet of the Party's philosophy is that War is Peace. Similarly, the Ministry of Love serves as, what we would consider, a department of war. What role do these contradictions serve on the grand scale? Discuss other contradictions inherent in the Party's philosophy. What role does contradiction serve within the framework of Doublethink? How does Doublethink satisfy the needs of The Party?

Answer: All of the contractions in the book are the Party’s way of manipulating and brainwashing the people into thinking that what they are doing is okay. The Party wants its people to be ignorant so they can get away with what they do. If the people we not ignorant then the Party would probably not get away with anything because too many people would turn against them at once. They want the people to live in fear and to have the knowledge that if they did turn against Big Brother that they would be tortured or put to death. The words crimestop, blackwhite, and doublethink stop anyone in the Party “unwilling and unable to think too deeply on any subject” (Orwell, pg 211). Doublethink makes your thoughts contradict to the point that it is pointless to think too much on the subject of anything. This is exactly what the Party wants to happen. The party wants to make it so “there will be no curiosity, no enjoyment of the process of life. All competing pleasers will be destroyed” (Orwell, pg 267). All the party wants is the control and power over all that happens, even the thoughts of its people. The contradictions and the application of doublethink is what makes this possible.

Posted by: Regina Green at November 5, 2013 03:37 PM

Regina Green, Stephanie Gilbert, Julia Deuapenna, Jordan Dedez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
5 November 2013

Question: Eros’s Love. Discuss the role of sex and intimacy in Nineteen Eighty-Four. What specific function does the Party’s directive on sexual interaction serve?

Answer: Eros is love through intimacy. In Plat's Symposium, Eros is described as two torn "souls who seek through eros to unite with their missing halves and become whole again" (Geoffrey, 2). The more power and hatred you have the more you loose that Eros for the other half of yourself because there is no Eros for the other individual. In Nineteen Eighty-four, the Party is trying to destroy all sexual desire. Winston and Julia were able to find a hiding spot where they were able to meet and perform Eros love, but it did not last as long as they had hoped. When Winston is being interrogated at the Ministry of Love O'Brien tells him "The sex instinct will be eradicated . . . We shall abolish the orgasm . . . There will be no love except love for Big Brother" (Orwell, 267). To the Party sex is nothing but an act of reproduction, it is not an act of pleasure. They want to make it so their people do not have a physical attraction to anyone or anything.

Posted by: Regina Green at November 5, 2013 05:54 PM

Jocelyne Hilary
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature

5th November 203

Question: Part 2 Chapter 9 “What is the only danger of this oligarchy? Summarize and explain.”

Answer: The danger that accompanies this oligarchy is the fact that “doublethink” emerges. “the mystique of the party,…..doublethink” (pg179). This idea plays a vital role in the Party’s plan to manipulate people. “..the never questioned instinct that first led to the seizure of power..” (pg 179) “Doublethink” involves putting two contradicting ideas into an individual’s mind. The Party supports this because it makes it easier to control what people think and have them obey. Once they have become victims of this, they would believe anything the Party tells them.

Posted by: Jocelyne Hilary at November 5, 2013 05:54 PM

Lydia R Santana
Deirdre Rowan
Blake Holtzhower
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL- Love and Desires in Literature

In class assignment

Question 24: Refer back to Winston's conversation with the old man at the pub. Why is Winston so determined in his approach to the old man? What is Winston hoping to learn from him? Was he successful? Why or why not?

Answer: Because Oceania rewrote history and it occurred to Winston that the old man was in his thirties when the revolution started. Winston was curious to see what the past really held, he could not recall from his own memory. Winston ponders about his approach to the old man on page 87,"Tell me about your life when when you were a boy. What was it like in those days? Were things better than they are now, or were they worse" (Orwell)? Also Winston states to the old man, "We can only read about them in books may not be true" (Orwell 89). Winston is not very successful with the old man as he just states random memories. As the old man states, "Lackeys!' he said. 'Now there's a word I ain't 'eard since ever so long. Lackeys!['Y]de Park of a Sunday afternoon to 'ear the blokes making speeches. Salvation Army, Roman Catholic, Jews, Indians-- all sorts, there was" (Orwell 90).

Posted by: Lydia Santana at November 5, 2013 06:38 PM

Aye’Kendria George
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
05 November 2013

Q: What does Winston remember about the beginning of the war?
A: He remembers that no one has heard of big brother before the 1960s

Posted by: Kendria George at November 5, 2013 06:44 PM

Zarin Hamid
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
21 October 2013
Question: What police bother Winston?
Answer: The Thought Police bothers Winston. The Thought Police believes that thinking is a crime and therefore people can get arrested for thought crimes. If you do any of your own thinking and go against the Party, it is considered a thought crime and you will be taken away. In chapter one of part one, the Thought Police is described by Winston as, “How often, or on what system, the Thought Police plugged in on any individual wire as guesswork,” or in other words because of the Thought Police, you are always being watched and everything you say and do is monitored (2).

Posted by: Zarin Hamid at November 5, 2013 06:50 PM

Aye’Kendria George
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
05 November 2013

Q: From whom has Winston rented a room? Why?
A: He rented the room from Mr. Charrington for his affair with Julia.

Posted by: Kendria George at November 5, 2013 06:50 PM

Aye’Kendria George
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
05 November 2013

Q: From whom has Winston rented a room? Why?
A: He rented the room from Mr. Charrington for his affair with Julia.

Posted by: Kendria George at November 5, 2013 06:50 PM

Lydia R Santana
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL- Love and Desires in Literature
23 October 2013

Question 75 Part 1/Chapter 7: Does the party admit these equalities?

Answer: No the party actually makes it seem that they way that the party is set up now is better off for the people and that in the past before the revolution everything was horrible. As Winston states, "The Party claimed [. . .] [b]efore the Revolution the had been hideously oppressed by the capitalists, they had been starved and flogged, women had been forced to work in the coal mines [. . .], children had been sold into the factories at the age of six" (Orwell 70-71).

Posted by: Lydia Santana at November 5, 2013 06:53 PM

Aye’Kendria George
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
05 November 2013

Q: To what do they drink their second glass of wine? Why is this significant?
A: they toast to the past because it’s a way for Winston to let the past go and toast to new beginnings.

Posted by: Kendria George at November 5, 2013 06:54 PM

Aye’Kendria George
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
05 November 2013

Q: To what do they drink their second glass of wine? Why is this significant?
A: they toast to the past because it’s a way for Winston to let the past go and toast to new beginnings.

Posted by: Kendria George at November 5, 2013 06:55 PM

Erica Esqueda
Desiree Jaramillo
Darius Anderson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
5 November 2013

Question: (Group 2) 11. On pages 147-48 of the edition ordered for this course, Winston reflects on the omnipresence of The Party: “He thought of the telescreen with its never-sleeping ear. They could spy upon you night and day, but if you kept your head you could still outwit them….Facts at any rate, could not be kept hidden. They could be tracked down by inquiry, they could be squeezed out of you by torture. But if the object was not to stay alive, but to stay human, what difference did it ultimately make?” (Orwell 147-48). What, in essence, is Winston saying about the lone individual in relation to The State? Does this contention remain true throughout the novel?

In relation to the state, Winston is trying to say that although the state may be in control of basically all aspects of their being, they still have control over their own mind. He is realizing that the state is very wrong in trying to control them. Winston mentions, “What you say or do doesn’t matter; only feelings matter,” (Orwell 147), therefore he is saying that their feelings, which are within them, are their own. Only they can control them, no one else has a say in what they can feel or think. Julia mentions, “They can make you say anything – but they can’t make you believe it,” (Orwell 147) meaning that the state can try to force someone to believe one thing, but if the individual keeps control of their mind, the state’s efforts to brainwash them are useless, “they can’t get inside you,” (Orwell 147). The novel begins with Winston beginning to realize all of these things and throughout the novel, it is demonstrated that he really begins to believe it. He knows that he needs to keep control of his mind and his feelings.

Posted by: Erica Esqueda at November 5, 2013 06:56 PM

Zarin Hamid
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
23 October 2013
Question: Why does Winston go off on his own? What activities is he missing out on?
Answer: Winston goes off on his own to walk around the Prole district. He does this because he does not want to participate in the Community Center activities. He wants to see if life before the Party was better. In this chapter, the community activities are described as, “The sky was a warmer blue than he had seen in that year, and the lectures, the creaking camaraderie oiled by gin, had seemed intolerable,” it is the repulsion and repetitiveness, which causes Winston to skip out (72). He has attended them for such a long time, he wants no part in them anymore.

Posted by: Zarin Hamid at November 5, 2013 07:10 PM

Erica Esqueda
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
5 November 2013

Question: 51. Part 1/Chapter 4: Does Winston enjoy his work?

“Winston’s greatest pleasure in life was in his work,” (Orwell 43) and he felt that he was very good at it. There were many different parts to his job and that is what he liked the most because he was always thinking. He could lose himself in them and not have to think about anything else.

Posted by: Erica Esqueda at November 5, 2013 07:28 PM

Erica Bodden, Jalisa Lowe, Monika Guirguis, Jen Schubin
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
5 November 2013

Question: Discuss the idea of Room 101 in Nineteen Eighty-Four, the place where everyone meets his or her worst fear. Keeping in mind that, for most of Winston’s time at the Ministry of Love, he does not know what he will find in Room 101. What role does that uncertainty play in making Room 101 frightening? Does the cage of rats break Winston’s spirit, or does it merely play a symbolic role?
Answer: The Essence of uncertainty makes room 101 terifying. The scene in the novel where the skull face man tried everything in his power not to go back to room 101 foreshadows the horror that awaits Winston in room 101. The skull face man pleads desperately with the officer, “Just tell me what it is and I’ll confess it straight off. Write it down and I’ll sign it- anything! Not room 101” (Orwell 236). Moreover, the cage rats do more than break Winston’s spirit. The rats initiated he could be broken mentally. The moment he shouted, “Do it to Julia! I don’t care what you do to her” (Orwell 286) was the moment the party won.

Posted by: Erica Bodden at November 5, 2013 07:37 PM

Hector M. Rosario
Morgan Salter
Joe Rulli
ENG 210CL CA01
Professor Hobbs

Group 3 #19) In the final analysis, how accurate was Orwell in his vision of the
future? In what ways does our contemporary society compare to his idea of society in
Nineteen Eighty-Four? Are there examples in which he was correct? What is most
opposite? Do you see a potential for aspects of Orwell’s “vision” to come true? If so,
explain them.

Orwell was accurate in predicting how media has a huge role in what we see. They control what goes in and out of our information pool every day. Another accurate point is how the people of Oceania were not given full freedom of speech which is often also overlooked in some countries today. Reverse propaganda is another element Orwell got right. However, he did have a few oversights in his predictions. People are more vocal in today's world that that of "1984." We are more likely to protest something we do not believe in whereas in the novel people were afraid to stand up to the government. Torture was used in the book as a weapon of gaining information, something practiced by many countries in times of war.

Posted by: Hector Rosario at November 5, 2013 08:46 PM

Lauren Rhodes
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
30 October 2013

Question: What does Winston think happened to his mother and father?
Winston believes that both his mother and father has been killed. Winston states that “He could not remember what had happened, but he knew in his dream that in some way the lives had been sacrificed to his own” (Orwell 26).

Posted by: Lauren Rhodes at November 5, 2013 09:25 PM

Lauren Rhodes
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
30 October 2013

Question: What is Mr. Charrington like?

Winston describes Mr. Charrington as “a widower aged sixty- three and had inhabited this shop for thirty years” (Orwell 88).

Posted by: Lauren Rhodes at November 5, 2013 09:27 PM

Lauren Rhodes
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
30 October 2013

Question: Where does Julia say they can meet once again? When and why?

Julia claims that they can meet out in the field again Julia claims, “We can come here once again [. . .] It’s generally safe to use any hide- out twice. But not for another month or two, of course” (Orwell 112) Julia says this after they met for the first time, and because she feels it’s safe from the government.

Posted by: Lauren Rhodes at November 5, 2013 09:28 PM

Lauren Rhodes
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
30 October 2013

Question: Who says, “you are dead.”? Why? What does it mean/why is this important?

The voice on the telescreen tells both Julia and Winston that they are dead. At this point in the book both Julia and Winston have found out Mr. Charrinton was part of the thought this whole time, and that they were captures. The poster fell revealing the telescreen behind it and the voice started talking, it says “ We are dead, he said, we are dead, echoed Julia, you are dead said the iron voice behind them” (Orwell 197).

Posted by: Lauren Rhodes at November 5, 2013 09:30 PM

Lauren Rhodes
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
30 October 2013

Question: How does Winston react to the first pain he suffers? Why? What is his original intent?

Winston explains how “Everything explodes into light” (Orwell 213) As the guard was laughing Winston explains: “Nothing in the world was so bad as physical pain. In the face of pain there are no heroes, no heroes, he though over and over as he writhed on the floor” (Orwell 213).

Posted by: Lauren Rhodes at November 5, 2013 09:31 PM

Lauren Rhodes
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
30 October 2013

Question: Compare and contrast these other characters in Winston’s world: Parsons, Syme, O’Brien. How does Winston view each one? How do they differ from Winston? What opinion do you think each one has of Winston?

To Winston, Parson’s was his next door neighbor, and a man he saw on a regular basis. Syme was a man who was working on the Newspeak dictionary in Winston’s work, and O’Brien was a man who worked with Winston who he believed was against the party like he was. Winston felt he could trust these men. All along Winston believed he could never trust Parson because his children worked with the party, and in the end Parson was in the same boat Winston was in. His children turned him in. Winston was shocked when he found out he asked “Who denounced you? [. . .] It was my little daughter [. . .] She listened at the key hole.” (Orwell 208) O’Brien was the biggest shock of all to Winston. He felt he was the only one he could trust, and he failed him. When Winston found out he claimed “They’ve got you too! [. . .] They got me a long time ago said Winston” (Orwell 213) Each person was faithful to the party, unlike Winston. I feel they all knew Winston was against the Party. Each one gave him a look like they already knew what was going to happen to him in the end.

Posted by: Lauren Rhodes at November 5, 2013 09:32 PM

Jocelyne Hilary
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature

5th November 203

Question: Whole Novel: Prior to meeting her, Winston fantasizes about Julia in violent, humiliating ways. Later, he describes in his diary an encounter with a middle –aged toothless prostitute. How do you account for these thoughts? How does Winston’s understanding of women change after his first liaison with Julia?

Answer: When Winston initially meets Julia, his first impressions of here are negative. “without exception, the most stupid, vulgar empty mind he had ever encountered” (pg 59.) His aggressive thoughts about her were prompted by the fact that she reminded him of the inadequacies he had, youth, strength and attractiveness. Due to this, his initial impression of Julia somehow associates with his encounter with the toothless prostitute he sleeps with. His encounter with the prostitute is described very negatively, and from this it is clear that Winston does not see women as worthy of respect. His liaison with Julia changes his mind because initially sex had been representative of empowerment, but Julia had changed it and it finally represented love. She brought life back into him, he had almost found a purpose fueled by passion.

Posted by: Jocelyne Hilary at November 5, 2013 09:44 PM

Vanessa Parkin
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
23 October 2013

Part 1 Chapter 3 Question 43)
When does Winston first believe he heard the word “Ingsoc”?

The narrator recalled upon the first time Winston heard the word Ingsoc, “ He did not believe that he had ever heard the word Ingsoc before 1960, but it was possible that in it’s Old – speak form – “English Socialism”, that is to say – it had been current earlier” (Orwell 32).

Posted by: Vanessa Parkin at November 5, 2013 10:02 PM

Vanessa Parkin
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
27 October 2013

Part 1 Chapter 8 Question 93)
What is life like in the proles’ end of London?

In the proles’ end of London the brown colored slums are battered with cobbled stoned streets. Rats live in street corners among the puddles of filthy muck water. The only reason for staying alive for millions of proles was the very slight chance of winning the lottery. The narrator describes the streets as Winston walks through, “In and out of the dark doorways, and down narrow alley-ways that branched off on either side, people swarmed in astonishing numbers--girls in full bloom, with crudely lipsticked mouths, and youths who chased the girls, and swollen waddling women who showed you what the girls would be like in ten years' time, and old bent creatures shuffling along on splayed feet, and ragged barefooted children who played in the puddles and then scattered at angry yells from their mothers.” (Orwell 73) Although life in the proles is dirty and dull, Winston believes the only hope lies there. “But if there was hope, it lay in the proles… You had to cling on to that. When you put it in words it sounded reasonable: it was when you looked at the human beings passing you on the pavement that it became an act of faith. If there was any one still alive who could give you a truthful account of conditions in the early part of the century, it could only be a prole”, Winston thought to himself. (73) Winston becomes eager to find the truth, if there is any left out there at all.

Posted by: Vanessa Parkin at November 5, 2013 10:04 PM

Vanessa Parkin
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
27 October 2013

Part 2 Chapter 5 Question 123)
Does Julia believe in Goldstein? Why, or why not?

Julia explains to Winston, “ The tales about Goldstein and his underground army, were simply a lot of rubbish which the Party had invented for its own purposes and which you had to pretend to believe in.” (Orwell 135) She took part in shouting above everyone else at rallies, the two minutes of hate, spontaneous demonstrations, and supported executions. Julia lived a very ignorant life, “she had only the dimmest idea of who Goldstein was and what doctrines he was supposed to represent” (135) Julia was far too young to remember any truth to the Revolution. When Winston sparked up conversations about the possible truth, she became very bored and uninterested.

Posted by: Vanessa Parkin at November 5, 2013 10:05 PM

Vanessa Parkin
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
1 November 2013


Part 2 Chapter 8 #146) What are the white tablets for? Why is this significant?

The tablet was to ensure that Julia does not smell of wine after leaving, “ O'Brien took a small box from the top of a cabinet and handed her a flat white tablet which he told her to place on her tongue. It was important, he said, not to go out smelling of wine: the lift attendants were very observant.” (Orwell 156).

Posted by: Vanessa Parkin at November 5, 2013 10:07 PM

Vanessa Parkin
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
3 November 2013


Part 3 Chapters 1-3: Who is brought into the cell after the first person and why? What is the significance of this? Explain.

Parsons was arrested for thought crime. Parsons explains to Winston, “Do you know how it got hold of me? In my sleep! Do you know what they heard me saying? Down with Big Brother!” (Orwell 208). Parsons seven-year-old daughter turned him in.

Posted by: Vanessa Parkin at November 5, 2013 10:09 PM

Vanessa Parkin
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
5 November 2013

#17 Whole Novel) Consider Tone. How would you describe the author’s tone in Nineteen Eighty – Four? Does it add to or detract from the Character’s discourse? Why, or why not?

Orwell’s novel Nineteen Eighty – Four is imbedded with a very dark tone. This most definitely adds to the Characters discourse, as Winston, the main character, lives a hopeful nightmare. The author gives the reader a connection of aspiration, to overthrow the government. As the reader, I obviously side with Winston and want him to succeed and live a life with emotion, happiness, love, and freedom. These are the essential rights we have as human beings and for these rights to be taken away would leave the human race mentally starved of basic human needs. This is how the people of Oceania Air Strip 1 London live. The tone is portrayed as a mind-paralyzing nightmare. Controlling and manipulating thoughts of this population leaves no hope for the future.

Posted by: Vanessa Parkin at November 5, 2013 10:11 PM

McKenzie Burns
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 Love and Desire in Literature CA01
5 November 2013

Question #133:Part 2 / Chapter 8: What does Winston tell O’Brien? Why is this significant?

Answer:Winston tells O'Brien that him and Julia want to join with him in the conspiracy that he is involved with against the Party. "We want to join it and work for it. We are enemies of the party" (Orwell 150). This is significant because no one would ever admit to being thought-criminals or adulterers. They are basically giving themselves up with the likelihood of being killed.

Posted by: McKenzie Burns at November 5, 2013 10:11 PM

McKenzie Burns
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 Love and Desire in Literature CA01
5 November 2013

Question #133:Part 2 / Chapter 8: What does Winston tell O’Brien? Why is this significant?

Answer:Winston tells O'Brien that him and Julia want to join with him in the conspiracy that he is involved with against the Party. "We want to join it and work for it. We are enemies of the party" (Orwell 150). This is significant because no one would ever admit to being thought-criminals or adulterers. They are basically giving themselves up with the likelihood of being killed.

Posted by: McKenzie Burns at November 5, 2013 10:11 PM

Vera Smirnova
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
4 November 2013

Question #17. Part III / Chapters 1-3: Why, according to O’Brien, is Winston in the Ministry of Love? What must he do while there? Will he be able to leave? If so, how?


According to O’Brian, Winston knew he is going to be tortured and vaporized after he started the diary. O’Brian explains to Winston that his goal is not to make Winston confess, but to cure him. Before he is going to kill him, he wants to convert him to on of them. After O’Brian allows Winston to see himself in the mirror, he tells him that it can be over. In order to stop the torture, he must start to love Big Brother, agree with everything that Party says, and at the end betray Julia.

Posted by: Vera Smirnova at November 5, 2013 10:14 PM

Erica Esqueda
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
5 November 2013

Question: 89. Part 1/Chapter 8: Whom does Winston see as he leaves the shop? Why is Winston worried?

As Winston leaves the shop, he looks down the street and sees “the girl from the Fiction Department, the girl with dark hair” (Orwell 100). This worries Winston because, previously he had begun to suspect that he was being spied on by her because she seemed to be in the same places as him during recent occasions. Seeing her again only heightened his suspicions that the girl with the dark hair was watching him and he needed to be careful.

Posted by: Erica Esqueda at November 5, 2013 10:25 PM

Erica Esqueda
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
5 November 2013

Question: 109. Part 2/ Chapter 3: What is Julia’s attitude toward the Party? Why does she feel that way?

Julia “hated the Party, and said so in the crudest words,” (Orwell 131). She believed that everyone should make sure to follow the minimal rules and break the more important ones. She said that the party wanted to rob every one of their pleasures and in order to get back at them for doing so, one should try to “break the rules and stay alive all the same,” (Orwell 131).

Posted by: Erica Esqueda at November 5, 2013 10:46 PM

McKenzie Burns
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 Love and Desire in Literature CA01
5 November 2013

Question #27:. Part III / Chapters 1-3: What is a logical absurdity? “Did not the statement ‘You do not exist’ contain a logical absurdity?” What does Winston mean by this? Explain.

Answer: Logical absurdity is when what people think is actually happening in real life does not make sense. For example, when O'Brien says "You do not exist" (Orwell 231) to Winston, Winston knows that logically he physically exists but what O'Brien is telling him does not make sense. He knows he is right when saying that he exists as a physical human being, but when O'Brien says over and over again that he does not exist, Winston starts to wonder if he is right, and questioning if he really does exist or not.

Posted by: McKenzie Burns at November 5, 2013 11:00 PM

Erica Esqueda
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
5 November 2013

Question: 20. Part 3/Chapter 1-3: Does Winston betray Julia in chapter 1 or 2 of part 3? Why or why not? Explain.

In chapter 1 of part 3, Winston begins to wonder to himself if her would be willing to take on more pain, if necessary, in order to save Julia. He then concluded that he would. However, he also decided that that decision was “an intellectual decision, taken because he knew that he ought to take it,” (Orwell 238). In a sense, this could be considered a betrayal because he says to love Julia, however, he thinks that this decision is only made because it would be the right thing to do, not because his intention is good and actually would be willing to lessen Julia’s pain.

Posted by: Erica Esqueda at November 5, 2013 11:00 PM

McKenzie Burns
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 Love and Desire in Literature CA01
5 November 2013

Question #11 Whole Novel: On pages 147-48 of the edition ordered for this course, Winston
reflects on the omnipresence of The Party: “He thought of the telescreen with its
never-sleeping ear. They could spy upon you night and day, but if you kept your head
you could still outwit them….Facts at any rate, could not be kept hidden. They could
be tracked down by inquiry, they could be squeezed out of you by torture. But if the
object was not to stay alive, but to stay human, what difference did it ultimately
make?” (Orwell 147-48). What, in essence, is Winston saying about the lone
individual in relation to The State? Does this contention remain true throughout the
novel?

Answer: Winston is saying that the lone individual is not trying to outsmart the telescreen or to stay alive, but to stay human. By staying human, you are not transforming into what other people or objects want you to be. By acting normal you would not get caught by the Thought Police, they could never really prove you doing anything wrong. All they did was guess and if you came out and admitted it then you would be punished for it. Or they would manipulate your thoughts into making you think that you actually committed Thought Crime. In contrast, Orwell says "But the inner heart, whose workings were mysterious even to yourself, remained impregnable" (148). He is saying that no matter what is happening to you what you truly feel cannot be touched by any outside source, even yourself.

Posted by: McKenzie Burns at November 5, 2013 11:17 PM

Alexia Chambers, Kylie Fagan, Aye’kendria George
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and desire in literature CA02
4 November 2013
Question:
18. Whole Novel: Eros’s Love. Discuss the role of sex and intimacy in Nineteen Eighty-Four. What specific function does the Party’s directive on sexual interaction serve?
Answer:
Eros refers to intimate/romantic physical love. The Party did not want anyone to be physically attracted to each other people were only allowed to get married if the party allowed it. “All marriages between Party members had to be approved by a committee appointed for the purpose, and--though the principle was never clearly stated--permission was always refused if the couple concerned gave the impression of being physically attracted to one another.” The only reason people were allowed to get married was to have children so those children could be brainwashed by the party.

Posted by: Alexia Chambers at November 5, 2013 11:44 PM

Jasmine Collins
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL: Love and Desire in Literature CA01
30 October 2013
Question: 21 Part III / Chapters 1-3: What is the last question that Winston asks O’Brien in Chapter Two, Part Three? What is O’Brien’s answer? What is the significance of this?
Answer: The last Question Winston asks O’Brien was “how soon will they shoot me” (Orwell 244). O’Brien’s answer to Winston’s question was, “You are a difficult case. But don’t give up hope. Everything is cured sooner or later. In the end we shall shoot you” (Orwell 244). I believe the significance lies within the part where O’Brien says that everything is cured sooner or later. He was talking about curing Winston’s hate for Big Brother (Orwell 252). In addition, he is saying that they will kill him if he does not conform to the rules of Big Brother.

Posted by: Jasmine Collins at November 6, 2013 12:13 AM

Vera Smirnova
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 Love and Desire in Literature CA01
2 November 2013

Question # 23. Whole Novel: Imaginative exercise. Imagine yourself as Winston Smith at the beginning of 1984. What would/could/should you do to undermine The Party? Knowing what you know now, how would/could/should you extricate yourself from the fate that awaits you? Remember to constrain yourself to the “rules” of the universe described in the book, e.g., there didn’t seem to be cell phones, or Internet for the general public, etc.
If I were Winston I would try to avoid the vaporizing by doing what the Party says and believe anything it wants me to. It might sound romantic to rebel against the Big Brother and fall in love, but there is no way to avoid being caught. According to Winston, “There are cameras everywhere. Oceanians live in a constant state of being monitored by the Party, through the use of advanced, invasive technology” (Orwell 3). I would not share my secrets with others. Winston said “If you want to keep a secret, you must also hide it from yourself.” (Orwell 283).
Orwell, George. 1984. New York: Signet Classic, 1950. Print.

Posted by: Vera Smirnova at November 6, 2013 12:21 AM

Lydia R Santana
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL- Love and Desires in Literature
25 October 2013

Question Part 2/ Chapter 4: While Winston is turned toward the window, what does J do?

Answer:J gets dress a paints her face for him. She wanted to look more feminine for him. She tells him, "[T]o turn your back on me for three minutes" (Orwell 141). Then as he turned around he saw a "transformation" occurred, he states that she, "[P]ainted her face" (Orwell 142).

Posted by: Lydia Santana at November 6, 2013 12:27 AM

Destiny Hubbard
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
4 November 2013

Question: What is Big Brother? What role does Big Brother play in Nineteen Eighty-Four? What effect does he/it have on Winston? Is Winston’s obsession with Big Brother fundamentally similar to or different from his obsession with O’Brien? Explain.
Answer: Big Brother is the controlling party and the law; it is the “embodiment of the Party” (Orwell 259). Their rule is to keep order within the people. They make sure the people follow their decrees and do not rise above them and rebel. Winston’s obsessed with the Big Brother party even though he knows he should not be.

Posted by: Destiny Hubbard at November 6, 2013 12:34 AM

Lydia R Santana
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL- Love and Desires in Literature
28 October 2013

Question Part2/ Chapter 7: What particular thing does Winston remember after his father left? Why is this significant?

Answer: After Winston's father left he remembers the "[r]ackety, uneasy circumstances of the time" (Orwell 160). He states, "The periodical panics of the air raids and the sheltering in the Tube stations, the piles of rubble every where, the unintelligible proclamations posted at street corners, the gangs of youths in shirts all the same color [. . .] above all, the fact that there was never enough to eat" (Orwell 160-161). Winston also claims, "He remember[s] long afternoons spent with other boys in scrounging round dustbins and rubbish heaps, picking out the ribs of cabbage leaves [and] potato peelings" (Orwell 161).This is significant because Winston wanted to know the truth, he could not remember earlier if what that textbooks that were issued held the truth or not. Which is why he, earlier in the story, approached a random old man and wanted to verify the past. That's why Winston wanted to ask him, "Tell me about your life when you were a boy. What was it like in those days? Were things better than they are now, or were they worse" (Orwell 87)?

Posted by: Lydia Santana at November 6, 2013 01:09 AM

Destiny Hubbard
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
6 November 2013
Question: Who is brought into the cell with Winston and why does he think he is there?
Answer: Ampleforth is brought into the cell with Winston. He thinks he is there because he let the word “God” stay at the end of a sentence of a poem he was rewriting; he states that he just “could not help it” (Orwell 206).

Posted by: Destiny Hubbard at November 6, 2013 01:23 AM

Lydia R Santana
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL- Love and Desires in Literature
28 October 2013

Question Part 3/ Chapters 1-3: Does Winston betray Julia in chapters one or two of part three? Why or why not? Explain.

Answer: No Winston does not betray Julia in chapters one or two of part three, he thought of it but he never actually did go through with it. Winston at first was very determined not to confess because he loved Julia. In chapter one Winston states, "He loved her and would not betray her; but that was only a fact[. . .]"(Orwell 228). Winston continues on by stating,"If I could save Julia by doubling my own pain, would I do it? Yes, I would" (Orwell 238). In chapter two Winston starts to crack under the pressure and is more willing to give a confession, as anyone would if they were being tortured, but tries to hang in there. Winston ponders,"I will confess, but not yet. I must holdout till the pain becomes unbearable. Three more kicks, two more kicks, and then I will tell them what they want" (Orwell 240-241). Although Winston hangs in there; the "beatings grew less frequent and mainly a threat" (Orwell 241). Which in the end didn't even matter, O'Brien was more focused on Winston's thought crimes, he or Oceania didn't really seemed to be bothered by his other crimes.

Posted by: Lydia Santana at November 6, 2013 02:30 AM

Lydia R Santana
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL- Love and Desires in Literature
30 October 2013

Question 17 Whole Novel: Consider tone. If you have forgotten what tone means (covered in my ENG 122), google the phrase "What is tone in literature" and take a few minutes to fill in the gaps of your knowledge. How would you describe the character's discourse? Why, or why not?

Answer: The tone in the literature throughout the story is serious and a lost of a sense of hope. Everything is dealt with in a serious manner, from approaching the man at the pub to being arrested and tortured. Winston was very inquisitive and wanted to know about certain things, such as history and him trying to figure out if Oceania is lying and everything in the textbooks isn't valid. That's why Winston pondered about the old man, "Tell me about your life when when you were a boy. What was it like in those days? Were things better than they are now, or were they worse" (Orwell 87)? I believe that the tone adds to the characters discourse because the tone gives the reader a sense of the character. The tone of Winston's story is serious and you can tell that Winston is serious and has a lost sense of hope, which is depicted clearly by the way he expresses or thinks to himself. For example when Winston is in the cafe with Syme, Winston states; "Syme's fate was not difficult to foreseen. And yet it was a fact that if Syme grasped, even for three seconds, the nature of his, Winston's, secret opinions, he would betray him instantly to the Thought Police" (Orwell 55).

Posted by: Lydia Santana at November 6, 2013 02:58 AM

Paula Pion
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02
5 November 2013

Question #39 Part 1/ Chapter 3: “What Country is Oceania at war with at this time?”

Answer: In the novel, Nineteen Eighty-Four, Oceania is currently “at war with Eurasia and in alliance with Eastasia” (Orwell 35).

Posted by: Paula Pion at November 6, 2013 03:32 AM

Paula Pion
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02
5 November 2013

Question #88 Part 1/ Chapter 8: “Does Winston intend to come back to the shop?”

Answer: Winston did not intend on going back to the book shop. He even told himself he would “never to come near the place again.” After, Winston wastes his time talking to the older man in the pub, he leaves and begins to walk to the street. It is not till after some walking Winston realizes his “feet have brought him back” to the junk shop where he purchased his diary (Orwell 95, 96).

Posted by: Paula Pion at November 6, 2013 03:32 AM

Paula Pion
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02
5 November 2013

Question #116 Part 2/ Chapter 4: “To what does Winston compare the paper-weight and the coral inside? What is the significance of this comparison?”

Answer: Winston compares “[t]he paper-weight to the room he was in, and the coral was Julia’s life and his own…” (Orwell 150). The comparison is significant because Winston realizes loves Julia (Orwell 150).

