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January 30, 2012

William Faulkner’s “A Rose for Emily”


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WILLIAM FAULKNER, “A Rose for Emily” (In the Mary McAleer Balkun Text)

Posted by lhobbs at January 30, 2012 08:18 PM

Readers' Comments:

28 October 2008

ENG 122 Students

A full-text of the short story "A Rose for Emily" by William Faulkner is available HERE: ">http://www.ariyam.com/docs/lit/wf_rose.html

1.     Group 1 (Antagonists): What is the conflict in this story?  If Miss Emily is the protagonist, who is the antagonist (a character or force that acts against the protagonist, denying his or her desires)?

 

2.     Group 1 (Antagonists): Is Homer Baron the antagonist of the story?  Does it matter that the story continues thirty years after his death?  (Remember that conflict in stories does not necessarily occur between individuals.)

 

3.     Group 2 (Foreshadowing): When you first read the story, when did you realize how it would end? What is your response to the end?

 

4.     Group 2 (Foreshadowing): After you read the ending, did your view of earlier scenes change, such as the parts about buying poison and the odor?  In retrospect, where are there hints about the plot ?

 

5.     Group 3 (Narrator’s Voice): What people and values does the narrator represent?  Does your view of the narrator affect your reception of the story?

 

6.     Group 3 (Narrator’s Voice): In paragraphs 1 and 2, the author speaks of buildings and structures, describing Miss Emily as a fallen monument.  Where else do related images occur?  If Miss Emily is a fallen monument, what is she a monument to?

 

7.     Group 4 (Historical Context): Notice references to the Civil War in this story.  Where do they occur?  How does that war play a role in the story?

 

8.     Group 4: (Historical Context): In this story, an aristocratic Southerner murders a Yankee carpetbagger.  Is the story about the triumph of a defeated South over a supposedly triumphant North?  What is this story really about?

 

9.     Group 5 (Symbolism): What is the significance of sidewalks in Faulkner’s “A Rose for Emily”?

 

10.  Group 5 (Symbolism): Why do we need to know about Miss Emily's hair changing color?

 

11.  Group 6 (Chronology/Timing): Why did they wait until after the funeral to open the closed room?  What word in the story informs you about the reasons for this delay?  Is the delay consistent with the world of this story?

 

12.  Group 6 (Chronology/Timing): After reading, reconstruct the sequence of events.  When did Homer Barron die?  How did he die?  Why is the story structured in the way that it is?

I have drawn my study questions from ones developed by Dr. Tina Hanlon of Ferrum College HERE.

Enter the answer to the question assigned to YOU only during our class meeting today in the comment box below. Retype your question and take about a paragraph to make your case.

Don't forget to answer the question for Plato's "Allegory of the Cave" HERE as part two of your participation homework. Failure to do both will render the assignment incomplete. Grade will be registered on turnitin.com

See you in our next meeting,

Dr. Hobbs

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Dr. Hobbs,

Question for Group 5 (Symbolism):

What is the significance of sidewalks in Faulkner’s “A Rose for Emily”?

Group 5's Answer:

Emily was forced to follow the rules set up in place for her in her life. She was not allowed to date anyone, because Colonel Sartoris thought no one was good enough for her. Emily's father also put up barriers in her life and after his death she did not know what to do with herself and lost her mind.

~Mary C.

Posted by: Dr. Hobbs at November 2, 2008 07:48 PM

After you read the ending, did your view of earlier scenes change, such as the parts about buying poison and the odor? In retrospect, where are there hints about the plot ?


After reading the ending all of the earlier scenes of the story began to make sense. It was as though the story was divided into sections and you needed the end to completely understand it. I think the story was a history meets present collaboration. Certain hints about the plot are the werid odors from the house and the fact that she choses to keep herself away from the rest of the town. As though she has something to hide from them. Another hint is that Homer is mentioned as seen going into the home, but then reading through the story he is dropped completely.

Posted by: Dominique Smith at November 2, 2008 08:24 PM

8.Group 4: (Historical Context): In this story, an aristocratic Southerner murders a Yankee carpetbagger. Is the story about the triumph of a defeated South over a supposedly triumphant North? What is this story really about?


The notion that Emily murdering Homer is symbolic of a "defeated South over a supposedly triumphant North" is a bit far fetched. Emily is one person in a town that does not accept her. She's an outkast and is looked upon as different and unconventional. The story is more about the dying of the past or changing of the guard. Emily was from a different era where there was still very real connections to the Civil War. Emily was the last of that generation left in her town and those old beliefs and thoughts about the world died when she did. Why else would the story begin with her death?

Posted by: Nicole Cofino at November 3, 2008 01:29 PM

10. Group 5 (Symbolism):Why do we need to know about Miss Emily's hair changing color?

Miss Emily's hair changing color symbolizes her change in personality. She goes from a well kept person under the strict controlling rules of her father to a "moralless" human being with lower standards that portrays a messy image. This can be proven by her new boyfriend that she is too good for, according to society. In addition, she gets fatter and doesn't care about her appearance.

Posted by: Thomas Moona at November 3, 2008 08:16 PM

Carlos Amado-Blanco
English 122

Group 2 : When you first read the story, when did you realize how it would end? What is your response to the end?

I could not realize how the story was going to end until it happened. Then at the end of the story i connected all the pieces of the story and it came together. The fact that she bought poison, the bad smell coming from her house, and why many people were stopping by the house.

Posted by: carlos amado-blanco at November 4, 2008 11:11 AM

Group 4 (Historical Context): Notice references to the Civil War in this story. Where do they occur? How does that war play a role in the story?

there are many references made to the civil war in the story. on the first page it talks about the grave yard with unmarked tombs of the soldiers who died. the war is in the story to provide backround information, it is not necisarly a key item to the story. the war is in the story to give the reader some information as to what is taking place in this part of the country at this time.

Posted by: john baron at November 4, 2008 01:03 PM

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*NOTE* The deadline for this particular assignment has now passed. Any comments listed below are *ONLY* for the reposting of comments that I specifically asked to be revised or are ones from non-student posters. Any 'student' posts below that missed the assignment deadline will not get credit for the assignment.

