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January 30, 2012

Eudora Welty - Wearing Away Paths


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Class,

In the comment box below,

. . . the note-taker/scribe from each group should retype the question your group discussed today in class and provide an answer with quotations from the text to support your answers. You MUST put the page number (or, paragraph number if there are no page numbers) in parentheses after any quotation used.

Enter your work on this text as prescribed in class. For example:

Remember: I have to "approve" all comments so you won't see it immediately after posting. After hitting submit, you should see a screen that confirms this.

We are beginning to use some concepts in our discussions that you may or may have had practice using before. I want to be sure that you have a clear understanding of the words we use in class (no more blank stares!) so be sure you are looking up words you don't feel you yet "own" (means, making it a part of your personal vocabulary) by utilizing your dictionaries to the fullest.

~Dr. Hobbs

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To see other English-Blog entries on the subject of Literature, please click HERE.

Posted by lhobbs at January 30, 2012 11:59 PM

Readers' Comments:

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Students of 2008,

If you are submitting to this blog post for your final exam, remember to add a few comments (after a line separator) at the END of your entry after the works cited (should be the FINAL, not first, revision of your term paper) explaining why this post was one of the most appropriate to your paper's topic/thesis. Don't forget that you need to do this for two blog entries and you need to submit a paragraph informing me of which two blog entries you submitted to and an explanation why to turnitin.com. All of these steps need to be completed to get credit for the final exam.

Good luck,

Dr. Hobbs

"Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire." ~ William Butler Yeats

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Hallie Geary
Dr. Lee Hobbs, PhD.
El267.01
30 April 2008

Revealing Equal Ethnicities in
Jerzy Kosinski’s The Painted Bird and Eudora Welty’s “A Worn Path”

The history of mankind often shows a powerful ethnicity subjugating a weaker ethnicity. Most of the time, the more powerful ethnicity is portrayed as more civilized and technologically advanced, while the weaker ethnicity is uncivilized and backwards. Often the more powerful ethnicity will assume or try to prove a natural superiority to the subjugated ethnicity. This is the case in both Jerzy Kosinski’s The Painted Bird and Eudora Welty’s “A Worn Path.” Both of these stories reveal a definite difference in the power of two ethnicities; however, both also reveal equality between the two by contrasting their views on civility and religion, and by the different outcomes of the main character’s journey.

The most contrasting ethnicities in Kosinski’s story are the rural peasants that the narrator lives with to the Kalmuks and the Red/Soviet army that he meets up with. The first similarity between the two classes is their levels of civility. The author, in a prologue to the book, describes the peasants as, “ignorant and brutal, though not by choice,” (Kosinski 4). This is a fundamental characterization of the class, because the peasants have no choice but to be ignorant and brutal because of the world they live in. It is more difficult to blame them for acting like animals when they have no opportunity for betterment and no idea that their actions are wrong. The Kalmuks, on the other hand, appear as “proud horsemen” with uniforms and guns at their disposal (Kosinski 176). They seem to have had the opportunity to choose a different path, but instead chose to “loot and rape in the manner of their war customs and manly traditions,” (175). The Kalmuks have the means change and civilize themselves, but lack the will to do so. Despite their technology, the more powerful and advanced Kalmuks certainly are not more civilized than the peasants, shown by the fact that the Kalmuks burst into town to rape, pillage, and murder the peasants in the most gruesome, humiliating, and painful manner they can think of (Kosinski 175-181). As a final contrast, the also technologically advanced Red Army appears and drives off the Kalmuks. The Red Army takes the narrator in and cares for him, even teaching him to read (Kosinski 181-186). The Red Army appears to be far more civilized than the peasants or the Kalmuks, but that sense of civilization proves to be shallow. When local villagers kill friends of Mitka, a legendary sharpshooter in the Red army, he shows that the same instincts that drive the villagers are present in the civilized armies by shooting and killing several random members of the village (Kosinski 200-205). Despite the rules and manners of the army, Mitka’s human nature takes control and calls for blood to revenge his fallen comrades. So, despite the different levels of technology and power, the three groups show equality in their true nature. The more powerful and advanced ethnicities are better able to conceal their savage nature, but they are also capable of far more damage when it is revealed.

The ethnical conflict in “A Worn Path” is between the Negro main character, Phoenix, and the white characters. Phoenix seems to be less civilized even at her first appearance, where she is wearing a “long apron of bleached sugar sacks,” and has “unlaced shoes,” (Welty 1). It is obvious from the description that Phoenix is fairly poor, which is confirmed later when she receives charity from the hospital (Welty 7). During her journey, Phoenix is attacked by a dog then saved by a white hunter. The white man helps her and the two exchange civil conversation (Welty 4), but this interaction soon proves to be as shallow as Kosinski’s portrayal of civility. Phoenix repays the white hunter by stealing a nickel that fell out of his pocket and the hunter lies and tells her that he would give her a dime if he had any money (Welty 4-5). Again both sides prove to be equally immoral and abandon the code of civility when it benefits them. Although these circumstances are far less drastic than in The Painted Bird and so the infraction seems to be less, the return to immorality is actually much more significant here because it is not a matter of survival but a matter of personal gain. Neither person is in circumstances that mandate any means for survival, so the deviation from civility is actually more drastic because it is unnecessary. Their infraction is worse because it is less needed, whereas Kosinski creates a story that requires brutality for survival.

Another difference between the two ethnicities in The Painted Bird is their views on religion. The peasants are extremely superstitious, even going as far as to rely on witch doctor like Olga for medicinal treatment (Kosinski 17-19). Their view of the Roman Catholic Church is not much better and, instead of learning and practicing the morals of the church, they attempt to gain exemption for sin by uttering prayers and only avoid sin for fear of God’s vengeance. The importance of the church and its ceremonies are just as obsessively strict and paranoid as the rest of the superstition, and even the smallest mistakes in the ritual of the church warrant a swift and severe punishment (Kosinski 130-142). The Red Army, on the other hand, places no faith in any God or superstition. As atheists, they place all their confidence in “The Party” which gains superhuman and almost God-like powers and control. Instead of God judging lives and deciding morality, The Party took the place of religion (Kosinski 187-195). Both rely on an obsessive order to attempt to gain control over their chaotic lives. The Reds, because there is some order to their lives, attempt to take all the control of their lives into their own hands. The peasants, whose lives are short and filled with violence, know they have no control over what happens to them and place all the power into a God or superstition. They try to find a reason for the misfortune that is a constant part of their lives and to control it by appeasing the deity that makes it happen. Both ethnicities are seeking the same thing, but because of a difference in power they seek it in different ways.