Posted by: Paula Pion at November 6, 2013 03:34 AM

Paula Pion
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02
5 November 2013

Question #156 Part 2/ Chapter 9: “What does the Inner Party believe? Why is this significant?”

Answer: The Inner Party believes that by acquiring large amounts of land and “building up an overwhelming preponderance power” it is a “coming conquest” (Orwell 196).

Posted by: Paula Pion at November 6, 2013 03:35 AM

Paula Pion
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02
5 November 2013

Question #4 Part 3/ Chapters 1-3: “Who denounced Parsons? How does he feel about the arrest? Explain?”

Answer: It is Parsons’ daughter who denounces him. Parson says he is not upset, but proud of his daughter for turning him in because it shows he raised her “right spirit” (Orwell 240).

Posted by: Paula Pion at November 6, 2013 03:36 AM

Paula Pion
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02
5 November 2013

Question #8 Whole Novel: “Review, think about, and then describe Winston’s character in Nineteen Eight-Four as it relates to his attitude toward the Party. If you don’t know what the word “fatalism” means, look it up and take a few minutes to fill in the gaps of your knowledge. In what ways might his fatalistic streak contribute to his ultimate downfall?”


Answer: Winston’s attitude towards the Party in the beginning of the novel was unsure just because he was not sure if the Party had even really existed. It is not until after Winston officially meets Julia he becomes more curious about the Party (Orwell 123). Even before meeting Julia, Winston begins a diary where he writes negative things (29). This leads to his ultimate downfall because everything he was trying to avoid happening to him in the beginning of the novel happens to him.

Posted by: Paula Pion at November 6, 2013 03:56 AM

Jayssy Hilary, Kelly Scott, and Paula Pion
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02
6 November 2013

Question #16: “Following his capture in Mr. Charrinton’s spare room, Winston undergoes a process of “philosophical cleansing” and re-education against which he valiantly, but unsuccessfully fights. Discuss Winston’s “capitulation” at the hands of O’Brian. How is Winston brought to “love Big Brother?” In sacrificing Julia, how has Winston, in essence, signaled his own end?”

Answer: After Winston is captured by O’Brian, Winston starts being tortured and brained washed. Winston’s capitulation was brutal (Orwell 246). From the beginning, Winston’s limbs were being twisted, and he was beaten up. He finally brought to “love Big Brother” by “philosophical cleansing” and he confesses to all his crimes because the pain was unbearable and he’s been told Julia betrayed him (282). By sacrificing Julia, he gave up his reason to live which signaled his own end.

Posted by: Paula Pion at November 6, 2013 04:41 AM

Vanessa Parkin, Salvatore Christlieb, and Lindsey Thilmony
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
4 November 2013
Question: Whole Novel: Prior to meeting her, Winston fantasizes about Julia in violent, humiliating ways. Later, he describes in his diary an encounter with a middle-aged, toothless prostitute. How do you account for these thoughts? How does Winston’s understanding of women change after his first liaison with Julia?
Answer: From a young age, Winston dealt with guilt issues concerning his mother’s death. Due to the death of his Mother, he has had no real interaction with any woman. This has given Winston a strange understanding of women, due to little communication with them. Moreover his psychological struggle of guilt, confusion, and frustration are bottled up because of the Party’s laws. He lives in a world where relationships are unheard of and punishable by death. Women are only seen as being “impregnable” according to the Party. A role model for a relationship of love does not exist. Therefore, Winston does not know how to feel about his desire for Julia. He knowingly becomes frustrated with his desire for Julia because he does not know how to tell her and it is outlawed to do so. This is his first time Winston feels this way toward a woman so Winston is intimidated by Julia.
At first, Winston does not see Julia as a human being like himself, but more of a fierce, young, beautiful, untrustworthy problem. Winston’s dark hatred and desire sparks his imagination as the narrator states “vivid, beautiful hallucinations flashed through his mind. He would flog her to death with a rubber truncheon. He would tie her naked to a stake and shoot her full of arrows like Saint Sebastian. He would ravish her and cut her throat at the moment of climax” (Orwell 12). Moreover, he realized why it was that he hated her and that was “because she was young and pretty and sexless” (Orwell 12). It turned out that he desired and wanted to have sex with her but, it would be hard to do so. Furthermore, “around her sweet supple waist, which seemed to ask you to encircle it with your arm, there was only the odious scarlet sash, [an] aggressive symbol of chastity” (Orwell 13). His twisted thoughts about Julia are signs that he wants what he cannot have. He desires something that he has never had, or possibly something he has never thought about before. He does not know how to interpret the feelings and he is unable to act upon them because of the Party.
While writing in his diary about the toothless prostitute, Winston releases his infatuation by thoughtcrime. Thus, explaining the underlying reason why he encountered this prostitute “and what he wanted, more even than to be loved, was to break down that wall of virtue, even if it were only once in his whole life. The sexual act, successfully performed, was rebellion. Desire was thoughtcrime” (Orwell 60). Winston was in desperation for some kind of rebellious relief and Julia, turned out to be this relief.
After Winston’s first liaison with Julia, he wants an appropriate relationship, wants to be loved, and desires to love back but, it can never be. His interaction with the prostitute also showed this desire for love and how he was not receiving it in the right ways; that is why he turned to Julia and treated her and women well but, struggled with his own actions for quite some time. He was ultimately reprogrammed by the Party because of his thoughtcrime.
References
Orwell, George. 1984: A Novel. New York, N.Y., U.S.A.: Harcourt Brace, 1983. Print.

Posted by: Salvatore Christlieb at November 6, 2013 07:34 AM

Vanessa Parkin ,
Salvatore Christlieb,
and Lindsey Thilmony

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 210CL CA02 Love and Desire in Literature

4 November 2013

Question: Whole Novel: Prior to meeting her, Winston fantasizes about Julia in violent, humiliating ways. Later, he describes in his diary an encounter with a middle-aged, toothless prostitute. How do you account for these thoughts? How does Winston’s understanding of women change after his first liaison with Julia?

Answer: From a young age, Winston dealt with guilt issues concerning his mother’s death. Due to the death of his Mother, he has had no real interaction with any woman. This has given Winston a strange understanding of women, due to little communication with them. Moreover his psychological struggle of guilt, confusion, and frustration are bottled up because of the Party’s laws. He lives in a world where relationships are unheard of and punishable by death. Women are only seen as being “impregnable” according to the Party. A role model for a relationship of love does not exist. Therefore, Winston does not know how to feel about his desire for Julia. He knowingly becomes frustrated with his desire for Julia because he does not know how to tell her and it is outlawed to do so. This is his first time Winston feels this way toward a woman so Winston is intimidated by Julia.

At first, Winston does not see Julia as a human being like himself, but more of a fierce, young, beautiful, untrustworthy problem. Winston’s dark hatred and desire sparks his imagination as the narrator states “vivid, beautiful hallucinations flashed through his mind. He would flog her to death with a rubber truncheon. He would tie her naked to a stake and shoot her

full of arrows like Saint Sebastian. He would ravish her and cut her throat at the moment of climax” (Orwell 12). Moreover, he realized why it was that he hated her and that was “because she was young and pretty and sexless” (Orwell 12). It turned out that he desired and wanted to have sex with her but, it would be hard to do so. Furthermore, “around her sweet supple waist, which seemed to ask you to encircle it with your arm, there was only the odious scarlet sash, [an] aggressive symbol of chastity” (Orwell 13). His twisted thoughts about Julia are signs that he wants what he cannot have. He desires something that he has never had, or possibly something he has never thought about before. He does not know how to interpret the feelings and he is unable to act upon them because of the Party.

While writing in his diary about the toothless prostitute, Winston releases his infatuation by thoughtcrime. Thus, explaining the underlying reason why he encountered this prostitute “and what he wanted, more even than to be loved, was to break down that wall of virtue, even if it were only once in his whole life. The sexual act, successfully performed, was rebellion. Desire was thoughtcrime” (Orwell 60). Winston was in desperation for some kind of rebellious relief and Julia, turned out to be this relief.

After Winston’s first liaison with Julia, he wants an appropriate relationship, wants to be loved, and desires to love back but, it can never be. His interaction with the prostitute also showed this desire for love and how he was not receiving it in the right ways; that is why he turned to Julia and treated her and women well but, struggled with his own actions for quite some time. He was ultimately reprogrammed by the Party because of his thoughtcrime.

References

Orwell, George. 1984: A Novel. New York, N.Y., U.S.A.: Harcourt Brace, 1983. Print.

Posted by: Vanessa Parkin at November 6, 2013 07:42 AM

Dana Delosa
Matt Nicholson-Lewis
Kaitlin Millner
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01: Love and Desire in Literature
5 November 2013

Question: “Whole Novel: Prior to meeting her, Winston fantasizes about Julia in violent, humiliating ways. Later, he describes in his diary an encounter with a middle-aged, toothless prostitute. How do you account for these thoughts? How does Winston’s understanding of women change after his first liaison with Julia? As with ALL homework questions for this course, use quoted passages from the actual text (with MLA in-text/parenthetical citations) to support your answer; No drop quotes. All quoted material must have a proper lead-in device and a lead out statement.”

Answer: Prior to meeting Julia, Winston strongly disliked women because he felt that they “were the most bigoted adherents of the Party” (Orwell 10). Further, his previous relationship with his wife Katherine fueled his dislike for women because of her blatant adherence to the Party’s rules (Orwell 66-67). Because of his preconceived distrust of women, he believed that Julia worked for Big Brother as a spy; this fueled his desire to murder her. After his encounter with Julia in the hallway, he becomes less suspicious of her and agrees to meet with her. Upon discovering that Julia has had sex with party members “hundreds of times-well, scores of times,” he becomes excited because it means that Party members are disobeying Big Brother (Orwell 125). He begins to view women in a better light after realizing that like Julia, they are also rebelling against Big Brother.

Posted by: Dana DeLosa at November 6, 2013 09:06 AM

Desiree Jaramillo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
21 October 2013

Question 53 Part 1/Chapter 4: How does Winston decide to fulfill his assignment in regard to BB’s speech?

Answer: When Winston first receives his assignment to modify Big Brother’s speech, he contemplates on how he could concoct a story that would raise no questions. It is stated in “The Times” that Big Brother, “makes references to non-existent persons,” and Winston must now exclude this person from Big Brother’s speech entirely (39). He decides that it would be best for Big Brother to commemorate a comrade who was deserving of heroic honor in his speech. So Winston transforms a completely non-existent man into a battle hero by simply creating the details. What was once fiction is now fact because the Party has the ability to change history by simply destroying any old evidence and replacing it with new information.

Posted by: Desiree Jaramillo at November 6, 2013 09:28 AM

Desiree Jaramillo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
23 October 2013

Question 85 Part 1/Chapter 8: What does Winston find to buy? Why does he buy it? What else does the old man show him?

Answer: In the dilapidated antique shop, Winston found many items that came from a time long before the time he now lives in. What struck him most peculiar was a small piece of glass with a chunk of coral encased inside of it. Winston recalls that, “it seemed to possess of belonging to an age quite different from the present,” time in which he resides in (84). Whether or not Winston realizes the correlation between himself and the object, they both share a peculiar importance. The coral may have seemed very big in comparison to the glass it was trapped in, but in actuality, it was very miniscule. The old man sees that Winston holds an interest in these old items, so he ventures upstairs with Winston to show him a bedroom that houses an antique twelve hour clock and an old photograph of one of London’s original churches.

Posted by: Desiree Jaramillo at November 6, 2013 09:29 AM

Desiree Jaramillo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
25 October 2013

Question 107 Part 2/Chapter 3: Although they never go back to the glen, where do they have a similar meeting? How is it alike/different?

Answer: Winston and Julia, following the instructions of Julia, meet again to engage in their sexual activities in an old broken down church that had been hit by an atomic bomb around thirty years prior. Both hiding places made perfect options due to their lack of any telescreens and hidden microphones. However, “the getting there was very dangerous,” because to get to these hiding places, Winston and Julia had to be absolutely sure that they were traveling without attracting any unwanted attention (113).

Posted by: Desiree Jaramillo at November 6, 2013 09:30 AM

Desiree Jaramillo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
30 October 2013

Question 2 Whole Novel: In Nineteen Eighty-Four, what technologies are available? How does technology affect the Party’s ability to control its citizens? In what ways does the Party employ technology throughout the narrative? Explain the implications.

Answer: The Inner Party has access to many technologies. Orwell writes that although horsepower is used to till the fields, book and other paper productions are made using machines. Also, the State utilizes processes somewhat similar to that of garbage chutes to completely destroy any documents that could be used to argue against the changes made to history. Telescreens and microphones are utilized to keep a constant watch on the citizens of the society and are even used to communicate with the people of society (209). Towards the end of the novel, the Inner Party puts it prisoners through extreme torture, such as electric shock, in order to make them do what they wanted

Posted by: Desiree Jaramillo at November 6, 2013 09:33 AM

Zarin Hamid
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and desire in Literature CA02
25 October 2013
Question: To what question does Julia say,”No,” Why is this significant?
Answer: Winston and Julia meet O’Brien who they believe will introduce them into the brotherhood and help them on their plans to a revolution. In part 2 of chapter 8 they are asked questions like this, “‘You are prepared, the two of you, to separate and never see one another again,’” to which Julia responds no because both Winston and Julia are in love and cannot bear to be without each other (153).

Posted by: Zarin Hamid at November 6, 2013 09:54 AM

Desiree Jaramillo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
28 October 2013

Question 158 Part 2/Chapter 9: What are the two aims of the Party? Summarize and explain. Why is this significant?

Answer: THE BOOK states that society is made up of three hierarchal classes, the Inner Party, the Outer Party, and the Proles. The first aim of the Inner Party is to maintain those class levels. To do this, the Inner Party must keep the lower classes so dependent and controlled that there will be no chance of rebellion. This entails that the Inner Party makes the rest of the Party actually believe that they are not living horrible lifestyles. This allows the Inner Party to remain in complete power. By convincing society that they are in a constant state of war, they are able to keep the prospect of rebellion at bay (175-77). The second aim of the Inner Party, as incredulous is it may seem, is to control the minds of society. By “freezing history” and giving themselves the power to change historical documents, they attempt to convince the people to believe whatever it is that the Inner Party wants them to believe. All documentation is written evidence that what the Inner Party wants the society to believe is historical fact.

Posted by: Desiree Jaramillo at November 6, 2013 09:57 AM

Zarin Hamid
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
28 October 2013
Question: What question does Winston ask O’Brien? Why is this significant?
Answer: Winston has a dream earlier on in the novel that impacts him, it is about O’Brien. Ever since he had the dream, he has a certain trusting perspective of O’Brien. In chapter 2 part 8 Winston asks, ‘” In the place where there is no darkness,”’ he is talking about meeting O’Brien in a place with no darkness which is the place in his dream (157). This place with no darkness gives Winston and the reader a sense of hope.

Posted by: Zarin Hamid at November 6, 2013 10:05 AM

Zarin Hamid
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
30 October 2013
Question: What does the girl provide as a treat? Why is it significant?
Answer: The girl has a slab of chocolate that she shares with Winston this is a treat for him. It is significant because it is bringing back some sort of memory within him yet he is pushing it away. In Part two of chapter 2 the Winston describes the chocolate as, “The taste was delightful,” obviously he has not had chocolate in a while and therefore it is something very close to him (108). The chocolate symbolizes his past since he has a memory that is trying to push through to him. It also foreshadows that we will find out about his past because of the symbolic chocolate.

Posted by: Zarin Hamid at November 6, 2013 10:18 AM

Group 1:
McKenzie Burns
Connor Schaefer
Abdolaziz Alsaif
Cheyenne DeMaggio
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
6 November 2013

Question #16:
Following his capture in Mr. Charrington’s spare room, Winston
undergoes a process of “philosophical cleansing” and re-education against which he
valiantly, but unsuccessfully fights. Discuss Winston’s “capitulation” at the hands of
O’Brien. How is Winston brought to “love Big Brother?” In sacrificing Julia, how has
Winston, in essence, signaled his own end?

Answer:
When Winston is captured by the thought police, he is mentally and physically tortured by O'brien. This torture conditions his thought process in a way to take his mind off of Julia, and put it towards Big Brother. The torture climaxes when O'brien decides to use Winston's biggest fear of rats against him. Winston is forced to exclaim "Do it to Julia! Not me! Julia! I don't care what you do to her" (Orwell 256). This is a huge turn around from how much he loved her to begin with. This signaled Winston's breaking point, the end of his own thoughts, because now that he did not love julia, he was forced to conform to what the party wanted him to be.

Posted by: Cheyenne DeMaggio at November 6, 2013 10:23 AM

Darius Anderson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
6 November 2013

Question: Why does Winston think his mother and father had to die?

Answer: Winston believes that his parents had to “die in order that he might remain alive (Orwell 26).”

Posted by: Darius Anderson at November 6, 2013 11:17 AM

Darius Anderson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
6 November 2013

Question: Why can’t the old man get a pint? Winston get any important information concerning the Past from the old man?
Answer: The old man cannot get a pint because they no longer serve pints, “liter and half liter- that’s all we serve” the barman told the old man (Orwell 78). And despite questioning the old man Winston got no important information of use out of him except “a rubbish heap of details (Orwell 81).”

Posted by: Darius Anderson at November 6, 2013 11:19 AM

Darius Anderson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
6 November 2013
Question: How does Winston react to the rats?
Answer: Winston reacts in a terrified frantic to the rats, “you’ve gone quite pale” Julia comments
of Winston upon the seeing of the rats (Orwell 128). Winston states after that “It’s nothing. I
don’t like rats that’s all (Orwell 128).”

Posted by: Darius Anderson at November 6, 2013 11:20 AM

Darius Anderson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
6 November 2013
Question: How does Winston react to the rats?
Answer: Winston reacts in a terrified frantic to the rats, “you’ve gone quite pale” Julia comments
of Winston upon the seeing of the rats (Orwell 128). Winston states after that “It’s nothing. I
don’t like rats that’s all (Orwell 128).”

Posted by: Darius Anderson at November 6, 2013 11:20 AM

Destiny Hubbard, Jasmine Charlton, Rache Robinson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
5 November 2013
(Group 3 Question #19)
Question: In the final analysis, how accurate was Orwell in his vision of the future? In what ways does our contemporary society compare to his idea of society in Nineteen Eighty-Four? Are there examples in which he was correct? What is most opposite? Do you see a potential for aspects of Orwell’s “vision” to come true? If so, explain them.
Answer: Orwell’s “vision” was accurate when talking about certain things, such as “the person that controls the present also controls the past and future”, but we believe his book is an over-exaggeration of today’s government. The things that are true in his book are as follows: the news only tells you want they want you to hear, those that go to war actually believe that they are doing so for the sake of peace, the government, “Big Brother”, controls the finances of the country, and the government is always watching. The things that are different are that in our society we are able to not only love, but to express our love, for someone other than the government. Also, whereas in the book they do not have access to their own history, we have records that we can look back upon to verify what we have been told. There are certain things that happened in Orwell’s book that we can see happening in the future: a dictatorship from a government to “Big Brother’s” equivalency, technology such as telescreens watching what we do, and the change in the education system.

Posted by: Destiny Hubbard, Jasmine Charlton, Rache Robinson at November 6, 2013 11:34 AM

Jasmine Collins
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL: Love and Desire in Literature CA01
6 November 2013
Question: 21. Whole Novel: Prior to meeting her, Winston fantasizes about Julia in violent, humiliating ways. Later, he describes in his diary an encounter with a middle-aged, toothless prostitute. How do you account for these thoughts? How does Winston’s understanding of women change after his first liaison with Julia? As with ALL homework questions for this course, use quoted passages from the actual text (with MLA in-text/parenthetical citations) to support your answer; No drop quotes. All quoted material must have a proper lead-in device and a lead out statement.
Answer: Winston’s fantasizes about Julia in such violent ways; one action was to “flog her to death with a rubber truncheon”(Orwell 13). And then he later describes his act of adultery with a prostitute (Orwell 56-61). I believe that Winston is sexually frustrated, well especially when he was with his wife and he felt that he needed to cheat on her. With Julia, he just hates her because “she was young and pretty and sexless” (Orwell 13). Winston’s understanding of women has changed, by him seeing them in a different light because he was with someone as rebellious as Julia.

Posted by: Jasmine Collins at November 6, 2013 04:53 PM

Zarin Hamid
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
1 November 2013
Question: From her first appearance as “the dark-haired girl,” through to the end of the novel, Julia is a key figure in Nineteen Eighty-Four. Trace the path of Julia in relation to Winston’s life; in what ways does she influence him? Did you trust her initially? Overall, do you feel she had a positive or negative impact upon him?
Answer: Julia does influence Winston in his idea that not all hope is lost. He also does not feel completely alone in the world because of his ideas. When talking to Julia they both discuss their views of society and how it pertains to them, as they dream of escaping. Initially I knew that she had to have some sort of impact on the novel since she was introduced and Winston would have fantasies about her. I think her role with him was neutral because in the end the outcome for the both of them was in the middle. They did not die but they were no longer attracted to each other or their views anymore. In the last part of the book there relationship to one another is described as, “He knew it as though instinctively that they now took almost no interest in his doings,” which is the meaning of sex and how they used to be (261).

Posted by: Zarin Hamid at November 6, 2013 10:48 PM

Christopher Lavie Mienandy
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210 CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
7 March 2014

QUESTION #43:
When does Winston first believe he heard the word “Ingsoc”?

ANSWER:
At the end of chapter 3, Winston tries to remember when the Party has been founded. He also thinks that he never heard the word “Ingsoc” before 1960: “He did not believe he had ever heard the word Ingsoc before 1960” (Orwell 32).

Posted by: christopher lavie mienandy at March 7, 2014 11:35 PM

Alison Schucht
Dr. Burgsbee L. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
8 March 2014

QUESTION #41:
What is Winston's decision about the past?

ANSWER:
Winston ultimately decides that the past "had not merely been altered, it had actually been destroyed" (Orwell 31).

Posted by: Alison Schucht at March 8, 2014 10:18 AM

Hosameddine Elnehmani
Dr. B. Lee Hobbes
ENG-210 Love and desire in Literature CA01
10 March 2014

QUESTION #40:
Part 1/ chapter 3: Why is the Past to be wiped away?


ANSWER:
The question is specifying Party Slogan who controls the past and has the ability to control the future in the same time. The Party Slogan involves war, freedom, and ignorance (Orwell ch.3).In most cases, the past to some people might cause hurt. This is why people should look into future, and be positive.

Posted by: Hosameddine at March 9, 2014 11:49 AM

Emma De Rhodo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire in Literature
10 March 2014

QUESTION #31: What does Winston think happened to his mother and father?

ANSWER: When reflecting on what he remembers of his parents, Winston mentions, “The two of them must evidently have been swallowed up in one of the first great purges of the Fifties” (Orwell 28). Winston also says, “In some way the lives of his mother and his sister had been sacrificed to his own” (Orwell 28). He expresses his thoughts about how his mother died, “tragic and sorrowful in a way that was no longer possible” (Orwell 28). Winston speaks about how people express certain values and how families do not do such deeds for each other anymore (Orwell 28).

Posted by: Emma De Rhodo at March 9, 2014 04:19 PM

Daniella Zacarias
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
Love and Desire in Literature CA01
9.3.2014
Question #35
35.
Part 1/Chapter 3: Why does Winston sleep without nightclothes?
ANSWER:
“Winston wrenched his body out of bed – naked, for a member of the Outer Party received only three thousand clothing coupons annually, and a suit of pajamas was six hundred.” Orwell 31).

Posted by: Daniella Zacarias at March 9, 2014 08:34 PM

Franck Bayebanen
Dr. Bursgbee L. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love & Desire in Literature
10 March, 2014


Question: #42 How long has big brother (BB) existed in the party histories

Answer:
Big Brother appears to be a fictional character in the novel, the totalitarian dictator of Oceania. He is constantly propaganda in order to protect his interest over the inhabitants. At one point in 1984 Winston Smith, the protagonist of Orwell's novel, tries "to remember in what year he had first heard mention of Big Brother. He thought it must have been at some time in the sixties. Big brother seemed to have been created around the sixties.

Posted by: Franck Bayebanen at March 9, 2014 10:06 PM

Marie Ryan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire in Literature
9 March 2014

Question 51: Does Winston enjoy his work?

Answer: No he does not enjoy his work because at the beginning of chapter four the narrator says, " With a deep unconscious sigh which not even the nearness of the telescreen could prevent from uttering when his days work started, Winston pulled the speackwrite toward him..." (Orwell 37)

Posted by: Marie Ryan at March 9, 2014 10:25 PM

Pauline Helgesson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
9 March 2014

Question #36

Part1/Chapter 3: What does Winston do after his coughing fit?

ANSWER:

After overcoming his daily morning coughing fit, Winston begins with his mandatory exercise routine in front of the telescreen. A young and muscular woman, dressed in tunic and gym-shoes, led the training session.

”The pain of the coughing fit had not quite driven out of Winston’s mind the impression made by his dream, and the rhythmic movements of the exercise restored it somewhat” (Orwell, 28).

As you can clearly see from reading this passage, it helps Winston to do his mandatory exercise everyday after his coughing fits.

Posted by: Pauline Helgesson at March 9, 2014 11:17 PM

Anthony Jannetta
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire CA01
10 March 2014

QUESTION #32:
Part 1 / Chapter 3: Why does Winston think his mother and father had to die?

ANSWER:
At the beginning of chapter 3, Winston thought his mother and father "must die in order that he remain alive, and that this was part of unavoidable order of things” (Orwell 29).

Posted by: Anthony Jannetta at March 10, 2014 12:20 AM

Shamera Bryant
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire in Literature CA01
9 March 2014
Question #52:
What happens to people who displease the party?
Answer:
People who displeased the party were never heard of again. “Most commonly, people who had incurred the displeasure of the Party simply disappeared and were never heard of again” (Orwell 39).

Posted by: Shamera Bryant at March 10, 2014 03:05 AM

Will Fumero

Dr. Hobbs

3/8/14

Pt. 1 Ch. 4

Question:How does the Party destroy history and maintain power?

They manipulate all of the records and all of the peoples memories. They manipulate the past and present to form the future, and the people can not record any memories of their own.

Posted by: William Fumero at March 10, 2014 03:52 AM

Alison Schucht
Dr. Burgsbee L. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
10 March 2014

QUESTION #1:
When does the story begin? What kind of day is it? How have the clocks been changed?

ANSWER:
"It was a bright cold day in April, and the clocks were striking thirteen" (Orwell 1). The opening sentence in Orwell's novel suggests that the story begins in April and that it was a beautiful, but cold day. "The clocks were striking thirteen" suggests that as opposed to a standard 12-hour clock, this novel uses military time instead of standard time. In other words, 13 can be represented as one o'clock PM in standard time.

Posted by: Alison Schucht at March 10, 2014 12:16 PM

Trey Griseck
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG. 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
10 March 2014

Question #91
How does the party destroy the future?
Answer:
In this chapter, we learn that the mind control that the party has on the citizens also controls the future of the society that these people are going to continue to live in. For example, the man that was standing outside of the pub he asks him “how was life before the revolution”(Orwell 1)? This man’s memory of it all is so scattered that he cannot prove or tell him anything about the past even though he was there at the time. When Winston asks Mr. Charrington about life before the revolution, he has a little more control and answers by saying the names of a few churches. The party destroys the future because it has brainwashed these people to think the world is something that it is not. These people feel that whoever controls the past controls the future and in this case, since the party controlled the past they feel that they will also control the future.

Posted by: Trey Griseck at March 10, 2014 04:13 PM

Alison Schucht
Dr. Burgsbee L. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
10 March 2014

QUESTION #92:
Why does Winston go off on his own? What activities is he missing out on?

ANSWER:
Winston goes off on his own because he does not want to partake with the community center, and that evening "as he came out of the ministry the balminess of the April air had tempted him" (Orwell 72). Clearly, this steers him away from participating in the community center. Winston missed out on "the boring, exhausting games, the lectures, the creaking camaraderie oiled by gin..." (Orwell 72).

Posted by: Alison Schucht at March 10, 2014 06:15 PM

Paige Fowler
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
3 March 2014
Question: Part1/chapter4: What is Winston job?
According to the text Winston works at the Ministry of Truth where he works in the Record Department. He alters historical records to match the party’s original version. “A Kilometer away from the Ministry of Truth, his place of work…” (Orwell 2).

Posted by: paige fowler at March 11, 2014 01:24 AM

Paige Fowler
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
3 March 2014
Question: Part1 / Chapter7 : What is the significance of the picture showering the three men at the social function in New York?
The significance of the picture shows that the three men where in New York at the time and not in Eurasia committing treason as proclaimed by the Party. This pictures for Winston illustrates the dishonesty of the party. “Prominent in the middle of the group were Jones, Aaronson and Rutherford. There were no mistaking them..” (Orwell 69)

Posted by: paige fowler at March 11, 2014 01:25 AM

Marie Ryan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire in Literature
11 March 2014

Question 83:Why can't the old man get a pint? Winston get any information concerning the Past from the old man?

Answer: The man cannot get a pint because the pub does not have any. Evidence to support this is when the barman says, "Liter and half liter- that's all we serve" (Orwell 88). Winston does not get any useful information from the old man. This is evident when the narrator says, "One could question him all day without getting any real information" (Orwell 92).

Posted by: Marie Ryan at March 11, 2014 04:48 PM

Kyle McLeish
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210 CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
7 March 2014

Question #33 Chapter 3: What change has there been in emotion since Winston's mother died?

Answer:
Since Winston's mother died, death seems no longer tragic. Death feels like it occurs in everyday life.

Posted by: Kyle McLeish at March 11, 2014 05:14 PM

Kyle McLeish
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210 CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
11 March 2014

Question96
What is Mr. Charrington like?

Answer:
Mr. Charrington is the owner of the second hand store who has an accent. He is a widow and is age 63. He sells Wilson his journal.

Posted by: Kyle McLeish at March 11, 2014 05:21 PM

Daniella Zacarias
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
Love and Desire in Literature CA01
11.3.2014
Question #1
1.
Part 1/Chapter 8: Does Winston intend to come back to the shop?
ANSWER:
Yes. Winston drops by the shop a second time after having bought the journal, this time he buys a glass paperweight with a piece of coral in it. “Yes, he thought again, he would come back. He would buy further scraps of beautiful rubbish.” (Orwell 100). In a way, we know that Winston has made up his mind on rebelling his own little rebellion by purchasing from Mr Charrington and speaking to him about the past.

Posted by: Daniella Zacarias at March 11, 2014 08:01 PM

Daniella Zacarias
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
Love and Desire in Literature CA01
11.3.2014
Question #88
88.
Part 1/Chapter 8: Does Winston intend to come back to the shop?
ANSWER:
Yes. Winston drops by the shop a second time after having bought the journal, this time he buys a glass paperweight with a piece of coral in it. “Yes, he thought again, he would come back. He would buy further scraps of beautiful rubbish.” (Orwell 100). In a way, we know that Winston has made up his mind on rebelling his own little rebellion by purchasing from Mr Charrington and speaking to him about the past.

Posted by: Daniella Zacarias at March 11, 2014 08:02 PM

Hosameddine Elnehmani
Dr. B. Lee Hobbes
ENG-210 Love and desire in Literature CA01
12 March 2014

QUESTION #81:
Part 1/ Chapter 8: What is a steamer? Who warns Winston?

ANSWER:
Winston had pointed excitedly to the sky. “Steamer!” he yelled. “Look out, guv’nore! Bang over’ead! Lay down quick!” (Orwell 74). A “Steamer” was a nickname which, the proles for a reason applied to rocket bombs. The proles were nearly right when they gave Winston the right warning.

Posted by: Hosameddine at March 11, 2014 09:22 PM

Christopher Lavie Mienandy
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210 CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
11 March 2014

QUESTION #76:
What happened to the leaders of the revolution by 1960?

ANSWER:
By 1960, the leaders of the revolution had been wiped out. Some of them disappeared, and other had been executed after their public trials: “The story really began in the middle Sixties, the period of the great purges in which the original of the Revolution were wiped out once and for all” (Orwell 66). Goldstein escaped, and Big Brother was the only one left. Only three men survived (Jones, Aaronson, and Rutherford). In 1965, they had been arrested, and they “vanished for a year or more” (Orwell 66). After confessing crimes against the Party, they had been forgiven and “given posts which were in fact sinecures but which sounded important” (Orwell 67).

Posted by: christopher lavie mienandy at March 11, 2014 10:12 PM

Emma De Rhodo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire in Literature
12 March 2014

QUESTION #97: What does Winston think when he sees the dark-haired girl outside Mr. Charrington’s shop?

ANSWER: When Winston sees the dark-haired girl outside Mr. Charrington’s shop, it apparently becomes clear that this woman is spying on Winston (Orwell 85). The narrator says that this woman had to have walked behind Winston to the place where they both were at this point since thinking it was just a coincidence that they were “walking on the same evening up the same obscure back street, kilometers distant from any quarter where Party members lived” was unreasonable (Orwell 85).

Posted by: Emma De Rhodo at March 11, 2014 10:25 PM

Franck Bayebanen
Dr. Bursgbee L. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love & Desire in Literature
12 March, 2014
Question: #3 how is Winston reprimanded?

Answer:
Winston dreams about the death of his mother he feels responsible for that. During his thoughts and his dream a voice is reprimanding for not being fit while other people are fighting in the front line “We don’t all have the privilege of fighting in the front line, but at least we can all keep fit” (Orwell 32).