Posted by: Dr. Hobbs at November 4, 2008 11:56 PM

Sonia Perez Perez 1
Dr. Lee Hobbs
Academic Writing 2- Eng 122 CA16
22 January 2009
Faulkner, William. “A Rose for Emily.” Literature. Mary McAleer Balkun. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson, 2005. 1-9.
William Faulkner’s “A Rose for Emily”
The last four paragraphs of “A Rose for Emily” are important in Faulkner’s suspense
about the character, Miss Emily, an elderly woman who is recognized in her community. She
dies and the imprint of a dead man found in her bed. Furthermore, Faulkner’s style adds the
mystery of Miss Emily doings, and this passage relates to earlier parts of the text and the
ideas expressed by Miss Emily.
The descriptions of the passage deal strictly with the mysterious actions of the main
character. It seems that Miss Emily has set up the room for her and her husband, Homer with
all the things a male needs in a home. When the narrator accompanied by companions enter the
room, the area presented in the first paragraph is has a man’s items and is arranged for “bridal”
purposes. The room is very dusty as if no one has occupied it for some time. Yet, men clothing
are all over the space, and “The body had apparently once lain in the attitude of an embrace…”
(Faulkner 9). Certainly, the descriptions explain Emily’s inexplicable dealings in the residence.
However, this passage is a result of earlier events in the story. The middle of the text,
states “the man’s toilet things backed with tarnished silver, silver so tarnished that the monogram
was obscured” (Faulkner 9). It has the initials H.B. for Homer; therefore, some of the items
found in the space are his. The clothes are Homer’s, since towards the end in the story he goes to
Emily’s home. They find Homer dead in the house because Emily purchases arsenic, and he is
the last person seen entering it. The indentation on the second pillow is from Emily, who sleeps
Perez 2
next to Homer since supposedly they are married. This leads back to the puzzling activities of
Miss Emily.
Additionally, the thoughts of the main character in this passage explain her actions. Miss
Emily probably assembles the room because she believes Homer will stay with her. The
problem is that Homer is a homosexual and is not interested in marriage and Miss Emily is in
love with him. In my opinion, she plans to use the arsenic to keep Homer sick and stay at her
home and did not plan for his death. “Upon a chair hung the suit, carefully folded;
beneath it the two mute shoes and the discarded socks” (Faulkner 9). Nevertheless, Homer dies,
and Miss Emily denies that he is dead, and pretends that he is still alive and loves her, too.
In conclusion, Faulkner writes this story through a woman’s perspective. Throughout this
passage, the description of the room is very detailed, which is a woman’s trait. After Miss
Emily’s death, the narrator notices everything, such as “a long strand of iron-gray hair” on the
pillow. The description in the last four paragraphs relates to earlier parts of the text and the
ideas of the passage express the mysterious doings of Emily.

Posted by: Sonia P. at January 26, 2009 07:18 PM

McLean 1
Jessica McLean
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122-CA17
January 26, 2009

A Rose for Emily
William Faulkner’s first line in A Rose for Emily is, “When Miss Emily Grierson died, our whole town went to her funeral:” (Faulkner 1). It is a very misleading way to start off his story. It insinuates that Miss Emily was a very well liked and important woman. Throughout the rest of the short story, however, we find out that Miss Emily is a very mysterious woman and didn’t get along with or know too many people from the town.
Miss Emily was convinced that she no longer had to pay taxes because a previous mayor pardoned her from paying them. She claimed it was the town’s way of paying back a debt owed to her father. When town officials came to her house to inform her that there was no such record, she barely gave them the time of day. Miss Emily wouldn’t listen to them and her only response was, “I have no taxes in Jefferson” (Faulkner 3), and then she had her servant make them leave. She was very unapproachable, unlike the opening statement suggests.
The townspeople even seemed afraid of her in some instances. When her house began to have a horrible stench, her neighbors complained to the mayor, instead of going to her directly, but even he didn’t want to be the one to tell Miss Emily. As an alternative, he sent over four men over to her house in the dark of night to distribute lime around all of the crevices (Faulkner 4). On another occasion, Miss Emily went to the pharmacist to acquire some arsenic. He had no problem giving it to her, but he explained that by law, he needed to know what it would be used for. Instead of answering she just glared at him until the pharmacist was intimidated enough to just give it to her (Faulkner 6).

McLean 2
I think Faulkner’s reasoning for using such a deceptive first statement was to make the readers feel sympathetic towards Miss Emily at the end of the story. Throughout the story he describes her as a crazy old woman with no one to keep her company, except her servant. In doing this, when she dies at the end of the story, we feel sorry for her, even though she was unfriendly and wanted nothing to do with anyone.

Posted by: Jessica McLean at January 29, 2009 02:02 AM

Katie Ganning
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 CA17
January 28, 2009
The Secret life of Miss Emily
William Faulker’s short story, A Rose for Emily, opens to the viewing of Miss Emily’s death. The story recollects the life of Emily through flashbacks of different points, much like everyone’s mind in life when reminiscing. The narrator talks about how much of a burden Miss Emily was to the town due to her old fashion ways. Throughout the story we learn of Miss Emily’s confederate standings and loneliness.
Miss Emily’s character was an extremely old fashion lady who still believed in the confederate era and was conservative to those rules. She had a Negro as a server throughout her whole life, keeping up with the gardening and kitchen work. She was a Gierson and while growing up that was considered a high ranking in the town, but as the town changed through the years, her lifestyle stayed the same. “When the town got free postal delivery, Miss Emily alone refused to let them fasten the metal numbers above her door and attach a mailbox to it. She would not listen to them” (Faulker 8). Incidences continued with Miss Emily, but along with her reasoning, she would always call the town Jefferson as if they were still in confederate times. Once she passed away, the men in town called her “the fallen monument” because of her unchanging life that was once a burden, but then praised after her death.
Although the town’s people had a difficult time dealing with Emily, they still felt sorry for her because of how lonely she was, they called her “Poor Emily” (5). Her father had a difficult time accepting men to date her growing up and when it came time for his death she would not accept it almost as if he was the only man in her life. Once he passed she became distant and her slender body became overweight. Soon after her father’s death, Homer Barron, “a Yankee- a big, dark, ready man” (5) came into her life. The town’s people viewed this as an odd couple because of her confederate standings. She began socializing again and everyone assumed they would marry each other. When rumors began about Homer possible being gay, the narrator explains of Emily purchasing rat poisoning and how anxious she was to find the best brand the druggist carried, however you do not put the two situations together right away. Soon after Homer left the small town and was never seen again, Emily then became anti-social, aged quickly and kept coming in and out of sickness until her death.
Since she had such a difficult time accepting her father’s death, having Homer leave her must have felt the same way, the town’s people expected. Once her funeral came the people of the town were eager to search through Emily’s belongings. When they came to a room that had been shut for years, they discovered bridal and groom garments and a bed. Inside the bed was a familiar face, Homer Barron, as if asleep all the years since his disappearance. Along the second pillow was one of Emily’s “long strand of iron-grey hair” (9), leading the reader to see the truth of her isolation and Homer’s disappearance.
The description of Emily’s character is well explained in Roberts’s text as rounded. Although she did not change with the times of the town, Emily was always the main focus of the town people’s conversation. Whenever a person entered and left her life, physically her body would age quickly, to either short hair or overweight and having to use a cane. The author’s motif description of how dark and dusty the house became because of the lack of sun light brought into the house also reflected her roundness. The dust and odor that lingered around the whole yard explained how unsanitary she lived and possibly why she was constantly sick. When the narrator explains the strand of hair in the bed alongside the dead body, shows how lonely she was. By killing the only man she loved, Homer Barron, gives you an idea that when he tried to leave her it was her only way of having him forever and to never be left alone again.