In “The Worn Path,” Phoenix shows the same kind of superstition in her journey as she speaks to herself, possibly asking a higher power to “Keep the big wild hogs out of my path. Don’t let none of those come running my direction,” (Welty 1). Throughout her journey, Phoenix talks to herself, animals, and any object she comes up against (Welty 1-3). Phoenix’s life is similar to that of the peasants from Kosinski’s story in that she spends much of her time in the forest, so she is aware of how often things happen by chance. Because she knows how chaotic and brutal the world and be and how little power humans truly have over it, Pheonix knows she cannot control her own fate, so she places control of her life into the hands of God or fate. The white nurses at the hospital, on the other hand, put faith only in their ritual and order. They are the most concerned with being able to fit Phoenix into a category, repeatedly asking her if she wants charity. One nurse recognizes Phoenix and asks about the grandson, then emotionlessly asks if he has died (Welty 6-7). Although they do not use superstition, the nurses rely on order to keep control over their lives and become agitated when Phoenix will not immediately fit into that order. In this story, like Kosinski’s, both ethnicities use ritual to maintain the illusion of control over their lives, with the weaker ethnicity praying to a higher power for protection and the stronger ethnicity using order to maintain control over life.

A final similarity between the two stories is in the journey of the narrator. Both stories show the narrator making a journey out of his/her and ethnicity to journey the territory of another ethnicity. The main difference between the two stories in this area is that in The Painted Bird the narrator is unable to return home. At the end, the boy returns to his family, but has been too affected by the his travels and growing up in savage lands to accept what his parents offer him, and he constantly slips out at night to return to the type of savage existence he has become accustomed to. Only returning him partially to the savage wilderness he grew up in allows him to find a kind of peace (Kosinski 231-234). Now that the narrator knows the true nature of man, he cannot accept the farce of civilization even in his own family.

In “The Worn Path,” on the other hand, Phoenix is able to successfully make her trip through the land of the white ethnicity, overcome her own lapse in memory, and return to her grandson with a resolve never to forget him again (Welty 6-8). Unlike in The Painted Bird, Phoenix is able to overcome her flawed human nature because of the love she has for her grandson. While the other narrator has great difficulty accepting the return to his family and his own ethnicity, Phoenix is happy to return to her grandson and leave the world of the white man behind. Both narrators have seen the true nature of humans, but only Pheonix is able to return to society and the love of her grandson. Kosinksi’s narrator is too altered by his experiences to find any bond with his family. Both narrators are changed by their journey, but Kosinki’s narrator is altered to reject his former home, while Pheonix resolves never to forget hers again. Both characters see the flaws of the other society along with the flaws of their own, but only Pheonix is able to accept the flaws of her own society and live there despite them.

Both of these stories show great conflict between ethnicities, and they also show great contrast between the habits of the ethnicities. However, in both stories the faults of one ethnicity are balanced by the same kind of faults in the other. Both authors show that the ethnicities are seeking the same ideas of comfort and safety, but their different levels of technology and power force them to seek it in different places. On the whole, both authors represent the ethnicities as superficially different, but equally savage at the core. The Painted Bird shows a humanity that is controlled completely by self-interest, and the narrator of that story is unable to accept the lie that civilization tries to give to him. “The Worn Path” shows humanity as being driven by self-interest but tempered by love, and so Phoenix is able to return home. Both stories, however, show humans as flawed creatures that easily fall into sin. Ethnicity may change what people use to fulfill their needs, but it cannot change the savage self-interest that resides in human beings.

Works Cited

Kosinski, Jerzy. The Painted Bird. New York: Grove Press, 1976.

Welty, Eudora. “A Worn Path.” 1940. An excerpt from An Introduction to Literature: Fiction, Poetry, Drama. Eds. Morton Berman, et al. Addison, 1996. 105-112.

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I felt that I should put my paper in this section even though I know my paper looks at The Painted Bird a lot more than it does this work simply because of how much longer the novel is in comparison. However, I think it's important to point out all the similarities there are between a novel and a short story like this one, which I did in my paper. I think you can get a lot more from a short story by looking at it like you would a novel (looking at the characterization and plot) than you would by looking at it like a fable or myth (looking for the point or moral). So I put my paper here instead of under ethnical conflicts because, while my paper might not have a ton to say about the short story, I think I use a style of looking at the short story that is important to see.