Posted by: Franck Bayebanen at March 12, 2014 12:27 AM

Devon Bell
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210 Love and Desire in Literature CA01
12 March 2014

Question #80 How does the social structure of the Party maintain control?

Answer: The proles are for the most part kept in their places. No one is being disobedient. The author states that the proles are not conscious (Nineteen Eighty-Four chapter 7). Saying these people are not aware of what is going on around their lives. Until they realize the wrongdoing of their lives. The party will continue, hence, no other group will stop it. The proles are the majority. The final say truthfully lies in their hands; they are simply illiterate to the facts.

Posted by: Devon Bell at March 12, 2014 07:27 AM

Pauline Helgesson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
11 March 2014

Question #93 Part 1/Chapter 8

What is life like in the proles’ end of London?

ANSWER:

The life for the Proles in the end of London was very hard. They were kept in a state of political ignorance, and almost all of them were poor. One good and important thing though was that the Proles were free and not controlled by BB.

“He was somewhere in the vague, brown-colored slums to the north and east of what had once been Saint Pancras Station”.

Posted by: Pauline Helgesson at March 12, 2014 08:41 AM

Anthony Jannetta
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire CA01
12 March 2014

QUESTION #79:
Part 1 / Chapter 7: What does Winston decide?

ANSWER:
At the end of chapter 7, Winston decides “he was writing the diary for O’Brien, TO O’Brien” (Orwell 103).

Posted by: Anthony Jannetta at March 12, 2014 08:48 AM

Peter Grana
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
Love and Desire in Literature
10, March 2014
Question #90
Part 1/ Chapter 8: What words does he read on the coin?
Answer:
Winston was contemplating over the Party, O’Brien, and Big Brother. His thoughts had come to him and then picked up a coin from his pocket. With it, the Party slogan was embedded in it. “Just as he had done a few days earlier, he slid a coin out of his pocket and looked at it. The face glazed up at him, heavy, calm, and protecting: but what kind of smile was hidden beneath the dark moustache? Like a leaden knell the words came back at him:
War is Peace,
Freedom is Slavery,
Ignorance is Strength” (Orwell, Paragraph 63).

Posted by: Peter Grana at March 12, 2014 09:25 AM

Allison Grohovsky
Dr.B Lee Hobbs
ENG 210 CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
12 March 2014

QUESTION:98:
How does ones own body betray a person?

ANSWER: Any subtle movement showing the hate of the party can cost you your life. This is showed during the party scene with Winston. While everyone accepts the lies the propaganda is telling them, he doesn't and he questions their motive behind it. "In principle a Party member had no spare time, and was never alone except in bed. It was assumed that when he was not working, eating, or sleeping he would be taking part in some kind of communal recreation: to do anything that suggested a taste for solitude, even to go for a walk by yourself, was always slightly dangerous. (part 1 ch 8)

Posted by: Allison Grohovsky at March 12, 2014 09:29 AM

Hosameddine Elnehmani,Trey, Paige, Shamera
Dr. B. Lee Hobbes
ENG-210 Love and desire in literature CA01
12 March 2014

Group 5, Chapter 7
“Until they become conscious they will never rebel, and until after they have rebelled they cannot become conscious.” (Orwell 62).

The people are being referred in the quote. The proles will never rebel against the party, until they realize that they are treating them bad, and until the party is moved from power. The proles will not know if they could have lived a better life before the revolution started.

Posted by: hosameddine Elnehmani at March 12, 2014 11:05 AM

Kyle McLeish
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210 CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
12 March 2014

Question 115. Part 2/Chapter 4 How does Winston react to the rats?

Answer:
Winston is horrified of the rats even though they are common throughout London. They are known to attack children.

Posted by: Kyle McLeish at March 12, 2014 06:54 PM

Marie Ryan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire in Literature
13 March 2014

Question 121: Does the couple have any feeling of foreboding? Why, or why not? If so, explain.

Answer: Yes, the couple did have feeling of foreboding? This is evident the the narrator say, Both of knew- in a way it was never out of their minds- that what was happening now could not last long" (Orwell 151). The feels that they will eventually get caught and be put to death of this is when the narrator says, "There were times when the fact of impending death seemed as palpable as the bed they lay on..." (Orwell 151).

Posted by: Marie Ryan at March 13, 2014 12:04 PM

Emma De Rhodo, Chelsea, Kara, Marie
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire in Literature CA01
14 March 2014

QUESTION: Pick a significant passage in Chapter 6.

ANSWER: Winston is thinking about when he had an encounter with a prostitute, and from his leaving out the last part of the story, he seems as if he must have had sex with her (Orwell 55). Because he was remembering this event, he started having thoughts about how he must not express certain actions he has taken part in since he would be punished for this by the Party. He is controlled by the Party; even his sex life is controlled, as is evident through his thoughts after remembering his event with the prostitute and his remembering unpleasant sex with his wife Katharine (Orwell 55-56, 57-58). After he remembers his event with the prostitute, the narrator mentions, “Your worst enemy, he reflected, was your own nervous system. At any moment the tension inside you was liable to translate itself into some visible symptom” (Orwell 56). This is the quote our group chose as significant in Chapter 6.

Posted by: Emma De Rhodo at March 13, 2014 08:52 PM

Emma De Rhodo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire in Literature CA01
14 March 2014

QUESTION #125: To whom does Julia give credit for the invention of the airplane? What does this tell us about her? Does she care about who gets credit for such historical factoids? Why, or why not?
ANSWER: Julia gives credit to the Party for the invention of the airplane (Orwell 127). This fact shows that Julia is younger than Winston is, and she has been taught, most likely, to believe that the Party has created more than what Winston was taught to believe the Party had created when he was growing up (Orwell 127). Then, Julia does not care about who gets credit for such historical factoids (Orwell 127). She seems to not care about anything having to do with the Party (Orwell 129). The narrator mentions, concerning her feelings about speaking about the Party and aspects of society that exist because of the Party, “One knew that it was all rubbish, so why let oneself be worried by it?” (Orwell 129).

Posted by: Emma De Rhodo at March 13, 2014 09:30 PM

Hosameddine Elnehmani
Dr. B. Lee Hobbes
ENG-210 Love and desire in literature CA01
14 March 2014

QUESTION #113:
Part 2/ chapter 4: Do women in the party wear makeup? Why, or why not?


ANSWER:
No, I do not believe they did, but proles women did. Because for that is to lessen from the sexuality. The party Orthodoxy would not allow it. The text also mentions that Julia was sleeping in Winston’s arms. “Most of her make-up had transferred itself to his own face or the bolster, but a light stain of rouge still brought out the beauty of her cheekbone.” (Orwell 127).

Posted by: Hosameddine at March 13, 2014 10:10 PM

Pauline Helgesson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
13 March 2014

Question #109 Part 2/Chapter 3

What is Julia’s attitude towards the Party? Why does she feel that way?

ANSWER:

Julia is only 26 years old, which make her child of the Party era. Julia hates the Party but acts like she likes it in order to stay alive and get away with her plans. She understands, for instance, that it uses sexual repression to control the populace. She even has a better intuitive grasp of the Party’s methods than Winston does, planning their affair and often explaining aspects of the Party to him. Julia thinks she is a perfect party member in order to break the bug rules.

“Them, it appeared, meant the Party, and above all the Inner Party, about whom she talked with an open jeering hatred which made Winston feel uneasy, although he knew that they were safe here if they could be safe anywhere”.

The open, jeering and hatred way she talks about the Party, clearly shows her feelings. Even though she does not criticize it directly, you get it by looking at how uncomfortable Winston feel when she talks about the Party.

Posted by: Pauline Helgesson at March 13, 2014 10:53 PM

Christopher Lavie Mienandy
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210 CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
13 March 2014

QUESTION #103:
What does the girl provide as a treat? Why is it special?

ANSWER:
Julia gives Winston a piece of chocolate when they hide in the countryside: “She felt in the pocket of her overalls and produced a small slab of chocolate. She broke it in half and gave one of the pieces to Winston.” (Orwell 107). It is special because this chocolate is different from the one people usually eat: “It was dark and shiny, and was wrapped in silver paper. Chocolate normally was dull brown crumbly that tasted […] like the smoke of a rubbish fire.” (Orwell 107). Julia admits that she got that chocolate on the black market.

Posted by: christopher lavie mienandy at March 13, 2014 10:55 PM

Daniella Zacarias
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
Love and Desire in Literature CA01
12.3.2014
Question #116
116.
Part 2/Chapter 4: To what does Winston compare the paper-weight and the coral inside? What is the significance of this comparison?
ANSWER:
Winston compares the paper-weight to the room above Mr Charrington’s shop. “The paperweight was the room he was in, and the coral was Julia’s life and his own, fixed in a sort of eternity at the heart of the crystal.” (Orwell 147).

Posted by: Daniella Zacarias at March 13, 2014 11:40 PM

Franck Bayebanen
Dr. Bursgbee L. Hobbs
English 210CL Love and Desire CA01
14 March, 2014
Question: #105 where does Julia say they can meet once again? When? Why?

Answer:
Julia and Winston are having a relation together but they know they have to hide in order to enjoy totally their relation. Therefore Julia and Winston always meet in different places, they never meet to the same place twice. They usually choose place where they won’t be seen “ She named a place where they could meet after work , four evenings hence” (Orwell 112). At the end of their meeting they decide the next place they decide to meet “We may as well go back to the place in the wood” (Orwell 121).

Posted by: Franck Bayebanen at March 14, 2014 12:28 AM

Devon Bell
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210 Love and Desire in Literature CA01
14 March 2014

Question: At what does Julia throw her shoe at? Why?

Answer:
Julia throws her shoe because she saw a rat, ‘What was it?’ he said in surprise. ‘A rat (Orwell's 181). She stated that there are plenty of rats all over the place. She threw the shoe to scare the rat. I gave him a good fright, anyway.’ (Orwell's 181).

Posted by: Devon Bell at March 14, 2014 04:39 AM

Devon Bell, Kyle
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210 Love and Desire in Literature CA01
14 March 2014

Group
Since about that time, war had been literally continuous, though strictly speaking it had not always been the same war. For several months during his childhood there had been confused street fighting in London itself, some of which he remembered vividly. But to trace out the history of the whole period, to say who was fighting whom at any given moment, would have been utterly impossible, since no written record, and no spoken word, ever made mention of any other alignment than the existing one.

Response
What is being stated here is that his life has been a war ever since the war. He is saying that he has had a rather difficult life, what he has experienced is not that of an everyday lifestyle. This also shows a great sign of memory; he has the ability to remember old memories and share rather interesting details of them. A great childhood memory lives in his mind.

Posted by: Devon Bell at March 14, 2014 04:40 AM

Peter Grana
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
Love and Desire in Literature
12, March 2014
Question #108
Part 2/ Chapter 3: How old is Julia? Where does she work? Why might this be significant in understanding her character?
Answer:
Julia is 26 years old. She works for the Ministry of Truth in their Fiction Department and is also part of the Junior Anti- Sex League. This is important to her characterization because Julia is a free spirited woman working in a world of Anti intimacy towards love and erotica. “Julia was twenty-six years old. She lived in a hostel with thirty other girls ('Always in the stink of women! How I hate women!' she said parenthetically), and she worked, as he had guessed, on the novel-writing machines in the Fiction Department. She enjoyed her work, which consisted chiefly in running and servicing a powerful but tricky electric motor.” (Orwell, Paragraph 8).

Posted by: Peter Grana at March 14, 2014 09:21 AM

Peter Grana
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
Love and Desire in Literature
12, March 2014
Team #4 Question
Pauline, Peter, Anthony
Answer:
To alter the Identity of a former official of the Party for new developments in old records, Winston changes the records so Big Brother can never be wrong and thus he creates a new identity out of Comrade Ogilvy based on Comrade Withers, the former Party associate. “Suddenly there sprang into his mind, ready made as it were, the image of a certain Comrade Ogilvy, who had recently died in battle, in heroic circumstances. There were occasions when Big Brother devoted his Order for the Day to commemorating some humble, rank-and-file Party member whose life and death he held up as an example worthy to be followed.” (Orwell, 40/41).

Posted by: Peter Grana at March 14, 2014 09:22 AM

Will Fumero

Dr. Hobbs

Eng 210-CL

3/12/14


Question: Part 2 / Chapter 4: When Julia arrives, what does she have in her bag?

It was a tool bag form her workplace that contained a screwdriver, spanners, and some paper packets (Orwell pg.176)

Posted by: William Fumero at March 14, 2014 09:32 AM

Hosameddine Elnehmani
Dr. B. Lee Hobbes
ENG-210 Love and desire in literature CA01
14 March 2014

QUESTION:
a. What’s missing?
b. What’s been added?
c. How are they (from your imagination) is different from each other’s.
ANSWER:
(1954) minute 48.55_______ 1:05
She falls into his hands and leaves him a paper in his hand. Giving him a paper saying “I love you.” Winston searches in the forest. He meets Julie. Winston tells her he is married and has a kid. Julia does not care, and they kissed. They both will not give up their love. Julie says, “Let’s enjoy being alive.” The proles women singing from the window. When they meet in the room, she puts the dress on, and they start singing. She gets him tea. Winston makes the tea, and he gets scared from the rat and tells the story to Julia. In the end, he looks at the glass ball, and talks about how the world is small, and it is hard to get into it.

(1956) 26.00_________ 50:00
Big brother everyone shouting. She gives a paper to the man, and she leaves away. At lunch break, they meet in the hall. In the 1954 version the lunch hall is missing, and in this version it is added. Winston later on asks her at lunch when do you get out of work, she replies 18:30; she gives the location where to meet at 19:00 at the mountain south, pass the bridge. They met she says, “Hello” when they face it was not like the 1954 version where they go straight into kissing. They try to hide. Winston at first was scared, she might be wearing a microphone. Loud bombs sounds, they meet the next day in his apartment. She gets real dark coffee for him. While kissing and moving around he saw a rat, and panicked, and tries to kill it, but it escaped. Winston later told the story to Julia, about his sister.

(1984) minute is 29:00 _________?
This version of the movie has, a lot of missing parts, Winston meets Julia while passing by she slips and falls on the ground. He asked if she was okay. They had eye-contact. She had her shoulder tied with a piece of cloth. He finds a note written by her. He reads it then burns it. In a fully crowded scene, she tries to search for him. She finds him and gives him a piece of paper, so he will not forget where to meet. In the past two versions, the piece of paper was not included. He rides the train and goes to the location. In the first two versions, the train was missing. Children singing on board. He later walks long a long distant, and she suddenly walks behind him. The part that was added here was Julia getting naked, and they both had sex in the forest. They later meet in his apartment. Bed is added to the version they have sex again. Weeks later she comes with sugar, bread, mild, and green tea. The rest of the stuff were not included in the first two versions. In bed, he cries, he tells her the story, and how he came back, and did not find his mother and sister were gone. The room was covered with rats. He cried.

Posted by: Hosameddine at March 14, 2014 05:54 PM

Pauline Helgesson
Dr. B. Lee Hobbes
ENG-210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
14 March 2014
Questions:
What’s missing? What’s been added? How are they different from each other?
Video 1: The BBC's 1954 Cinematic Adaptation of Orwell's 1984
In this video, Julia falls into Winton’s hands leaving him a note expressing her feelings. The note said “I Love You”, leading him to search for her in the forest. He ends up finding Julia and starts telling her that he is married and has a child. This did not change Julia’s feeling for Winston, and they end up kissing. Julia convinces Winston to enjoy the basic fact of being alive since they have not been caught or killed yet by Big Brother. Later on, they met up in the room where Julia puts on her dress, gives Winton tea, and they both start singing. At the end of the video Winston shows Julia the glass ball, which he describes to her as a peaceful place, he wished to live in.
Video 2: Columbia Pictures' 1956 Cinematic Adaptation of Orwell's 1984
The video starts with a crowd of people shouting Big Brother’s name out loud. When the crowd dispersed Julia slips a note to Winston, which says the same thing as in the first video. However, the way she hands him the note is very different. Both 1954 and 1956 videos are made in black and white. The difference between the setting in 1954 and 1956 is that there is no lunch hall in 1954. In order to meet up with Julia, Winston asks her the time she will be able to meet up, and Julia tells him 19:00 at the mountain south. The difference between both videos is that in 1956 both of them are afraid of being caught, and Winston suspects she might have a microphone on her. The next day, they met in the apartment and Julia offers Winston coffee instead of tea.

MGM's 1984 Cinematic Adaptation of 1984
This video is a newer version with color, but it differs greatly from the other two. Both the 1954 and 1956 video contains a lot of parts that are not included in this version. The way Julia hands Winston the note is very different. As she was walking past him with a cast on her arm, she slipped and caught his attention. Winston stopped and tried to help her up, and that was when she passed him the note, which he later burned. In the other two versions, Julia never passed him a note to decide where they were going to meet. An important detail in this version is that Winston took the train to meet up with Julia, which was not seen in the other two versions. Both previous videos only included kissing, while the newest one shows Julia completely naked, and making love in the forest. In all three videos, Winston and Julia always have the apartment as a place to meet up. In the first video he only tells Julia about his wife and child, but he never got to the point where he told her the story about his parents. Winston opens up to Julia about his past, and allowed himself to cry next to her.

Posted by: Pauline Helgesson at March 15, 2014 09:49 PM

Shamera Bryant
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire in Literature CA01
12 March 2014
Question #49:
Is this process of correction used in other media (Newspapers, mags etc..)?
Answer:
Yes, this process of correction was used in other media. “This process of continuous alteration was applied not only to newspapers, but to books,periodicals, pamphlets, posters, leaflets, films, sounds tracks, cartoons, photographs-to every kind of literature or documentation which might conceivably hold any political or ideological significance” (Orwell 35).

Posted by: Shamera Bryant at March 17, 2014 10:30 PM

Shamera Bryant
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire in Literature CA01
12 March 2014
Question #112:
While Winston is turned towards the window, what does J do?
Answer:
While Winston is turned towards the window J paints her face. “He turned round, and for a second almost failed to recognize her. what he had actually expected was to see her naked. But she was not naked. The transformation that had happened was much more surprising than that. She had painted her face”(Orwell 126).

Posted by: Shamera Bryant at March 17, 2014 11:46 PM

Marie Ryan
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire in Literature
18 March 2014

1)What is missing?

In all three film adaptations of Nineteen-Eighty Four none of them include that Julia found the hideout in the woods while lost on a Party hiking trip .Even though, it can be implied both the 1954 and 1956 versions don’t actual give any inclination that Julia and Winston have sex almost every time they meet in private. Both the1954 and 1984 versions do not include the bell tower scene. In the 1954 adaptation there is no meeting on Victory Square. Instead, Winston and Julia discuss when to meet in private for the first time at lunch. There is also no mention of Winston of writing in his diary between meetings. In the 1956 adaptation the note is passed during the two minutes of hate. However, in the book it is passed while they are both walking through a hallway. In this adaptation Party members are not wearing overalls. The clothing appears to look more like a suit. Also while in the hideout in the woods Julia says hello to get Winston’s attention, instead of putting her hand on his shoulder. In the 1984 adaptation there is not scene where Winston and Julia sit at lunch and talk about where to meet next. There is also no mention of Syme’s disappearance or the rats in the upper room.

2)What’s been added?

All three films add in that Julia has a dress in the first upper room meeting, when, in fact, she only has make-up at this point. The 1956 film adds the words “I must talk to you” to the note. It also adds in a scene where Winston is accused of being a thought criminal by, a girl named, Cynthia. In this version the name of the inner party member Winston believes he can trust is O’Connor. However, in the book his name is O’Brien. In the 1984 film the scene where Winston fixes Mrs. Parson’s drain is put in after Julia gives him the note.

3)How are they different from what you imagined?

I imagined Winston and Julia to look much like they did in the 1984 adaption of the book. I also pictured the upper room to look similar to the one in this film. I pictured the shop owner to luck similar to the way he did in the 1954 film. I never imagined the glass Winston bought from the shop owner was round. I thought it was flat and colorful. In my mind, the telescreens looked more like the televisions of today, and the speakwrites looked more like typewriters.

Posted by: Marie Ryan at March 18, 2014 07:24 PM

Christopher Lavie Mienandy
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210 CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
19 March 2014


In the first movie (1954), I noticed that the whole conversation with Julia at the cafeteria is missing. The meeting in the streets of London does not appear in this movie. In Orwell’s book, Winston tells her that he was very suspicious about Julia. He also wanted to rape her and to murder her. However, in this cinematographic adaptation Winston only admits that he wanted to kill her in the beginning.
In the second movie (1956), I saw that what is written in the paperweight is different from what is written in the book. In the movie, Julia wrote, “I need to talk to you, I love you." Nevertheless, in the book she only writes, “I love you." Unlike the first movie, Winston writes in his diary. When he the rats, Winston throws something at them while in the 1954 movie he just screams.
In the third and last movie (1984), Winston meets Julia in a corridor. At this occasion, she falls down in front of Winston and leave the paperweight on the ground when she leaves. Unlike the books and the first two movies, Winston repairs his neighbor plumbing after and he met Julia. I noticed that the people in the movie call each other “brother and sister” instead of comrade in the book. This adaptation is the only one to show Winston and Julia making love.
My favorite adaptation is, without a doubt, the one from 1956. Unlike the two other movies, Winston does not look weak. I found it realistic and close to Orwell’s book.

Posted by: christopher lavie mienandy at March 23, 2014 06:36 PM

Anthony Jannetta
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire CA01
24 March 2014

Differences between the book Nineteen Eighty-Four and the film interpretations

The film from 1954 is different from the book in several ways. The first element that is different between the book and the film is that Julia gave Winston the note “I love you” when she was falling (like in the book) but the difference is that they were not by themselves; there were people next to Julia, and Winston was at his desk. Also, it does not seem that Julia had her arm broken. Another difference I noticed was that Winston opened the note few seconds later (in the book he reads it eight minutes later). Winston was lucky in the movie because he could sit next to Julia at his first try (in the book he waits several time because she is not there at the same time as him, or she is with some friends, etc.). A missing part is that they did not meet at the Victory Square; Julia gave Winston the place and the time to meet in the wood at the cafeteria.

The film from 1956 is also different from the book in several ways. The first difference is that Julia gave Winston the note after the “Minute of Hate” and she did not fall. The second difference is that the note said “I must talk to you I love you” instead of “I love you”. At the cafeteria, Winston wanted to sit with her but his friends ask him to eat with them. While he was going toward his friends’ table, someone questioned him and in the meantime another man took his spot. He was free to sit with Julia. In the wood, Julia did not surprise Winston by touching his shoulder but by calling him from far. In this film, we notice that Winston was followed by the Thought Police. While Winston thought Julia was doing coffee, she was instead putting some make-up and wearing a nice dress.

The film from 1984 like the others is different from the book. Something that is different from the other films but similar to the book is that Julia had a broken arm when she feel and gave Winston the note. Unlike in the book, Winston and Julia did not meet at the cafeteria, they met at the Victory place instead. I do not know if it was written on the note or if they met over there by chance. Winston went to the wood by train. I noticed a difference in the wood, they made love the first time they saw each other in the wood. And she did not bring chocolate. Julia gave Winston a second hidden message in a pencil. To finish, Winston rent the room for $4 a week ($5 a week in the book).

Posted by: Anthony Jannetta at March 23, 2014 08:14 PM

Emma De Rhodo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
24 March 2014

QUESTION: Watch three excerpts from the film adaptation of Nineteen Eighty Four (1954,1956,1984) and answer the following questions: (a.) What is missing?, (b.) What has been added?, (c.) How are they different from how you imagined it?

ANSWER:
In the 1954 movie version of George Orwell’s novel Nineteen Eighty Four, Julia does not have chocolate with her when she and Winston meet together in the wood, but she does have chocolate at this part in the novel (Orwell 121). Furthermore, in this movie version, Julia does not tell Winston (as is mentioned in the book), while they are at in the clearing, that she has had sex with Party members multiple times (Orwell 125). On the other hand, the movie version does include the thrush’s song (Orwell 123-124). Also, in this movie version, Julia puts on makeup and a dress for Winston, but in the book she only puts on makeup the first time she surprises Winston and mentions that she will get a dress (Orwell 142). I believe that the part in which Winston goes to Julia in the crowd so they may speak is very significant since she ends up holding his hand, and this scene is not in the 1954 movie version of the book (Orwell 116).
In the 1956 film of Orwell’s novel, Julia gives Winston the note after the people are all screaming “’Big Brother!’” instead of her giving it to him when he helps her off of the ground as he does in the novel (Orwell 106). The book does not include the people screaming this exclamation. Also, in the 1956 film, a woman named Selena tells Winston he is a “thought criminal” after going behind him to a place to which he goes, and this scene does not occur in the novel. To continue, in this film, in the scene in which Winston is attempting to go sit with Julia in the canteen, Parsons asks for Winston’s “’contribution’” that would be made “’for the Party,’” and this encounter does not happen in the novel. I believe, however, that this encounter is important because it shows how much of an impact the Party has on the people of Oceania, giving an example of this impact through Parsons’ personality and actions at different points in the book and movie (Orwell 148-149).

Posted by: Emma De Rhodo at March 24, 2014 12:40 AM

Meshayla Williams
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210 CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
24 March 2014

Nineteenth-Eighty four

The three movies of “The eighteen-four” all indicate different interpretations of the book. In the first film made in 1954 it expresses Winston as I imagined him in the book, although it does not express Winston and the girl making love with each other. The tension between them felt very vague and not as romantic as the author George Orwell made it. In the second movie made in 1956, there was a more passionate connection between the two during the wood scene, they actually showed their clothes off of their body.
Although they did not show the girl take her clothes of, such as in the book it states, “She had torn her clothes off, and when she flung them aside it was with that same magnificent gesture by which a whole civilization seemed to be annihilated” (Orwell,15). There was also another scene in both of the movies missing, which was expressed in the book, “They flunged their clothes off and climbed into the huge machogary bed” (Orwell,179). In the flims they just show the two in the room talking and hugging not taking their clothes off or getting in the bed. However, in that scene after he attacked the rat both of the movies added Winston explain why he hates Rats; in the 1954 film it was because of his mother, and in the 1956 film it was because of his sister. The 1984 film, was the complete opposite of what I imagined while reading. The film seemed to add more intimate scenes and express a sexually connection between Winston and the girl.
In all three of the films Winston did not seem to contemplate on opening the letter although in the book he contemplates on it, “But there was another wilder possibility that kept raising wilder its head, throughout he tried vainly to suppress it” (Orwell,135). Also in the 1956 film the note read “I must talk to you, I love you” and in the book the note just said, “I love you” Moreover, the films clearly had different approaches than the book.


Works Citied
Sherborne, Michael. Nineteenth Eighty-four, George Orwell. Harlow: Longman, 2005. Print.

Posted by: Meshayla Williams at March 24, 2014 01:25 AM

Paige Fowler
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire
24th March 2014
Question#142- Part 2/chapter 5
What evidence of the past does Winston say he possessed? Why might this be
Important? To whom does/would this matter?

Answer
Winston says he possesses a paper about Jones, Rutherford, and Aaronson. These were 3 men who were accuse of committing a crime a specific location when in actuality they were not there. This showed the party dishonesty. This was very important because this picture provides concrete evidence of the past seeing that everything else is falsified. Winston shows that only he has evidence of the past but it is in his head. “After the thing is done, no evidence ever remains. The only evidence is inside my own mind ...”

Posted by: paige fowler at March 24, 2014 02:11 AM

Devon Bell
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210 Love and Desire in Literature CA01
24 March 2014

1954, 1956, 1984

In the book version of 1984 it is easy for one to use imagination to experience the book, the way in which he or she desires. I found the book version to be more exciting, it simply depends on how an individual sees things. The book and films were slightly different from one another, this is expected, hence, not everything from a book can be put into a film. In 1954 there seemed to be a jail like life style going on. In 1956, things were slightly similar; however, things were more futuristic. In 1984, the environment appeared more modern, as in today’s time. I imagined most of the book in today’s time. I figured a story written as early as that one would be similar to today. Differences throughout the book and films are definitely there. In 1956 added to the letter Julia gives to Winston is I must talk to you. The rat scene, which led to Winston becoming emotional, was rather different from the book. In 1954 and 1956, Winston is the one who strikes the rat to scare it, In the book Julia throws a shoe at it. While the 1984 film lacks the rat scene, yet still tells the story. The paperweight is interesting, The book share how he imagines Julia and himself together in the paperweight, While film shows him simply admiring it, who know what could be going through his mind. The book in my opinion, is for the most part, better than the movie, That is just

Posted by: Devon Bell at March 24, 2014 02:59 AM

William Fumero
Dr. Hobbs
3/14/14
Eng 210-cl

Question: What are the differences between the 3 clips and ch. 1-5 and part 2? Whats added? Whats missing? How is each different from how you imagined it?

Being film interpretations of the novel itself, the films had very much in common with that of the book. The story line followed that of the book, from couple falling love with each other to the atmosphere and time it is set in. The film adaptations themselves differ from each other as well as the book. The Love is one of the primary and significant differences. In the Novel the note clearly says “I love you” (pt. 2 pgs.110-111). In a couple of the clips, this message is displayed slightly different. In the Earlier version, 1956 Hollywood, The note says “I must talk to you. I love you”. This film also featured a sit down scene where the 2 converse at a table during lunch, something that is in with the novel but not the BBC clip (pg.110-116) They all got the love affair scene correctly, however by meeting in outskirt woods. The films themselves are very much different with the styles of clothing and the portrayal of some characters, and this made my vision of the story slightly different than what was portrayed from my own reading. Despite the different creative influences in each of the films, the directors and producers all did a fine job in making sure the adaptation went along closely with the book, and for that I applaud them.

Posted by: William Fumero at March 24, 2014 05:11 AM

Kyle McLeish
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210 CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
22 March 2014

1954 BBC
I love you note was given why he was in the office.

1956
The love you note says I must talk to you I love you.

1984
A helicopter flies in between two buildings. When he receives the I love you note, he throws it into a fire. This movie used more technical equipment due to being filmed in 1984. The story was changed because of this and they were able to use cars and phones that were not in the previous two films.

Posted by: Kyle McLeish at March 24, 2014 07:57 AM

Shamera Bryant
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire in Literature CA01
23 March 2014
3 Excerpts:

In the 1954 excerpt Julia acts as if she is injured to slip a note to Wilson that reads “I love you." As for in the 1956 clip she slips him a note after a chant in which the note reads “I must talk to you I love you." In the 1984 clip, she dramatically falls to the ground seeking his attention to get a note to him which read “I love you." As we see from just this one scene all three scenes are showing the difference and two a similarity.
There were numerous of differences throughout all three of the clips. In one clip, she doesn’t ask him to turn his head as she applies her makeup while, in another, it is something he just turns around and see. In the first video which would be the 1954 one he tells Julia about his sister being eaten by the rats were like in the 1956 and 1984 clips he just tells her that he is frighten of them and mentions something about his sister. Another difference that stuck out to me was in the 1984 video they had an intimate scene when they met up. It sparks my attention to why this did not happen in any one of the other clips? Does it have anything to do with when it was put out? Or was this clip just adding a bit more exaggeration to the story.
Winston being followed for acting suspiciously was always something that was new. The fact that, in the 1984 clip, it showed her in full nude was also something new an unexpected. The different places that the two would slip notes at and meet at were new. A scene in the 1954 and the 1956 room looked totally different. The 1956 room looks cozier.
Some parts were different from what I imagined it to be in the sense that I was not expecting all the emotions. For example referring to the nude scene again I didn’t expect for that to happen in the 1984 clip. Although it is more modern and I can see how it is interrupted I was not expected. For the most part, I imagined it to go down the same way. Most of it was pretty accurate and shined light on some part I did not understand.

Posted by: Shamera Bryant at March 24, 2014 08:49 AM

Daniella Zacarias
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
Love and Desire in Literature CA01
23.3.2014
Book vs Film Adaptations
Watch three excerpts from film adaptations of Nineteen eighty-four 1954, 1956, and 1984. These versions are based on Part II chapters 1-5. What is missing in the film version, that is in the book? What has been added? How is each adaptation different from how you imagined it?
ANSWER:
In all three adaptations, the language seems intelligent (this might be due to the want of a general audience), whereas I had imagined a very simplistic and limited version of English. Also in all three films, Winston’s physical appearance changes from how it is described in the book. Winston in 1956 is very much the stereotypical American hero; he is largely built, and does not really feel fear when he sees the rat in the room, he instead seems angry and disgusted. Winston in 1954, when he sees the rat, it is obvious that he fears them, and the emotional trauma from his past is brought up at their sight. This Winston seems younger than what I had imagined. The 1984 Winston fits the age description of Winston in the book, however since I first read the book I have imagined Ricky Gervais as Winston.