Works Cited
Faulkner, William. A Rose for Emily. Ed. McAleer Balkun, Mary. Upper Saddle River, NJ. 2005. 1-9.
Roberts, Edgar V. Writing About Literature. Brief 11th ed. Upper Saddle River: Prentice Hall, 2006. 64-76.

Posted by: Katie Ganning at February 2, 2009 01:26 PM

Michelle Youngblood
Professor Hobbs
Eng 122 CA 16
February 5, 2009
A Rose for Emily: Point of View
According to Roberts, point of view is a much more complicated section of literary study. There are three points of view in which an author uses in his or her writings: first person, second person and third person. The use of tense can shift in a story, poem, or play changing the point of view as the tense changes. In some short stories, the author sometimes identifies the narrator of the story and sometimes he or she does not. By knowing who the narrator is can make a story much more exciting or suspenseful.
In A Rose for Emily, the short story is mostly in a first –person point of view. First- person point of view involves the pronouns I, my, mine, me and sometimes we, our and us. (Roberts, 84) For example, the story uses we, I, and our. “I want some poison” she said to the druggist; “We really must do something about it, Judge.” (Balkun, 6, 3) Second-person point of view uses the pronoun you. It is most times used when the speaker talks directly to another person and explains that person’s past actions and statements. (Roberts, 85) The use of the words she, he, it, and they is an indication of third-person point of view. In this point of view, the speaker is outside the action. (Roberts, 85)
First and third-person points of view are the two that are used mostly in the story. For example, the pronoun she is utilized numerous times. “She did not ask them to sit.” (Balkun, 2) The major participant in this story was Miss Emily. Although she does not say much, the story is about her and is narrated by someone else. In third-person, there are three variants of this point of view: Dramatic or objective, omniscient, and limited omniscient. “In dramatic or objective the narrator reports only what can be seen and heard. Omniscient third-person is when the speaker knows all, sees all, and reports all. A limited omniscient focuses on the actions, responses, thoughts, and feelings of a single character.” (Roberts, 85)
Point of view is important in story writing. It helps a person to understand the story more. If the story uses me or us then the reader will most likely caught on and know that the speakers are part of the story or part of a group. Sometimes in short stories there may be a major participant but he or she may not be the one telling what happened in the story. Using first, second, and third-person point of view aids in making a story, poem, or play a success.

References
Balkun, Mary McAleer. A Rose for Emily. Upper Saddle River: New Jersey, 2005.
Roberts, Edgar V. Writing About Literature. Brief 11th ed. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson, 2006. 68,285.

Posted by: Michelle Youngblood at February 9, 2009 10:46 PM

Dawn Serzanin
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 CA17
10 February 2009
Remembrance of Emily
Every story has a point of view or standpoint which may alter the information slightly when being given to the audience. Authors can either choose to have themselves or someone else tell the story. In William Faulkner’s short story A Rose for Emily he uses an outsider’s perspective as his point of view. This third person point of view allows the reader to form an opinion based on how others saw Emily.
This short story was written after the passing of Miss Emily, who is the main character, by and outsider who seems to be a part of her community. The narrator is able to talk not only about how they feel about the character but how others react to the character. The audience is able to understand the main character through the tone and language the narrator uses for example the narrator says, “Alive, Miss Emily had been a tradition, a duty, and a care;” this shows how influential this woman who has passed away was not only to one person but to the whole community. A third person view in this story allows the reader to not only see the respect given to Miss Emily because she has died but also what others really think of her, and how many found her very peculiar. Faulkner uses his story teller to fill in details that an outsider would not know. Although the reader is not informed of every detail of the main characters life they are able to see what influential events took place.
The short story in which Faulkner uses the third person limited point of view to explain the funeral and after thoughts of Miss Emily, an older woman who lived in a judgmental community. The narrator’s opinions and observations of the main character cause the reader to make quick judgments and form some opinions which may be uninformed.

Works Cited
Faulkner, William. “A Rose for Emily.” A Prentice Hall Pocket Reader: Literature. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Prentice Hall, 2005.

Posted by: Dawn at February 10, 2009 09:08 AM

Allyn Tuff
Dr. Hobbs
English 122 CA16
2-17-2009
Plot in A Rose for Emily
In the story A Rose for Emily, There was a series of conflicts that happened in the story. These series of conflicts are what makes up a plot. According to Edger V. Roberts conflict “refers to people or circumstances that a character must face and try to overcome.” (Roberts 93). The conflicts that appear in the story are when Emily refused to pay her taxes, and it got the attention of many people, and thoughts of negativity . Then Emily’s house started to smell awful which started to make people suspicious. After that Emily died, and they found the dead corpse of Homer while searching the house.
One of the conflicts that Roberts talks about in his writing is a prime example in A Rose for Emily. This is when Emily does not pay her taxes. Roberts says “conflicts bring out extremes of human energy, causing characters to engage in decisions, actions, responses, and interactions that make up fictional literature” (Roberts 93). Well in this case, it caused the IRS to come over and tell Emily that she hadn’t been paying her taxes. This caused a lot of talk in the small town where she lived, and people started to wonder if this lady was still of her sanity.
Another conflict that made up the plot in this story is when Ms. Emily’s house smelled bad. In fact it smelled so bad that the people neighboring her had complained. This caused the Government to get involved, and they put lime under the cellar, and into the basement of her house. Once again, this got people talking more about Emily, and why she was losing grip of her sanity. This conflict in the story has to do with the interactions of people that make up the plot.
The last conflict that is showed in this story is the one that reveals the secret of what happened to Homer, her lover that betrayed her, and tells that Emily had lost herself to insanity. I believe this is the climax of the story. Emily died, and they finally went through her house and found that Homer was killed and lay in Emily’s bed until his body decomposed. According to Roberts the climax is “a sequence of the crisis, the story’s high point and may take the shape of a decision, an action, or affirm denial, or an illumination or a realization”. (Roberts 97)
The plot in this story is well thought out, and correlates rather well with what Robert’s text said. The conflicts that appear in the story were Emily not paying the taxes, her house smelling, and her dying. These three conflicts brought the negative thinking of the town, the suspicion of the town, and the resolution that Homer really was killed by Emily, and that she was insane.