Posted by: HGeary at April 30, 2008 08:47 PM

Amanda Farabaugh
Prof. Lee Hobbs
American Literature 1915-Present EL 267
30 April 2008
Perceiving the Natural Symbols within Texts
Nature plays a significant role in literature. It may be in the form of everyday obstacles such as the trees, animals, wind and destructive forces. It is also in the form of natural symbolism, as well as perception verses reality. Within two texts, Eudora Welty “A Worn Path” and Metallica “One”, there is natural symbolism that is present, as well as the idea of perception verses the reality. Things found in the texts have different meanings then what the eye notices. Through ones travels through life, the daunting task of perceiving the truth is influenced by nature’s existence in a literature text.
Natural symbolism is an idea that represents something in a story that either comes from nature or something that surrounds us. Within two texts, natural symbolism and perception verses reality will be defined and explained to the fullest. In Eudora Welty’s, “A Worn Path”, the worn path symbolizes Phoenix Jackson’s life because of the long path Phoenix Jackson has to travel, symbolizing her life’s journey as she ages and must go through. During her journey she travels a long cold path into town for medicine that her grandson needs. She will do whatever it takes get the medicine.
On her journey the heroine, Phoenix Jackson, demonstrates that her love for her grandson is stronger than the obstacles that are put upon her. Her love for her grandson is stronger than the obstacles because throughout her journey she had only one thing in mind, to get the medicine so her grandson will become better.
One natural symbolism in the story is Phoenix’s love of life. The heroine speaking towards the animals of the forest, to not be in her way; demonstrates it;
“Out of my way, all of you fox, owls, beetles, jack rabbits, coons and wild animals!.. Keep out from under these feet, little bobwhites. . . Keep the big wild hogs out of my path. Don’t let none of those come running my direction. I got a long way” (“A Worn Path”, Welty, 1).
Within this quotation, the reader may understand that obstacles are no matches for her. Even though she is described as being old, she is like a phoenix. She is a symbol of keeping peace within the forest. From dancing with the scarecrow to drinking water from a well that’s been there before her time, is another example of natural symbolisms. It is representing how the well and the water is symbolizes her long life.
Phoenix Jackson’s name is a symbol of the bird the phoenix. These are birds that are reincarnated after death. They are strong fierce birds like Phoenix Jackson. She is a fierce woman who is on a journey for her loved one. Everything around her emphasizes natural symbols. For example, Phoenix Jackson says, “Seem like there is chains about my feet, time I get this far”, “Something always take a hold of me on this hill-pleads I should stay”(“A Worn Path”, Welty, 1). This is a natural symbolism as her body is very old and weak and that this hill is a hard climb for an elderly woman. Even though there is nothing visible in reality holding, the hill represents life being too difficult to climb, but nothing will stop her.
One page two of Welty’s “A Worn Path”, more natural symbolisms can be found. For example, “Big dead trees, like black men with one arm . . .” “There sat a buzzard” (“A Worn Path”, Welty, 2). The buzzard alone is also a symbol for death, but sitting on the dead tree emphasizes the symbolism of death. Buzzards are nasty creatures that one may think of as a flesh eating bird that follows death. When something dies, buzzards appear before the animals ready to eat and take the life and soul that had been left. To be perched on a dead tree is a symbol for the death surrounding her. The forest has death throughout.
When Phoenix reaches the city, she hears bells ringing, which naturally symbolizes her journey (Natural Symbols and Symbolism in Eudora Welty's A Worn Path). Seeing red, green and silver wrapping is opposite of what she’s used to back home. She journey’s through dark and dreary woods and enters a bright and lively town.
The idea of perception verses reality in “A Worn Path” by Eudora Welty, shows even though obstacles were put in front of Phoenix Jackson, she does not stop to interpret why these obstacles were trying to stop her. She only knew that they were there and no matter what it took or how long it took, she was going into town for her grandson’s medicine. Her love of life and her grandson keeps her trekking into town for the medicine. In her reality, she has a sick grandson who is back at home waiting for her and the medicine. The perception of her old age is not the case; in actuality her old age does not stop her in any way shape or form. Her eyesight changes her perception of the real world that is in front of her; “Her eyes were blue with age” (“A Worn Path”, Welty, 1).
“One” by the band Metallica, is lyrics that describe a man who had his life taken from him due to an outside force-nature of warfare, bombs being deployed and death surrounding. The nature of warfare, according to lines 33-39, has taken the man’s sight, speech, hearing, arms, legs, soul and according to him, his life. A natural symbolism in the text is when James Ulrich writes, “Back in the womb it’s much too real” (“One”, Metallica, 1). It’s a natural symbolism that explains not being able to walk, move your arms, speak and even see; it is representing how a baby feels in the womb. This is where an unborn baby does absolute nothing only receiving life through the tube/umbilical cord. Just like how an unborn baby is being kept alive through the tube, so is this man in Metallica lyrics. He is only alive due to the “machines that make me be” (“One”, Metallica, 1). To be kept alive only with machines is the torture to him, he’d rather let God take him then live the way he is.
“Landmine has taken . . .” is a lyric that refers to how nature of warfare is surrounded by pain, misery, and even death (“One”, Metallica, 1). A landmine has taken parts of him that he can never get back, except the landmine has left his life. Death is what this man wants God to do for him, “Oh God, Help me” . . . “Hold my breath as I wish for death” (“One”, Metallica, 1). He is not strong like Phoenix Jackson and his love for life is weakened as he thinks of how War has taken everything from him. With Phoenix Jackson, she knew that her grandson depended on her to make that long journey and return home with medicine, whereas this man has no love for life or anyone else, he would rather die than be kept alive through the machines.
Another natural symbolism is found within the text where James Hatfield writes, “That there is nothing left of me” (“One”, Metallica, 1). This is a symbol of his body being without limbs, his hearing, eyesight and even speech. According to this man, there is nothing left of him but a piece of meat that just lies there unable to do anything.
James Ulrich writes “Darkness is imprisoning me” representing that darkness is an absence of life (“One”, Metallica, 1). Someone would see darkness being portrayed in a movie as having a feeling of horror or something bad is bound to happen to one of the characters. This also represents that death is making itself known.
He perceives that the world around him is gone, but in reality the world is still there and he is not the only one (“One, Metallica, 1). The perception to this man is that his life is over, “Now that the war is through with me” (“One”, Metallica, 1). “Cut this life off from me” explains that he perceives his life should be cut off due to his loss of everything except his life (“One”, Metallica, 1). He feels that since he has no way of communicating to the outside, his life should just end. Reality of his condition is that the man needs to understand he is still living and can be a part of the world as long as he understands that his life is not over, even though nature of warfare has “Taken my sight, Taken my speech, Taken my hearing, Taken my arms, Taken my legs” (“One”, Metallica, 1).
“A Worn Path” by Eudora Welty and “One” by Metallica, have natural symbolisms found inside. Many are quite easily found while others may take time and a bit of understanding. The nature of a text is what the author wants the readers to find. In Eudora Welty’s “A Worn Path”, the nature of the text knows that love is stronger than any obstacle thrown at Phoenix. Phoenix is in touch with reality but at the same time, she perceives the natural surroundings as her reality. In Metallica “One”, the nature of the text lets us know that a man perceives his life as lost and wants God to take him rather than face the reality he is still living in with the help of the machines (“One”, Metallica, 1). He’d rather perceive his life as lost than continue to live the way he is.
The characters in the texts are being tested by outside agents. These are outside agents that are trying to stop the characters from moving forward with their journey/life. Within Eudora Welty’s “A Worn Path” old age and disease to her grandson is trying to bring Phoenix Jackson down. Old age is intertwining itself within her bones trying to make her journey on the long path as difficult as possible. Her grandson’s disease is an outside agent that forces Phoenix to make the long uneasy journey.
Within Metallica “One”, was the bomb and warfare. The bomb has affected the man whereas he can never hear, speak, see and move again. Warfare is a symbol of death. When people enter war the result is death. Each of these outside agents has caused darkness to all characters. Natural Symbolism and perception verses reality are all ways of understanding the true existence of nature in a text.


Works Cited
Hatfield, James and Lars Ulrich. “One” . . .And Justice for All. CD. Elektra, 1998
Metallica.com. 2008. 5 March 2008. Albums/albums.asp?album_id=5>.
Natural Symbols and Symbolism in Eudora Welty's A Worn Path." 123HelpMe.com. 24 Apr
2008 .
Welty, Eudora. “A Worn Path.” 1940. An Introduction to Literature: Fiction, Poetry,
Drama. Eds. Morton Berman, et al. Addison, 1996. 105-112.


This analysis has been submitted to this blog because it is written about Eudora Welty’s short story, “A Worn Path”. This analysis looks into her story by perceiving the nature behind her text. The way Eudora Welty wrote her story has many symbolisms that relate to different things in the world. Within my paper I have examined many examples of her work and what they mean. I feel that my paper fits well under her heading because of the fact I wrote about her work and the fact that I took her writing and found the different meanings behind what she writes. I enjoyed her work and analyzing the true nature of her words.