Posted by: Daniella Zacarias at March 24, 2014 09:20 AM

Peter Grana
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
Love and Desire in Literature
23, March 2014
Nineteen Eighty-Four film Excerpt Evaluation

Answer:
A) What’s Missing?
From each excerpt there is a missing part of how each of the scenes are conducted. There is a distinguishing change in the character appearance, emphasis on the lines acted, background scenery, etc. In terms od the structure of the excerpts arrangement of the story timeline, there is little difference it is just how differently they are conducted. That shows the missing material between the three versions.
B) What’s Been Added?
What has been added for each version and its respective successor is the different emphasis on how each scene is appropriately conducted in accordance with the story’s basis. The cinematic versions of the story is consistently upgraded to visualize a difference in perspective on the story and it’s goal of interpreting the meeting and recognition of love between Winston and Julia. For instance the stress of musical score seen in the 1954 version on the love of the two tell that their love is a danger which fits in with what the story intended. Whereas the latter from 1956 conducts a difference by stressing scenery and action difference that was not entirely focused on in the prior. The rat scene supports this as both scenes are conducted differently.
C) How are they (How it each) different from how you imagined it?
The way I had imagined in my head via the storyline of the book was more resembling to the interpretation of the 1954 BBC serial because of the downscale of the scene watched. There was some similarity in the 1984 version that I had imagined as well in terms of cinematic visual style but pertaining to my more simplistic vision of pure act and interpretation, the 1954 version closely fits. The difference of the versions presents different perspective of how each scene from the book is showcased and explained in their own way. Each of the filmmakers intended their signature look and style towards the film, stressing their view of the actions of the characters, play of the scenery and visual cinema, the approach and evolution of cinematic erotica, etc. The difference is in the detail of interpretation towards the story’s purpose each of the productions tries to facilitate.

Posted by: Peter Grana at March 24, 2014 09:28 AM

Trey Griseck
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG. 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
24 March 2014

Question #207
How do O'Brien and Winston each define existence?
Answer:
Near the end of the book when Winston is in the ministry of love and talking to O'Brien asking him about Big Brother's existence, he says "Does He Exist in The Same Way I Exist" (Orwell 1). O'Brien replies, "You do not exist" (Orwell 2). The two men have a different understanding of what they feel it means to exist on earth. O'Brien meaning behind existence is that whatever you personally believe is real actually exists. On the other hand Winston believes that to exist you must be able to visually see what you believe is existing.

Posted by: Trey Griseck at March 24, 2014 02:28 PM

Pauline Helgesson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
24 March 2014

Question #204

Part 3/Chapters 1-3: Why does O’Brien want to convince Winston that two plus two equals five? Why is this significant?

ANSWER:

O'Brien is trying to convince Winston with the statement "two plus two equals five," to show that he has accepted anything Big Brother has to say. O'Brien wants to see how long time it takes until Winston gives into the Party, cause then he knows that he has full power over him.

“The body is an extension of the mind and the mind is only the total of the body’s experience”. This idea is illustrated when O’Brien convinces Winston that 2+2=5.

Posted by: Pauline Helgesson at March 24, 2014 07:19 PM

Hosameddine Elnehmani
Dr. B. Lee Hobbes
ENG-210 Love and desire in literature CA01
25 March 2014

QUESTION # 212:

Part III / Chapters 1-3: What does it mean to “capitulate” What might this word have to do with this part of the novel? Explain

ANSWER:
The meaning of “capitulate” is to surrender, and give up the resistance that is taking place. In this novel, I believe the best portion that outburst this word “capitulate” is when O’Brien seized Winston’s shoulder and spun him round so that he was facing him (Orwell 242). He then voices him by saying, “Look at the condition you are in” he said. “Look at this filthy grime all over your body. Look at the dirt between your toes. This also shows that Winston had surrendered to O’Brien from the first place when he was inquired to take his clothes off.

Posted by: Hosameddine at March 25, 2014 09:56 PM

Franck Bayebanen
Dr. Bursgbee L. Hobbs
English 210CL Love and Desire CA01
26 March, 2014

Question: #215 Why are the common criminals and political prisoners treated differently in the temporary lock-up? Explain
Answer:
The goal of the party is to control human being mind. In order to do that they constantly say this sentence: Who controls the past controls the future. Who controls the present controls the past.
The common prisoners had more freedom than political prisoners because they didn't betray the party. The pain that Winston faces in the prison comes from the fact that the party considers him to be a betrayer. Therefore political prisoners are tortured and abused “suddenly he realized what was the matter. The man was dying of starvation” (Orwell 209).

Posted by: Franck Bayebanen at March 25, 2014 11:42 PM

Chelsea Dickenson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire in Literature CA01
27 March 2014

Question 211: What brought Winston to tears? Explain.
Answer: After Winston is brought into a cell with four telescreens that monitor his every move, he was interrogated and abused for weeks on end. O’Brien, who works for the Ministry of Love, oversees Winston’s torture sessions and eventually becomes someone who Winston finds himself loving. He begins to feel this way because O’Brien takes the pain away and continuously brain washes him into thinking what he is doing is the correct way of curing him. Winston was in the room for much longer than he originally thought, for when he was told to look in the mirror his body was completely transformed and deteriorated. “He was aware of his ugliness, his gracelessness, a bundle of bones in filthy underclothes sitting weeping in the harsh white light; but he could not stop himself” (Orwell 273). Because Winston saw himself in such a terrible manner, he wept. He then blames O’Brien, who he cares for, for doing such a thing to him. In the end, O’Brien tells Winston that he knew this was going to happen the moment he began his diary.

Posted by: Chelsea Dickenson at March 27, 2014 08:18 PM

Paige Fowler
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire
24th March 2014
Video Comparison
QUESTION: What’s missing? What’s been added? How are they (from your imagination) is different from each other’s.
ANSWER:
Film #1 (1954)
This film is the oldest out of the films and do not have a continual fluidity between scenes. This film has many aspects missing what was seem in future films. The connection between Winston and the dark-haired girl (Julia) was not there until she mysteriously passes him a note. Also, the hate riot, crowd of people and the intimate scene between Winston and Julia was missing from this film. The rat scene was more of a panic attack that allow him to speak about his pass was not seen in other films. The film added dramatic background music to draw attention to the note. This film is different from my imagination by Julia being less flirtatious as preserved in the book. Also, Julia and Winston love making scene was non-existent.
Film #2 (1956)
This film was dramatically different from the previous film. Winston was missing his slim, dull appearance. In this film he appeared well feed with a more built body structure. Julia appearance was also different, instead of her having dark hair she had blond hair; a significant difference from the first film and the book. In this film they added more people in the surroundings, Julia was not hurt by the paperweight in this film as scene in the first one. A teloscreen was added and the note was slipped to Winston rather than trying to help Julia, the note also read “I need to talk to you” rather than “I love you”. The hate riots was added and the directions to the meeting place was written down instead of by mouth like in the first film. This film also added the act of Winston writing in his diary as time goes on with him and Julia. The rat scene was also different rather than being afraid, Winston tries to kill the rat immediately and does not go into detail about his past.
Film #3 (1984)
This film is more modern than the previous films. Evolving from black and white to color films. This modern version also has major differences from the second and first films. Julia was not hurt by the paperweight nor was she in a room full of people when she passed Winston the note. Her hand was injured and in a sling, a conversation between Winston and Julia was added before the note was past. A more realistic way of doing things not seen in the previous films. The communication patterns between Winston and Julia during hate week were also different. Also, an explicate sex scene was added to this film. A rat scene was seen at the beginning running over a dead body but none was scene in the room when he was with Julia. This film satisfied my imagination and perception about the book more than the two previous films.

Posted by: paige fowler at March 27, 2014 09:43 PM

Paige Fowler
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire
27th March 2014
Question #198 Part III / Chapters 1-3: Does Winston betray Julia in chapters one or two of Part three? Why, or why not? Explain.
Answer:
No, Winston does not betray Julia in this chapter. He doesn’t betray her because he loves her and has no real evidence that Julia actually betrayed him even though they told him she did. “What have you done with Julia ?” said Winston.. (Orwell 230).

Posted by: paige fowler at March 27, 2014 10:09 PM

Christopher Lavie, Alison Schucht, Bri Waller, Danielle Zacarias
Dr. Burgsbee L. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
28 March 2014

QUOTE:
"Don't you see that the whole aim of Newspeak is to narrow the range of thought? In the end we shall make thoughtcrime literally impossible, because there will be no words in which to express it. Every concept that can ever be expressed exactly by one word, with its meaning rigidly defined and all its subsidiary meaning rubbed out and forgotten" (Orwell 46).

ANSWER:
This quote is not only highly significant to this chapter, but also the entire novel itself. At this point of time, Winston and Syme are out to eat for lunch and Syme is telling Winston that Newspeak is aiming to limit the range of thought to put an end to thoughtcrime. This is a powerful thought in that no one in this society will ever be able to rebel since no one is capable of having any sort of independent thought, which is considered to be thoughtcrime. This is significant because this takes away any sort of independence in this society that anyone ever had, an identity truly does not exist in this novel.

Posted by: Alison Schucht at March 28, 2014 08:43 AM

Alison Schucht
Dr. Burgsbee L. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
28 March 2014

QUESTION 104:
How do Winston and Julia spend their time? How does it fit in with what is allowed?

ANSWER:
Winston and Julia spend their time in a very secluded place where no one else ever travels to. They spend their time generally getting to know one another in this chapter. This fits in with what is allowed because "there were no telescreens," however, "but there was always the danger of concealed microphones" (Orwell 104). This way, they are not constantly being watched over by Big Brother.

Posted by: Alison Schucht at March 28, 2014 08:59 AM

Christopher Lavie Mienandy
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210 CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
29 March 2014

QUESTION #206:
According to O’Brien, why does the party seek power? How does it differ from Winston’s response? Explain.

ANSWER:
According to O’Brien, the Party only seeks power for “its own sake” (Orwell 234). The Party does not care about anything else than having the power: “We are not interested in the good of others; we are interested solely in power. Not wealth or luxury or long life or happiness; only power, pure power.” (Orwell 234). Winston does not know the answer to that question. What matters to him is to give O’Brien a correct answer to avoid being tortured again. Thus, Winston responds to O’Brien in these words: “You are ruling over us for our own good […] you believe that human beings are not fit to govern themselves.” (Orwell 234

Posted by: christopher lavie mienandy at March 29, 2014 03:49 PM

Alison Schucht
Dr. Burgsbee L. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
30 March 2014

QUESTION #200:
Quoting from the text, list all of the things to which Winston confesses to in Chapter Two. How many things are there?

ANSWER:
"He confessed to the assassination of eminent Party members, the distribution of seditious pamphlets, embezzlement of public funds, sale of military secrets, sabotage of every kind. He confessed that he had been a spy in the pay of the Eastasian government as far back as 1968. He confessed that he was a religious believer, and admirer of capitalism, and a sexual pervert. He confessed that he had murdered his wife, although he knew, and his questioners must have known, that his wife was still alive. He confessed for years he had been in personal touch with Goldstein and had been a member of an underground organization which had included almost every human being he had ever known" (Orwell 216). Winston confesses to twelve different things.

Posted by: Alison Schucht at March 30, 2014 03:20 PM

Emma De Rhodo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire in Literature CA01
31 March 2014

QUESTION #216: 216. Part III / Chapters 1-3: Up until this point, what is something that has been said about the Ministry of Love building? How might the lack of windows in the Ministry of Love be symbolic? Hint: it might have something to do with what Siddhartha(and, the Buddha) was after.

ANSWER: At the beginning of Part Three, Winston is said to be probably in the Ministry of Love building (Orwell 225). It is said that the building has tall ceilings and does not have any windows, and the walls’ material is white porcelain (Orwell 225). Also mentioned is, “Concealed lamps flooded it [this building] with cold light, and there was a low, steady humming sound which he supposed had something to do with the air supply” (Orwell 225). The Ministry of Love’s not containing windows is also mentioned in the beginning of the story as well as the fact that this Ministry “was the really frightening one” (Orwell 4). Apparently, not just anyone could go into this Ministry’s building at any time, and there is “a maze of barbed-wire entanglements, steel doors, and hidden machine-gun nests” (Orwell 4-5). Obviously, the Ministry of Love, which is the Ministry that dealt with “law and order,” is not welcoming or actually exemplifying real love at all (Orwell 4). One can tell by the fact that there are not any windows that what is happening inside of the building is not desired by the Ministry for the public to view, which may mean that they are probably not performing actions that would be deemed acceptable by most people (probably not lovable actions) (Orwell 4). Also, by not allowing people viewing access and access inside of the building, this Ministry is not being welcoming to and clearly exemplifies the opposite of its name, showing the irony of its name (Orwell 4-5).

Posted by: Emma De Rhodo at March 30, 2014 06:12 PM

Marie Ryan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire in Literature
30 March 2014

Question 195: Why, according to O'Brien, is Winston in the Ministry of Love? What does he do while there? Will he be able to leave? If so, how?

Answer: According to O'Brien Winston is in the Ministry of Love because he is insane. Evidence of this can be found when O'Brien says, " shall I tell you why we have brought you here? To cure you! To make you sane!" (Orwell 253) O'Brien is trying to reform Winston's sanity by getting him to believe in everything the party stands for. One passage from the book that suggests he is trying cure Winston is when he says, "There are tree stages to your regeneration,... There is learning, there is understanding and there is acceptance. It is time for you to enter upon the second stage" (Orwell 260). Winston may be let go when they are done however the odds are not likely because on page 274 O'Brien says, "Everything is cured sooner or later. In the end we shall shoot you" (Orwell 274).

Posted by: Marie Ryan at March 30, 2014 09:21 PM

Will Fumero
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210-cl
3/30/14

Question: Part III/chapters 1-3 What is the last question that Winston asks O’Brien in Chapter 2, Part three? What is O’Brien’s answer? What is the Significance of this?
Answer:
Winston asks several questions. The first is asked on page 326 when he asks O’Brien what had happened to Julia. He then tells him that she betrayed him easily and voluntarily to Winston’s dismay. His second question is if whether or not Big Brother exists on page 327. His answer is yes, and that he exists within and as the party itself, making him seem omnipotent and immortal to certain degree. Winston’s asks his last question inquiring about what is in room 101 on page 328. He replies, “You what is in room 101. Everyone knows what is in room 101”. This is meant to strike fear into Winston, as if he indirectly tells him that an unknown and unwanted fate lies behind the door.

Posted by: William Fumero at March 30, 2014 10:23 PM

Anthony Jannetta
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire CA01
31 March 2014

QUESTION 203:
Part III/ Chapters 1-3: What is Winston’s attitude towards O’Brien during this part of the story? Support your answer with quotations.

ANSWER:
We can notice that Winston feels love towards O’Brien during this part of the story. Indeed, at several passages, the narrator says that Winston loves O’Brien. For example, we can see on the chapter 2 of the part 3, that Winston “had never loved [O’Brien] so deeply as this moment” (Orwell 318).

Posted by: Anthony Jannetta at March 30, 2014 10:42 PM

Meshayla Williams
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210 CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
Question
#50.) What are some of the jobs of the Ministry of Truth other than the Records department?

Answer:
One branch collected and destroyed all documents that have been superseded and due for destruction.
“The largest section of the Records Department, far larger than the one on which Winston worked, consisted simply of persons whose duty it was to track down and collect all copies of books, newspapers, and other documents which had been superseded and were due for destruction” (Orwell,51)

Posted by: Meshayla Williams at March 31, 2014 02:57 AM

Meshayla Williams
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210 CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01

Question
#99.) Why does Winston wonder about church bells ringing in London?

Answer:
It was an illusion, because he thought he had heard the bells before but in reality he has never heard them before.
“Winston sat for a minute or two gazing at his empty glass, and hardly noticed when his feet carried him out into the street again. Within twenty years at the most, he reflected, the huge and simple question, ‘Was life better before the Revolution than it is now?“ (Orwell,122).

Posted by: Meshayla Williams at March 31, 2014 02:59 AM

Meshayla Williams
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210 CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01

Question
#120.) Have any changes taken place in Winston? If so, what? How does this affect our understanding of him now?

Answer:
Winston attitude starts to change in a more optimistic way, he is starting to be more spontaneous and not follow rules. We can certainly see the change in his character dynamics which proves that he is easy willing, and cautious of others.
“He had brightened up immediately at the mention of Newspeak. He pushed his pannikin aside, took up his hunk of bread in one delicate hand and his cheese in the other, and leaned across the table so as to be able to speak without shouting”(Orwell,65)

Posted by: Meshayla Williams at March 31, 2014 03:00 AM

Meshayla Williams
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210 CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01

Question


209.) According to O’Brien, what else does the party have planned for its citizens? Why is this significant? Explain.

Answer:

To bring society together and make the citizens interact more. The significance this foreshadows what happens throughout the story to Winston.
“Sometimes he tried to calculate the number of porcelain bricks in the walls of the cell. It should have been easy, but he always lost count at some point or another” (Orwell,290).

Posted by: Meshayla Williams at March 31, 2014 03:01 AM

Daniella Zacarias
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
Love and Desire in Literature CA01
30.3.2014
Question #208
208.
Part 3/Chapters 1-3: What is “solipsism”? What might this word have to do with this part of the novel? Explain.
ANSWER:
Winston
Solipsism is essentially a theory in which only the mind exists, and that in reality there is nothing, not even other minds, outside of it. In 1984, the idea of solipsism is silently predominant, the entire country is really unaware of what is happening outside in the war, if there even is a war. Solipsism can also be interpreted in the majority of the characters, who, because of lack of privacy, prevent themselves from questioning out loud their lifestyle.
"The belief that nothing exists outside your own mind; surely there must be some way of demonstrating that it was false? Had it not been exposed long ago as a fallacy? There was even a name for it, which he had forgotten."

Posted by: Daniella Zacarias at March 31, 2014 08:05 AM

Allison Grohovsky
Dr.B.Lee Hobbs
Eng 210 CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
31 March 2014

QUESTION #210:What does Winston believe will defeat the party? Who disagrees with him?

ANSWER:
Winston believes that the spirit of man is the principle that will defeat the party. Obrien disagrees with him. "Do you believe in God, Winston?" "No." "Then what is it, this principle that will defeat us?" "I don't know. The spirit of Man." "And do you consider yourself a man?"(p.265) If God cannot help defeat the party then the spirit of man will.

Posted by: Allison Grohovsky at March 31, 2014 08:54 AM

Alison Schucht
Dr. Burgsbee L. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
31 March 2014

QUESTION #210:
What does Winston believe will defeat the Party? Who disagress with him, and why?

ANSWER:
In Winston's journal, he writes that "ultimately a proletarian rebellion" will overthrow the Party (Orwell 233). O'Brien disagress with this statement because "there is no way in which the Party can be overthrown. The rule of the Party is forever" (Orwell 233). O'Brien explains to Winston that there are absolutely no thoughts or actions that will ever bring the Party to an end, and that his claim was nonsense.

Posted by: Alison Schucht at March 31, 2014 11:52 AM

Marie Ryan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire in Literature
31 March 2014

Question 209: According to O'Brien, what else the party have planed for its citizens? Why is this significant? Explain.

Answer: According to O'Brien the party is planning a world where the only progress is pain. the is evident when he says, "Progress in our world will be progress toward more pain" (Orwell 267). This is significant because in a world where pain is the only type of progress there will be no true loyalty, freedom, or love. This is excactly the world the party is trying to create.

Posted by: Marie Ryan at March 31, 2014 05:23 PM

Pauline Helgesson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
31 March 2014

Question #203 Part 3/Chapter 1-3

What is Winston’s attitude towards O’Brien during this part of the story? Support your answer with quotations.

ANSWER:

At the beginning of Part three, there are many incidents that contribute to confusion for Winston. He does not know how to think and behave during those three chapters. At first we learn that Winston is being tortured by O’Brien, which would lead into a prisoner and interrogator relationship. However, as the chapters continues, Winston grows to see O’Brien as an almost fatherly figure who looks after him and tries to show him the error of his ways. The statements “For a moment he clung to O’Brien like a baby, curiously comforted by the heavy arm round his shoulders” and “He had the feeling that O’Brien was his protector, that the pain was something that came from outside, from some other source, and that it was O'Brien who would save him from it" (206-207), shows his various and strange feelings for O'Brien.

Posted by: Pauline Helgesson at March 31, 2014 10:15 PM

Trey Griseck
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG. 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
1 April 2014

Question #197
What does O’Brien tell Winston about Big Brother, the Party, and the Brotherhood? Why is this significant?
Answer:
Winston asks O’Brien a question about Big Brother, the Party, and the brotherhood. O’Brien tells Winston “both Big Brother and the Party exist but Winston will never know whether or not the brotherhood exists” (Orwell 1). The significance of this is that Winston does not know the full truth, and probably will not because O’Brien is not going to tell him. Therefore, he knows that the party and that Big Brother exist, but he will never know if the brotherhood exists.

Posted by: Trey Griseck at April 1, 2014 05:50 PM

Hosameddine Elnehmani
Dr. B. Lee Hobbes
ENG-210 Love and desire in literature CA01
02 April 2014

QUESTION # 208:

Part III / Chapters 1-3: What is “solipsism”? What might this word have to do with this part of the novel? Explain.

ANSWER:
Solipsism is the view about the self and only the self-existence. I believe the word Solipsism does share some important ideas regarding this book. From my readings, I was able to link this word to an example from the novel. In the part where O’Brien gives Winston, the idea of how to become successful and taught him to leave all the bad habits that Winston obtained. O’Brien had brought Winston to his attention regarding his self-existence. O’Brien had said; “you are falling to pieces. What are you? A bag of filth” (Orwell 243). O’Brien is trying to teach Winston how to deal with life, because as far as O’Brien had mentioned that Winston had only couple more teeth and had left his body dirty.

Posted by: Hosameddine at April 1, 2014 08:29 PM

Daniella Zacarias
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
Love and Desire in Literature CA01
1.4.2014
Question #205
205.
Part 3/Chapters 1-3: What is logical absurdity? “Did not the statement ‘Ýou do not exist’ contain a logical absurdity?” What does Winston mean by this? Explain.
ANSWER:
Logical absurdity can be defined as the absurdity behind logic. What I mean by this, is that in a case such as the statement “You do not exist” it does not necessary imply the philosophical question of “are we really here?” Instead, what it implies, in my opinion, is that the “self” is missing. The phrase “You do not exist” means to belittle Winston; he may be alive and he may be physically there, but he cannot think for himself and he if he can then he is alone in a world where no one would be able to comprehend the nature of thoughts. “If you are a man, Winston, you are the last man. Your kind is extinct; we are the inheritors. Do you understand that you are alone? You are outside history, you are non-existent.” (Orwell 270).

Posted by: Daniella Zacarias at April 1, 2014 09:39 PM

Christopher Lavie Mienandy
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210 CL Love and Desire in Literature CA01
1 April 2014

QUESTION #200:
Quoting from the text, list all things to which Winston confesses to in Chapter Two. How many things are there?

ANSWER:
Winston confesses the following things in Chapter Two: “He confessed to the assassination of eminent Party members, the distribution of seditious pamphlets, embezzlement of public funds, sale of military secrets, sabotage of every kind. He confessed that he had been a spy in the pay of Eastasian government as far back as 1968. He confessed that he was a religious believer, an admirer of capitalism, and a sexual pervert. He confessed that he had murdered his wife […]. He confessed that for years he had been in personal touch with Goldstein and had been a member of an underground organization […]. “(Orwell 216). In total, Winston has confessed twelve things.

Posted by: christopher lavie mienandy at April 1, 2014 09:59 PM

Emma De Rhodo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire in Literature CA01
1 April 2014

QUESTION: 195. Part III / Chapters 1-3: Why, according to O’Brien, is Winston in the Ministry of Love? What must he do while there? Will he be able to leave? If so, how?

ANSWER: According to O’Brien, Winston is in the Ministry of Love in order for the Party to “cure” him and “make you[him] sane!” (Orwell 253). While Winston is in the Ministry of Love, he must be “cured;” O’Brien mentions, “Will you understand, Winston, that no one whom we bring to this place ever leaves our hands uncured?” (Orwell 253). O’Brien also says, “The Party is not interested in the overt act: the thought is all we care about” (Orwell 253).Therefore, he will not be able to leave until he has been “cured” or “changed” in his “thought;” once this transformation has taken place, he can leave (Orwell 253).

Posted by: Emma De Rhodo at April 1, 2014 10:31 PM

Will Fumero
Dr. Hobbs
4/1/14
ENG 210-cl

215.) Part III/Chapters 1-3: Why are common criminals and political prisoners treated differently in the temporary lock-up? Explain.

Answer:
On page 287, it is stated that they are mere common criminals that exist in the system and are rightfully punished. They are considered scum, but are perceived as a threat to big brother or the government itself. These men and women are locked up for thievery, bribes, assaults and much more. What makes them different from political prisoners, however, is that the political criminals pose a threat to the system by rebelling against big brother and promoting free thought and morality. Stated on page 288, the “PoLITS”, as they are referred to, are more quiet, timid and repressed. They are the ones who can easily cause a rebellion in numbers if free thought is promoted, and Big Brother’s very “existence” could be threatened.

Posted by: William Fumero at April 1, 2014 11:14 PM

Franck Bayebanen
Dr. Bursgbee L. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01 Love & Desire in Literature
2 April, 2014

Question: According to O’Brien, why does the party seek power? How does it differ from Winston’s response? Explain.
Answer: O’Brien and Winston have two different points of views concerning the motives of the party. It is clear for Winston that the party the Party rules the country for their own good “You are ruling over us for your own good,” (Orwell 234). On the other hand O’Brien thinks that the only thing that the party is really trying to control is the human mind

Posted by: Franck Bayebanen at April 1, 2014 11:36 PM

Anthony Jannetta
Dr. Lee B. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire CA01
2 April 2014

QUESTION 194:
Part III/Chapters 1-3: What was the Inquisition? What does O’Brien say was the error of the Inquisition? How has it been corrected, in his opinion?

ANSWER:
The Inquisition happened in the Middle Ages; the Catholic Church used to burn heretics. According to O’Brien, the error of the Inquisition was to kill the heretics “in the open, and killed them while they were still unrepentant” (Orwell 320). In his opinion, it has been corrected in the sense that the “heretics” (people who do not believe in the political system) are subjected to a brainwashed instead of being killed. Moreover, they change identity and nobody will remember them.

Posted by: Anthony Jannetta at April 2, 2014 12:21 AM

Devon Bell
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210 Love and Desire in Literature CA01
1 April 2014

Question: Why doesn’t The Party simply eliminate rebellious members? Why does it go to all of this trouble? Explain the significance of their stance.

Answer:
The party chooses not to eliminate rebellious members for the reason of wanting them to die loving Big Brother. This is something that is rather important to them, hence they will go through any trouble, that comes a long with trying to get people to love Big Brother.

Posted by: Devon Bell at April 2, 2014 01:22 AM

Peter Grana

Love and Desire in Literature

Dr. B. Lee Hobbs

1, April 2014

Question: #199

Part III / Chapter 1-3: What is the last question Winston asks O’Brien in Chapter Two, Part Three? What is O’Brien’s Answer? How many things are there?

Answer:

Winston asks, “’What is in Room 101?’” (Orwell 128). This succeeds his questions about Julia and Big Brother. And O’Brien answers, “’You know what is in Room 101, Winston. Everybody knows what is in Room 101.’” (Orwell 128). As his expression did not change and his answer was dry.


Posted by: Peter Grana at April 2, 2014 09:28 AM

Denzel K Williams
Dr. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA01
25 April, 2014

Homework Submission/ Close Readings George Orwell 1984

Quote: “The Ministry of Truth, Which concerned itself with news, entertainment, education and the fine arts. The Ministry of Peace, which concerned itself with war. The Ministry of Love, which maintained law and order. And the Ministry of Plenty, which was responsible for economic affairs.”

Answer: This selected passage is important as it shows a great deal of irony. In explaining the political system or hierarchy, the Ministry of “Peace” deals with war, the Ministry of Love, concerning with law and order of society. These titles say much about the “reverse” thinking of society and the unfair politics. This passage sheds more light on the circumstances in which people of Air Strip One are living under. The question still remains what decides who is placed where and to what degree are these ministries involved in the novel.

Quote: It was almost normal for people over thirty to be frightened of their own children. And with good reason, for hardly a week passed in which The Times did not carry a paragraph describing how some eavesdropping little sneak- ‘child hero’ was the phrase generally used- had overhead some compromising remark and denounced its parents to the Thought Police” (21-22)

Answer: This particular passage really goes in deep and highlights the influence of society on children at a young age. With any notion or reason to believe that even their own parents are guilty of a thought crime, the children will denounce them. The message of big brother is so deeply rooted within their minds at such a young age that it IS their way of life. The fact that most parents begin to worry beyond thirty shows indicates that perhaps at a certain age all people begin to experience “thought”. This passage is just another piece revealing the way of society.

Quote: “Thoughtcrime does not entail death, thoughtcrime IS death” (25)

Answer: This passage, the saying that thoughtcrime IS death in essence defines the law. It is almost an assurance to the reader that if you are guilty of thoughtcrime you WILL be caught, and you will be punished by death. The tolerance for such an act is absolutely zero as thoughtcrime is zero. This sheds light on the attitude and efforts to assure that no one go against the grain of pollute their system with such an act.

Quote: “The past, he reflected, had not merely been altered, it had been actually destroyed. For how could you establish even the most obvious fact when there existed no record outside your own memory?”(31).

Answer: In the passage above, Winston is pondering the methods of the “Ministry of Truth”, Time after time he erased history or altered it. This passage hold great significance as the changing of the past often comes back to haunt those in the present. With this forceful change of the past citizens within this society must also their memories or account of events. It is even stated in the passage that “he who controls the past, controls the future”.

-----------------

*NOTE* The deadline for this particular assignment has now passed. Any comments listed below are *ONLY* for the reposting of comments that I specifically asked to be revised or are ones from non-student posters. Any 'student' posts below that missed the assignment deadline will not get credit for the assignment. ~ Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: Dr. Hobbs at April 2, 2014 05:26 PM

Dalton Hart
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351: The Contemporary World View CA01
2 March 2015

Question: What city and country does Winston live in? Can Winston recall the city of his childhood?

Answer: Winston lives in the city of London. Although he lives there, it is no longer party of England. Instead, London is a city in the province Airstrip One, which is part of the larger Oceania. Winston, peering out the window, tries to recall his childhood but, “nothing remained of his childhood except a series of bright-lit tableaux, occurring against no background and mostly unintelligible,” (Orwell 7). Winston’s inability to remember his childhood seems to have to do with the way the world is set up in the novel.

Posted by: Dalton Hart at March 1, 2015 02:52 PM

Dalton Hart
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351: The Contemporary World View CA01
2 March 2015

Question: What is the bad news on the telescreen?

Answer: When the music of the telescreen is interrupted by the newsflash, Wilson finds out that his country has won an important battle. This announcement also comes along with some less fortunate news for Wilson, the telescreen announcer states, “the chocolate ration would be reduced from thirty grams to twenty,” (Orwell 25). This news creates a less than enthusiastic response from Wilson as he contemplates his situation.

Posted by: Dalton Hart at March 1, 2015 02:54 PM

Dalton Hart
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351: The Contemporary World View CA01
2 March 2015

Question: Why did Winston think his mother and father had to die?

Answer: Winston remembers losing his parents, to what he assumes is one of the large purges that occurred when he was younger. Winston does not seem to remember the exact scenario, but does states that their death was somewhat sacrificial, stating, “they must die in order that he might remain alive, and that this was part of the unavoidable order of things,” (Orwell 28).

Posted by: Dalton Hart at March 1, 2015 03:08 PM

Racheljoy Capitola
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary Worldview CA01
1 March 2015

2. Who is the first character introduced? Where does he live?

The first character introduced is Winston who lives in Victory Mansions.

26. What is the only thing people can call their own?

People can only call “the few cubic centimeters inside your skull” (27) their own. In other words, everything else is dictated by Big Brother.

48. What happens when all corrections are made in the times?

The older copies without the changes to the newspaper are burned in destroyed after being placed in the pneumatic tube. Meanwhile, the corrected versions of the news are considered legitimate and people’s knowledge of the past becomes skewed. History is rewritten.

Posted by: Racheljoy Capitola at March 1, 2015 06:49 PM

Mekayla Davila
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary World View
1 March 2015

Question #5:
Why is it difficult for W to climb the stairs?

Answer:
It is difficult for Winston to climb the stairs because he has a varicose ulcer above his right ankle. (Orwell 1)

Posted by: Mekayla Davila at March 2, 2015 01:18 AM

Mekayla Davila
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary World View
1 March 2015

Question #27:
Before Winston leaves for work, what is the essence of what he writes in his diary?

Answer:
In his diary Winston had written all over "DOWN WITH BIG BROTHER". He knew the letters were big enough to be seen from across the room if the book remained open. Winston was very much aware that his thought crimes would cause him death. (Orwell 20)

Posted by: Mekayla Davila at March 2, 2015 01:36 AM

Mekayla Davila
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary World View
1 March 2015

Question #40:
Why is the Past to be wiped away?

Answer:
The past is to be wiped away since there are no written records of it there it to be not conflicting recollections of it. Contradicting opinions on the past can lead to stories being misconstrued and lies being told. This is done so that even the most obvious fact cannot be known. (Orwell 34-35)

Posted by: Mekayla Davila at March 2, 2015 02:11 AM

Annie Hays
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary Worldview CA01
2 March 2015

Question: When does the story begin? What kind of day is it? How have the clocks been changed?

Answer: The story begins in April on a bright, cold day. The clocks are different because they are striking thirteen (Orwell 1).

Posted by: Annie Hays at March 2, 2015 10:44 AM

Glen Pringle
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary Worldview CA01
2 March 2015

Q: What are the three slogans of the party etched on Miniture?

A:The three slogans are War is Peace, Freedom is Slavery, and Ignorance is Strength.

Q:Before Winston leaves for work, what is the essence of what he writes in his diary?

A: Winston expresses his dissatisfaction with the current party system through thoughtcrime. He basically denounces Big Brother completely.

Q: How long has Big Brother (BB) existed in the Party histories?