Works Cited
Faulkner, William. "A Rose For Emily." Balkun, Mary McAleer. A Prentice Hall Pocket Reader Literature. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Pearson Prentice Hall, 2005. 1-9.
Roberts, Edger V. Writing About Literature. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Prentive Hall, 2005.



Posted by: Allyn Tuff at February 16, 2009 08:18 PM

Josh Green
Professor Hobbs
Eng 122 CA17
2/11/09

Faulkner, William. “A Rose For Emily.” A Prentice Hall Pocket Reader: Literature. Ed. Mary McAleer Balkun. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Perspn 2005. 1-9
A Rose for Emily: Plot & Structure
In Faulkner’s classic short story A Rose for Emily, the plot certainly thickens near the end of the story when parts of Miss Emily’s life, which were previously shrouded in mystery, were further by the townsfolk after her funeral. The story unfolds in five different sections starting with the introduction into her funeral followed by a flashback of the years leading up to her passing. This process helps readers build questions and doubt right from the start of the story.
The story focuses mainly on her reclusive life and her peculiar behavior noted by many of the town’s inhabitance. After her father’s death, Emily was left only in her house with only her humble black servant at her side. Each day alone in her house aged Emily greatly. Her hair grew grayer over the years and she was never seen outside the house. Soon the town’s people noticed an apparent romance between Emily and a northern construction foreman named Homer Barron. One day Miss Emily purchased a package of arsenic from the local druggist which raised many suspicions in the community. “She will kill herself,” (Faulkner 6) the town’s people would say because they knew Homer Barron was not the marrying type and it was rumored that he preferred the company of men. But the townsfolk learned that Emily had been out and about ordering certain items with the initials H.B. which hinted a wedding of some sort was in order. Then one day Homer was seen entering Emily’s house and he was never seen again.
At Emily’s funeral the people finally got to go inside the house that no one except for Homer and the black servant had seen in forty years. When they made their way to her room they found something surprisingly grotesque. Around her room were the apparent bridal furnishes she purchased outside the house and on the Emily’s bed laid the rotting corpse of Homer Barron. On the pillow next to the dead was a single strand of “iron-gray hair” (9)

Posted by: Josh Green at February 16, 2009 11:15 PM

Brittany Thunberg
Dr. Hobbs
Academic Writing II CA16
20 February 2009

“A Rose for Emily” Analyzing Setting

In the short story “A Rose for Emily” written by William Faulkner setting is a huge aspect in understanding this work. Faulkner portrays an incredibly clear picture for readers of the setting and characters as well throughout this work. Faulkner’s attention to setting and atmosphere helps readers interpret the actions as well as motivations of Emily and the rest of the people in her town.
The setting throughout “A Rose for Emily is in the deep south of the United States in a very small town. The town that this story takes place in is Jefferson. This story takes place sometime before the civil war and the reader can understand this simply by reading the text. “No negro woman should appear on the streets without an apron.” (Baulkun 1) In this time period racism was still a huge problem and African Americans were not considered equal.
Roberts explains that authors utilize three basic types of settings. Faulkner uses cultural and historical circumstance in “A Rose for Emily.” Cultural and historical circumstances are obvious in this work. The setting of “A Rose for Emily” being in the old south helps readers understand important aspects of the story. “Just as physical setting influences characters, so do historical and cultural conditions and assumptions.” (Roberts 110) Understanding the culture of this era as well as history is one of the key elements in this work.
Roberts explains that in revealing certain important aspects of a character setting is important. “To reveal or highlight qualities of character, and also to make literature lifelike, authors include many details about objects of human manufacture and construction.” (Roberts 109) Readers can understand what Roberts is trying to say after reading “A Rose for Emily.” There is a great deal of detail put into describing the town as well as Emily’s house. “They were admitted by the old Negro into a dim hall from which a stairway mounted into still more shadow. It smelled of dust and disuse- a close dank smell.” (Baulkun 2) Faulkner uses description and cultural and historical references in creating the setting in “A Rose for Emily.”


Works Cited

Faulkner, William. "A Rose For Emily." Balkun, Mary McAleer. A Prentice Hall Pocket Reader Literature. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Pearson Prentice Hall, 2005. 1-9.

Roberts, Edger V. Writing About Literature. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Prentice Hall, 2005.

Posted by: Brittany Thunberg at February 23, 2009 10:59 PM

Sasha-ann Jarrett
Dr. Hobbs
English 122-CA17
February 24, 2009
The Secret of Ms. Emily
“A Rose for Emily” written by William Faulkner is narrated in third person by the townspeople and begins by mentioning the main character, Ms. Emily’s, funeral. When the time came for Ms. Emily to pay her taxes, the author describes her house and how she looks, “only Miss Emily's house was left, lifting its stubborn and coquettish decay above the cotton wagons and the gasoline pumps-an eyesore among eyesores” (page 1). As the author begins with such a gloomy setting, the reader can predict that the main idea throughout the theme will be based around death. The author expresses the main idea clearly by letting the narrator describe the setting vividly.
The actions of the townspeople make it clear to the reader that death was looming in the story. They questioned Ms. Emily’s appearance, her skeletal figure; they questioned the movements about her house and the smells that were coming out of it. Their actions told the reader that something was evidently to do with death. At times, there was dialogue present, especially due to the curiosity of the townspeople which gave the main idea/ theme even more. An example is when Ms. Emily went to the Pharmacy to the druggist to ask for some poison, the druggist asks her for what and she told him to kill rats. But the druggist could tell that that what she asked for “arsenic,” was to kill something bigger than rats.
The structure helped greatly in bring out the main idea, as the author uses the technique of flashback to bring it across. At first, he talks about the death but then follows by giving a short summary of the person and the reason for the main them to occur, and then goes back to end with death. Within detailing the main theme, there are different manifestations of Ms. Emily life as a “murderer”, which clearly states that the author wanted the theme to be well played out. He could have simply just used one manifestation to bring out the idea of death, but to emphasize it he makes sure to explain it from different angles.
Overall, I believe that the author did a good job at incorporating the idea of death in “A Rose for Emily”. Immediately, as I begun to read, I realized that the main theme would be death, and so I kept reading to support my conclusion. At times, it was not clear, but how the author used his words and the dialogues present helped me to grasp what he was talking about.