Posted by: Amanda F. at May 1, 2008 09:34 PM

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*NOTE* The deadline for this particular assignment has now passed. Any comments listed below are *ONLY* for the reposting of comments that I specifically asked to be revised or are ones from non-student posters. Any 'student' posts below that missed the assignment deadline will not get credit for the assignment. ~ Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: Dr. Hobbs at May 6, 2008 10:52 AM

Alyssa R Davis
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA07
12 October 2014

Question #11:
In Eudora Welty’s short story, “A Worn Path,” what do the attendant’s pennies represent? In your own words, explain your response. You must use quoted passages from the actual text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer:
The attendant knew that Phoenix came from poverty. When she offered the five pennies, I think it was her way of trying to be nice and giving what she could to phoenix for her long journey all the way to town and also because the holiday was around. In the story, it says, “It’s Christmas time, Grandma,’ said the attendant. ‘ Could give you a few pennies out my purse?’ “The attendant knew that it was only Phoenix and her grandson and she knew they were poor. Giving Phoenix the pennies was her way of helping out.

Posted by: Alyssa Davis at October 12, 2014 01:14 PM

Roslyn Thomas
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 121 Academic Writing II
13 October 2014

Question #7:
SYMBOLISM. Why is “Phoenix” an appropriate name for the protagonist? Note where the author refers to birds. Considering the symbolic meaning of birds, how does the bird motif contribute to the development of meaning? As you reread, note any other motifs you discover. In your own words, explain your response. You must use quoted passages from the actual text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer:
Giving protagonist the name phoenix is ironic in a way because the definition of phoenix is a unique bird that lives for five or six centuries in the Arabian Desert. When the lady of the story is old and in her last few years, in the beginning of the story they give a description of her saying;
“She was very old and small and she walked slowly in the dark pine shadows, moving a little from side to side in her steps, with the balanced heaviness and lightness of a pendulum in a grand-father clock.” (Welty, p.1)
The meaning of it would be unique and the lady is unique from her old age.

Posted by: Roslyn Thomas at October 12, 2014 10:27 PM

Mickael Dodard
Dr Hobbs
Academic Writing II CA07
13 October 2014

Question #5
Much like a theme, a motif, a unifying element in a piece of literature, may be created through recurrent images, symbols, character types, themes or stylistic formulas. An author usually incorporates motifs to aid in the development of the primary theme of her story. As you red A Worn Path by Eudora Welty, note words that are associated with time. Why is the time motif signification to the development of Welty’s theme? In your own words, explain your response.

Answer
The sentences that are associated with time in the story are, “The time getting all gone here." (Welty 2) And "The time come around."(Welty 4). In those sentences, Welty tried to show the readers that time is an important factor in life and it shouldn’t be wasted. In many obstacles in the story, the author refers to time to make the readers remember that life is short and time is precious.

Posted by: Mickael Dodard at October 13, 2014 11:00 AM

Samantha Witte
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA07
October 13, 2014


QUESTION #8:
What does Natchez represent? Its oak trees? Its steeple and cabins? Its little children whirling around? Its paved streets?

ANSWER:
It represents innocence and youth. Phoenix talks about seeing young children running around at Christmas time and having fun. It causes her to think about her younger days, when she was not so old and forgetful. The man she meets in the woods is surprised to hear how long she had been walking and thinks that he “knows [them] old colored people! Wouldn’t miss going to town to see Santa Claus” (Welty 4). Believing in Santa Claus is associated with innocence, and giving young children the impression that all is good in the world. Young children are sheltered from the bad, much like how Natchez reminds her of younger and better days. Phoenix “smelled the wood smoke, and smelled the river, she saw a steeple and cabins on the steeple steps” (Welty 5). These are all descriptions that would make a person feel at home and gain a sense of comfort. She makes her trips there to remember the past and to give herself a break from the reality that she is not the same young little girl or even young mother that she used to be. It is a sense of security and hope that she finds when she gets there.

Posted by: Samantha Witte at October 13, 2014 01:02 PM

Danielle Kluender
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 CA07 Academic Writing II
12 October 2014

Question #4:
What is significant about Eudora Welty’s short story, “A Worn Path” being set in December, and during Christmas? In your own words, explain your response.

Answer:
It is significant that the story takes place in December because it shows what Phoenix really had to go through to get the medicine for her grandson. December is a very cold month as it explains in the story, “It was December- a bright frozen day in the early morning.” (Welty 1). Also, she wanted to get this medicine for her grandson as a gift to make him better.

Posted by: Danielle Kluender at October 13, 2014 01:15 PM

Rashard Knowles
Dr. B Lee. Hobbs
ENG122 Academic Writing CA07
13 October 2014

Question:
In Eudora Welty's short story, A Worn Path what is the significance of the title? In your own words, explain your response.

Answer:
The significance of the title in this story is just as simple is it sounds. Pheonix, the protagonist walks this long path regularly, facing the dangers of thw wild life, and in some cases dangers of racial conflicts. This in turn leads me to think the title may in some cases be saying that she's old and worn down by having to deal with these situations.

Posted by: Rashard Knowles at October 13, 2014 01:40 PM

Elizabeth Brown
ENG 122 Academic Writing II
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
13 October 2014

Question #13:
In Eudora Welty’s short story, “A Worn Path,” define the treatment Phoenix experiences in the clinic. Provide some rationale for it. Are there any thematic similarities between the incident with the attendant and the encounter with the scarecrow? In your own words, explain your response.
Answer:
In “A Worn Path,” Phoenix is treated as if she does not matter in the clinic. The attendant talks to her as if she is “deaf” (pg. 6 Welty). Phoenix refuses to respond to the attendant and is acting as the scarecrow did to her in the woods. The theme of “ghostliness” is prevalent and the similarities between herself and the ghost are almost exact. She acts hollow and cold toward the people at the clinic while the scarecrow does the same to her in the woods

Posted by: Elizabeth Brown at October 13, 2014 01:54 PM

Roslyn Thomas, Samantha Witte
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA07
Groupwork
October 13, 2014


QUESTION #17:
How does the description of Phoenix aid in the development of meaning?

ANSWER:
It tied together the meaning of her name to her life. It fully described who she was as a person, really emphasized how old she was. A phoenix is an old, legendary bird, and she is described as one who “moves….with the balanced heaviness and lightness of a pendulum in a grand-father clock” (Wetly 1). She is always going, even if it is not as fast anymore. A phoenix is a very proud bird, and she is described as having that strength and walking with confidence, even though her age has slowed her down a bit. She is proud of the life she has lived, and she knows that her time is becoming more and more limited with each passing day.