A: In the party histories, BB has existed since the 1930's. However, Winston thinks otherwise. "He did not believe he had ever heard the word Ingsoc before 1960." (Orwell 20) He imagines that he heard it first at about the same time in the 1960's.

Posted by: Glen Pringle at March 2, 2015 10:56 AM

Annie Hays
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary Worldview CA01
2 March 2015

Question: Who is at Winston's door and why?

Answer: Mrs. Parsons is at the door because she needs her sink repaired (Orwell 20).

Posted by: Annie Hays at March 2, 2015 11:16 AM

Annie Hays
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary Worldview CA01
2 March 2015

Question: What does Winston think happened to his mother and father?

Answer: Winston thinks his mother and father, "must evidently have been swallowed up in one of the first great purges of the Fifties" (Orwell 29). He is pretty sure his mother and sister died so that he could live, but he has no idea why.

Posted by: Annie Hays at March 2, 2015 11:47 AM

Kenna Dieffenwierth
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary World View CA01
2 March 2015

Question: 17) What does Winston realize he has done with his diary? (part 1/chapter 2)

Answer: He realized that he had left his diary open on the kitchen table with "Down with Big Brother" written over it multiple times in large letters (Orwell 20). "DOWN WITH BIG BROTHER was written all over it, in letters almost big enough to be legible across the room" (Orwell 20). He realized that this was stupid and a bad idea, but he did not close it because he feared smudging the paper if the ink was still wet (Orwell 20).

Posted by: Kenna Dieffenwierth at March 2, 2015 11:48 AM

Madison Brunk
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351: The Contemporary World View CA01
2 March 2015

Question: What city and country does Winston live in? Can Winston recall the city of his childhood?

Answer: Winston lives in London, a "chief city of Airstrip One", all of which make up a providence in Oceania (Chapter 1, page 5). Winston struggles to "squeeze out some childhood memory" yet is unable to remember anything from that time in his life.

Posted by: Madison Brunk at March 2, 2015 12:02 PM

Kenna Dieffenwierth
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary World View CA01
2 March 2015

Question: 39) What country is Oceania at war with at this time? (part 1/chapter 3)

Answer: In 1984, Oceania is at war with Eurasia and allied with Eastasia. The wars and alliances of the past were not well documented, but Winston could remember that they had been at war with Eurasia for four years (Orwell 34). Before those four year, Oceania and Eurasia had been allies. This was not made clear publicly. The current enemy was always portrayed as the absolute enemy. "Oceania was at war with Eurasia: therefore Oceania had always been at war with Eurasia. The enemy of the moment always represented absolute evil, and it followed that any past or future agreement with him was impossible" (Orwell 34).

Posted by: Kenna Dieffenwierth at March 2, 2015 12:06 PM

Kenna Dieffenwierth
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary World View CA01
2 March 2015

Question: 56) Who is Syme? What does he want from Winston? (part 1/chapter 5)

Answer: "Syme was philologist, a specialist in Newspeak" (Orwell 48). Syme was Winston's friend. Technically people of this time did not have friends, they had comrades, but Winston found Syme more pleasant than other comrades. Syme worked in the Research Department and was working to compile the Eleventh edition of the Newspeak dictionary (Orwell 48). Syme wanted razor blades from Winston because there was a shortage of razor blades. Winston lied and said he didn't have any to spare when he actually had two extra (Orwell 48-49).

Posted by: Kenna Dieffenwierth at March 2, 2015 12:22 PM

Madison Brunk
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351: The Contemporary World View CA01
2 March 2015

Question: What change has there been in emotion since Winston’s mother died?

Answer: Winston recalls his mother's death 30 years prior with emotional sorrow that no longer exists in society. In 1984, though there are rageful emotions they lack "dignity of emotion" and "deep and complex sorrows" (Orwell, 32).

Posted by: Madison Brunk at March 2, 2015 12:24 PM

Stephen Pinol
Dr. Hobbs
Hon 351 The Contemporary World View CA01
2 March 2015

Question: What is the caption beneath the large poster on the wall?

Answer: “BIG BROTHER IS WATCHING YOU.”

Posted by: Stephen Pinol at March 2, 2015 01:36 PM

Stephen Pinol
Dr. Hobbs
Hon 351 The Contemporary World View CA01
2 March 2015

Question: Are the Victory Apartments well built? Explain

Answer: No these apartments are not well built in anyway shape or form. They were built in the 1930’s and are now falling apart in the book. Although they have lasted several years, the foundation and materials that were used are not long lasting.

Posted by: Stephen Pinol at March 2, 2015 01:42 PM

Stephen Pinol
Dr. Hobbs
Hon 351 The Contemporary World View CA01
2 March 2015

Question: What change has there been in emotion since Winston’s mother died?

Answer: After losing his father, he was very emotional for different things throughout the book. But once his mother dies, death seems to no longer be tragic or sorrowful. Even though it is his mother, he treats death like it is a part of everyday life. A similar experience or emotion is shared with Elie.

Posted by: Stephen Pinol at March 2, 2015 01:42 PM

Lyndsey Pospisil
Dr, Hobbs
HON 351 The Contemporary World View
1 March 1, 2015

Question: Part 1 / Chapter 1: Describe the residence of the first character mentioned (details: smells, conditions).What is the large poster?
Answer: The first character mentioned is Winston Smith. His residence is described as smelling like “boiled cabbage and old rag mats” (Orwell, p. 3). The lift inside of his residence rarely works, hinting to the fact that the conditions are not the best. The residence of Victory Mansions is described in chapter two as “old flats, built in 1930 or thereabouts, [and] falling apart” (Orwell, p. 22). The large poster is described as “depicting an enormous face, more than a metre wide: the face of a man of about forty-five, with a heavy black mustache and rugged handsome features” (Orwell, p. 3). The caption of the poster reads, “big brother is watching you.”

Posted by: Lyndsey Pospisil at March 2, 2015 02:39 PM

Lyndsey Pospisil
Dr, Hobbs
HON 351 The Contemporary World View
1 March 1, 2015

Question: Part 1 / Chapter 2: What does he put on the corner of the cover of his diary before he leaves?

Answer: Winston places “an identifiable grain of whitish dust” on the corner of the cover of the diary (Orwell, p. 31). Winston does this as a way to identify whether or not his diary has been moved or discovered. The dust was “bound to be shaken off if the book was moved” (Orwell, p. 31).

Posted by: Lyndsey Pospisil at March 2, 2015 02:40 PM

Lyndsey Pospisil
Dr, Hobbs
HON 351 The Contemporary World View
1 March 1, 2015

Question: Part 1/ Chapter 3: Why does Winston sleep without nightclothes?
Answer: Winston sleeps without nightclothes because they are too expensive. The text states, “a member of the Outer Party received only three thousand clothing coupons annually, and a suit of pajamas was six hundred” (Orwell, p. 33).

Posted by: Lyndsey Pospisil at March 2, 2015 02:40 PM

Rachel Cunio
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary Worldview CA01
02 March 2015

Question: Describe Winston (Be specific) Why doesn't Winston take the lift?

Answer: Winston Smith is a thirty-nine year old with a “varicose ulcer above his right ankle” (Orwell 3) who works at the Ministry of Truth. He lives alone in a flat in the Victory Mansions, which is an ironic name because in actuality, the building is “falling to pieces” (Orwell 22). Winston questions the world of Big Brother in which he lives and works because it gives him a “sort of vague distaste” (Orwell 5). Winston does not take the life because it “was seldom working” (Orwell 3) in Victory Mansions, and also because there was no electricity during the day due to the “economy drive in preparation for Hate Week” (Orwell 3).

Posted by: Rachel Cunio at March 2, 2015 02:56 PM

Rachel Cunio
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary Worldview CA01
02 March 2015

Question: Why are the children disappointed?
Answer: Mrs. Parson’s children are disappointed because “’they haven’t been out today’”(Orwell 23) and “’couldn't go see the hanging’”(Orwell 25) because both Parson parents were otherwise occupied and couldn't take them. Both the little boy and girl show their disappointment about missing the hanging by yelling “’want to see the hanging’” (Orwell 25).

Posted by: Rachel Cunio at March 2, 2015 02:57 PM

Rachel Cunio
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary Worldview CA01
02 March 2015

Question: What does Winston do after his coughing fit?
Answer: Immediately following Winston’s terrible coughing fit in which “his veins had swelled with the effort of the cough” (Orwell 34), Winston partakes in the required Physical Jerks mandated by Big Brother and led by a “scrawny but muscular” (Orwell 34) woman on the telescreen. On top of participating in the Physical Jerks, Winston maintains the expected “look of grim enjoyment” (Orwell 34) despite his discomfort and feeling that another coughing fit is about to ensue.

Posted by: Rachel Cunio at March 2, 2015 02:58 PM

Jacob Gates
Dr. Hobbs
Contemporary Worldview HON 323 CA01
2 March 2014

George Orwell’s 1984

Question #8: Can the Telescreen be completely shut off? How does it differ from our television?
Analysis: The telescreens act as both televisions and security cameras, but only the inner party is monitored by them, and they cannot be shut off, however O’Brien claims to be able to.

Question #51: Does Winston enjoy his work?
Analysis: Winston does enjoy his work, he’s good at it, but he is curious to know “what really happened.”

Question #71: How many Proles are there?
Analysis: It’s unclear how many there specifically are in Oceania, but they’re described as making up 85% of the population.

Posted by: Jacob Gates at March 2, 2015 03:22 PM

Craig Graves
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary World View CA01
2 March 2015

Question: (Part 1, Chapter 1, Question 9)
What is the word on the flapping poster?

Answer:
The word on the flapping poster was INGSOC. Ingsoc is the English Socialist Party, who are in power during the events of 1984.


Posted by: Craig Graves at March 2, 2015 03:33 PM

Craig Graves
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary World View CA01
2 March 2015

Question: (Part 1, Chapter 2, Question 22)
Who is Parsons? Describe him.

Answer:
Parsons is a neighbor to Winston. He also works at the Ministry of Truth. Parsons is fat, boring, dumb, and annoying.

Posted by: Craig Graves at March 2, 2015 03:34 PM

Craig Graves
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary World View CA01
2 March 2015

Question: (Part 1, Chapter 5, Question 55)
Describe the canteen.

Answer:
The canteen has a low ceiling and is set deep underground. It is often packed with people and extremely noisy. The food is disgusting and the room is filled with nasty smelling steam.

Posted by: Craig Graves at March 2, 2015 03:34 PM

Glen Pringle & Jake Gates
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary Worldview CA01
2 March 2015

In chapter 7, the main dynamic characters that are present are Winston and Julia. They are the only characters present in the chapter, and they have been seen before in the story. The dramatic role of both characters is to provide contrast to one another and to highlight the change of Winston. The chapter, as well as the entire work, is set in limited third person omniscient view. This limits the scope and perspective of Winston, but provides readers a more accurate portrayal of his emotions. The entire chapter takes place in the present at night- Winston is awoken from a nightmare and and is comforted by Julia. All of this takes place in his room- supposedly a private place, but impossible due to the reach of Ingsoc and Big Brother. His residence is located in Oceania, a large coalition of countries that make up most of Europe and Russia. The main conflict that takes place in the chapter is Winston vs. Julia. The development and differences of the two characters is made stark and open. Winston has evolved a new mindset, while Julia is still under the ideas of Ingsoc. Their influence is the theme of the chapter, and it shows their far-reaching influence. Their methods even extend to dreams, where Winston thinks he has killed his mother. The chocolate that Winston steals in his dream represents temptation and selfishness in Winston. He is too scared and selfish to return to his mother before the war, which he thought lead to her death. However, he has an epiphany. He hasn't actually killed his mother, this is all lies put into his head by IngSoc. Julia and Winston profess their love for one another at the end of this chapter. This is setup for irony, as their meeting after their torture in the novel proves to be meaningless.

Posted by: Glen Pringle and Jacob Gates at March 2, 2015 04:32 PM

Mekayla Davila
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary World View CA01
4 March 2015

Question:
Do women in the Party wear makeup? Why, or why not?

Answer:
No, women in the Party do not wear makeup because gender is irrelevant within the dystopian society yet still is used as a sign of male dominance against females. Since makeup feminizes women, Julia uses this to her advantage to accept her sexuality and use her promiscuity to rebel against Big Brother. (Orwell 142)

Posted by: Mekayla Davila at March 4, 2015 05:05 AM

Mekayla Davila
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary World View CA01
4 March 2015

Question:
Does the couple have any feeling of foreboding? Why, or why not? If so, explain.

Answer:
Yes, the couple does have feelings of foreboding because they know they were crazy to think it could work and at times believed in their impending deaths. Winston had thoughts of Katherine’s death in hopes of suddenly being able to marry Julia. These were all dangerous thoughts and actions of being together and they knew it was only a matter of time before they would either get caught or devise a plan to escape together or commit suicide. (Orwell 151).

Posted by: Mekayla Davila at March 4, 2015 05:17 AM

Mekayla Davila
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary World View CA01
4 March 2015

Question:
What is the conspiracy called? Why is this significant?

Answer:
The conspiracy is called The Brotherhood and it is an organization designed to bring down the Party. It is significant because its goal is to take down the head figure Big Brother by creating resistance and spreading corruption. The irony in the name is what makes it significant because in turn ‘The Brotherhood’ will be destroying ‘Big Brother’. (Orwell 171)

Posted by: Mekayla Davila at March 4, 2015 05:28 AM

Mekayla Davila
Madison Brunk
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary World View CA01
4 March 2015

Group Question – 1984
“… In chapter 5 of 1984, the round character Winston is still very prominent and remains the protagonist of this novel. Parson’s, also a round character, was introduced in the novel early but have been portrayed in more detail within this chapter. We see him to be exuberant and proud yet simple. He is an ideal Party member. In this chapter we also are shown the dark-haired girl. She is mysterious and quiet so far. Winston believes her to be a shape shifter and possibly an agent. A new character introduced in this chapter is Syme. As of now he is a static character and acts as a possible mentor. His is an employee of the ministry of truth and is believed to be too smart. This chapter is told in limited third person omniscient because the readers are being told the inner thoughts of the characters. The events in this chapter take place in the Ministry of Truth in Oceania, London. It is a public space which makes the characters and actions of them vulnerable. The plot of chapter 5 is that despite his own suspicions, Winston feels uncomfortable sitting with those he also believes are too intelligent. He begins noticing the conditioned messaged from the telescreen and feels watched. He sees the girl watching and gets suspicious. The conflicts in this chapter are self vs. self; Winston’s own thoughts vs. his conditioning. Some emerging themes in this chapter are doubt and suspicion from Winston himself which and possible irony that is continuing from previous chapters because of this conflict he holds in himself. Manipulation, conditioning and observation, are also continuing themes of this chapter. The epiphany of this chapter is the moment Winston realizes that everyone is being brainwashed and no one is aware of it. This is where his internal conflict occurs and sets up the next chapter for what he will decide to do with his realization.”

Posted by: Mekayla Davila at March 4, 2015 05:51 AM

Annie Hays
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary Worldview CA01
4 March 2015

Question: What does the girl provide as a treat? Why is it special?

Answer: Julia gives Winston real chocolate that she got at the black market. This is special for Winston because it causes him to vaguely remember his childhood (Orwell 121-2).

Posted by: Annie Hays at March 4, 2015 11:02 AM

Annie Hays
Dr. Hobbs
Hon 351 Contemporary Worldview CA01
4 March 2015

Question: Although they never go back to the glen, where do they have a similar meeting? How is it alike/different?

Answer: The second meeting place is a bombed out church in the countryside (Orwell 128). The church is a bit more civilized since it was once a building instead of forest, but it is similar in that no one goes there and it is in the countryside. In both places they are able to make love without being disturbed.

Posted by: Annie Hays at March 4, 2015 11:13 AM

Glen Pringle
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary Worldview CA01
4 March 2015

Question: To whom is a toast made? What is the purpose of this/Why is this significant?

Answer: Winston and O'Brien make a toast tot he past. "'To the past,'" said Winston. (Orwell 104) The significance of this event is not lost on the reader. This is an open act of revolution.

Question: What has happened to the word “science”? What is the purpose of this/why is this significant?

Answer: Science is completely changed from a modern perspective, and is a word that simply doesn't make sense to common citizens. "In Newspeak there is no word for 'Science'." (Orwell 113) There is no empirical method of thought and all facts are dictated from the party.

Question: Who comes into the room last? What does Winston discover about this person?


Answer: O'Brien comes into the room last. Winston is at first worried "They've got you too!" (Orwell 138) but O'Brien is quick to reassure him that Winston and himself are very different. The latter is a high class member in IngSoc. Winston is crushed but had the feeling all along. "Yes, he saw now, he had always known it." (Orwell 138)

Posted by: Glen Pringle at March 4, 2015 11:18 AM

Annie Hays
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary Worldview CA01
4 March 2015

Question: When Julia arrives, what does she have in her bag?

Answer: Julia brings bread, tea, coffee, sugar, and jam. This is stuff reserved for Inner Party members only, but she managed to steal some (Orwell 142-3). She also brought make-up to surprise Winston even more.

Posted by: Annie Hays at March 4, 2015 11:37 AM

Craig Graves and Annie Hays
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary World View CA01
4 March 2015

Question:
Summarize Chapter 6 as a narrative.

Answer:
In chapter six, the round character of Winston returns with the intention of writing down in his journal an encounter he had with another round character, the prostitute. While writing this memory down, he mentions the flat characters of his former wife, Katherine, and a random man he puzzled over on the street. The flat characters serve no significant roles while the round prostitute is a trickster and shapeshifter, appearing young but then revealing her age. This chapter has a third person limited perspective where the only inside knowledge given is from Winston’s head. The setting varies from Winston’s apartment in the current time of the narrative and the seedy street and room of him memory with the prostitute. The plot, as previously mentioned, involves Winston trying to write down his encounter with the prostitute and the sex he had with her. This chapter is rather depressing and reflective, focusing on the repetition of the lack of love people share for one another and the emptiness in relationships. The prostitute’s lack of teeth serves as a symbol for this emptiness. Though there is nothing ironic in this chapter, Winston does have the realization that one’s worst enemy is his or her nervous system (Orwell, Part 1, Chapter 6, Paragraph 3).

Posted by: Craig Graves at March 4, 2015 01:03 PM

Madison Brunk
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351: Contemporary World View CA01

Question: While Winston is turned towards the window, what does J do?

Answer: As Winston is looking out the window, Julia had been preparing him for a surprise, which he expected to be her naked. However, when he turned around she had "painted her face" with a complete set of make-up she had just purchased (Orwell, 149).

Posted by: Madison Brunk at March 4, 2015 01:14 PM

Madison Brunk
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351: Contemporary World View CA01
4 March 2015

Question:What new poster is displayed all over London? What is its significance/purpose?

Answer: During preparations for Hate Week, a new poster is introduced to London, and even outnumbers posters featuring Big Brother. This poster features a "Eurasian soldier, three or four meters high, striding forward with expressionless Mongolian face and enormous boots" and also features a weapon (Orwell, 156). This weapon, from every angle, looks as if it is pointing directly at the onlooker. It signifies the periodical patriotism of the proles.

Posted by: Madison Brunk at March 4, 2015 01:22 PM

Madison Brunk
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351: Contemporary World View CA01
4 March 2015

Question: Why does O’Brien give Winston his address? Is this a normal thing for someone
to do? What does it mean when someone does this?

Answer: Winston believes that O'Brien gave his address as a way of letting him know where to find him if Winston needs help. This is significant because "except by direct enquiry it was never possible to discover where anyone lived" (Orwell, 166).

Posted by: Madison Brunk at March 4, 2015 01:28 PM

Bethanee Victoria Reynolds
HON 351 The Contemporary World View
Dr. Hobbs
4 March 2015

Question:
To whom does Julia give credit for the invention of the airplane? What does this tell us about her? Does she care about who gets credit for such historical factoids? Why, or why not?
Answer:
Julia believes that The Party invented airplanes. It tells us that she is not as strong of a rebel as Winston is and that she is more susceptible to the brain washing of The Party. “When he told her that airplanes had been in existence before he was born, and long before the Revolution, the fact struck her as totally uninteresting.” (Orwell, Nineteen-Eighty-Four, pages 153-154). This shows that Julia does not really care who gets what credit. If it does not directly affect her then she does not see the problem. All of this is evident according to Winston’s view of Julia in the book when this discussion takes place.

Posted by: Bethanee Reynolds at March 4, 2015 02:28 PM

Bethanee Victoria Reynolds
HON 351 The Contemporary World View
Dr. Hobbs
4 March 2015


Questions:
Does Julia want to give up their relationship? Why, or why not?
Answer:
“yes, dear, it has occurred to me, several times. But I’m not going to do it all the same.” (Orwell, Nineteen-Eighty-Four, page 165) this clearly shows that Julia does not want the relationship to end, she understands the risks, but she is not as worried as Winston is. She feels she can protect herself and keep herself alive well enough. She knows that they will probably be caught but she will not give up until necessary, even if it means dying because at least they were human by feeling and holding on to that feeling.

Posted by: Bethanee Reynolds at March 4, 2015 02:35 PM

Bethanee Victoria Reynolds
HON 351 The Contemporary World View
Dr. Hobbs
4 March 2015

Question:
To whom is a toast made? What is the purpose of this/Why is this significant?

Answer:
“‘to the past,’ said Winston.” They drink their second glass of wine to the past. This is significant because, Winston is starting to remember his past. Winston is becoming aware of how deep the psychological manipulation of the party runs in him. The Party does not want the past to be known, it has subconsciously surprised the past in the people, and it is how they gain power.

Posted by: Bethanee Reynolds at March 4, 2015 02:38 PM

Dalton Hart
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351: The Contemporary World View
4 March 2015

Question: What does the girl’s note to Winston say? Is this a surprise turn in the story, thus far? Why, or why not? How does Winston feel about this?
Answer: When Winston notices the dark-haired girl has fallen to the ground and is having trouble getting up, he goes to help her and she secretly slides him a note. Upon opening and reading the note, he finds that it says “I love you”. Although Winston is initially shocked by this note, he begins to develop feelings toward the girl. As the narrator recounts, “Even in his sleep he could not altogether escape from her image” showing that Winston has some sort of infatuation with the girl (Orwell 93). Thus far in the novel this scene comes as a major surprise because the dark-haired girl was viewed as an enemy to Winston in the beginning. Winston assumed she was a girl that favored the Party and therefore she would be an enemy of his.

Posted by: Dalton Hart at March 4, 2015 02:42 PM

Dalton Hart
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351: The Contemporary World View
4 March 2015

Question: Where does the couple meet? How was it arranged?

Answer: Winston and Julia, the dark-haired girl, meet in a secluded area near the Paddington Station. The plan for the two to meet is set up while the two eat lunch together nearly a week after the note was first given to Winston. After deciding that the two should meet, Julia tells Winston to meet her near the station and, “With a sort of military precision that astonished him, she outlined the route that he was to follow” (Orwell 96). The description that is given to the reader seems to allude to the fact that Julia has done this before, and later in the chapter, Julia informs Winston that she has done this same thing before with many Party members, which only creates a more lustful attitude in Winston.

Posted by: Dalton Hart at March 4, 2015 02:50 PM

Lyndsey Pospisil & Dalton Hart
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 The Contemporary World View
3 March 2015

1. The characters that are present in this chapter include Winston, the old man, Mr. Charrington, and the dark haired girl. Winston is a round character. The dark haired girl seems to have potential to become a round character as the novel continues. The old man represents a flat character because he seems insignificant to the novel as a whole. Additionally, Mr. Charrington seems also seems to be a flat character as of right now. Mr. Charrington may have some potential to become an important character later in the novel because he is the one that sells Winston the paperweight in this chapter and the diary in previous chapters.
2. The new characters introduced in this chapter are the old man and Mr. Charrington. Winston and the dark haired girl have both been introduced in previous chapters.
3. Mr. Charrington appears to be a shapeshifter with the possibility of being an ally. Mr. Charrington is the one who sold Winston the diary, and he remembers this specifically. Now, in this chapter, Mr. Charrington sells Winston the paperweight and brings him to another room that does not have a telescreen. Mr. Charrington is a character that we do not know much information about as of right now, and as a result, his intentions and loyalties are unclear. The old man plays a very insignificant role in this chapter. The old man may play the role of a herald in that he is a sign of what is to come. The old man’s lack of a clear memory at his age acts as a sign of what the future will look like in this society. People will continue to have altered memories and will not able to distinguish between what truly happened and what the Party has made them remember.
4. This chapter is told from the limited third person omniscient. The readers know the inner thoughts and feelings of only Winston.
5. The overall setting in this novel is Oceania in London. The year is 1984. In this chapter, the main setting of the chapter is the Parole District. This chapter takes place in the present life of Winston. The spaces used in this chapter include both public and private spaces, but mainly public since Winston is walking the streets of the Parole District. This affects the actions of Winston in that he is not able to express his feeling about his hatred for big brother and the Party when in the public spaces. The private place included in this chapter is the room Mr. Charrington brings Winston in that does not have a telescreen.
6. The main conflict of this chapter, and this novel, is Winston vs. the Party. Branching off this main conflict is Winston vs. forgetting the past. In this chapter, Winston encounters an old man that he attempts to get information about the past. Winston is unsure what is fact and what is made up by the Party about the past. In his attempt to get information about the past from the old man, he finds himself again triumphed by the Party when he realizes that the old man has a horrible memory. Another conflict encountered in the chapter is Winston vs. the dark haired girl. In this chapter, Winston notices the dark haired girl following him as he leaves the Parole District. He becomes terrified when he realizes that she is a part of the Party and is following him.
7. There are no new themes that emerge in this chapter. Themes that are continuous in this chapter from previous ones include the theme of the control of the Party.
8. A new symbol that emerges in this chapter includes the paperweight with the coral in it. This item has major potential to become a symbol because it was bought from the same secondhand store that Winston bought his diary from. Reoccurring symbols mentioned in this chapter is the diary. When Winston goes back into the secondhand store, Mr. Charrington remembers vividly that Winston bought the diary from him.
9. There are no ironies that exist in this chapter.
10. Winston has the epiphany at the end of the chapter that suicide is the only answer of escaping the grasps of the Party’s control. Additionally, Winston also has the epiphany in the chapter that the dark haired girl is working for the Party and is following him.

Posted by: Lyndsey Pospisil at March 4, 2015 02:59 PM

Lyndsey Pospisil
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 The Contemporary World View
3 March 2015

Question: Part 2 / Chapter 3: What is Julia’s attitude toward the Party? Why does she feel that way?
Answer: Julia hates the party but not enough to do anything about the control that it has. The book states, “she hated the Party, and said so in the crudest words, but she made no general criticism of it” (Huxley, p. 138). Julia feels this way because she does not agree with their rules and their views on women. She “had her first love affair when she was sixteen, with a party member of sixty” (Huxley, p. 137). Julia believes that “the clever thing was to break the rules and stay alive all the same” (Huxley, p. 138).

Posted by: Lyndsey Pospisil at March 4, 2015 02:59 PM

Lyndsey Pospisil
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 The Contemporary World View
3 March 2015

Question: Part 2 / Chapter 5: Do Julia and Winston meet during the month of June? Why, or why not?

Answer: Julia and Winston met seven times during the month of June. The book states, “four, five, six- seven times they met during the month of June” (Huxley, p. 157). They met to “make love” and enjoy the “paradise” that the room above Mr. Charrington’s shop provided them (Huxley, p. 156-157). The books states, “as soon as they arrive they would sprinkle everything with pepper bought on the black market, tear off their clothes and make love with sweating bodies” (Huxley, p. 157).

Posted by: Lyndsey Pospisil at March 4, 2015 03:00 PM

Lyndsey Pospisil
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 The Contemporary World View
3 March 2015

Question: Part 2 / Chapter 6: What are the subjects of the men’s discussions? How might this affect the life and ambitions of Winston?

Answer: The subject of the men’s discussion in this chapter is about Winston’s Newspeak articles in the Times and the words he uses in his article. O’Brien remarks that Winston used “two words which have become obsolete” (Huxley, p. 165). This leads into a discussion about the tenth addition of the Newspeak Dictionary, where O’Brien then offers to show Winston a copy if he comes to his house one evening. O’Brien gives Winston his address. This affects the ambitions of Winston in that he feels closer and closer to rebellion and conspiracy. He realizes he is closer to being put to death. The novel states, “he had the sensation of stepping into the dampness of the grave, and it was not much better because he had always known that the grave was there and waiting for him” (Huxley, p. 166-167).

Posted by: Lyndsey Pospisil at March 4, 2015 03:00 PM

Kenna Dieffenwierth
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary World View CA01
4 March 2015

Question: 110) Part 2 / Chapter 4: From whom has Winston rented a room? Why?

Answer: He rented a room from Mr. Charrington (Orwell 136-137). He rented the room to have an affair. "Nor did he seem shocked or become offensively knowing when it was made clear that Winston wanted the room for the purpose of a love affair" (Orwell 137).

Posted by: Kenna Dieffenwierth at March 4, 2015 03:10 PM

Kenna Dieffenwierth
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary World View CA01
4 March 2015

Question: 117) Part 2 / Chapter 5: Who has vanished? Why is this troubling? What does it mean when someone vanishes?

Answer: "Syme had vanished" (Orwell 147). When Winston went to check the message board, Symes name was missing from the list of chess club members (Orwell 147). This was troubling because it meant that he no longer existed as far as society was concerned. He had been executed and subsequently erased.

Posted by: Kenna Dieffenwierth at March 4, 2015 03:11 PM

Rachel Cunio
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary Worldview CA01
04 March 2015

Question: Who makes plans for the meeting? What are the plans?
Answer: Winston Smith plans for a week to initially make contact with the girl in the “safest place” (Orwell 116) he can think of, which is the canteen. However, when the first communication does happen, although Winston initiates the subtle conversation, it is the girl who actually makes the plans to meet at Victory Square the same evening. The girl even makes sure to tell Winston not to “come up to” (Orwell 119) her, but rather “just keep somewhere near” (Orwell 119) in order to avoid attention.

Posted by: Rachel Cunio at March 4, 2015 03:14 PM

Racheljoy Capitola
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary Worldview CA01
4 March 2015

116. To what does Winston compare the paper-weight and the coral inside? What is the significance of this comparison?
Winston compares the paperweight and coral to “the arch of the sky, enclosing a tiny world with its atmosphere complete” (147). Then he continues further on to compare the glass to the room, and Julia and himself to the coral; hence, he and Julia’s relationship are a fixed thing of its own.

122. Does Winston believe in Goldstein? Why or why not?
Winston never outright says he believes in Goldstein or not. However, he seems to be more inclined to doubt Goldstein or the rebellion’s existence: “Even if the fabulous Brotherhood was a reality, there still remained the difficulty of finding one’s way into it.” (152) There is no proof to lead Winston into believing there is a rebellion, as much as he’d like to start one with his friend O’Brien off a whim.

133. What does Winston tell O’Brien? Why is this significant?
Winston tells O’Brien that “You can turn it off!” (169) in regards to the telescreen. It is significant because it is a lack of manners and very unorthodox of Winston, which would give him away as someone who does not follow society’s rules.

Posted by: Racheljoy Capitola at March 4, 2015 03:15 PM

Rachel Cunio
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary Worldview CA01
04 March 2015

Question: How do Winston and Julia spend their time? How does it fit in with what is allowed?
Answer: Winston and Julia spend their time eating “dark and shiny” (Orwell 127) chocolate, talking about going against the Party and a little about themselves, exploring what Winston refers to as being almost like “’the Golden Country’” (Orwell 129), and having sex. Winston’s comment that he does not “’want any virtue to exist anywhere’” (Orwell 132) encapsulates how Julia and Winston’s time spent together fits into what is allowed: it doesn't. In fact, the time Julia and Winston spent together was “a blow struck against the Party” and “a political act” (Orwell 133).

Posted by: Rachel Cunio at March 4, 2015 03:15 PM

Dalton Hart
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351: The Contemporary World View
4 March 2015

Question: Where does Julia say they can meet again? When and why?

Answer: After the first meeting between Winston and Julia, the narrator notes, “[Julia] had named a place where they could meet after work, four evenings hence,” (Orwell 106). They choose to meet in the poorer part of town, where Big Brother is less likely to catch them. They decide to meet in this place so that they are able to schedule another meeting at a separate location where they can make love again.

Posted by: Dalton Hart at March 4, 2015 03:16 PM

Rachel Cunio
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary Worldview CA01
04 March 2015

Question: Does Julia arrange for more meetings? Why, or why not?

Answer: Julia does arrange for more meetings, saying “’We can come here once again’” (Orwell 133). However, because the first hide-out cannot be used “for another month or two” (Orwell 133), Julia also makes plans for the couple to meet in an “open market” (Orwell 133) and later on in other hiding places. She does this in order to continue the “political act” (Orwell 133) of meeting and loving Winston.

Posted by: Rachel Cunio at March 4, 2015 03:16 PM


Kenna Dieffenwierth
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary World View CA01
4 March 2015

Question: 126) Part 2 / Chapter 6: Whom does Winston meet face to face at the Ministry? What is the person’s position? Is s/he an equal to Winston? Why, or why not?

Answer: "It was Obrien" (Orwell 157). No they are not equals. This can be seen in how intimidated Winston is by him. Obrien is an inner party member (Orwell 157-158).

Posted by: Kenna Dieffenwierth at March 4, 2015 03:18 PM

Jacob Gates
Dr. Hobbs
Contemporary Worldview HON 323 CA01
4 March 2014

George Orwell’s 1984

Question #123: Does Julia believe in Goldstein? Why, or why not?
Analysis: Julia is apathetic to Goldstein and the inner workings of the party; she doesn’t really think about Goldstein at all.