Work Cited
Faulkner, William. “A Rose for Emily” A Prentice Hall Pocket Reader. Pearson Education Inc., 2005

Posted by: sasha-ann.jarrett at March 3, 2009 07:46 AM

Chris Collier
ENG121 Academic Writing II
Dr. Hobbs
March 10, 2009
Is Miss Emily a Symbol In and of Herself?
Williams Faulkner’s “A Rose for Emily” is set in a post-Civil War era township known as Jefferson. He describes in some detail the southern aristocracy, and he uses a limited first person approach to bring into focus a woman named Emily Grierson. She is deceased, and the narrator describes her past and up to and a little after her death. He describes her as almost being: “a tradition, a duty, and a care; a sort of hereditary obligation upon the town…” (Faulkner 1), playing into the symbolism that Faulkner would use in other works of his. She is a symbol of the past, and of the customs of an age that after the Civil War, all but disappeared.
Emily’s father, who represents the typical southern gothic father, was so overbearing that he would chase away any young man that would come for her. In effect, leaving her alone to only him and the secretive family that was the Griersons. After his death, her world was shattered, because she had no one else besides her black servant, whom she most likely never spoke to. She did not have to pay taxes because of an agreement, an old agreement, between her father and the original mayors and aldermen of the town. Though as the times changed, Ms Emily did not represent a golden era of the Confederacy, nor of the aristocracy that she had come from; she had lost her wealth, and her notoriety. Earning nothing but pity and gossip from the rest of the township, they also gawked at her being thirty and unmarried.
When a northerner named Homer Barron appeared, the townspeople saw him as a symbol of change and of a possible suitor of Ms Emily. Ms Emily had some relatives, two female cousins, living with her at the time, and everyone in the town (including Ms Emily) wanted to get rid of them, so that Homer Barron might return after his departure. Ms Emily bought some poison, presenting a tinge of insidiousness in her personality, and mysteriousness, as Faulkner never reveals how the poison is used. Eventually the cousins leave and Homer Barron moves in with Ms Emily. At the same time, Ms Emily shuts herself from the rest of the world.
The next time the township sees the inside of the old Grierson estate, is when Ms Emily is determined to be dead by her servant. Her hair had begun to turn a dark iron color. This symbolizes just how hardened to the outside she had become. But what is the most symbolic of the happenings in Faulkner’s tale, is Ms Emily become morbidly obese. This represents a perversion of the attractiveness she had when she was of a younger age, while at the same time bringing forth the true (at least physical) nature of the gothic family. The secretive nature and the overall negativity and animosities that the old southern gothic families harbored becomes capitalized by the finding of a dark iron hair on the pillow next to the carcass of Homer Barron. Yet, because of the past influences and the symbol that Ms Emily was, they only broke into the upper room after she was buried out of fear.

Posted by: Chris Collier at March 10, 2009 01:47 AM


Katie Ganning
Dr. B.L. Hobbs
ENG 122 CA17
16 April 2009
Psychological Outlook: A Rose for Emily
Miss Emily Grierson, a secretive and lonely women who has recently just died in the town of Jefferson. Everyone in the town has gathered for her funeral, not so much to mourn, but to figure out the clues that lead to the conclusion of the women’s life. She once was friendly and welcoming to the townspeople, but as she gained a relationship with a man known as Homer Barron that quickly ended she aged, became rude, antisocial and mean.
Miss Emily is an example of Frieda Fromm-Riechman’s culture and child development known of loneliness. According to Roberts text, “Psychoanalysis provided a new key to the understanding of character by claiming that behavior is caused by hidden and unconscious motives” (Roberts 189) and can analyze authors and the artistic process (189). During this psychological research-informed paper, William Faulkner’s “A Rose for Emily” will be examined based on Miss Emily’s behavior of attachment and the “anxiety to which separation and loss give rise” ( Bowlby 30).

Works Cited
Bennis, Warren G., et al. Interpersonal Dynamics. Homewood, IL: The Dorsey Press, 1964.
Bowlby, John. “Seperation.” Attachment and Loss. New York: Basic Books, 1973.
Faulkner, William. A Rose for Emily. Prentice Hall Pocket Reader. Ed. Mary McAleer Balkun. Upper Saddle River, NJ. 2005. 1-9.
Roberts, Edgar V. Writing About Literature. Brief 11th ed. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, 2005.
Shriver, Joe M. Human Behavior and the Social Environment. Needham Heights, MA. Allyn and Bacon, 1995.



Works Cited
Bennis, Warren G. et al. Interpersonal Dynamics. Homewood, IL: The Dorsey Press, 1964. Filled with different test and measurements, this book of essays will be useful to give me information and example about loneliness.
Bornstein, Marc H., Bruner, Jerome S. Interaction in the Human Development. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 1989. Based on the interaction between humans and their dependency on the recourses given by the environment surrounding them. This will be useful when explaining Miss Emily’s attachment that has mentally effected her lack of socialization with the environment.
Bowlby, John. “Separation.” Attachment and Loss. New York: Basic Books, 1973. Deals with family issues in regards to losing someone or never having one of the parents around. This will be useful to give an insight about the cause of Miss Emily’s attachment due to losing her father.
McNeil, Elton B. Human Socialization. Belmont, CA: Brooks/Cole, 1969. Explains the early childhood and the effects of the development caused by certain factors, and this text will guide me to an understanding that will serve as an explanation of alienation and marginality that is caused by parents care.
Schriver, Joe M. Human Behavior and the Social Environment. Needman Heights, MA: Allyn and Bacon, 1995. An outline of the regular human and the different outlook about socialization, this will help me explain the importance of family and what leads to future social and attachment problems.