Posted by: Samantha Witte, Rosyln Thomas at October 13, 2014 01:58 PM

Justine Gonzalez, Trejon Baynham
Dr.Burgsbee Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II Ca07
13 October 2014

Question #16:
In Eudora Welty's short story,"A Worn Path," why does the nurse label Phoenix "stubborn"? Is she stubborn? In your own words, explain your response. You must use quoted passages from the actual text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer:
The nurse labels Phoenix stubborn because she’s annoyed with Phoenix and how long she takes to answer her questions. When the nurse asks about her grandson, Phoenix goes on and on and takes over to explain the problem. Phoenix is not stubborn, the reason she took so long to answer the question was because of her age and her bad memory. She explains to the nurse, “There I sat and forgot why I made my long trip,” her memory is bad (Welty 6).

Posted by: Justine Gonzalez at October 13, 2014 02:12 PM

Danielle Kluender, Zachary Gary
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 CA07 Academic Writing 2
13 October 2014

Question #23:
In Eudora Welty’s short story, “A Worn Path,” why will Phoenix buy her grandson a windmill?
In your own words, explain your response.
Answer:
She’s buying him a windmill for Christmas.(Welty 7) Basically she thinks the paper windmill is fragile, just like her grandson because he has a disease like asthma.
"I going to the store and buy my child a little windmill they sells, made out of paper. He going to find it hard to believe there such a thing in the world. I'll march myself back where he waiting, holding it straight up in this hand."

Posted by: Zachary Gary, Danielle Kluender at October 13, 2014 02:17 PM

Dr. B Lee. Hobbs
ENG122 Academic Writing CA07
13 October 2014
Question:
#20
Answer:
The significance of the nickel is that for one, the farmer hassled Pheonix for no apparent reason, so in a sense it was rather pay back. Also it showed that she was not stable financially stable because in these days a nickel want much, yet she cleverly hid the nickel until it was clear for her to pick it up.

Posted by: Rashard Knowles at October 13, 2014 02:23 PM

Alyssa R Davis & Elizabeth Brown
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA07
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
13 October 2014

Question #22:
In Eudora Welty’s story, “A Worn Path,” define the purpose of the brief bout of forgetfulness (from a literary point of view) that Phoenix experiences. In your own words explain your response.
Answer:
In Welty’s “A Worn Path” Phoenix briefs bout of forgetfulness acts as a flashback to wish she experienced with the scarecrow prior to her arrival at the clinic. On her way to the clinic she met a cold hollow scarecrow that wouldn’t respond to her so when she got to the clinic, her age caught up to her and she forgot who she was. “My grandson. It was my memory had left me. There I sat and forgot why I made my long trip,” said Phoenix, this quote shows that her grandson was the only thing that made her remember and she couldn’t remember why she had came (Welty Page 6).

Posted by: Alyssa Davis at October 13, 2014 07:21 PM

Shelby Rexroth
November 17th, 2014
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CA02

Question: 4) SETTING: What is significant about Eudora Welty’s short story, “A Worn Path” being set in December, and during Christmas? In your own words, explain your response.

Answer: The significance of Eudora’s Welty’s short story, “A Worn Path” being set in December, and during Christmas is that on her long journey, people were wondering why she was making such a trip during Christmas, but once she explained, she got a donation because of the holiday spirit of others. Also, with it being set during the holidays, Phoenix probably had thought that it was important to get the medicine for her grandson, which she considered a gift to save his life.

Posted by: Shelby Rexroth at November 17, 2014 08:14 PM

Thomas Watson
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
18 November 2014

QUESTION #13: In Eudora Welty’s short story, “A Worn Path,” define the treatment Phoenix experiences in the clinic. Provide some rationale for it. Are there any thematic similarities between the incident with the attendant and the encounter with the scarecrow? In your own words, explain your response.

ANSWER:
When Pheonix goes into the clinic, she was treated poorly. The attendant she first encountered was fairly rude to her with her comments. The attendant says to her, “A charity case, I suppose” then goes on to ask her frequent questions, then after she doesn’t respond the attendant’s last word to her was “Are you deaf”(Welty 6). Then, once the nurse that knows who Phoenix is rushes her in a sense. Here’s what she was thinking, “ “All right." The nurse was trying to hush her now”(Welty 7). However, there does seem to be an ongoing theme when Phoenix meets both the attendant and scarecrow. When she encounters both, she seems to be in a state of bewilderment due to her old age. She is unaware of what’s going on around her. With the scarecrow, for example, she thought it was a ghost at first and reached for it to see if it truly was. “"You scarecrow," she said. Her face lighted. "I ought to be shut up for good," she said with laughter. "My senses is gone. I too old. I the oldest people I ever know. Dance, old scarecrow," she said, "while I dancing with you."(Welty 3). When she first encounters the attendant she was called Grandma, and she has no idea what’s going on.

Posted by: Thomas Watson at November 18, 2014 02:49 PM

Irma Sera
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG. 210CL Love & Desire in Literature CA02
17 November 2014


Question #10 SYMBOLISM. In Eudora Welty’s short story, “A Worn Path,” what does the grandson represent? Why is it significant that he cannot speak? In your own words, explain your response. You must use quoted passages from the actual text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: The grandson in “A Worn Path” is the motivation for phoenix. Everything she does is for him, including her long journey to get him his medicine. The grandson also represents future generations to come for the family. He and his grandmother are the only ones in the family left alive and Phoenix seems very persistent in doing whatever she needs to do to make him better and most importantly, make him happy. “We is the only two left in the world. He suffer and it don't seem to put him back at all. He got a sweet look. He going to last. He wear a little patch quilt and peep out holding his mouth open like a little bird. I remembers so plain now. I not going to forget him again, no, the whole enduring time. I could tell him from all the others in creation” (Welty, page 7). This quote indicates that her love for her grandson is the reason behind setting out on such a voyage that would probably be too dangerous for someone her age.

Posted by: irma sera at November 18, 2014 10:36 PM

Zailet Martinez
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 201CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
18 November 2014

Question #11:
SYMBOLISM. In Eudora Welty’s short story, “A Worn Path,” What do the attendant’s pennies represent? In your own words, explain your response. You must use quoted passages from the actual text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer:
The pennies symbolize the opportunity and reward for the old lady Phoenix. She came all the way to town from the country to get medicine for her grandson. She had found a nickel that had fell of the pocket of someone she met along the way. The five pennies is what she needed to make her grandson happy, it would complete the necessary amount she needed to buy him a gift. ‘"This is what come to me to do," she said. "I going to the store and buy my child a little windmill they sells, made out of paper. He going to find it hard to believe there such a thing in the world. I'll march myself back where he waiting, holding it straight up in this hand."’ (Welty, 7). After she receives the nickel with complete the full ten cents she realizes the purpose to why she had come to town. She needed to buy her grandson a gift and that will truly will make him feel better, better than the medicine that does not seem to be helping.