Question #130: When young Winston went home after devouring the chocolate, what does he find? Why is this even important to his personal development? In other words, how has/did this affect him?
Analysis: Winston finds that his Mother and his Sister’s body have both disappeared, and this affects him because he convinces himself that he killed his mother, but instead he was blameless. The revelation lifts the guilt that he had been carrying off his shoulders and causes him to further question his memories and thoughts.

Question #71: Why is Martin told to sit down? Why is this significant?
Analysis: It means that Martin may be more than just a servant, that there’s much more to him than what meets the eye.

Posted by: Jacob Gates at March 4, 2015 03:21 PM

Rachel Cunio and Stephen Pinol
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary World View
02 March 2015
Chapter 3 Summary Questions
1. Winston is the dynamic character present in this chapter. The characters present in Winston’s dream are O’Brien, his mother, father, baby sister, and the “girl with dark hair” (Orwell 33). There is also an old man and an old woman in Winston’s dream. Additionally, when Winston wakes up, the Physical Jerks are led by “a youngish woman, scrawny but muscular” (Orwell 34) on the telescreen.
2. Winston’s mother, father, sister the old man and woman, and the young woman leading the Physical Jerks are new characters in this chapter.
3. Winston is the protagonist in this chapter. Winston’s mother acts as his guardian, the dark-haired girl is a lover, O’Brien is a shapeshifter, and the old man is a rebel.
4. The story is told from a limited third-person omniscient perspective.
5. The actual setting of the chapter is in Winston’s apartment, specifically in his bed and then in front of the telescreen.
6. The plot of this chapter is comprised of conflicts that foreshadow events that occur later in the novel. Within Winston’s dream, the conflicts are man vs. self, Winston’s desire to understand his mother vs. Winston’s desire to be saved by his mother, and lust vs. morals in the fantasy conflict with the dark-haired girl. When Winston wakes up, the conflict is first whether the dream had been a memory or something Winston created in his head and then the conflict becomes physical ability vs. required duties during the Physical Jerks.
7. The major themes in the chapter are the dislike of Big Brother, the physical controlling by Big Brother, and the importance of memory and psychological manipulation.
8. Some symbols in the chapter are Big Brother, and the Dark-haired girl, which is a symbol of everything Winston fears, perfect exemplification of ideals of the Party.
9. The irony in this chapter is that Winston knows (because he personally partakes in the action) that info from past gets changed, and yet he struggles with knowing what is real. It is also ironic that what Winston is doing is committing thought crime while at the same time erasing those who have committed thought crime from history.
10. This chapter includes the development of the epiphany that the Party and Big Brother are doing things that are “beyond forgiveness” (Orwell 35) when Winston experiences the old man’s grief over his loved one’s death. Additionally, Winston’s awakening from his dream makes him realize that he’s mixing memory and created images in his head, another implication that he is committing thought crime.


Posted by: Rachel Cunio at March 4, 2015 03:29 PM

Craig Graves
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary World View CA01
4 March 2015

Question (Part 2, Chapter 4, #115):
How does Winston react to the rats?

Answer:
Winston is terrified of the rats. He exclaims, “Of all horrors in the world – a rat! (Orwell 316)” He tries to brush his fear off as nothing, though.


Posted by: Craig Graves at March 4, 2015 03:39 PM

Craig Graves
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary World View CA01
4 March 2015

Question (Part 2, Chapter 7, #129):
What particular thing does Winston remember after his father left? Why is this significant?

Answer:
After his father left, Winston remembered how awful life was. Winston remembers how he and “other boys [would be] scrounging round dustbins and rubbish heaps, picking out the ribs of cabbage leaves, potato peelings,” and other such trash and waste (Orwell 350). This is significant because it shows how there really was no utopia present and that life was dreadful for many people.

Posted by: Craig Graves at March 4, 2015 03:40 PM

Craig Graves
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary World View CA01
4 March 2015

Question (Part 2, Chapter 8, #132):
What does O’Brien do that is unusual? Why is this significant?

Answer:
O’Brien is able to turn off the attentive eyes and ears of the telescreen because he is part of the Inner Party. As he says, he “has that privilege (Orwell 368).” This is important because it shows that the more important one is, the more privilege and privacy one gets.

Posted by: Craig Graves at March 4, 2015 03:41 PM

Rachel Cunio and Bethanee Reynolds
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary World View
04 March 2015
Part II Chapter 1 Summary Questions
1. Winston and the girl are the dynamic characters present in this chapter. Parson, Wilsher, and the “beetle-like” man (Orwell 118) are flat characters in the chapter.
2. The “beetle-like” (Orwell 118) man is the only new character in this chapter.
3. Winston is the protagonist in this chapter. The girl acts as a rebel who excites Winston’s desire.
4. The story is told from a limited third-person omniscient perspective.
5. The setting in the beginning of the chapter is in a corridor of the Ministry of Truth where Winston and the girl work. In the middle of the chapter, the setting is in the Ministry of Truth’s canteen, and in the end of the chapter, the setting is in Victory Square.
6. First, Winston witnesses the girl falling and goes to help her. When he helps her up, she hands him a note that says “I love you” (Orwell 113). Winston plans for a week to subtle converse with the girl in the canteen. When they are able to talk, the girl suggests meeting in Victory Square. The couple meets (again subtly) in the square and makes plans to meet again at Paddington Station.
7. The major themes in the chapter are the fear of Big Brother, the desire to live, the desire to be wanted, curiosity, and the importance of subtlety.
8. The girl’s note to Winston is a symbol for hope, desire, and curiosity. The relationship between Winston and the girl is a symbol for subtle political rebellion.
9. The irony in this chapter is that the couple desires to live freely, but to do so has to deliberately stay under the Party’s radar. At the same time, to stay hidden, the couple is forced to meet initially in very crowded places.
10. The epiphany in this chapter comes in the form of Winston’s awakening from the girl’s note that leads him to action.

Posted by: Rachel Cunio at March 4, 2015 04:37 PM

Dalton Hart & Lyndsey Pospisil
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351: The Contemporary World View
4 March 2015

Summary of Chapter 3

In chapter 3 of part 2 of Orwell’s 1984, there is only one new character introduced, Katharine, Winston’s ex-wife, although she is never physically present in the chapter. Although Katharine is not truly present in the chapter, she does act as a hindrance to Winston as his ex-wife would make it much more difficult to marry Julia, which Winston intends to do. The entire chapter is told in the third-person limited omniscient, as the reader is only able to understand the inner thoughts and feelings of Winston. The events in the chapter takes place in the future and unfold in a variety of places within London. Much of the action occurs in places outside of Big Brother’s watchful eye, including the woods, the streets of the poor district in London, the Church tower, and other places that Winston and Julia feel they are unlikely to be caught by the Thought Police. The conflicts within in the chapter are the same conflicts that have been brought up thus far in the novel, including Winston versus the Party, memory versus lack of memory, and privacy versus publicity. Winston and Julia attempt to meet in places that the Thought Police are unlikely to be monitoring them because they are breaking rules that would put them in trouble with Big Brother. Winston and Julia are thwarting the policies of Big Brother by engaging in sexual acts and both speak defiantly about the Party, which is a major theme throughout this chapter as well as the entire novel. A major symbol within the chapter is the woods. In much of literature, the woods represents the seclusion from civilization, and within the context of this chapter, the woods represents Winston’s ability to retreat from civilization the Party as a whole. The major epiphany of the chapter occurs toward the end of the chapter when Winston and Julia speak of human death. Winston becomes entrenched in the idea that all humans are basically dead because they will die eventually, but Julia is able to thwart these ideas by giving Winston a new perspective on life. After Julia asks Winston if she enjoys touching her body, her living body, Winston replies, “Yes, I like that,” (Orwell 113). This shows that Winston is slowly coming to enjoy the new life that he has found within Julia and signals a change in perception of the world.

Posted by: Dalton Hart & Lyndsey Pospisil (Group Work) at March 6, 2015 09:37 AM

Lyndsey Pospisil
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 The Contemporary World View
8 March 8, 2015

Question: Part III / Chapters 1-3: Why does O’Brien want to convince Winston that two plus two equals five? Why is this significant?

Answer: O’Brien wants to convince Winston that two plus two equals five because he is trying to make Winston “sane.” O’Brien remarks that Winston is in the Ministry of love because he has not controlled his own memory in accordance to the Party’s standards. O’Brien states, “You are here because you have failed in humility, in self-discipline. You would not make the act of submission, which is the price of sanity. You prefer to be a lunatic…” (Huxley, p. 261). In an attempt to make Winston sane and improve his ability to control his memory, O’Brien tortures Winston. O’Brien tortures Winston until Winston himself believes he sees five fingers rather than four, since that is what the Party has told him to see. O’Brien tells Winston that the Party is attempting to “convert him, capture his inner mind, [and] reshape him” (Huxley, p. 267). This is significant because it shows the true characteristics of the dystopian society depicted in nineteen eighty-four. This instance also shows the complete control that the Party has over people, and the extremes it is willing to go to ensure that all members of society conform to what the Party wants them too.

Posted by: Lyndsey Pospisil at March 8, 2015 05:47 PM

Lyndsey Pospisil
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 The Contemporary World View
8 March 8, 2015

Question: Part III / Chapters 1-3: What is “solipsism”? What might this word have to do with this part of the novel? Explain.

Answer: Solipsism is “the belief that nothing exists outside our own mind” (Huxley, p. 279). This word is relate to this part of the novel because in this chapter, O’Brien and Winston are having a conversation about the worldview that the Party finds to be effective for society. O’Brien states, “We control matter because we control the mind. Reality is inside the skull” (Huxley, p. 277). Winston cannot believe that the concept of solipsism is a valid one, but O’Brien interjects that it is “collective solipsism,” rather than just solipsism. The Party finds collective solipsism effective because it allows the Party to alter reality. If reality if inside the mind and consciousness is alterable, then reality can be altered to the way in which the Party wishes

Posted by: Lyndsey Pospisil at March 8, 2015 05:48 PM

Lyndsey Pospisil
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 The Contemporary World View
8 March 8, 2015

Question: Part III / Chapters 1-3: What brought Winston to tears? Explain.

Answer: Winston is brought to tears upon realizing the state in which his body has deteriorated. While looking at himself, Winston was “Aware of his ugliness, his gracelessness, [he was a] bundle of bones in filthy underclothes…” (Huxley, p. 285). Winston tells O’Brien that he is the reason why he has been deteriorated to this state. O’Brien tells Winston that it is his own fault.

Posted by: Lyndsey Pospisil at March 8, 2015 05:48 PM

Dalton Hart
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351: The Contemporary World View
9 March 2015

Question: Describe exactly what is happening to Winston in Chapter Two of Part Three, and who is doing this to him? Why is this happening?

Answer: In Chapter Two of Part Three, Winston is being beaten into submission by members of the Party for his crimes against them. Orwell writes, “With that first blow on the elbow the nightmare had started. Later [Winston] was to realize that all that then happened was merely a preliminary, a routine interrogation to which nearly all prisoners were subjected,” showing that Winston is being tortured by the members of the Party (Orwell 198). Winston is not necessarily being tortured for the crimes he has committed though, he is being punished in the hopes that he will conform to the Party’s view of how things should operate.

Posted by: Dalton Hart at March 8, 2015 08:11 PM

Dalton Hart
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351: The Contemporary World View
9 March 2015

Question: What is an “oligarchy”? What does O’Brien mean in Chapter Three of Part Three when he says that the party is different from all other oligarchies of the past?

Answer: An oligarchy is a type of government in which a small group of people rules over the masses of people. When O’Brien states, “We are different from all the oligarchies of the past in that we know what we are doing,” he is claiming that the Party differs from other oligarchies because they do not hide what they are attempting to do (Orwell 217). O’Brien acknowledges that the Party has gained power in the hopes of maintaining their rule and oppressing the masses and they do not try to hide this fact, much like other oligarchies have done. This acknowledgement of maintaining power for the good of the rulers is what sets the Party apart from all other oligarchies of the past.

Posted by: Dalton Hart at March 8, 2015 08:13 PM

Dalton Hart
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351: The Contemporary World View
9 March 2015

Question: Why are the common criminals and political prisoners treated differently in the temporary lock-up? Explain.

Answer: Common criminals and political prisoners are treated much differently when locked in prison because the Party intends to make an example of the political prisoners and ridicule them. O’Brien states, “Every day, at every moment, [heretics] will be defeated, discredited, ridiculed, spat upon – and yet they will survive,” showing that political heretics are treated differently because the Party recognizes the prisoner’s power (Orwell 221). Common criminals pose no true threat to the Party because simple crimes can be done away with of the Party chooses, but opposition of the Party’s ideology will always exist. In order to deal with the opposition to the Party, political prisoners are tortured to show other heretics that the Party will eventually be able to control them once they are caught.

Posted by: Dalton Hart at March 8, 2015 08:52 PM

Mekayla Davila
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary World View
9 March 2015

Question:
What does O’Brien tell Winston about Big Brother, the Party, and the Brotherhood? Why is this significant?

Answer:
O’Brien tells Winston that the Party has learned how to eliminate its enemies without making martyrs of them. He also tells Winston that big brother is not a real person and he will never know if the brotherhood truly exists or not (Orwell 242-60). This is significant because O’Brien is giving Winston information that he would not have been able to get on his own. He is opening his eyes and allowing him the opportunity to finally see what is really true or not within their society.

Posted by: Mekayla Davila at March 9, 2015 02:38 AM

Mekayla Davila
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary World View
9 March 2015

Question:
Does Winston betray Julia in chapters one or two of Part three? Why, or why not? Explain.

Answer:
Winston did not betray Julia in either of these chapters because it was said that as long as they loved each other they would not betray one another and at this point in the novel Winston still very much loved Julia (Orwell 259).

Posted by: Mekayla Davila at March 9, 2015 02:47 AM

Mekayla Davila
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary World View
9 March 2015

Question:
What is the last question that Winston asks O’Brien in Chapter Two, Part Three? What is O’Brien’s answer? What is the significance of this?

Answer:
The last question Winston asks O’Brien is “What is in Room 101?” to which O’Brien replies “You know what is in Room 101, Winston. Everyone knows what is in Room 101” (Orwell 260). This is significant because it establishes that the room is relative to whomever enters it. It is a foreshadow for the soon to be knowledge that within Room 101 lies the fears and worst nightmares of whomever enters it. This is where the breaking down of resistance begins.

Posted by: Mekayla Davila at March 9, 2015 02:54 AM

Mekayla Davila
Madison Brunk
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary World View CA01
9 March 2015

Group Question- 1984; Part 2 Chapter 8
“… In chapter 8 of Part 2 of 1984, Winston is still clearly the most prominent round character and continues to be the protagonist of the story. Julia, who is also a round character is featured in this chapter as well as O’Brien who is slowly becoming a very influential character within Winston’s life. We are introduced, in this chapter, to a new flat character named Martin who is O’Brien’s servant and just simply leads Winston and Julia to O’Brien’s apartment. This chapter is written still in omniscient third person from Winston’s point of view. The events of this chapter take place in O’Brien’s apartment which is an area free from big brother and private space. This entire plot is centered on the fact that Julia and Winston confirm their anti-party values and have gained information to the brotherhood. The theme of chapter 8 is that Winston and Julia are finally taking action to move against the party. They have both come to the realization of the corruption that is has done to their society and no longer wish to be a part of the games run by Big Brother so they have decided to take initiative into going against the grain. The symbol for this chapter is that there is no longer darkness which means there is no more big brother, at least for Julia and Winston. Towards the end of this chapter Winston comes to the sudden realization that the brotherhood is real and together, he and Julia, wish to dedicate themselves to the brotherhood by any means possible.”

Posted by: Mekayla Davila at March 9, 2015 03:17 AM

Annie Hays
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary Worldview CA01
9 March 2015

Question: Find the section in Part III where O’Brien says “And above all we do not allow the dead to rise up against us.” What does he mean by this? Explain.

Answer: The quote means that in the past, when totalitarian regimes would arise, martyrs would die to lead the people against the government (Orwell 253). "Naturally all the glory belonged to the victim and all the shame to the Inquisitor who burned him" (253). The dead heroes would fill people with anger and hatred of the regime, and this would give them a reason to fight. So this government decided that instead of simply killing people, they had to diffuse the martyrs' power. The traitors would be retaught everything they know, and their public confessions would make people think they actually did commit crimes. The people would have no lost cause to fight for, and would even turn on the martyrs (254). Furthermore, all records of the traitor would be destroyed so that no one would ever remember him. If people cannot even remember the traitor, they cannot follow his cause (255).

Posted by: Annie Hays at March 9, 2015 12:07 PM

Annie Hays
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary Worldview CA01
9 March 2015

Question: What is Winston’s attitude towards O’Brien during this part of the story? Support your answer with quotations.

Answer: Winston still respects O'Brien just as much as when he was at the Two Minutes Hate at the start of the story. "The peculiar reverence for O'Brien which nothing seemed able to destroy, flooded Winston's heart again" (Orwell 273). O'Brien seems to know everything Winston is thinking, as if he is reading his mind (256). Also, O'Brien is still someone Winston can talk to (252). He even enjoys talking to O'Brien except when he is being electrocuted. The calm, all-knowing air that O'Brien has seems to have put a spell on Winston since they met.

Posted by: Annie Hays at March 9, 2015 12:26 PM

Annie Hays
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary Worldview CA01
9 March 2015

Question: What is a logical absurdity? “Did not the statement ‘You do not exist’ contain a logical absurdity?” What does Winston mean by this? Explain.

Answer: A logical absurdity is something that both makes sense and is completely wrong at the same time. It can only exist if people adhere to doublethink. "You do not exist" is a logical absurdity because Winston physically exists, but at as far as society is concerned he does not exist. Winston occupies space, and he is a thinking, breathing human being (Orwell 259). But all record of him has been destroyed so there is no proof he ever existed. "He knew, or he could imagine, the arguments which proved his own nonexistence; but they were nonsense" (259). Everyone in society is trained to forget people who disappear, so there is no evidence that Winston exists or has ever existed.

Posted by: Annie Hays at March 9, 2015 12:41 PM

Annie Hays and Craig Graves
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary Worldview CA01
9 March 2015

Summary of Nineteen Eighty-Four by George Orwell: Chapter Nine

Chapter Nine focuses on Goldstein's book, which Winston got from O'Brien. Winston tries reading the book to Julia, but she falls asleep. The chapter is in third-person limited as it explains Winston's thoughts on Goldstein and O'Brien, but it does not explain why Julia is so bored with the book. All four of these characters are central to the book, and each one is round as they all change at some point in the novel. Winston and Julia are in the secret flat during the chapter, so they feel safe enough to read the book. Since the book is just describing the situation in the world, none of it is involved in the plot. The only plot is Winston reading and Julia falling asleep. The main theme of Goldstein's book is how people are manipulated by fear and deprivation. If there were no wars, or food was plentiful, people would not want to give so much power to the Party. But thanks to blind adherence to Party values out of fear of death or war, the government can easily herd the people. Goldstein is the symbol of reason in this chapter. He reaffirms everything Winston suspected his entire life, and Winston is grateful for truth since he is surrounded by lies all day. There are no epiphanies in this chapter since Winston already suspected everything in the book, and he was frustrated that he learned nothing new.

Posted by: Annie Hays and Craig Graves at March 9, 2015 01:10 PM

Madison Brunk
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary World View CA01
9 March 2015

Question: “They got me a long time ago” What is meant by this phrase? Why is it
significant?

Answer: This phrase is spoken by O'brien when he enters Winston's cell in the Ministry of Love. Winston thinks he has been captured and asks "They got you too?" and O'brien answers, which insinuates his role with the party. (Orwell, 251) This is directly ironic due to his affiliation with being free and being the symbol of freedom against Big Brother.

Posted by: Madison Brunk at March 9, 2015 01:26 PM

Madison Brunk
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 The Contemporary World View CA01
9 March 2015

Question: Compare Ampleforth’s and Parsons’ reactions to their arrests. How are they
different?

Answer: The poet, Ampleforth, is in bad-shape when he arrives in the cell and is unsure of the reasoning behind his arrest. While he has an idea of why, he provides it as more of an excuse than an admission of guilt. However, Parsons' reaction is one of excessive guilt. He claims "There I was, working to do my bit, never knew I had any bad stuff in my mind at all." and felt that they had saved him by arresting him (Orwell, 245). Though both don't deny guilt, their reactions are still very different.

Posted by: Madison Brunk at March 9, 2015 01:32 PM

Madison Brunk
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary World View CA01
9 March 2015

Question: What is the number of the room where the guards take some of the
prisoners? How do many of them react to this?

Answer: The telescreen often assigns people to Room 101, an infamous room according to many of the prisoners around Winston. While some, like Ampleforth, seem perplexed or confused about Room 101, most prisoners have horrific and terrible feelings about Room 101. One prisoner, after being assigned there, dramatically pleas that they can slit his whole families throat while he watches but "not Room 101" (Orwell, 249).

Posted by: Madison Brunk at March 9, 2015 01:36 PM

Bethanee Reynolds
Kenna Dieffenwierth
HON 351 The Contemporary World View CA01
Dr. Hobbs
2 March 2015
Summary : Part 1 Chapter 4

Winston is still the main character worth mentioning. He is continuing to develop as the protagonist, which makes him a round character. Another character that appears is Tillotson; he seems to be a static, shadow character. Tillotson’s main purpose in this chapter serves to show Winston’s division between hating “Big Brother” and serving the party and wanting to serve well. It is written in limited 3rd person because we are reading in the perspective as if we were in winston’s mind, yet jut on the outside watching his life play out. The setting of this chapter is in Winston’s workplace, The Ministry of truth also known as MiniTruth in newspeak. There is definitely the conflict of Man vs. Society in this chapter because Winston is at work and he cannot openly show his distrust and hate for Big Brother and the party. There is also a Man vs. Self-conflict because he doesn’t trust Big Brother or The Party but, when he is working on the articles he shows a sense of enjoyment for helping The Party change the past, especially when he is changing the article about comrade withers and he makes up comrade Ogilvy. The last conflict that arises is one of Man vs. Man. This conflict is more subtle and not as important, at the end of the chapter when Winston is finishing his article change, he thinks about Tillotson working on the same article as him and he is determined for his to be the better one, he view Tillotson in the case as opponent. The main theme is still the fear of Big Brother is watching you, the lack of privacy and the fear of not succeeding or supporting The Party. Something that was ironic about this chapter is that we know Winston’s character wants to remember the past, remember his mother, times before the revolution and yet his job is changing the past so that others cannot remember it and he slightly enjoys it. The memory tubes are the greatest form of symbolism because one of the reoccurring motifs is remember the past and memories, and memory tubes are what they use to destroy written history after they rewrite it.

Posted by: Bethanee Reynolds at March 9, 2015 01:53 PM

Kenna Dieffenwierth
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary World View
9 March 2015

Question: 195. Part III / Chapters 1-3: Why, according to O’Brien, is Winston in the Ministry of Love? What must he do while there? Will he be able to leave? If so, how?

Answer: He is in the Ministry of Love because he has failed to control his mind. “You are here because you have failed in humility, in self-discipline. You would not make the act of submission which is the price of sanity. You preferred to be a lunatic, a minority of one” (Orwell 248-249). He must learn to control his mind while hear in order to be able to leave. He has to essentially be brainwashed through torture or die in the process (Orwell 246-253).

Posted by: Kenna Dieffenwierth at March 9, 2015 02:19 PM

Kenna Dieffenwierth
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary World View
9 March 2015

Question: 196. Part III / Chapters 1-3: If the purpose of torture at the Ministry of Love is not to obtain confessions alone, what is the true purpose? Why is this significant? Explain.

Answer: The purpose of the torture is to brainwash/torture Winston into submission. “Not merely to extract your confession, nor to punish you. Shall I tell you why we have brought you here? To cure you! To make you sane!” (Orwell 253). This is significant because it makes it clear that the party is interested in a person’s though crimes rather than their actions (Orwell 253).

Posted by: Kenna Dieffenwierth at March 9, 2015 02:19 PM

Bethanee Victoria Reynolds
HON 351 The Contemporary World View CA01
Dr. Hobbs
9 March 2015
Question:
Where is Winston as this section of the novel opens? What is his number?
Answer:
He belives that he is in the Ministry of Love, “Presumably he was in the Ministry of Love;…” (Orwell, Nineteen-Eighty-Four, page 225), but there is no way to be sure where he is. His number is 6079. “ ’Smith!’ yelled a voice from the telescreen. ‘6079 Smith W! Hands out of pockets in the cells!”(Orwell, Nineteen-Eighty-Four, pager 226).

Posted by: Bethanee Reynolds at March 9, 2015 02:21 PM

Bethanee Victoria Reynolds
HON 351 The Contemporary World View CA01
Dr. Hobbs
9 March 2015

Question:
Who is brought into the cell with Winston and why does he think he is there?
Answer:
“He must speak to Ampleforth, and risk the yell from the telescreen. It was even conceivable that Ampleforth was the bearer of the razor blade.” (Orwell, Nineteen-Eighty-Four, page 230). The poet Ampleforth was brought into the same cell as Winston. Winston believed that Ampleforth was bearing the razor blade from the Brotherhood that Winston would use to kill himself.

Posted by: Bethanee Reynolds at March 9, 2015 02:22 PM

Racheljoy Capitola
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary Worldview CA01
9 March 2015

189. What reason does O’Brien give for Winston’s being brought to the Ministry of Love? Explain. Why is this significant?

O’Brien explains that Winston is being brought to the Ministry of Love because he is a “flaw in the pattern” that must be “washed clean” (255). When a person is found guilty of a crime, Big Brother torturers the deviant until they are brainwashed into feeling completely sorrowful for their disobedience. Heretics are reeducated into desiring to be killed out of Love for the organization. It is significant because not only are people being killed and erased by Big Brother, but they are also being forced to lose their individuality and rebellious thoughts.

193. How does Winston react to the first pain he suffers? Why? What is his original intent?

When Winston first experiences physical pain by being hit on the elbow, he is shocked. “Inconceivable, inconceivable, that one blow could cause such pain!” (239) Winston ends up “writhed on the floor” and realizing that physical pain was the worst experience in the world. Originally, he had thought that he would be willing to double his pain if he could save Julia (238), but that was impossible.

206. According to O’Brien, why does the party seek power? How does it differ from Winston’s response?

O’Brien claims the “party seeks power entirely for its own sake.” (263) Because Big Brother seeks pure power, the organization doesn’t get led off course by achieving other goals such as “revolution” and “paradise.” “Power is not a means; it is an end.” (263) O’Brien’s answer contrasts with Winston’s because Winston believe the party thought people were unfit to govern; but the reality is, the party is made up of a handful of people that are in power.

Posted by: Racheljoy Capitola at March 9, 2015 02:52 PM

Racheljoy Capitola & Kenna Dieffenwierth
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary Worldview CA01
9 March 2015

Group Question: Chapter 8

In chapter 6 of 1984, there are two characters: Winston, who is a round character because he is the complex protagonist, and O’Brien, who is a flat, static character because not much is known about him (such as his background or desires). The chapter is told in limited third person omniscient like the rest of the novel. The setting is in the Ministry of Truth, particularly in the same hallway that Julia snuck a note to Winston, which makes the place a significant threshold of transpired messages; it is a public setting but one in which the characters can have secret written conversations without alerting the telescreens. The plot focuses on Winston taking a chance by trusting O’Brien to be a part of the rumored rebellion and accepting O’Brien’s coded invitation to his estate. The conflict is man versus society since Winston feels like he is at war with Big Brother and wants to possibly join an organization that acts out against the current state of society. Several themes present in the chapter are rebellion (because Winston finally decides to act out in a fighting way), chance (because Winston puts his fate in O’Briend being a conspirator), and doom (because Winston felt the “sensation of stepping into the dampness of a grave” (159) which may indicate his actions are based on knowing he has no choice but to act against society). The epiphany moment is when Winston finally realizes—or assumes—there is someone who also understands his urge to deviate from his conditioning. Possible symbols shown in the chapter are the fact that O’Brien also owns a book and that, once again, a piece of paper is used as a form of communication; it is as if those associated with the rebellion refer to outdate methods of communication. Also, O’Brian owns a gold ink pencil, and gold often refers to wealth and power, which may set up foreshadowing for later chapters about O’Brien’s significance.

Posted by: Racheljoy Capitola at March 9, 2015 03:13 PM

Rachel Cunio
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary Worldview CA01
09 March 2015

Question: Who denounced Winston? How does he feel about the arrest? Explain.
Answer: With the words “’they got me a long time ago’” (Orwell 250), O’Brien reveals to Winston that he is an agent of the Party and therefore likely the one who denounced Winston to the Party. O’Brien’s comment that Winston “knew this” (Orwell 251) about O’Brien only confirms that Winston should not feel surprised about the arrest. The actual arrest is made my Mr. Charrington, the agent of the Thought Police, whom Winston never suspected. Winston feels betrayed by both men, Mr. Charrington because he caught Winston off guard using a deceptive appearance, and O’Brien because Winston truly thought O’Brien was someone whose true feelings were against the Party.

Posted by: Rachel Cunio at March 9, 2015 03:19 PM

Rachel Cunio
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary Worldview CA01
09 March 2015

Question: What happened to Parsons? Why? Explain.
Answer: Parsons was denounced to the Thought Police by his “little daughter” (Orwell 245) for repeating “Down with Big Brother” (Orwell 245) in his sleep, and is then placed in a cell with Winston. Parsons is so conditioned by the Party that he even feels “proud” (Orwell 245) of his daughter despite what her actions caused because those actions, though against her own father, show that she has “the right spirit” (Orwell 245).

Posted by: Rachel Cunio at March 9, 2015 03:19 PM

Rachel Cunio
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary Worldview CA01
09 March 2015

Question: Who comes into the room last? What does Winston discover about this person?
Answer: The last person to come into the room is O’Brien, which shocks Winston so much that he forgets about “the presence of the telescreen” (Orwell 250). Winston discovers that even though he had “always known it” (Orwell 251), O’Brien is a true Party member.

Posted by: Rachel Cunio at March 9, 2015 03:20 PM

Jacob Gates
Glen Pringle
Dr. Hobbs
Contemporary Worldview HON 323 CA01
4 March 2014

1984 Part 1 Chapter 7

In this particular chapter of George Orwell’s 1984, Winston is starting to become more interested in the idea of changing the party or change in general. He thinks of ways the part could possibly be overthrown and becomes convinced that the only way it would be possible is through the Proles, the weakest, largest, and most forgotten of the classes in Oceania. In limited third person omniscient Orwell describes Winston’s desperation and hope for change. Winston remembers a small dinner at the chestnut tree cafe that he went to, and introduces the characters of Rutherford, Jones, and Aaronson. Rutherford, Jones, and Aaronson appear to all be loyal to Ingsoc and make pithy small talk with Winston about the party and its politics. Winston remembers that after the party, the three friends were arrested and confessed to being on eurasian soil and plotting to overthrow the party, they were then presumably executed. Winston then remembers that they couldn’t have been in Eurasia at the time and that the government must have lied about what they had actually done. This chapter is significant because it shows Winston truly starting to doubt the intentions of the party and recognize that what they may present as truth may not in fact be the case.

Posted by: Jacob Gates and Glen Pringle at March 9, 2015 03:21 PM

Craig Graves
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary World View CA01
9 March 2015

Question (Part 3, Chapters 1-3, # 209):
According to O’Brien, what else does the Party have planned for its citizens? Why is this significant? Explain.

Answer:
While torturing Winston, O’Brien explains about the Party’s plans for the highest level power over the people of the society. O’Brien proclaims that “we [the Party] are the priests of power… that power is collective (Orwell 567).” He goes on to say that individuals will only ever have power if they no longer act as individuals. The Party, as O’Brien explains, will continue to monitor and alter the consciousness of the people of the society until everyone has submitted to the collective power and accepted the ideology of “freedom is slavery.” Alone, O’Brien explains, humans are weak and trivial, but together as the Party, they are powerful and infinite.


Posted by: Craig Graves at March 9, 2015 03:32 PM

Craig Graves
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary World View CA01
9 March 2015

Question (Part 3, Chapters 1-3, # 210):
What does Winston believe will defeat the Party? Who disagrees with him, and why?

Answer:
Winston believes that a rebellion of the proletarians is needed to overthrow the Party. O’Brien disagrees with Winston, saying that “there is no way in which the Party can be overthrown; the rule of the Party is forever (Orwell 562).” O’Brien is son indoctrinated by the Party and its ideals that he refuses to believe that anyone could possibly try to overthrow the Party and he forces this hope-crushing belief onto Winston.

Posted by: Craig Graves at March 9, 2015 03:32 PM

Craig Graves
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary World View CA01
9 March 2015

Question (Part 3, Chapters 1-3, # 212):
What does it mean to “capitulate” What might this word have to do with this part of the novel? Explain.

Answer:
“Capitulate” means to surrender to an opposing force or viewpoint. In the novel, this word relates to Winston being held by the party for re-education. As it is used in the story, Winston had given up long before he admitted to it. As the narrator puts it, Winston “had grasped the frivolity, the shallowness of his attempt to set himself up against the power of the Party (Orwell 593).” In other words, Winston subconsciously knew that his goal to overthrow the Party was a fool’s errand. He was bound to submit to the whim of the Party with such an outlook on his actions.