Posted by: Katie Ganning at April 16, 2009 08:49 AM

Katie Ganning
Dr. B. L. Hobbs
ENG 122 CA17
21 April 2009
The Anxious Attachment Style of Miss Emily Grierson
Many times when growing up, the relationship one has with their parents is quite similar to the relationship they will have with future romantic relationships. This is not because it happens by accident, but because it is how they are raised by someone who loves them and this is how one learns to treat someone they love. These types of relationships that children have with their parents are considered attachment styles. According to John Bowlby; attachment system is formed during infancy, when the infant must maintain physical proximity to a wiser and stronger caregiver as a foundation of the exploration system […](Bowlby). A particular attachment is known as anxious attachment which is also considered “over dependency” (212). This form of attachment is the constant need of a person presence and attention. It can lead to enhanced social conflicts, cause of dysfunctional coping situations and difficulties in romantic relationships. This attachment is an example of the relationship that William Faulkner’s, A Rose for Emily, Miss Emily Grierson’s led with her father and affected her future romantic relationship with Homer Barron.
While Miss Emily was growing up, her father seemed to play the only parent role in her life. Mr. Grierson gave Miss Emily a very nice lifestyle in the conservative south in a town called Jefferson. “The people in our town […] believed that the Grierson’s held themselves a little too high for what they really were (Faulkner 4). As she grew into a mature young lady, he believed that no man was good enough to date his daughter. However though, as years went by Mr. Grierson died, leaving nothing but the house to Miss Emily. At first, she did not believe that his death was real, she told the townspeople “that her father was not dead” (4); situations like this are common due to the realization of loneliness. “Most people who are alone try to keep the mere fact of their aloneness a secret from others, and even try to keep its conscious realization hidden from themselves.” ( Fromm-Riechman 129). However, three days later she “broke down” (4) and excluded everyone from the town in her life. Studies have shown that children raised on anxious attachment that were not very socializing growing up, tend to be timid by peers, causes poor communication skills and may lead to alienation or a better psychologically know as marginality. Marginality is “the isolation from others and so forced to maintain an identity without the emotional support that most of us receive from fellow citizens” (McNeil 76). Situations that are caused by marginality are from how one was raised in a society and usually are unaware of the social norms that the society adapts to when that person is not taught such appropriate skills (similar to Miss Grierson and the change of mail box numbers along the house) and wishes to not take part in.
Between parent and child interaction, the child’s personality is based on the structure in which the parent uses for the child to learn socialization. The problem with Miss Emily’s anxious attachment to her father is that it led her to fear and future serious situations. Usually in an attachment such as anxious attachment, the person is in constant fear of being left which leads to the constant attachment, however for Miss Emily, her attachment seemed to be unconscious to her until after her father passed away. After about two years passed, she met a man named Homer Barron. They were seen very frequently together and the townspeople assumed they would eventually marry, however their relationship was over before it even began. As the town noticed of Homer Barron’s league of absence, Miss Emily returned to her old ways of loneliness by rarely leaving her home. It wasn’t until her own death that the townspeople discovered Homer Barron’s body in her home laying in a bed as if he was sleeping and with “a long strand of iron-grey hair” (9), which is assumed to be from Miss Emily’s hair. The killing of Homer Barron was because of him trying to leave Miss Emily and led to her poisoning him so she would not be left alone again.
Based on her society’s status after her father’s death, the town was becoming more modern. Since the way her father raised her, which was conservative values, she would not accept the things that the town changed. This type of situation is known as a “democratic interaction” (McNeil 62) in a family’s social interaction. There are three types of ranges to this interaction which are pseudo democratic, scientifically democratic and warmly democratic families. In Miss Emily’s type of growing up, she was raised by the pseudo democratic interaction which is when the child “is allowed to participate in only those decisions that are not truly important.” (62). By doing so, Miss Emily would not adapt to the new social norms that the town would partake in, instead she kept things in her life the way her father would have left it.
For Miss Emily’s situation, she was left in the world alone to fend for herself and the knowledge her father left her with and also led to conflicts with the townspeople. When the tax collectors came to her door to collect what she owed, she believed in what her father told her which was that the taxes were already paid off due to the donation he gave to the town. According to Elton McNeil, “The family’s role in socializing the child involves teaching him about the real world, about the behavior expected of him in it, and about what other people are like.” (McNeil 64). Since this information was what Colonel Sartoris stated almost ten years ago about the families taxes, she refused to pay and would send them away. Because of her father’s death, it made Miss Emily not want change in her life
Not only did her father’s death affect her mentally, but it affected her physically and caused dysfunctional coping matters. Certain coping matters are learned from aging or development strategies. She was obviously trying to avoid the stress that a death would cause someone, however since she was not taught how to act in a situation such as dealing with death she caused herself into “self-imposed aloneness” (Fromm-Riechmann) which led to constant illnesses and began to age very quickly. She went from a slender young lady and into a heavier set woman with her hair cut short “making her look like a girl” (5), an appearance of someone who just did not care. Physical change in a person is possible if they are to lose someone close to them, however recovery is the reassurance of a person to be okay, but in Miss Emily’s case of attachment to her father, she never fully recovered.
“Most persons described by clinicians that are dependent or over dependent are ones who exhibit attachment behavior more frequently and more urgently than the clinician thinks proper.” (Bowlby 212). Since Miss Emily was left alone, she acted out by becoming anti social which is not a healthy way to act upon because “the human being is born with the need for contact and tenderness.” (Fromm-Riechmann 125).
Homer Barron trying to leave Miss Emily led her to develop insecure attachment which is learned through anxious attachment. When he wanted to leave her, she obviously began to remember the loneliness and anxiety that the death of her father left her. For Miss Emily to kill Mr. Barron and to keep him there with her is her way of showing her “natural desire for a close relationship with an attachment figure, and recognizes that he is apprehensive lest the relationship be ended.” (Bowlby 213). Since her fathers death left her alone, when it came to being left again for the second time, she decided on not letting this happen again by killing him and keeping him there for her self’s own psychological needs. By doing so, her “attachment figure will be available to him when desired.” (213).
Since the Grierson’s thought of themselves as a higher class among the other townspeople and the anxious attachment to her father, this could have led Miss Grierson to marginality. As much as the townspeople disliked Miss Emily, they still treated her with respect of an elder of the town and even with the death of her father, they still tried to send their condolences.
Nature and nurture are an important influence when it comes to a person’s development. If a child is raised on positive social caretaking, it is predicted that they will have a normal mental growth in the child and will follow them throughout their life. It is crucial for a child to have diversity of early interaction while growing up because it will affect the type of person they will become as an adult and for Miss Emily, this type of prediction is considered correct. Her father kept her from understanding independence due to the attachment she learned from him. By doing so, this affected her relationship with Homer, her interaction with the townspeople and also led her into becoming a murderer. This type of attachment could be looked at as “greedy” or as John Bowlby describes as a chapter title in his book, Separation, “The Theory of Spoiling”. As much as the townspeople felt sorry for Miss Emily, she almost was seen as selfish because of her constant need of attention by a certain person which led to her wrongful actions.
It is difficult to say that parents are the sole purpose as to why a child has such form of an attachment; the environment also does indeed play a role when it comes to the development as a person. However, families are known to be “structural units in society” (McNeil 77) and are the primary learning development of socialization. During the time when Miss Emily was raised, mothers taught the daughters how to mature and develop whereas the father did the same for the son’s in the family, but in her situation with only a father-figure in her life growing up, she was limited to the teachings of a young women of that time and lacked the nurturing care of a women, which draws one to believe of her male attachment and out lashing conclusions.

Posted by: Katie Ganning at April 29, 2009 03:06 PM

Irma Sera
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG. 210CL Love & Desire in Literature CA02
27 October 2014

Question: In William Faulkner’s short story “A Rose for Emily” (1930), what are the lingering expectations of the upper class regarding integrity and appropriate behavior? Answer in your own words, but use quoted and cited passages from the text to support your answer.