Posted by: Zailet Martinez at November 19, 2014 12:20 AM

Emily Finck
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
19 November 2014


Question: #9
SYMBOLISM: In Eudora Welty’s short story, “A Worn Path,” what does Missy, the person who ties Phoenix’s shoelaces, represent? In your words, explain your response. You must use quoted passages from the actual text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.


Answer:
In the short story “A Worn Path,” by Eudora Welty. Missy the lady who ties Phoenix’s shoelaces represents the obligation to be charitable towards her. For example, Phoenix is known in the town for not being well off, as well as having to take care of her sick grandson. Thus, the townspeople, upon seeing Phoenix, stop to help her out when they can. Missy is just one of the physical representations of this obligation of charity. For instance, Phoenix says she reminds her of a “roses in hot summer” (Welty 5). Signifying Missy’s vulnerability to those in need because her being described as rose means that she is kind, warm, and compassionate.

Posted by: Emily Finck at November 19, 2014 12:07 PM

Gabriela Navarro
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
19 November 2014

QUESTION #3: Note clues that help you determine when and where the story takes place. What is the context of the story?

ANSWER:
The story takes place in 1940, which is the same year the U.S. entered WWII, and other wold conflicts began to take place. As Old Phoenix said, "Up through pines," she said at length. "Now down through oaks," she describes the area she is or should it be more explained as a path through the country side hills and forest. Phoenix Jackson's world is much smaller than the global world of international warfare. Her world revolves around her home, her grandson, and the rural life of Natchez, Mississippi.

Posted by: Gabriela Navarro at November 19, 2014 01:39 PM

Allison Ward
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
19 November 2014

Question# 7
Why is “Phoenix” an appropriate name for the protagonist? Note where the author refers to birds. Considering the symbolic meaning of birds, how does the bird motif contribute to the development of meaning? As you reread, note any other motifs you discover.

Answer
The author refers to birds at the beginning of the story. She talks about the narrator who is called Phoenix. She writes about what Phoenix looks like, her personality, and how she walks. Phoenix walks with a cane and the way she uses it sounds like, “a solitary little bird.”(Welty 1) The name “Phoenix” is appropriate for the narrator because of the way she was described. Phoenix seems to be one with nature. Phoenix is calm and embraces the world around her with grace.

Posted by: Allison Ward at November 19, 2014 01:52 PM

Rebecca Messano
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL
November 19, 2014

Question 5
What is the significance of the time motif in "A Worn Path"?

Answer
During Christmastime, she is making a long trip in order to get medicine for her grandson. This is her idea of a "gift" by saving his life. It is also significant because her grandson needs this medicine within a certain amount of time.

Posted by: Rebecca Messano at November 19, 2014 02:43 PM

Sharonda Byrd
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL CA02
17 November 2014

Question #15.

In Eudora Welty’s short story, “A Worn Path,” even though Phoenix is elderly, the white man treats her condescendingly, as if she were a child. Why do you think Welty does not give the man a name? What does he represent? What point might Welty be trying to make here?

In Worn Path when Phoenix and the man cross paths he obviously knows that she is old because he refers to her as Granny, but even though she is elderly he does not have to treat her like a child. He keeps telling her that she should just go home and he treats her like she has never been out in the world before. The man is also white so he kind of treats her with this attitude, for instance he says something about her going to see Santa Clause even though that is not what she is doing, and the man is disrespectful. The man represents white society and their stereotypes that they had during this time period. Welty’s’ point is that you really should never judge a book by its cover.

Posted by: Sharonda Byrd at December 9, 2014 11:09 PM

Emily Buckley
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
23 February 2015

Question: THEME/MOTIF. Much like a theme, a motif, a unifying element in a piece of literature, may
be created through recurrent images, symbols, character types, themes or stylistic formulas. An
author usually incorporates motifs to aid in the development of the primary theme of her story.
As you read “A Worn Path,” by Eudora Welty, note words that are associated with time. Why is
the time motif significant to the development of Welty’s theme? In your own words, explain
your response. You must use quoted passages from the actual text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: The time motif is significant because it highlights the honorable character of the main character. Phoenix makes this time-consuming journey for her grandson, it is very difficult for her to make even the young hunter says he would not make that journey unless he got something for his trip. “"Why, that's too far! That's as far as I walk when I come out myself, and I get something for my trouble." This emphasizes how difficult it would be for a very old woman to make this very long trip for her grandson’s medicine. “"Oh, that's just old Aunt Phoenix," she said. "She doesn't come for herself—she has a little grandson. She makes these trips just as regular as clockwork. She lives away back off the Old Natchez Trace." She bent down. "Well, Aunt Phoenix, why don't you just take a seat? We won't keep you standing after your long trip." She pointed.” She is concerned with her grandson waiting for her to get back with the medicine, so she pushes on and makes the trip; she is determined to do this for him. “"My little grandson, he sit up there in the house all wrapped up, waiting by himself," Phoenix went on.”

Posted by: Emily Buckley at February 27, 2015 12:57 PM

Mallory Delay
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
27 February 2015

Question 7: Why is "Phoenix" an appropriate name for the protagonist? Note where the author refers to birds. Considering the symbolic meaning of birds, how does the bird motif contribute to the development of meaning? As you reread, note any other motifs you discover.

Answer: "Phoenix" is an appropriate name for the protagonist because it symbolizes not only rebirth but longevity. Phoenix has lived a long time even mentioning to the hunter, "there is not telling, mister, no telling." (Welty 4) Birds symbolize the connection between heaven and earth. Phoenix is so old that there are times where her soul is about to be released, but she pushes it off as long as she can. There is a sentence in the story where "She was meditating, and not ready, and when he came at her only hit him a little with her cane." (Welty 3) The dog represents death and she not yet ready to leave the earth and become a "bird".

Posted by: Mallory Delay at February 27, 2015 02:50 PM

Kathleen Sholl
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA 12
27 February 15

“The Worn Path” Discussion Question

Question: What is the context of the story? In your own words, explain your response.

Answer: To define context, it means that the story gives information about the time when a piece of literature was written to help the readers understand the story better as a whole. The context of the story is before the civil rights era. I say this because the hunter says to Phoenix, “I know you old colored people” (Welty 4). Before the civil rights era, white people disrespected the blacks; therefore, the reader is able to tell that the context is before the 60’s in the south. “Far out in the country there was an old negro woman” (Welty 1).