Posted by: Craig Graves at March 9, 2015 03:33 PM

Kenna Dieffenwierth
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary World View
9 March 2015

Question: 201. Part III / Chapters 1-3: Why doesn’t The Party simply eliminate rebellious members? Why does it go to all of this trouble? Explain the significance of their stance.

Answer: The party wishes to eliminate martyrs. “But we make the brain perfect before we blow it out” (Orwell 255). They completely break a person down so that they die praising Big Brother (Orwell 255). This is significant because it different than the typical way of eliminating enemies seen throughout history. Enemies are actually erased. They aren’t even allowed to die with their own mind.

Posted by: Kenna Dieffenwierth at March 9, 2015 03:38 PM

Glen Pringle & Jake Gates
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary Worldview CA01
9 March 2015

Book Three, chapter IV of 1984 finds Winston and O'Brien together. These are both the dynamic characters in the chapter, whom interact with one another with intention. Winston continues to dream about Julia and his mother, making them uninvolved and flat, just for this chapter. Other flat characters include the doctors and guards, whom go through no character development whatsoever. Other than the latter, all previously mentioned characters have been introduced to the reader before, and there are no new surprises. Like the rest of the novel, the chapter is told in limited third person omniscient view. Winston is being tortured in the Ministry of Love, in the present time of the novel. The major conflict that he faces is versus the Party. Finally being captured, be faces more conflict through O'Brien, whom has revealed himself to be a inner member of the Party. This carries over to the main theme of the chapter: resistance is futile, and Ingsoc will prevail. The symbol of Room 101 casts an ominous tone over the chapter. Winston continually asks about what exists in the room, and is rebuffed or told he knows already what is in the room. It represents (and actually is) the deepest fears of anyone who enters.

Posted by: Glen Pringle at March 9, 2015 04:31 PM

Lyndsey Pospisil & Dalton Hart
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 The Contemporary World View
9 March 9, 2015

Part 3, Chapter 2 Summary
In Chapter 2, Part 3 of Nineteen Eighty-Four, the characters that are present in this chapter are Winston and O’Brien. Both Winston and O’Brien are round characters. There are no new characters presented in this chapter. O’Brien can play the role of a trickster. We find out that O’Brien pretends to induct Winston into the brotherhood in an attempt to gain his trust and catch him directly defying the Party. The character of O’Brien is confusing and his exact role in the novel is unclear. Although O’Brien brainwashes and tortures Winston to make him conform to the Party, Winston still receives a sense of love, respect, and comfort from O’Brien. This chapter is told from the third person omniscient. Although O’Brien is present throughout the entire chapter, we only know the inner thoughts and feelings of Winston. This chapter takes place in the Ministry of Love in the present time of Winston’s life. This chapter includes, what we consider, both a public and private place. The Ministry of Love is a private place from the rest of the society, however, it is a very public place for the Party and Big Brother to see what is going on. The main conflicts of this chapter are Winston v. The Party, and as a direct relation to this conflict, Winston v. O’Brien. O’Brien is a member of the Inner Party, and in this chapter he spends most of his time torturing and brainwashing Winston. In this chapter, Winston tries to continue to rebel against the Party when he insists that he sees four fingers instead of five. Although he is being tortured, he continues to insist he sees only four fingers. Finally, the Party breaks Winston and he tells O’Brien he sees five fingers. There are no new themes introduced in this chapter. The main themes of this chapter that are continual are the Party’s control and the theme of Rebellion. Winston tries his best to rebel against the Party but he fails because the Party has too much control over him, through torture, while he is in the Ministry of Love. A new symbol that emerges in this chapter is Room 101. Room 101 symbolizes the extremes that the Party will go to in order to ensure conformity. Room 101 is a torture chamber that has “the worst thing in the world,” which varies from person to person. An instance of irony that can be found within this chapter deals with what is considered “sane” within this society. O’Brien tells Winston that he is insane. O’Brien states, “You are here because you have failed in humility, in self-discipline. You would not make the act of submission, which is the price of sanity. You prefer to be a lunatic…” (Huxley, p. 261). Irony can be found when one considers the true definition of sanity in relation to the society of nineteen eighty-four. O’Brien and the Party are considered “sane,” yet they are torturing and brainwashing someone who does not agree with them. Winston has an epiphany in this chapter when he asks the question of what is in Room 101. When O’Brien tells Winston that he knows the answer to that question, Winston has an epiphany that it is his worst nightmare.

Posted by: Lyndsey Pospisil at March 9, 2015 04:44 PM

Mekayla Davila
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary World View CA01
10 March 2015

1984- Part 3 Chapter 5
“… In chapter 5 of part III of 1984, the round characters presented were Winston who is still the protagonist and O’Brien who is considered to be the antagonist at this point in the novel. O’Brien is a part of the party which Winston was unaware of previous to this chapter and so he has fooled Winston into thinking he was a part of the brotherhood and anti-party movement. There were no new characters introduced in this chapter of the novel since it is mainly just Winston and O’Brien in room 101 together. This chapter is still written in a third person omniscient limited perspective. The setting, as previously mentioned is room 101 which is where Winston will be broken down into revealing his love for the party. The plot of chapter five begins with Winston being called to room 1010. O’Brien then tells him that room 101 contains the worst thing, which is different for everybody; for Winston it is rats. He is overwhelmed with this fear and as the cage with them inside comes closer to him Winston then surrenders and betrays Julia and O’Brien closes the cage. The theme within this chapter is that power is power and fear. Winston realizes the significance of the control and power big brother really has to have such control over the fears of others. The symbol of this chapter, as well as the entire novel, is in fact big brother himself and what he stands for as far as within society and within the individual. Winston’s epiphany is that he did end up giving up and betray Julia when the circumstances where no longer bearable. This makes him realize that no matter what he loves, big brother will always have control over how he truly feels.”

Posted by: Mekayla Davila at March 10, 2015 10:18 PM

Annie Hays and Craig Graves
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary World View CA01
11 March 2015

Part 3 Chapter 3 Summary

In this chapter, the round character O’Brien is torturing the other round character of Winston as punishment for his thought crimes against the Party. The round characters Julia and Goldstein are mentioned, but never seen otherwise. O’Brien reveals himself as the shadow, trickster, and shape-shifter archetypes in this chapter to Winston. As usual in this story, the narration is third-person limited though there is a level of omnipotence while O’Brien is explaining the actions and techniques of the Party. This chapter takes place in the Retraining Center of the Ministry of Love. As previously stated, O’Brien is torturing Winston to break and re-educate him, showing a mixture of man-versus-man, man-versus-society, and man-versus-self conflicts. O’Brien repeatedly questions Winston about who has the power and who is in control, making both of these issues themes. Overall, the mood is a clash of being conflicted and knowledge as the secrets of the Party are brought to light in unorthodox and backward methods. The dichotomy of the trivial individual and the immortal society is symbolized in O’Brien’s torture of Winston, for O’Brien says that he, as an individual is not hurting Winston, but rather the Party, is hurting him. This explanation feeds into the epiphany that the Party is ultimately evil, and there is a cycling truth in the society that “freedom is slavery … slavery is freedom (Orwell 567).” This saying means that being free enslaves a person to his or her desires, but in contrast being enslaved by the society’s strict rules will allow people to be free from their desires, vices, and imperfections.

Posted by: Craig Graves at March 11, 2015 03:06 PM

Kenna Dieffenwierth and Racheljoy Capitola
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary World View CA01
11 February 2015

Part 3, Chapter 6 Summary
Winston, Julia, and a bar tender. The chapter is written in third person omniscient. Winston and Julia are round characters that became flat characters after having their minds wiped clean and rebuilt. They went from rebels to standardized, empty ideal citizens. The bar tender is a flat character. This chapter deals with the reintroduction of Winston and Julia into society following their captivity. Their appearance is changed to the point where they are almost unrecognizable. Winston was given a job better than he had before. "He had always plenty of money nowadays. He even had a job, a sinecure, more highly paid than his old job had been" (Orwell 289). This money funded his new routines and habits. He came everyday to the Chestnut Cafe and drank while playing chess alone in the same corner. At one point in the chapter, he talks about following Julia to a park where they admit to one another their betrayal. The theme of this chapter is submission. Both Winston and Julia were successfully rehabilitated to The Party's standards. Now they fall into place as ideal citizens living pointless, submissive lives as hollowed shells. There is no conflict in this chapter, because they have completely given in to the system. "But it was all right, everything was all right, the struggle was finisthed. He had won the victory over himself. He loved Big Brother. There is no traditional form of an epiphany. Winston and Julia are merely hollowed shells at this point. Some symbolism in this chapter includes the chessboard and the color white. The color white is referenced throughout the chapter. While playing chess, Winston relates white to Big Brother and to good. "White always mates, he thought with a sort of cloudy mysticism. Always, without exception, it is so arranged. In no chess problem since the beginning of the world has black ever won. Did it not symbolize the eternal, unvarying triumph of Good over Evil? The huge face gazed back at him, full of calm power. White always mates" (Orwell 289).

Posted by: Kenna Dieffenwierth at March 11, 2015 03:37 PM

Jamee Townsend, Karra Rutherford, Michael Barbee
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 The Contemporary World View CA02
22 February 2016

Questions:
1. What are the conflicts in your chapter? What is the chief conflict?
2. Which conflicts are dichotomies, even if they are false dichotomies?
3. How are the dichotomies structured? What are the hegemonies? What is privileged? What is not?
4. Similarities to Republic? Huxley?

Answer: Chapter 2
1. The Parson children who are Winston’s neighbors and also Junior Spies accuse him of thought crimes. Also, Winston is having an internal struggle concerning his thoughts towards Big Brother during his diary sessions, which is also the chief conflict in the chapter. He is extremely concerned about the consequences of what he wrote, “Thoughtcrime does not entail death: thoughtcrime IS death (Orwell 28).”
2. The dichotomies that we discussed in this chapter are privacy vs. order (the people endure extreme impeachment of privacy to uphold the government’s rules), truth vs. ignorance (the people are controlled by propaganda and lies but are aware of some truths), and rebellion vs. conformity (Winston’s internal struggle with his thoughts against Big Brother). In Chapter 2, Winston says that he feels, “as though he were wandering in the forests of the sea bottom, lost in a monstrous world where he himself was the monster (Orwell 26).”
3. In the dichotomy of truth vs. ignorance, there is hegemony of propaganda and altering the record of historical events by the government whom also enforces compliance-ignorance. So although Winston’s internal struggle is pushing him to defy mentally the government that he works for, in Chapter 2 ignorance is still the prevailing side of the dichotomy.
4. In both 1984 and Brave New World, the people are aware that they are being deceived, and that there is another truth out there; as well as the people are controlled by the television and conditioning respectively. Winston can be compared to Helmholtz Watson in Brave New World because both of them have very unorthodox thoughts and venture into questioning their controlling power. Therefore, the Utopia/Dystopia presented in 1984 has a lot of similarities with Brave New World, but it can also be said that The Republic is similar in that the main dichotomy is truth vs. ignorance.

Posted by: Jamee Townsend at February 23, 2016 11:31 PM

Ashlee English
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
HON 351 The Contemporary World View CA02
22 February 2016

QUESTIONS #:

9. Part 1 / Chapter 1: What is the word on the flapping poster?
20. Part 1 / Chapter 2: How is the Parson’s flat (apartment) different from Winston’s?
31. Part 1 / Chapter 3: What does Winston think happened to his mother and father?

ANSWERS:
9. The word flapping on the poster is INGSOC.
20. The parson flat differs from that of Winston’s as it was larger and decorated with posters of Big Brother, with everything trampled on.
31. Winston thinks his mother and father were swallowed up in the Holocaust purges in the fifties.


Translation Used
1984 by George Orwell
ePub version by University of Adelaide

Posted by: Ashlee English at February 24, 2016 10:15 AM

Jasmine Daniels
Dr. Hobbs
Hon 351 Contemporary World View CA02
24 February 2016

Question #13: What are the three slogans of the party etched on Miniture?

The three slogans that are etched on the Miniture are, “WAR IS PEACE, FREEDOM IS SLAVARY, IGNORANCE IS STRENGTH.” (Orwell 4)

Question #29: What does he put on the corner of the cover of his diary before he leaves?

“With the tip of his finger he picked up an identifiable grain of whitish dust and deposited it on the corner of the cover, where it was bound to be shaken off if the book was moved.” (Orwell 23) By doing this Winston would at least be able to know whether or not someone besides himself had touched the diary. Therefore, he would at least be warned before he would be taken by the thought police.

Question #40: Why is the Past to be wiped away?

“And if all others accepted the lie which the Party imposed -if all records told the same tale -- then the lie passed into history and became truth. Who controls the past, ran the Party slogan, controls the future: who controls the present controls the past. And yet the past, though of its nature alterable, never had been altered. Whatever was true now was true from everlasting to everlasting. It was quite simple. All that was needed was an unending series of victories over your own memory.” (Orwell 41) As the above quote states, the past is to be wiped away so that history can be rewritten and make the party seem better than they actually are. They also want to show the omnipresence of the party throughout history.

Posted by: Jasmine Daniels at February 24, 2016 11:34 AM

Andrew Thriffiley, Ashlee English, Melissa Bryan
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 The Contemporary World View CA02
23 February 2016

Questions:
1.) What are the conflicts in your chapter? What is the chief conflict?
2.) Which conflicts are dichotomies, even if they are false dichotomies?
3.) How are the dichotomies structured? What are hegemonies? What is privileged? What is not?
4.) Similarities to Republic? Huxley?

Answer: Chapter 3
1.) Winston is dreaming about his mother and his sister at the beginning of the chapter, and he honestly believes based on his idea that he is the reason his mom and sister have died. "He could not remember what had happened, but he knew in his dream that in some way the lives of his mother and his sister had been sacrificed to his own."(Huxley 29-30). Winston also gets in trouble at the end of the chapter for day-dreaming while he should be exercising, and this perfectly illustrates how carefully people are watched in society.
2.) The dichotomies present in this section are reality vs. imagination. This is so because Winston has these thoughts that he is responsible for his family's deaths; however he cannot be for sure if he is right or not. Other dichotomies present in the chapter are guilt vs. innocence, memory vs. history, and peace vs. war. One example of memory vs. history is portrayed in this quote. "And if all others accepted the lie which the Party imposed- if all records told the same tale- then the lie passed into history and became truth." (Huxley 34).
3.) In 1984, war was far more privileged than peace because there has always been war. The privileged in the dichotomies are almost always opposite of what one would expect today. A perfect example of memory vs. history where memory is privileged is shown by how the Party treats history. "Who controls the past, ran the Party slogan, controls the future."(Huxley 34). This is showing that whoever is in power gets to make the decisions on what people remember.
4.) The book is very similar to Huxley in the way one group can control the whole society and way of thinking. The Party makes decisions very similar to how Mustapha Mond had the say to how things would go in A Brave New World. A similarity of both The Republic and Huxley is the way people were told what their jobs would be. They didn't even get a chance to pick themselves they are just cast there and say to perform their jobs. This is also similar that castes of people in all of the societies have either better standing with the rulers, or they are worse off.

Posted by: Andrew Thriffiley, Ashlee English, Melissa Bryan at February 24, 2016 12:18 PM

Andrew Thriffiley
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 The Contemporary World View CA02
23 February 2016

Questions:
2.)Who is the first character introduced? Where does he live?
26.)What is the only thing people can call their own?
36.)What does Winston do after his coughing fit?

Answer:
2.) Winston Smith is the first character introduced, and he lives in Victory Mansions.
26.) The only thing people can call their own is "the few cubic centimeters inside your head." (Huxley 26)
36.) After Winston has his coughing fits, he starts the mandatory exercises that are done daily, which they call the exercises physical jerks.

Posted by: Andrew Thriffiley at February 24, 2016 02:41 PM

Jamee Townsend
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 The Contemporary World View CA02
24 February 2016

Question: Part 1
10. What police bother Winston?
26. What is the only thing that people can call their own?
32. Why does Winston think his mother and father had to die?

Answer:
10. He is bothered by thoughtpolice whom he believes will punish him for his impure thoughts against Big Brother, “Thoughtcrime does not entail death: thoughtcrime IS death (Orwell 28).”
26. People can call their dreams their own because they contain the same thoughts, feelings, and memories that are forcefully repressed by the government during the day. They are even conditioned to be so scared of the thoughtpolice and junior spies that they feel a sense of guilt and internal conflict if any inappropriate thought passes their mind, “The consequences of every act are included in the act itself (Orwell 28).”
32. In Chapter 3 it is said that they, “must evidently have been swallowed up in one of the purges of the Fifties,” which sounds like a sort of cleansing of the population (Orwell 29). Although Winston cannot specific remember what happened to them, he has a feeling that their death with sacrificial in order for him to live. This perspective was most likely conditioned into the population using propaganda and thoughtpolice.

Posted by: Jamee Townsend at February 24, 2016 03:05 PM

Dominique Bauer
Dr. Hobbs
HON – 351 The Contemporary Worldview CA02
24 February 2016

Question 11: What city and country Winston live in? Can Winston recall the city of his childhood?
Answer: Winston lives in “London, chief city of Airstrip One, [which is] the third most populous of the providences of Oceania” (Orwell 5). In more simplistic terms, Winston lives in Oceania, London. In regards to the city of his childhood, “he tried to squeeze out some childhood memory that should tell him whether London had always been quiet like this [. . .] bit it was no use, he could not remember” (Orwell 5). In other words, Winston cannot recall what this city was like when he was a child, no matter how hard he tries.
Question 28: What ordinary thing does Winston do before he goes back to work?
Answer: Before returning to work, Winston “went to the bathroom and carefully scrubbed the ink away with the gritty dark-brown soap, which rasped [the] skin like sandpaper and was therefore well adapted for this purpose” (Orwell 31). Winston does this before returning to work because he had ink on his hands from writing in the diary, and if he were to be caught with the ink on his hands, then that would be what could get him in trouble for what he was writing.
Question 37: What can Winston remember of his early life?
Answer: From his early life, Winston can remember “a fairly long interval of peace [. . .] because [. . .] of an air raid which appeared to take everyone by surprise” (Orwell 35). From this it can be interpreted that, despite him only knowing of the war, there was a point in time where there was not during his lifetime. He also remembers, “the names of countries, and their shapes on the maps, had been different” (Orwell, 34). Tying into this is the concept that he “remembered huge events which had quite probably not happened” (Orwell 34). In all, Winston can remember, or thinks he remembers, bits and pieces of his childhood, but he does not know for sure.

Posted by: Dominique Bauer at February 24, 2016 03:26 PM

Jamee Townsend
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 The Contemporary World View CA02
24 February 2016

Question: Part 1
10. What police bother Winston?
26. What is the only thing that people can call their own?
32. Why does Winston think his mother and father had to die?

Answer:
10. He is bothered by thoughtpolice whom he believes will punish him for his impure thoughts against Big Brother, “Thoughtcrime does not entail death: thoughtcrime IS death (Orwell 28).”
26. People can call their dreams their own because they contain the same thoughts, feelings, and memories that are forcefully repressed by the government during the day. They are even conditioned to be so scared of the thoughtpolice and junior spies that they feel a sense of guilt and internal conflict if any inappropriate thought passes their mind, “The consequences of every act are included in the act itself (Orwell 28).”
32. In Chapter 3 it is said that they, “must evidently have been swallowed up in one of the purges of the Fifties,” which sounds like a sort of cleansing of the population (Orwell 29). Although Winston cannot specific remember what happened to them, he has a feeling that their death with sacrificial in order for him to live. This perspective was most likely conditioned into the population using propaganda and thoughtpolice.

Posted by: Jamee Townsend at February 24, 2016 03:27 PM

Grace Lederer (scribe)
Ashely Reynolds (speaker)
Jasmine Daniels (researcher)
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 The Contemporary World View CA02
24 February 2014

1984 Group Questions

Question: What are the conflicts in your chapter? Of those, what is the chief conflict? Which conflicts are dichotomies (including false ones)? How are the dichotomies structured? What are the hegemonies? What is privilege/not privileged?

Answer: The conflicts in chapter 1 of 1984 include Winston Smith yearning to break away from the watchful eye of Big Brother, essentially “rebellion vs. conformity” and “freedom vs. oppression” with government and oppression being the privileged parties. Smith is also conflicted by his emotions about a young-dark haired woman that he claims to hate but finds himself having violent sexual fantasies about, a result of the forced chastity imposed by the government, representing the dichotomy of celibacy vs. promiscuity, celibacy being the privileged. Smith’s chief conflict is that he has decided to keep a diary and he knows that he has committed the dangerous act of thought crime, representing “man vs. government” and “surveillance vs. privacy” with government and surveillance being the privileged parties.
The government in 1984 also presents dichotomies as being equal entities in their motto “war is peace, freedom is slavery, ignorance is strength” (Orwell 16).
A false dichotomy presented in chapter one is stability vs. censorship. The government of 1984 thinks that erasing the existence of people and the existence of people’s memories will lead to stability, however, this is not the case. As Smith describes:
“People simply disappeared, always during the night. Your name was removed from the registers, every record of everything you had ever done was wiped out, your one-time existence was denied and then forgotten.”

The fact that people disappear on a recurring basis shows that the society is indeed not more stable as a result of the excessive censorship.

Question: What are the similarities to Plato’s Republic? To Huxley’s Brave New World?

Answer: The similarities between all three dystopias lies in the separation of classes. In both Brave New World and 1984 anyone who is out of the ordinary, not following the status quo, is easily identified and cast out.

Posted by: Grace Lederer at February 24, 2016 03:49 PM

Melissa Bryan
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary World View CA02
24 February 2016

Questions:
5. Part 1 / Chapter 1: Why is it difficult for W to climb the stairs?
18. Part 1 / Chapter 2: Who is at Winston’s door and why?
35. Part 1 / Chapter 3: Why does Winston sleep without nightclothes?

Answer:
It is difficult for Winston to climb the stairs because he was “thirty-nine and had a varicose ulcer above his right ankle” (Orwell 3). Secondly, Mrs. Parsons was at his door because she needed help as her kitchen sink was blocked up (Orwell 22). Winston was nervous at first as he thought that it might have been the ‘Big Brother’. Lastly, according to Orwell, “Winston wrenched his body out of bed--naked, for a member of the Outer Party, received only 3,000 clothing coupons annually, and a suit of pyjamas was 600--and seized a dingy singlet and a pair of shorts that were lying across a chair” (33). Hence, Winston sleeps without nightclothes because pajamas were too expensive. It would have cost him one-fifth of his clothing coupons.

Translation Used
Nineteen Eighty-Four (1984) translated by George Orwell Penguin Books (2008).

Posted by: Melissa Bryan at February 24, 2016 08:12 PM

Ashley Reynolds
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary World View CA02
24 February 2016

Question 3: Part 1 / Chapter 1: Describe the residence of the first character mentioned (details: smells, conditions). What is the large poster?

Answer: Winston Smith lives in an apartment called Victory Mansions. It smells of “boiled cabbage and old rag mats” (Orwell 3, Penguin ed.). In the hallway is a giant poster with the face of Big Brother, the leader of the Party. Big Brother’s eyes appear to constantly follow Winston. There is an elevator, but it doesn’t work, so Winston has to climb seven flights of stairs. Inside Winston’s flat, a large telescreen constantly talks about production and affairs of state. There is a camera attached to the telescreen that watches Winston.


Question 17: Part 1 / Chapter 2: What does Winston realize he has done with his diary?

Answer: Winston realizes that he has accidentally left his diary open as he opens the door. Inside the diary, Winston has written “DOWN WITH BIG BROTHER” over and over again, almost big enough for his visitor to see it (Orwell 22, Penguin ed.). He realizes the danger he is in, but cannot bring himself to ruin the diary by hiding it: “It was an inconceivably stupid thing to have done. But, he realized, even in his panic he had not wanted to smudge the creamy paper by shutting the book while the ink was wet” (Orwell 22, Penguin ed.). He places his love of his diary over his personal safety.


Question 24: Part 1 / Chapter 2: Who does Winston think says, “We shall meet in the place where there is no darkness?”

Answer: Winston first hears the phrase “We shall meet in the place where there is no darkness” in a dream. He first meets O’Brien around that same time and believes that the voice he heard was O’Brien’s. He therefore thinks that O’Brien was the one who said the phrase to him (Orwell 27, Penguin ed.).

Posted by: Ashley Reynolds at February 27, 2016 06:21 PM

Ashley Reynolds
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary World View CA02
29 February 2016

Question 119: Part 2 / Chapter 5: Do Julia and Winston meet during the month of June? Why, or why not?

Answer: Julia and Winston meet seven times during the month of June. Winston spends much of his free time fantasizing about his time with Julia. However, he is unable to go to the room above Mr. Charrington’s shop often because he and Julia are preoccupied with Hate Week preparations (Orwell 156-7, Penguin ed.).

Question 123: Part 2 / Chapter 5: Does Julia believe in Goldstein? Why, or why not?

Answer: Julia does not believe in Goldstein because she thinks he is Party propaganda. Julia does not think that anyone could publicly oppose the Party without severe punishment. As she says, “The tales about Goldstein and his underground army, she said, were simply a lot of rubbish which the Party had invented for its own purposes and which you had to pretend to believe in” (Orwell 159, Penguin ed.). Julia’s take is that Goldstein is a scapegoat, a fictitious figure for the people to hate.

Question 134: Part 2 / Chapter 8: Why is Martin asked to sit down? Why is this significant?

Answer: Martin is asked to sit down because he is a member of the Brotherhood. Martin is posing as O’Brien’s servant in order to escape suspicion. At O’Brien’s invitation, Martin sits down, but continues to act like a servant. Winston is surprised at how faithfully Martin plays his role as a servant: “it struck him that the man's whole life was playing a part, and that he felt it to be dangerous to drop his assumed personality even for a moment” (Orwell 178, Penguin ed.). This is significant because it means the Brotherhood is capable of changing a person’s entire identity in order to his them from the Party.

Posted by: Ashley Reynolds at February 27, 2016 06:22 PM

Kaelyn Cardona and Jasmine Daniels
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 The Contemporary World View CA02
29 February 2016


In chapter 1 of Part II of George Orwell’s novel, Nineteen Eighty-four, Winston is the primary focus. As the protagonist of the novel, Winston is a dynamic character. The volatility of his development is evident in his encounter with another dynamic character of Nineteen Eighty-four: the girl with the dark hair. Both of the characters undergo changes in their nature as the story progresses, and the changes revolve around the nature of their relationship, which is transformed by three words: “I love you” (Orwell 113). The dark-haired girl passed the message to Winston after falling onto her knees at their workplace, the Ministry of Truth, which symbolically conveys surrender, perhaps to her feelings for Winston. Orwell’s choice of setting for their initial exchange in chapter 1 is ironic, for the Ministry of Truth is the place of falsification where propaganda is manufactured to be force-fed to the citizens of Oceania. It makes the reader wonder, is the dark-haired girl as truthful as the Ministry? Should Winston take her written word of adoration with a grain of salt? The medium on which the words are written, a small piece of paper, symbolizes the fragility of words and emotions. In addition, Winston’s haste to flush it down the drain after an intimate, parting kiss foreshadows an ominous end to their newfound relationship. Already, Orwell constructs a foreboding situation between the protagonist and the girl with the dark hair.

Instead of doubting the honesty of her declaration, Winston is consumed by it. Following their exchange, his mind reels with images of her: “the memory of her face came back, and with it a raging, intolerable desire to be alone” (Orwell 114). Her three words instilled in him “the desire to stay alive,” when “only five nights ago he had contemplated smashing her skull in with a cobblestone” (Orwell 115). The reader has a glimpse into Winston’s tumultuous thoughts through Orwell’s third-person omniscient narration, which allows one to notice the transformation from malice to lust in regards to his perception of the dark-haired girl (Orwell 115). The days leading up to their reunion are “like a restless dream” to Winston, and he tirelessly tries to sit beside her at the canteen to confirm their feelings for each other (Orwell 116). When Winston’s attempt to sit beside her is interrupted by Wilsher, a comrade of his, he imagines himself “smashing a pick-axe right into the middle [of his face],” exemplifying his desperation to get in contact with her (Orwell 118). It is ironic that Winston would hallucinate killing a comrade over a woman he had wanted dead only a week prior.

Finally, Winston and the dark-haired girl sit together at the canteen. Over lunch, they plan a meeting at Victory Square. Slipping through the masses, they reunite beside the statue of Big Brother, the man that vanquished those that opposed him; his perpetual stare mimics God and His absolute authority, which is being tested by Winston and the girl’s blossoming love affair (Orwell 119-120). In Big Brother’s presence, Winston and the girl affectionately join hands and plan another meeting in the midst of an incensed crowd. The crowd receives the prisoners, either from Eurasia or Eastasia, angrily with boos and hisses, creating a mood of hatred to oppose their loving exchange (Orwell 122). The chapter ends eerily, with Winston starting into a prisoner’s eyes instead of the girl’s, foreshadowing once again a mournful end to their affair (Orwell 123).

Posted by: Kaelyn Cardona at February 29, 2016 10:24 AM

Kaelyn Cardona
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 The Contemporary World View
29 February 2016

Questions:
126. Part II/Chapter 6: Whom does Winston meet face to face at the Ministry? What is the person’s position? Is s/he an equal to Winston? Why, or why not?
127. Part II/Chapter 6: What are the subjects of the men’s discussions? How might this affect the life and ambitions of Winston?
128. Part II/Chapter 6: Why does O’Brien give Winston his address? Is this a normal thing for someone to do? What does it mean when someone does this?

Answers:
126. At the Ministry of Truth, Winston meets O’Brien, a member of the Inner Party of Oceania. O’Brien’s role in society far surpasses Winston’s, so when he speaks to him with “peculiar grave courtesy,” he is surprised (Orwell 164). They are not equal, for Winston works as a member of the Outer Party in the Ministry of Truth, while O’Brien is intimately involved with confidential and prestigious government affairs in the Inner Party; the dichotomy of inner and outer creates a schism in the distribution of knowledge in Oceania. O’Brien knows more, and therefore has more power than citizens like Winston have.
127. O’Brien approaches Winston to discuss one of his Newspeak articles in the Times, complimenting him on his writing style and scholarly interest in Newspeak (Orwell 164). O’Brien draws parallels between Winston’s writing and Syme’s, an unperson; Winston reacts with paranoia because hinting at an unperson is a thoughtcrime, which O’Brien seems impervious to noticing and he continues to suspect O’Brien to be a member of the rebel Brotherhood as a result (Orwell 165). By accepting O’Brien’s invitation to his apartment in order to obtain a copy of the Tenth Edition of the Newspeak Dictionary, Winston hopes to confirm whether or not O’Brien is a member of the Brotherhood. His ambition is to dive deeper into the rebellion, and by meeting with a suspected member of the Brotherhood, Winston prepares to pilot his life in the direction of drastic resistance.
128. “Except by direct enquiry, it was never possible to know where anyone lived,” therefore, O’Brien wrote his address on paper and gave it to Winston (Orwell 166). He gave him his address so Winston could obtain a copy of the unreleased Tenth Edition of the Newspeak Dictionary, but Winston translated it as: “If you ever want to see me, this is where I can be found” (Orwell 166). Knowing someone’s address is not conventional in Oceania’s society, for once it is known, comrades can meet one another without any interference of the government. As a result, Winston regards the invitation as a confirmation of O’Brien’s resistance to the Inner Party and possible affiliation with the Brotherhood.

Posted by: Kaelyn Cardona at February 29, 2016 11:05 AM

Ashlee English and Dominique Bauer
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
HON 351 The Contemporary World View CA02
24 February 2016

Chapter 7 Outline
Chapter seven in nineteen eighty-four by George Orwell is written in third person limited omniscient. This is because we can only ‘hear’ Winston’s thoughts. The mood of the chapter is pensive and reflective, also there are no new characters in this chapter, and the setting is in Winston’s apartment with he and Julia in bed. He relates to her the ‘nightmares’ he has surrounding the disappearance of his mother and sister and the guilt he feels. This line of conversation streams into his view of the proles. He discusses how he and Julia are not human due to their concealed desires that the proles can freely express. Additionally, they discuss the danger of them being together and how long they may have until they are forced to believe what they are supposed to.


Translation used
1984 by George Orwell
ePub version by University of Adelaide

Posted by: Ashlee English and Dominique Bauer at February 29, 2016 11:36 AM

Jasmine Daniels
Dr. Hobbs
Hon 351 Contemporary World View CA02
29 February 2016

Question #125: To whom does Julia give credit for the invention of the airplane? What does this tell us about her? Does she care about who gets credit for such historical factoids? Why, or why not?

Julia does not care for historical factors or who is given credit to them. For example, Orwell states, “But she only questioned the teachings of the Party when they in some way touched upon her own life. Often she was ready to accept the official mythology, simply because the difference between truth and falsehood did not seem important to her.” (Orwell 78) As a result, Julia gave credit for the invention of the aeroplane to the party.

Question #130: When young Winston went home after devouring the chocolate, what does he find? Why is this even important to his personal development? In other words, how has/did this affect him?

Young Winston finds that both his mother and sister have gone missing from his home and have taken nothing with them. Winston now believes that he murdered his mother and younger sister or that he is at least at fault for their disappearance. In earlier chapters, Winston mentioned that he believed that they were gone so that he could live. In addition, this event have increased his interest in thought-crimes. For instance, Winston explains that the party did not believe that feelings or loyalties to any other beside the party is useless. While other individuals like the proles believe and are loyal to individual relationships. (Orwell 97) In the case of his mother, Winston believes the same as the proles because of her protectiveness of his sister.