Answers: While Emily’s father was alive, he believed that no one their town was good enough for his daughter and that she had to be protected from people who were beneath her station. The lingering expectation of the upper class regarding integrity and appropriate behavior was that because of how high the Griersons held themselves, because Emily had begun to hang out with someone who was beneath her, someone who paved sidewalks it stirred up talk in the town of how ashamed she out to be and how even her grieving shouldn’t cause her to be nice to a person less fortunate than her. But there were still others, older people, who said that even grief could not cause a real lady to forget noblesse oblige--without calling it noblesse oblige” (William, pg. 4). The townspeople made it clear that this was not a behavior that someone with such high standards takes part in.

Posted by: irma sera at October 28, 2014 03:04 AM

Allison Ward
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
28 October 2014

Question #1
In William Faulkner’s short story “A Rose for Emily” (1930), why does Tobe stay with Emily?

Answer
Tobe stays with Emily to help her manage her life because of her father’s death. For example on page two of the story, townsmen keep harassing Emily about her taxes and orders Tobe to, “show these gentlemen out.”(Faulkner 2) Tobe is the butler of the house and is there whenever Emily needs him.

Posted by: Allison Ward at October 28, 2014 06:15 PM

Shelby Rexroth
October 28th, 2014
ENG 210

14) In William Faulkner’s short story “A Rose for Emily” (1930), what kind of relationship did Emily have with her neighbor(s)? Answer in your own words, but use quoted and cited passages from the text to support your answer.

The town and Emily had a strange relationship. Emily was the one person that the town wouldn’t bother with. They wouldn’t go out of their way to have a conversation with her, but they also wouldn’t be disrespectful and not tell her hi when they saw her. After the death of her father, the town became sorry for Emily and expressed their condolences continuously.

Posted by: Shelby Rexroth at October 28, 2014 10:03 PM

Emily Finck
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
29 October 2014


Question #4: In William Faulkner’s short story “A Rose for Emily” (1930, what are some of the different things inherited in the story? Answer in your own words, but use quoted and cited passages from the text to support your answer


Answer:
In William Faulkner’s “A Rose for Emily” Miss Emily inherits the “taxes” of her late father (1). Miss Emily also begins to inherit the physical attributions of the house and her surroundings. She becomes progressively “distant” from society much like her house; she becomes more and more “withdrawn” with the change in society (2). She begins to “decay” declines in health and attitude also like her house (3). Miss Emily also inherits her “mental instability” from old lady Wyatt, one of her “crazy” family members (4).

Posted by: Emily Finck at October 28, 2014 10:21 PM

Zailet Martinez
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
28 October 2014

Question 13:
In William Faulkner’s short story “A Rose for Emily” (1930), what do Emily's external conflicts with the people of Jefferson reveal about her? Answer in your own words, but use quoted and cited passages from the text to support your answer.

Answer:
She was privileged. Emily’s external conflicts with the people of Jefferson reveal subtle characteristics about her which we would not understand otherwise. Faulkner writes, “Alive, Miss Emily had been a tradition, a duty, and a care; a sort of hereditary obligation upon the town.” By saying this, Faulkner is referring to Emily’s long history in the town of Jefferson, the town’s duty to ignore her tax-paying negligence, and an object of fascination and curiosity which the town ponders over daily (Faulkner, 1). The external conflict arises with the government officials, when Emily sends back her tax notice, unclaimed. Miss Emily seems to have power above all others, no one seems to question her words. People complain about her home smelling very bad, but authorities were afraid to tell her that she smelled to her face. Even though people talked about her behind her back, they care or were interest about her life, she was the talked of the town. Miss Emily was a mysterious woman that kept everything to herself but apart from that it seems like everyone followed and watch her every move.

Posted by: Zailet Martinez at October 28, 2014 10:31 PM

Ahmed Almoailu
Dr. Hobbs
ENG210CL
October 29, 2014

Question: In William Faulkner’s short story “ A Rose for Emily” (1930) what happen to Homer Barron? Answer in your own words, but use quoted and cited passages from the text to support your answer.
Answer: I think Emily poisoned Homer Barron. I think Emily poisoned him so he stay in the house and never leave again, because she have no one around her and she is scared of loneliness. Therefore, as soon as he came back she poisoned him. “Within three days Homer Barron was back in town.” (Faulkner, William “A Rose to Emily” Page 6).

Posted by: Ahmed Almoailu at October 29, 2014 02:17 PM

Rebecca Messano
ENG 210 Love and Desire In Literature
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Oct. 29, 2014

Question #11: What do the police think about Emily and what does it say about her stubbornness?

Answer: In the short story, "A Rose For Emily" there is no specific reference to "cops" . There are however, references to several other authorities who do have clear opinions about Miss Emily and her stubbornness. my impression of Miss Emily as a stubborn woman is established early on when her house is also being described as decaying stubbornly

Posted by: Rebecca Messano at October 29, 2014 02:34 PM

Martin J Terrasi
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
29 October 2014

Question: In William Faulkner’s short story” arose for Emily” (1930), what is the significance of the passage “clings to that which has robbed her”?

Answer: the passage helps open our understanding of the relationship Emily had with her father. Her father had not allowed her to marry any of the suitors that came for Emily, and when her father died she was left with no one. She refused to admit the father was dead for three days, this in some peoples mind is she did not want to admit she was now alone in the world. “She told them that her father was not dead. She did that for three days…..We did not say she was crazy then. We believed she had to do that.” (Faulkner p.4)

Posted by: Martin Terrasi at October 29, 2014 03:11 PM

Thomas Watson
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
31 October 2014

QUESTION #10: In William Faulkner’s short “A Rose for Emily” (1930), is there any proof that Tobe, Emily’s servant, is loyal to her?

ANSWER:
I would say that Tobe was a loyal servant to Emily. The story starts off by saying that the secrets that Emily had hidden within the house weren’t available to anyone’s eyes. With proof, “the women mostly out of curiosity to see the inside of her house, which no one save an old manservant--a combined gardener and cook--had seen in at least ten years”(Faulkner 1). He opened the doors without saying a word, and when she asked him to escort the town authorities out he did so. From the text, "I have no taxes in Jefferson. Tobe!" The Negro appeared. "Show these gentlemen out” (Faulkner 2). Also, when Emily died he disclosed no information; “We did not even know she was sick; we had long since given up trying to get any information from the Negro. He talked to no one, probably not even to her”(Faulkner 7).