Posted by: Kathleen Sholl at February 27, 2015 11:28 PM

Kaitlin Murphy
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
1 March 2015

Question: In Eudora Welty’s short story, “A Worn Path,” why will Phoenix buy her grandson a windmill? In your own words, explain your response.

Answer: In the short story, “A Worn Path,” Phoenix will buy her grandson a windmill because she now has two nickels, and since it’s around Christmas time, Phoenix wants to buy her grandson a windmill. “I going to the store and buy my child a little windmill they sells, made out of paper” (Welty 7). She wants her grandson to have something nice, so she wants to buy this for him to enjoy for Christmas.

Posted by: Kaitlin Murphy at March 1, 2015 06:48 PM

Amanda Cannon
Dr. Hobbs
ENC 122 Academic Writing II CA12
25 February 2015

A Worn Path
Question #11: In Eudora Welty’s short story, “A Worn Path,” what do the attendant’s pennies represent? In your own words, explain your response.
Answer: The attendant’s pennies were a gift to Phoenix, “It’s Christmas time, could I give you a few pennies (Welty 7)?” Phoenix was going to use the nickel she found and the nickel the attendant gave her, to buy a gift for her grandchild, "I’m going to the store to buy my child a windmill (Welty 7).” The symbolism would be that Phoenix received a gift, and she used it to buy her grandchild a gift.

Posted by: Amanda Cannon at March 1, 2015 08:56 PM

Selena Hammie
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing CA12
1 March 2015

“The Worn path”

Question #9: In Eudora Welty’s short story, “A Worn Path,” what does Missy, the person who ties Phoenix’s shoelaces, represent?

The woman who ties Phoenix’s shoelaces represents equality because Phoenix is an elderly black woman and Missy is a white woman who tied her shoe for her regardless of her race. "Do all right for out in the country, but wouldn't look right to go in a big building." "Stand still then, Grandma," said the lady. She put her packages down on the sidewalk beside her and laced and tied both shoes tightly. (Welty page 5)

Posted by: Selena Hammie at March 1, 2015 11:11 PM

Aderias Ewing
Dr. Hobbs
Academic Writing 2
2 March 2015
Q12 THEME. In Eudora Welty’s short story, “A Worn Path,” discuss secondary themes, including what the story tells readers about love and the nature of charity.
Resurrection- The phoenix was the bird in ancient mythology that rose from its own ashes every 500 years to begin a new life cycle.
Guilt- Phoenix feels guilty when she picks up the nickel that falls from the pocket of the white hunter.
Duty and Responsibility- Phoenix Jackson is mobilized by her sense of duty to her grandson. Because she is the only person her grandson has to rely on.
Her love and charity comes from: when the clinic employees remind her twice that hers is a charity case, expecting gratitude for what they give, they contrast sharply with Phoenix who dreams of and delights in bringing her grandson comfort and joy. In approaching true charity, in which love rather than self-praise is the motive.

Posted by: aderias ewing at March 2, 2015 12:18 AM

Emma Riemer
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
2 March 2015

A Worn Path

Question 8: SYMBOLISM. In Eudora Welty’s short story, “A Worn Path,” what does Natchez represent? Its oak trees? Its steeple and cabins? Its little children whirling around her? Its paved streets? In your own words, explain your response.

Answer:
All of these things represent the freedom that Phoenix has, an elderly black woman being able to walk into a city with black children running and playing in the streets. Natchez also symbolizes the journeys end. The oak trees shadows are like she is walking into another room, “the shadows hung from the oak trees to the road like curtains”(Welty 5). The shadow is a curtain that hangs over the entrance into the village.

Posted by: Emma Riemer at March 2, 2015 12:45 AM

Vallinique Martin
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
2 March 2015


Question: What is the significance of the title, “A Worn Path”?

Answer: “A Worn Path” describes the journey of an elderly black woman named Phoenix Jackson, who walks from her home to the city of Natchez to get medicine for her sick grandson. As she walks, she struggles with fatigue and poor eyesight, as well as such obstacles like thorn bushes and barbed wire. At one point in the story, she mistakes a scarecrow for a ghost. “At first she took it for a man. It could have been a man dancing in the field. But she stood still and listened, and it did not make a sound. It was as silent as a ghost. “Ghost," she said sharply, "who be you the ghost of? For I have heard of nary death close by.” But there was no answer--only the ragged dancing in the wind. She shut her eyes, reached out her hand, and touched a sleeve. She found a coat and inside that an emptiness, cold as ice. "You scarecrow," she said. Her face lighted. "I ought to be shut up for good," she said with laughter. "My senses is gone. I too old. I the oldest people I ever know. Dance, old scarecrow," she said, "while I dancing with you." (Welty 2-3)

Posted by: Vallinique Martin at March 2, 2015 02:13 AM

Rachel Addington
Dr. Hobbs
ENG122 Academic Writing II CA12
1 March 2015

Question: THEME. According to Perrine’s Literature, “[t]he theme of a piece of fiction is its controlling idea or its central insight. It is the unifying generalization about life stated or implied by the story. To derive the theme of a story, we must determine what its central purpose is: what view of life it supports or what insight into life it reveals.” Now that you have read Eudora Welty’s short story, “A Worn Path,” in a single well developed sentence, express the primary theme of the story, according to THIS definition (which differs from Edgar V. Roberts’s definition). In your own words, explain your response.
Answer: The primary theme in “A Worn Path” is courage and love because although Phoenix knew she was too old to travel and was losing her eyesight and memory she continued to go to town for her grandson without actually knowing. When encountered by the hunter with a gun she didn’t show fear she showed courage. “"Doesn't the gun scare you?" he said, still pointing it. "No, sir, I seen plenty go off closer by, in my day, and for less than what I done," she said, holding utterly still.” (Pg. 5) After visiting the nurse to get medicine for her grandson she went to go buy him a windmill to make him happy.

Posted by: Rachel Addinton at March 2, 2015 10:15 AM

Jorge Braham

Dr. Hobbs

Academic Writing II CA12

1 March 2015

Worn Path

Question:

SETTING. What is significant about Eudora Welty’s short story, “A Worn Path” being set in December, and during Christmas? In your own words, explain your response. You must use quoted passages from the actual text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer:

I would have to say that the setting of story is quite significant because there is a lot of meaning one would be that she travels great lengths to help his grandson out and during December it’s a time of love. “It was December—a bright frozen day in the early morning.” (Eudora Pg.1)

Posted by: Jorge braham at March 2, 2015 10:44 AM

Diego Garcia and Rously Paul
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
31 January 2015

Question: In Eudora Welty’s short story, “A Worn Path,” what is significant about the nickel? In your own words, explain your response.