Question #137: What questions are asked of Julia and Winston? What is the purpose of this/Why is this significant? 8

In this chapter O’Brien asks both Winston and Julia various questions to assert their commitment to the downfall of the party and what they would and would not be willing to do. The questions asked are as followed: “What are you prepared to do? You are prepared to give your lives? You are prepared to commit murder? To commit acts of sabotage which may cause the death of hundreds of innocent people? To betray your country to foreign powers? You are prepared to cheat, to forge, to blackmail, to corrupt the minds of children, to distribute habit-forming drugs, to encourage prostitution, to disseminate venereal diseases -- to do anything which is likely to cause demoralization and weaken the power of the Party? If, for example, it would somehow serve our interests to throw sulphuric acid in a child's face -- are you prepared to do that? You are prepared to lose your identity and live out the rest of your life as a waiter or a dock-worker? You are prepared to commit suicide, if and when we order you to do so? You are prepared, the two of you, to separate and never see one another again? Do you understand that even if he survives, it may be as a different person?” (Orwell 108-110) These questions and their answers are significant because they show the growth of Winston’s character and show more about Julia’s and O’Brien’s.

Posted by: Jasmine Daniels at February 29, 2016 12:32 PM

Andrew Thriffiley
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 The Contemporary World View CA02
29 February 2016

Question:
129) What particular thing does Winston remember after his father left? Why is this significant?
138) To what question does Julia say, “No,” Why is this significant?164) What do Winston and Julia decide to do about the book? Why is this significant?

Answer:
129) Winston started to notice that his mother had a change in demeanor once his father left. "a sudden change came over her. She seemed to have become completely spiritless." (Huxley 161). This is significant because it shows maybe a hint of what led to Winston's mother being taken away or whatever may have happened to her. It was a different feel in the house for Winston than previously once his father left.

138) The question that Julia says no to is in regards to her and Winston. "You are prepared, the two of you, to separate and never see one another again?" (Huxley 173). This is significant because Julia is willing to give up her own life, but she won't separate from Winston. This shows just how loyal Julia is to Winston and how much they care about each other.

164) Once Julia and Winston get the book, they decide to read it to find out the ultimate truth that they are in search of. "Suddenly, as one sometimes does with a book of which one knows that one will ultimately read and reread every word, he opened it at a different place and found himself at the third chapter." (Huxley 185). This is significant because it is highly against the Party to read the book, so the fact that Winston and Julia were willing to put their lives on the line to learn an ultimate truth shows how dedicated they are to the cause of finding out about the Party.

Posted by: Andrew Thriffiley at February 29, 2016 02:00 PM

Ashley Reynolds, Andrew Thriffiley
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary World View CA02
29 February 2016

Summary, Part 2, Chapter 9

Part 2, chapter 9 is primarily about Hate Week and Goldstein’s manifesto. There are several characters present within this chapter: Winston (the protagonist), Julia (ally, shapeshifter), the man with the brief case (the herald), the spy children (tricksters), and other various Department workers. There are also many characters present in the “shadow” or antagonist role: the Hate Week crowd, the patrols, and Big Brother. Goldstein (the guide) is not physically present, but his presence is still felt through his Manifesto. The POV switches between third person limited through Winston to third person objective in Goldstein’s manifesto. The settings are the room above Charrington’s shop (private), the Records Department (public), and the Hate Week processions in the square (public).

The chapter opens with Winston working furiously on Hate Week preparations. Part of the way through Hate Week, the announcement is suddenly made that Oceania has switched allies and is now enemies with Eastasia (society vs. society). During the chaos of the rally, a man gives Winston a brief case, which Winston later discovers contains Goldstein’s manifesto, THE THEORY AND PRACTICE OF OLIGARCHICAL COLLECTIVISM. Winston eagerly reads the manifesto, even though he knows it’s an act of heresy (man vs. society). The manifesto contains forbidden information on the class system, the War, and the Thought Police. Winston reflects that he already somehow knows this information, but he doesn’t know how. He treasures the manifesto, but is slightly disappointed he hasn’t learned anything new yet (man vs. self). Julia arrives and Winston reads out of Goldstein’s manifesto until she falls asleep. Goldstein states that the classes are deliberately designed to oppose one another (class vs. class). Winston’s epiphany comes after he reads the manifesto with the hidden knowledge: “The best books, he perceived, are those that tell you what you know already.”

There are several themes continued in this chapter: rebellion against society, censorship of history, surveillance, and division of classes. Goldstein’s manifesto introduces the new theme of the inability to successfully resist society. This foreshadows Winston’s eventual inability to resist Big Brother. This chapter also contains several symbols: Goldstein’s manifesto as a symbol of truth, rebellion, and lost history; Big Brother as a symbol of the Party, conformity, government, and surveillance; Hate Week as a symbol of war, hatred, and hive mind; the room above Charrington’s shop as a symbol of privacy, personal life, independent thought, “solitude and safety”; and the brief case as a symbol of mystery and hidden knowledge. There is definite irony between the briefcase symbol of mystery, but it contains the manifesto, which is a symbol of knowledge and truth. Goldstein’s manifesto also makes use of irony; he uses the tenets of Oceania (War is Peace, Freedom is Slavery, Ignorance is Strength) as section headers, then proceeds to dispute these tenets. Winston’s response to the manifesto is also ironic; it is supposed to revelatory, but Winston claims she already knows it.

Posted by: Ashley Reynolds, Andrew Thriffiley at February 29, 2016 02:35 PM

Jamee Townsend, Melissa Bryan
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 The Contemporary World View CA02
24 February 2016

Part 2-Chapter 3 Summary:
In chapter 3, part 2, of Nineteen Eighty-Four, the main round characters are Winston and his lover Julia, in addition to the introduction of Winston’s wife Katherine who is a new flat character. Julia has transitioned to an ally of the protagonist instead of her previous role as a shape-shifter because Winston now trusts her as his love instead of a possible spy, and she is using her knowledge to help their relationship. The chapter is told in third person limited omniscient because as the reader we are told a great deal about the protagonist’s emotions. The setting includes the various secret places that the two main characters are meeting rebelliously to be with each other, clearing in the woods or the belfry of a ruined church, as well as the city. During this chapter, we see that Winston and Julia love each other and have similar passions, but are struggling with the conflict of rebellion versus conformity. They are also debating the topic of death as a definite component to human life, presenting the conflict of life versus death that we have heard in Winston’s thoughts in previous chapters. When they talk about Winston’s wife Katherine, there is symbolism in the description of a memory of “one tuft of two colours” that he noticed while walking one day with his wife. It symbolizes that although the two are married, they are completely different people with different emotional foundations and thoughts. Also, during their walk, he had thought about pushing her off a cliff but didn’t, which he explains as symbolic of the fact that you cannot win against forces of oppression in life. This symbolism is also an epiphany moment for Winston, as he fully admits his position on oppression and control. Overall the theme of this chapter is still about attempting to find happiness through rebellion, and the tone was disheartened and sentimental despite their new love because of their deep conversations about their lives, including Winston’s memories of his wife.

Posted by: Jamee Townsend at February 29, 2016 03:05 PM

Dominique Bauer
Dr. Hobbs
HON – 351 The Contemporary Worldview
29 February 2016

Question: Does Winston believe in Goldstein? Why, or why not?
Answer: It would seem as though Winston does believe in Goldstein. This can be seen through his reaction and thoughts about Julia’s opinions on Goldstein. Through the narration of this passage, it is said that “she had grown up since the Revolution and was too young to remember the ideological battles of the ‘fifties and ‘sixties [;] such a thing as an independent political movement was outside her imagination” (Orwell 160). By this, it can be seen that Winston does not have as easy of a time denying Goldstein as Julia does, and therefore, does believe in him.
Question: To whom is a toast made? What is the purpose of this/Why is this significant?
Answer: A toast is made to Goldstein. The toast is made by O’Brien and he says “to our leader: To Emmanuel Goldstein” (Orwell 178). The significance/purpose of this is that it confirms the existence of Goldstein. It is followed by several questions from those in attendance.
Question: Why has Winston been so busy? What is the purpose of this/why is this significant?
Answer: Winston has been so busy because of the revelation that Oceania is actually at war with a different country than originally thought. Because of this revelation, “reports and records of all kinds, newspapers, books, pamphlets, films, sound tracks, photographs – all had to be rectified at lightning speed” (Orwell 190). This significance/purpose of this is to show what happens when history is changed, and the impact it plays on society.

Posted by: Dominique Bauer at February 29, 2016 03:15 PM

Jamee Townsend
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 The Contemporary World View CA02
28 February 2016

Questions:
1. Part 2 / Chapter 5: What new poster is displayed all over London? What is its significance/purpose?
2. Part 2 / Chapter 8: What does Winston tell O’Brien? Why is this significant?
3. Part 2 / Chapter 9 What does Winston receive at the rally? What is the purpose of this/why is this significant.

Answer:
1. On the poster there is no words, only a picture of a monstrous Eurasian soldier, “three or four meters high, striding forward with expressionless Mongolian face and enormous boots, a submachine gun pointed from his hip.” The gun always seemed to be pointing at you from every angle, and it also outnumbered the posters of Big Brother.
2. During Winston and O’Brien’s conversation at the ministry, O’Brien compliments Winston on his work and also talks about Syme’s work, but without mentioning his name. Winston believes that this is a clue that he and O’Brien are accomplices in thoughtcrime.
3. A book that contains the history and ideology of the party. This is significant because it pushes Winston to find out more, he already understands what the party does but he strives to know why the party does what it does.

Posted by: Jamee Townsend at February 29, 2016 03:24 PM

Andrew and Dominique
Dr. Hobbs
HON – 351 The Contemporary Worldview CA02
29 February 2016
Question 228: Early on in the novel, readers learn of Winston’s belief in the proles as a liberating force. What accounts for Winston’s almost blind faith in the proles? What are some of the characteristics of the proles that, in Winston’s eyes, make them the ultimate means for overthrowing Big Brother?
Answer: Proles are not really controlled by the government; Winston believes they are able to remain the most human, which can be seen through the Party slogan “Proles and animals are free” (Orwell 75). What accounts for Winston’s almost blind faith in the proles is that “because only [in them], in those swarming disregarded masses, 85 per cent of the population of Oceania, could the force to destroy the Party ever be generated” (Orwell 72). Some of the characteristics of the proles that, in Winston’s eyes, make them the ultimate means for overthrowing Big Brother include “not even hav[ing] telescreens in their homes [. . ., and] the civil police [interfere] with them very little” (Orwell 75). What this indicates is that they would be able to discuss the potential of overthrowing Big Brother without fear of being overheard. Furthermore, there are a large number of Proles, and that would also be beneficial in overthrowing Big Brother.

Posted by: Andrew and Dominique at February 29, 2016 04:52 PM

Ashlee English
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
HON 351 The Contemporary World View CA02
29 February 2016

QUESTIONS #:
121. Part 2 / Chapter 5: Does the couple have any feeling of foreboding? Why, or why not? If so, explain.

142. Part 2 / Chapter 8: To what do they drink their second glass of wine? Why is this significant?

148. Part 2 / Chapter 9 With what country is Oceania at war with now? What is the purpose of this/why is this significant?

ANSWERS:
121. The couple does not have any feeling of foreboding, as they were blissfully ignorant so they threw caution to the wind. Regardless of room above, the junk shop being “dirty or clean, the room was paradise” (Orwell 139) to Winston and Julia and provided an escape from their oppressive life.
142. They drink “to the past” (Orwell 167) which is significant as it places emphasis on remembering and thinking which was a thought crime by itself, thus aiding in his incrimination.
148. Winston read that “Oceania was at war with Eastasia” (Orwell 170) and not Eurasia illuminating how the party could change facts and rewrite history to keep the masses ignorant.

Translation Used
1984 by George Orwell
ePub version by University of Adelaide

Posted by: Ashlee English at February 29, 2016 07:27 PM

Melissa Bryan
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary World View CA02
29 February 2016

Questions:
129. Part 2 / Chapter 7: What particular thing does Winston remember after his father left? Why is this significant?
131. Part 2 / Chapter 7: Does Julia want to give up their relationship? Why, or why not?
145. Part 2 / Chapter 8: What question does Winston ask O’Brien? Why is this significant?

Answer:
After his father had left, Winston noticed, “His mother did not show any surprise or any violent grief, but a sudden change came over her” (Orwell 168). He said that his mom became “spiritless” (Orwell 168) as if she was expecting that his dad would have left. Then, Winston became a very greedy boy, and he could not control his hunger problems that led to him having many arguments with his mom. Also, the last thing that occurred before his mom disappeared was that he stole a quarter of a chocolate bar from his sister and then ran away for a few hours in the street. This is significant because it showed us that his father disappearance affected him in the sense that he became a selfish and spoiled young man.

Julia did not want to give up on their relationship. She said, “They can make you say anything-anything- but they can’t make you believe it. They can’t get inside you” (Orwell 174). Hence, she did not want to give up because she said that no matter what they said or do to them, she would still love Winston.

Winston asked O’Brien, “In the place where there is no darkness?” (Orwell 185). It is significant because it demonstrates Winston willingness to rebel against Big Brother and the party. O’Brien agreed to get Winston on his side. Hence, whether or not there is a place where there is no darkness was true or not came into questioning right here and then.

Translation Used
Nineteen Eighty-Four (1984) translated by George Orwell Penguin Books (2008).

Posted by: Melissa Bryan at February 29, 2016 09:42 PM

Ashley Reynolds
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary World View CA02
2 March 2016

Question 192: Part III / Chapters 1-3: When does Winston first realize that O’Brien is directing his torture? Is there any evidence to suggest that, on some level, Winston was always aware that O’Brien was an inner party member? Why, or why not?

Answer: Winston first realizes that O’Brien is directing his torture after O’Brien walks into his cell in the Ministry of Love. Winston is surprised to see O’Brien and cries out “They’ve got you too!” O’Brien simply replies, “They got me a long time ago” (Orwell 250-1, Penguin ed.). However, Winston is not surprised by this revelation. H e thinks, “Yes, he saw now, he had always known it” (Orwell 251, Penguin ed.). And indeed there is evidence to suggest he had always known O’Brien was a member of the Party. He had suspected O’Brien and Julia of deception from the start, but acted against the Party anyway. He was so desperate to rebel that he did not care if he was caught.

As Winston is being tortured, he is aware that O’Brien is the one in charge: “all through his interrogation, although he had never seen him, he had had the feeling that O'Brien was at his elbow, just out of sight. It was O'Brien who was directing everything” (Orwell 255-6, Penguin ed.). Not only did O’Brien betray him, O’Brien has orchestrated everything from start to finish. O’Brien lured him into the trap in order to re-educate him.


Question 195: Part III / Chapters 1-3: Why, according to O’Brien, is Winston in the Ministry of Love? What must he do while there? Will he be able to leave? If so, how?

Answer: Winston is in the Ministry of Love in order to be reformed. According to O’Brien, the Ministry of Love does not exist to punish people or make them confess. He says, “Shall I tell you why we have brought you here? To cure you! To make you sane! […] We are not interested in those stupid crimes that you have committed. The Party is not interested in the overt act: the thought is all we care about. We do not merely destroy our enemies, we change them” (Orwell 265, Penguin ed.). The Ministry of Love wants to entirely change Winston’s thoughts until he is no longer himself. Winston will be able to leave once he submits, of his own free will, to the Party.


Question 206: Part III / Chapters 1-3: According to O’Brien, why does the Party seek power? How does it differ from Winston’s response? Explain.

Answer: Winston thinks that the members of the Party believe they are working for the greater good. He states that the Party seeks power in order to rule the people because people are incapable of ruling themselves. O’Brien laughs at this explanation and answers that the Part seeks power for power’s sake alone. He says, “Power is not a means, it is an end. One does not establish a dictatorship in order to safeguard a revolution; one makes the revolution in order to establish the dictatorship. The object of persecution is persecution. The object of torture is torture. The object of power is power” (Orwell 275-6, Penguin ed.). According to O’Brien, the Party does not deceive itself; it is aware that it wants power in order to maintain total control, not to help the people.

Posted by: Ashley Reynolds at March 1, 2016 12:57 PM

Ashlee English
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
HON 351 The Contemporary World View CA02
29 February 2016

QUESTIONS #s:

179. Part III / Chapters 1-3: Where is Winston as this section of the novel opens? What is his number?

198. Part III / Chapters 1-3: Does Winston betray Julia in chapters one or two of Part three? Why, or why not? Explain.

211. Part III / Chapters 1-3: What brought Winston to tears? Explain

ANSWERS:
179. Winston is in a cell at the opening of part three and his number was “6079 Smith W.” (Orwell 208) shouted from the telescreen.
198. Winston does betray Julia in chapter 2 when he says, “Do it to Julia! Do it to Julia! Not me! Julia! I don’t care what you do to her. Tear her face off, strip her to her bones. Not me! Julia! Not me!” (Orwell 259) after being faced with his greatest fear. Indicative of that what he thought was love was just love as he betrayed Julia at the first sight of his ultimate fear.
211. Winston was brought to tears, after his abuse but more at the revelation that he betrayed Julia. He realized that he broke the promise he and Julia made, “they can make you say ANYTHING but they can’t make you believe it” (Orwell 158) as he said he wanted here tortured and believed it.

Translation Used
1984 by George Orwell
ePub version by University of Adelaide

Posted by: Ashlee English at March 1, 2016 04:02 PM

Melissa Bryan
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary World View CA02
2 March 2016

Questions:
180. Part III / Chapters 1-3: Who is brought into the cell with Winston and why does he think he is there?

187. Part III / Chapters 1-3: Who comes into the room last? What does Winston discover about this person?

202. Part III / Chapters 1-3: Find the section in Part III where O’Brien says “And above all we do not allow the dead to rise up against us.” What does he mean by this? Explain.


Answer:
The poet Ampleforth was brought into the cell with Winston (Orwell 241). According to Orwell, “It was even conceivable that Ampleforth was the bearer of the razor blade” (242). Hence, he thinks that the Brotherhood sent Ampleforth to give him a razor (Orwell 242). He was possibly thinking about committing suicide.

O’Brien was the last person to come in Winston’s cell (Orwell 250). O’Brien stated, “They got me a long time ago” (Orwell 250). Hence, Winston discovers that O’Brien is a part of the Thought Police and not Winston associate in the Brotherhood Society (Orwell 251).

O’Brien says, “And above all we do not allow the dead to rise up against us” (Orwell 266). This means that the Party does not want anyone they torture to confess because he or she is being tortured. The Party wants anyone that they torture to believe sincerely that what they did is wrong and that the truth lies only in the beliefs of the Party. Hence, they wanted rebels to give themselves up based on their free will.

Translation Used
Nineteen Eighty-Four (1984) translated by George Orwell Penguin Books (2008).

Posted by: Melissa Bryan at March 2, 2016 03:05 AM

Ashley Reynolds, Jamee Townsend
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary World View CA02
2 March 2016

Question: In the final analysis, how accurate was Orwell in his vision of the future? In what ways does our contemporary society compare to his idea of society in Nineteen Eighty-Four? Are there examples in which he was correct? What is most opposite? Do you see a potential for aspects of Orwell’s “vision” to come true? If so, explain them.

Answer: Orwell was extremely accurate in some aspects of the future, but less accurate in others. There are several ways in which Nineteen Eighty-Four resembles our contemporary society. Firstly, surveillance over the people is a major issue in today’s society. In Nineteen Eighty-Four, the Party infringed upon privacy in order to maintain security and order. As technology advances, the debate between privacy and security in our society is increasingly prevalent. Recently, the FBI asked Apple for a “key” to break into iPhones. They claimed that by having this key, they would be able to stop acts of violence before they happen. Apple, on the other hand, says it would endanger the security of all its users. The two are currently engaged in a legal battle over privacy versus security. Employers and advertisers use social media in order to track a person’s interests and activities. Even private messages are monitored in order to create targeted ads for users. People are increasingly punished for what they do or say in the private sphere. This is one area in which society as the potential to become Orwellian.

Secondly, our modern society resembles Nineteen Eighty-Four in its use of propaganda. In the novel, propaganda is used to indoctrinate the masses to the beliefs of the Party. Propaganda is always present, both in public and in the citizens’ private homes. In our modern society, we see much of the same conditioning through media and advertisements. TV shows condition kids to learn and accept certain things. For example, children are taught about patriotism (Captain America, G.I. Joe) and gender roles (action heroes vs. princesses). Real-life propaganda is a hybrid between the always-present telescreens in Nineteen Eighty-Four and the corporate conditioning of Brave New World.

Thirdly, our government can resemble Nineteen Eighty-Four in using torture to extract information and change minds. In the novel, the Ministry of Love tortures political prisoners until they tell the Party everything it wants to hear. While we do not do this to American citizens, we can see this happening to certain prisoners of war, especially those accused of terrorism. Guantanamo Bay is still used to illegally torture information out of suspects, even if they have not been convicted of a crime. Solitary confinement is considered a form of torture by the U.N., yet it is commonly used on American prisoners in order to “reform” them.

The time period in history that most closely resembled Nineteen Eighty-Four was the Cold War. The USSR was a totalitarian regime that closely monitored every aspects of the citizens’ personal lives. However, the U.S. also closely monitored its people to the point questioning the U.S. was an act of heresy. In Nineteen Eighty-Four, citizens spied on one another and anyone even suspected of “thought crime” was immediately arrested. During the Red Scare, this was also the case in the U.S. Senator McCarthy led hunts for suspected communists. People’s reputations were ruined for being accused of being a communist, regardless of whether it was true or not. The Nineteen Eighty-Four mantra, “War is Peace,” is also similar to the propaganda that the U.S. put out saying the war was to protect democracy, freedom, and world peace.

The aspect of modern society that is most opposite from Nineteen Eighty-Four is the personal freedom in most Western societies. In the U.S., the Bill of Rights ensures that these personal freedoms, including free speech and freedom of religion. While there are certain legal limitations on free speech, it is not nearly as tightly controlled as in Oceania. In Nineteen Eighty-Four, sex is tightly controlled and used only for reproductive purposes. In our society, all insurance companies are required to provide free birth control. Gay marriage, in which sex is not for reproductive purposes, is now legal in all 50 states.

Posted by: Ashley Reynolds, Jamee Townsend at March 2, 2016 09:57 AM

Grace Lederer
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 The Contemporary World View CA02
2 March 2016

Question 191: Part III / Chapters 1-3: Describe exactly what is happening to Winston in Chapter Two of Part Three, and who is doing this to him. Why is this happening?

Answer: Winston has been captured by the State and his being tortured, questioned, reconditioned by O’Brien who tells Winston as he is strapped to a chair, “For seven years I have watched over you. Now the turning point has come. I shall save you, I shall make you perfect,” (Orwell 244). O’Brien is inflicting pain on Winston as he questions him through some type of electrical shock device. This is happening to Winston because he had been identified as a threat to the Party of Oceania a long time ago due to his historical discoveries that prompted him to want to remember things.

Question 212: Part III / Chapters 1-3: What does it mean to “capitulate” What might this word have to do with this part of the novel? Explain.

Answer: Capitulation is the act of surrendering or ceasing to resist an opponent or demand. In this part of the novel, Winston is capitulating in regards to clinging to his beliefs that are against the Party because of the severe pain he is being put in by O’Brien.

Question 214: Part III / Chapters 1-3: What is an “oligarchy”? What does O’Brien mean in Chapter Three of Part Three when he says that the Party is different from all the other oligarchies of the past.

Answer:An oligarchy is a governmental structure in which a small group of people have control of the country. As O’Brien describes the Party of Oceania to Winston, he is saying that it is different from oligarchies of the past because it recognizes that there is no “paradise where human beings would be free and equal,” (Orwell 263). The party is not concerned with the welfare of other, but just in ascertaining and keeping complete power; they did not establish a dictatorship to safeguard a revolution, but made a revolution in order to establish a dictatorship. O’Brien points this foundation out as a weakness to the German Nazi and Russian Communist parties in not being able to recognize that there should be no end game to their actions; their actions should be the end game.

Posted by: Grace Lederer at March 2, 2016 11:32 AM

Andrew Thriffiley
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 The Contemporary World View CA02
2 March 2016

Questions:
186.) What is the number of the room where the guards take some of the prisoners? How do many of them react to this?
199.)What is the last question that Winston asks O’Brien in Chapter Two, Part Three? What is O’Brien’s answer? What is the significance of this?
208.)What is “solipsism”? What might this word have to do with this part of the novel? Explain.

Answer:
186.) The room that the guards take the prisoners is Room 101. The discovery is not received lightly by the prisoners. "There was a gasp and a flurry at Winston's side The man had flung himself to his knees on the floor, with hands clasped together.... "You don't have to take me to that place!." (Orwell 236). The quote shows just how scared of this room the prisoners. They plead as much as possible to get out of going to this room because of how terrible it is
199.) Winston asks O'Brien "What is in Room 101?" (Orwell 260). O'Brien answered, "You know what is in Room 101, Winston. Everyone knows what is in Room 101" (Orwell 260). The significance of this is that Winston already knew what would happen to him for his actions, and he still took the chances that he did. Room 101 is the consequences of his actions, which he knew could have been possible at any time if he got caught
208.) Solipsism is the theory that the self is the only thing that can be known for sure to exist. Solipsism has to do with the novel because the Party realizes that if reality is internal, then it can alter it, and this is how they have controlled everyone. The Party sees that if they can change reality to people's liking, then they have the advantage. "The real power, the power we have to fight for night and day, is not power over things, but over men." (Orwell 266). This thinking shows that the Party realized early on if they can control the reality of everyone, and then they can make people believe whatever they want, and this leads to the society they were able to create. Winston knew through the whole thing that he was right in regards to reality being only inside your mind, but he never could demonstrate that the Party was delivering false facts.

Posted by: Andrew Thriffiley at March 2, 2016 02:06 PM

Dominique Bauer
Dr. Hobbs
HON – 351 The Contemporary Worldview CA02
1 March 2016

Question 183: What happened to Parsons? Why? Explain.
Answer: Parsons was also arrested. The reason he was arrested was for “thoughtcrime” (Orwell 244). Parsons himself was actually unaware of the fact that he was capable of committing a thoughtcrime, as it occurred in his sleep and his daughter “listened at the keyhole [, h]eard what [he] was saying, and nipped off to the patrols the very next day” (Orwell 245). What his daughter heard him say was “Down with Big Brother” (Orwell 245). Parsons is initially very terrified, but throughout his dialogue with Winston, it seems as though he calms himself down a bit.
Question 200: Quoting from the text, list all of the things to which Winston confesses to in Chapter Two. How many things are there?
Answer: Winston confessed to at least 12 things. He confessed to: “the assassination of eminent Party members, the distribution of seditious pamphlets, embezzlement of public funds, sale of military secrets, sabotage of every kind [, . . . being] a spy in the pay of the Eastasian governments [, . . . being] a religious believer, [being] an admirer of capitalism, [. . .] a sexual pervert [, . . . murdering] his wife, [and] he confessed that for years he had been in personal contact with Goldstein and had been a member of an underground organisation which had included almost every human being he had ever known” (Orwell 254). The text goes on to mention that more confessions were made, but it does not go in to detail as to what the confessions actually are.
Question 204: Why does O’Brien want to convince Winston that two plus two equals five? Why is this significant?
Answer: O’Brien wants to convince Winston that two plus two equals five because it goes against what Winston knows to be true. O’Brien states that he is “not merely to extract [. . . a] confession, not to punish [. . . but] to cure” (Orwell 265). It is understood that Winston needed curing because he was able to think freely, instead of just accepting what was supposed to be. Earlier Winston wrote, “freedom is the freedom to say that two plus two make four” (Orwell 261). This goes against what is supposed to be in society, and for this, it is believed that he needs to be cured.

Posted by: Dominique Bauer at March 2, 2016 03:02 PM

Dominique Bauer
Dr. Hobbs
HON – 351 The Contemporary Worldview CA02
29 February 2016

Question 122: Does Winston believe in Goldstein? Why, or why not?
Answer: It would seem as though Winston does believe in Goldstein. This can be seen through his reaction and thoughts about Julia’s opinions on Goldstein. Through the narration of this passage, it is said that “she had grown up since the Revolution and was too young to remember the ideological battles of the ‘fifties and ‘sixties [;] such a thing as an independent political movement was outside her imagination” (Orwell 160). By this, it can be seen that Winston does not have as easy of a time denying Goldstein as Julia does, and therefore, does believe in him.
Question 135: To whom is a toast made? What is the purpose of this/Why is this significant?
Answer: A toast is made to Goldstein. The toast is made by O’Brien and he says “to our leader: To Emmanuel Goldstein” (Orwell 178). The significance/purpose of this is that it confirms the existence of Goldstein. It is followed by several questions from those in attendance.
Question 150: Why has Winston been so busy? What is the purpose of this/why is this significant?
Answer: Winston has been so busy because of the revelation that Oceania is actually at war with a different country than originally thought. Because of this revelation, “reports and records of all kinds, newspapers, books, pamphlets, films, sound tracks, photographs – all had to be rectified at lightning speed” (Orwell 190). This significance/purpose of this is to show what happens when history is changed, and the impact it plays on society.

Posted by: Revised - Dominique Bauer - Monday, Feb 29 at March 2, 2016 03:06 PM

Jamee Townsend
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 The Contemporary World View CA02
1 March 2016

Questions:
1. Part III / Chapters 1-3: Who is brought into the cell after the first person and why? What is the significance of this? Explain.
2. Part III / Chapters 1-3: How does Winston react to the first pain he suffers? Why? What is his original intent?
3. Part III / Chapters 1-3: Why are the common criminals and political prisoners treated differently in the temporary lock-up? Explain.

Answer:
1. Ampleforth is the second person to be thrown into the cell with Winston, and he believes that he is there because he used the word “God” to rhyme in a poem.
2. We hear immediately about Winston’s pain, “The dull pain in his belly never went away […], when it grew worse he thought only of the pain itself, and of his desire for food (Orwell 228).” He reacted so badly to this pain and the thought of future pain he might endure so that he wanted to end his life with the razor blade.
3. Winston describes the situation as very unfair with favoritism and bribery. “The guards, too, treated the common criminals with a certain forbearance, even when they had to handle them roughly (Orwell 227).” He then says that the “positions of trust were given only to the common criminals […] and all the dirty jobs were done by the politicals (Orwell 227).”

Posted by: Jamee Townsend at March 2, 2016 03:24 PM

Melissa Bryan and Kaelyn Cardona
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 Contemporary World View CA02
2 March 2016

Question: After his first formal meeting with O’Brien, Winston receives a book, ostensibly written by Emmanuel Goldstein. In reading passages from this book, Winston is further enlightened as to “how” the current society came into being. Focus on these passages, and in particular, on the theory of the High, Middle and Low classes (Orwell 179). If true, what does this theory hold for the proles? Is Winston’s plan for the proles now altered? Why or why not?

Answer:
The book states that the lower class the proles find it difficult to get anywhere in life. It is stated, “ That it sought power because men in the mass were frail cowardly creatures who could not endure liberty or face the truth, and must be ruled over systematically deceived by others who were stronger than themselves” (Orwell 275). This took away their individuality. The Proles are most content with their social atmosphere (Orwell 199). The Proles emotions normally exhibits “fear, rage, triumph and self-basement” (279). The Proles are subjected to suffering, pain being inflicted on them, and they are humiliated. The upper class tears them down and builds “a world of fear and treachery and torment” (Orwell 279). They became accustomed to a world where they are “trampled upon” (Orwell 279). Their complacency with their role in society is evident when Winston was being held captive in the prison cell, for he notices they "seemed to care nothing for nobody," and made an effort only to preserve themselves by smuggling food, bribing guards, and only fighting back when their belongings were confiscated (Orwell 238). In contrast, imprisoned Party members like Winston were terrified, clearly unused to incarceration and uncomfortable with being on the other side of the law (Orwell 238). Therefore, overtime they refine themselves and in the end that is basically the only thing they know. Winston’s plan for the proles is now deemed to be impossible (Orwell 281).

Translation Used:
Nineteen Eighty-Four (1984) translated by George Orwell Penguin Books (2008).

Posted by: Melissa Bryan & Kaelyn Cardona at March 2, 2016 03:36 PM

Jamee Townsend
Dr. Hobbs
HON 351 The Contemporary World View CA02
1 March 2016

Questions:
1. Part III / Chapters 1-3: Who is brought into the cell after the first person and why? What is the significance of this? Explain.
2. Part III / Chapters 1-3: How does Winston react to the first pain he suffers? Why? What is his original intent?
3. Part III / Chapters 1-3: Why are the common criminals and political prisoners treated differently in the temporary lock-up? Explain.

Answer:
1. Ampleforth is the second person to be thrown into the cell with Winston, and he believes that he is there because he used the word “God” to rhyme in a poem.
2. We hear immediately about Winston’s pain, “The dull pain in his belly never went away […], when it grew worse he thought only of the pain itself, and of his desire for food (Orwell 228).” He reacted so badly to this pain and the thought of future pain he might endure so that he wanted to end his life with the razor blade.
3. Winston describes the situation as very unfair with favoritism and bribery. “The guards, too, treated the common criminals with a certain forbearance, even when they had to handle them roughly (Orwell 227).” He then says that the “positions of trust were given only to the common criminals […] and all the dirty jobs were done by the politicals (Orwell 227).”

Posted by: Jamee Townsend at March 2, 2016 04:32 PM

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