Posted by: Thomas Watson at October 31, 2014 12:07 PM

Ahmed Almoailu & Ashjan Alrashid
Dr. Hobbs
ENG210CL
October 31, 2014

Question: William Faulkner’s short story “A Rose for Emily” (1930). How is the desire for completion exhibited in this story, if at all? What’s incomplete, if anything? What needs to be healed (and with what) so that whatever’s injured can be restored? Think Aristophanes. Explain fully. Answer in your own words, but use quoted and cited passages from the text to support your answer.
Answer: The desire of competition in this story exhibited by Emily felling lonely and in need of feeling love, that’s what would make her feel complete. Emily is not complete because she feels lonely and unloved after the death of her father. Emily need to be healed from feeling lonely by love. “Then we noticed that in the second pillow was the indentation of a head.” (A Rose For Emily By William Faulkner, page 8). Which means that she might have been injured, and she wanted to restore her injury because she thought that he will leave her, so she made sure he stay with her in the house for the rest of her life in her own way.

Posted by: Ahmed Almoailu at October 31, 2014 02:55 PM

Martin J Terrasi Matt Weller
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
31 October 2014

Question: William Faulkner’s short story “A Rose for Emily”(1930). How is narcissism represented in this story, if at all? Think Agathon. Explain fully. Answer in your own words, but use quoted and cited passages from the text to support your answer.

Answer: Narcissism is seen throughout the story in that almost everything Emily does after her father’s death is for herself. From refusing to believe her farther is dead and holding on to his corps long after she should because she is not ready to move on from the only person she had and could rely on. She puts the town’s people through the cycle all because she refused to understand and accept he is dead. Even when it comes to the taxes that she was once given a release from, when the town again tries to collect she simply deny she owes anything. ‘"See Colonel Sartoris. I have no taxes in Jefferson."’ (Faulkner p.2) . Everything she does was to put herself first weather lifestyle or emotionally.

Posted by: Martin Terrasi Matt Weller at October 31, 2014 03:02 PM

Shelby Rexroth & Gabby Navarro
ENG210 CA02
October 31st, 2014


27) William Faulkner’s short story, “A Rose for Emily” (1930) How is the love of “Beauty,” with a capital “B” represented in this story, if at all? Think Socrates and Diotima. Explain fully. Answer in your own words, but use quoted and cited passages from the text to support your answer.

The love of “Beauty” is represented in the story because in the beginning of the story, she was happy, beautiful, outgoing and represented as a white rose. After her father passed, she became a dark, ugly, lonely person and then once she hit her 30’s, she was still considered to be a dark person and there was no coming back for her.

Posted by: Shelby Rexroth at October 31, 2014 03:09 PM

Antonella Aviles and Sharonda S Byrd
English 210 Love and Desire
Professor Hobbs
October 31, 2014

“A Rose for Emily”

Question: How is commonly love depicted in this story, if at all? How is heavenly love depicted in this story, if at all? Think Phaedrus and Pausanias.

Answer: Miss Emily was known for being a sought after bachelorette that many men wanted to marry but her father turned them all down. Therefore the only man that Emily could love was her father. With that being said, Colonel Sartoris death affected her extremely and she was left alone. Homer Barron was well known by his social skills and reputation. They spent a lot of time together even after his declaration: “he liked men, and it was known that he drank with the younger men in the Elks Club--that he was not a marrying man.” (Faulkner, 5). Emily was free to see who she pleased after her father’s death hence she was dating Homer who was seen as a means of distraction or commonly love. In the end, it is evident that she killed him from poison but he had a strand of her hair in his corpse which says that she slept there even though he was dead. This evidence shows that this relationship could have been heavenly love if Emily wasn’t mentally ill and Homer was a respectable man.

Posted by: Antonella Aviles and Sharonda Byrd at October 31, 2014 03:23 PM

Emily Finck and Irma Sera
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
3 November 2014


Question #28:
William Faulkner’s short story “A Rose for Emily” (1930). Of all the types of love discussed thus far in this course, which variety is the most/best represented? Explain fully. Answer in your own words, but use quoted and cited passages from the text to support your answer.


Answer:
In William Faulkner’s short story “A Rose for Emily” the two types of loves best represented are commonly and the desire for wholeness. For example, commonly love is shown from Miss Emily for her father. Emily’s commonly love for her father is expressed by her lack of “grieving” and “denial” for her father’s passing (Faulkner 4). Once she was finally able to come to terms with his passing, she expressed commonly love for his absence and not for his character, for he was the only person she had any real contact. In order to replace her father, Miss Emily “married” Homer Barron in order to give her a sense of wholeness (5-6).

Posted by: Emily Finck at November 3, 2014 11:33 AM

Antonella Aviles and Sharonda S Byrd
English 210 Love and Desire
Professor Hobbs
October 31, 2014
“A Rose for Emily”
Question: How is commonly love depicted in this story, if at all? How is heavenly love depicted in this story, if at all? Think Phaedrus and Pausanias.
Answer: Miss Emily was known for being a sought after bachelorette that many men wanted to marry but her father turned them all down. Therefore the only man that Emily could love was her father. With that being said, Colonel Sartoris death affected her extremely and she was left alone. Homer Barron was well known by his social skills and reputation. They spent a lot of time together even after his declaration: “he liked men, and it was known that he drank with the younger men in the Elks Club--that he was not a marrying man.” (Faulkner, 5). Emily was free to see who she pleased after her father’s death hence she was dating Homer who was seen as a means of distraction or commonly love. In the end, it is evident that she killed him from poison but he had a strand of her hair in his corpse which says that she slept there even though he was dead. This evidence shows that this relationship could have been heavenly love if Emily wasn’t mentally ill and Homer was a respectable man.

Posted by: sharonda byrd at November 3, 2014 02:50 PM

Zailet Martinez and Allison Ward
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210 CL Love and Desire in Literature
27 October 2014

Question 20:
What is the chief conflict of this story? First, you must note any and every conflict (there could be several) before you can decide on the main conflict. The main conflict is the one that, if it went away, so would all the others. Frame the conflict as ____ vs. ____; e.g., “man vs. man,” “man. vs. self,” man. vs. nature,” “man vs. god,” “jack vs. jill,” “the upper class vs. the lower class,” “race vs. race,” “the old vs. the young,” etc. Think dichotomies! Explain fully. Answer in your own words, but use quoted and cited passages from the text to support your answer.

Answer:
The chief conflict of the story is that everyone disliked Emily and talked bad about her. The quote, “Miss Emily had been a tradition, a duty, and a care; a sort of hereditary obligation upon the town” implies the conflict as being Emily vs. the world. Emily’s house was the old and it smelled bad. It was like the haunted house in the neighborhood. The house was falling apart into a decay as Emily was. Colonel Sartoris invented an “involved tale to the effect that Miss Emily's father had loaned money to the town.” For this is the reason everyone tries to harass Emily for since “only a man of Colonel Sartoris' generation and thought could have invented it, and only a woman could have believed it. Everyone is after her money, including the guy she was supposed to marry but mysteriously disappeared.

Posted by: Zailet Martinez & Allison Ward at November 3, 2014 08:53 PM

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