Answer: The significant thing about the nickel is that she steals some of it and saves up the rest to eventually buy a paper windmill for her son at the end. The author tells us this when she says, "I going to the store and buy my child a little windmill they sells, made out of paper.” (Welty 7). The gift was for Christmas.

Posted by: Diego Garcia and Rouly Paul at March 2, 2015 11:03 AM

Amber Dunlap
Dr. Hobbs
ENG. 122 Academic Writing II
2 March 2015

Question:
In the short story “A Worn Path,” what does the grandson represent? Why is it significant that he cannot speak?

Answer:
The grandson was known for representing self-sacrifice and the generation worth sacrificing for. “My grandson, it was my memory had left me…” (Welty 6). The fact that he does not have a voice is significant because the black people were known not to have a voice, and because he could not talk, he had no one to talk to.

Posted by: Amber Dunlap at March 2, 2015 11:21 AM

Emily Buckley and Kaitlin Murphy
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
2 March 2015

Question: Describe the entry to the building in Eudora Welty’s short story, “A Worn Path.” What do the
stairs, its size, the golden document nailed to its door represent? In your own words, explain
your response. You must use quoted passages from the actual text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words

Answer: The building is big with a lot of steps going up to the entrance. There must be different offices in the ‘big’ building because Phoenix “Walked up and around and around until her feet knew to stop.” (Welty 5) The door had a document on it that was stamped with an official gold seal, and framed in a gold frame. Her dream was to finish her journey for her grandson and she finally made it to the end. “She entered a door, and there she saw nailed up on the wall the document that had been stamped with the gold seal and framed in the gold frame, which matched the dream that was hung up in her head.” (Welty 5) The actions Phoenix takes makes her like a Christ-like figure she makes this journey that is very difficult, for someone else that is helpless. She completed her journey and ‘accented into heaven,’ because she went up the stairs into the big building, and the gold could symbolize the riches of heaven. “She went into the big building, and into a tower of steps, where she walked up and around and around until her feet knew stop. She entered a door, and there she saw nailed up on the wall the document that had been stamped with the gold seal and framed in the gold frame, which matched the dream that was hang up in her head.” (Welty 5)

Posted by: Emily Buckley and Kaitlin Murphy at March 2, 2015 11:43 AM

Kathleen Sholl, Amber Dunlap, and Ian Urbaniak
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA 12
2 March 15

“A Worn Path” Group Discussion Question

Question 24: What is symbolic about Phoenix’s journey back in Eudora Welty’s short story, “A Worn Path”? In your own words, explain your response.

Answer: In the short story, “A Worn Path,” Phoenix’s journey is symbolic because she is an elderly woman who was “very old and small” (Welty 1) who completed a laborious adventure. She talks herself through each obstacle that she is faced with and is guided by her positive outlook on the situation saying things such as, “I wasn’t as old as I thought” (Welty 2). Even when people doubted her saying, “why, that’s too far” (Welty 4), she still kept going. She exemplifies power and dedication every time she pumps herself up, stating, “this is the easy place. This the easy going” (Welty 2). Not only does her journey symbolize her will power, but the elderly woman’s name is symbolic as well. Phoenix’s are mythical creatures that die in fire, but rise from the ashes and come out stronger than they once were. Therefore, her name represents a strong willed mythological creature, and the expedition she goes on proves her commitment. “I bound to go on my way, mister” (Welty 5).

Posted by: Kathleen Sholl, Amber Dunlap, and Ian Urbaniak at March 2, 2015 11:44 AM

Selena Hammie and Rachel Addington
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing CA12
2 March 2015

“A Worn Path”

Question #18: What do the following concepts from Eudora Welty’s short story, “A Worn Path” represent: eyes, barbed wire, the dress, withered cotton field, scarecrow, trees silver in their dead leaves? In your own words, explain your response.

In the short story, “A Worn Path” Phoenix’s eyes, the barbed wire, the dress, withered cotton field, scarecrow and the trees silver in their dead leaves all represent her aging through life. In the story, she is portrayed as a woman with life but she is elderly, “Her eyes were blue with age.” (Welty page 1) The barbed wire represents the obstacles she has to go through as she ages. ”There she had to creep and crawl, spreading her knees and stretching her fingers like a baby trying to climb the steps.” (Welty page 2) The dress represents how she goes through life and how she deals with her hardships, she did everything possible to keep the dress in one piece, “she could not let her dress be torn now.” (Welty page 2) The withered cotton field represents what she went through during the slavery days she had to undergo. The scarecrow and the trees in their dead leaves both represent death, she mistook a man for a scarecrow because he scared her and she says to him, “I ought to be shut up for good.”

Posted by: Selena Hammie at March 2, 2015 06:17 PM

Amanda Cannon and Aderias Ewing
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
2 March 2015

A Worn Path
Question #15: In Eudora Welty’s short story, “A Worn Path,” even though Phoenix is elderly, the white man treats her condescendingly, as if she were a child. Why do you think Welty does not give the man a name? What does he represent? What point might Welty be trying to make here?
Answer: In Welty’s story, the white hunter is a flat, static character. When he first encountered Phoenix, he helped her out of the ditch and conversed with her. He soon began to belittle her, telling her “Why, that’s too far! Now you go on home granny (Welty 4)!” He is an important character, but he was not important enough to have a name.

Posted by: Amanda Cannon at March 3, 2015 03:07 PM

Emma Riemer and Alison Colon
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
4 March 2015

A Worn Path Discussion


Question 17: In the first two paragraphs of Eudora Welty’s short story, “A Worn Path,” the author goes into great depth, in her description of Phoenix. How does the description of Phoenix aid in the development of meaning?

Answer:
Describing Phoenix in great depth aids the meaning of the story because she is an old woman making a long journey and she has done it many times for someone she loves. The meaning of the story is to show that love can bring one to do difficult things.

Posted by: Emma Riemer and alison colon at March 3, 2015 09:44 PM

Vallinique Martin and Jorge Braham
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
3 March 2015

Question: In Eudora Welty’s short story, “A Worn Path,” what point about human nature is Welty making through Phoenix’s encounter with the scarecrow?

Answer: When Phoenix first sees the scarecrow, she is unsure of what it is and assumes it is a ghost. At first, she took it for a man. It could have been a man dancing in the field. However, she stood still and listened, and it did not make a sound. It was as silent as a ghost. "Ghost," she said sharply, "who be you the ghost of? For I have heard of nary death close by.” (Welty 2). The job of a scarecrow is to scare away the black crows, which also symbolizes death. She dances with the scarecrow, as if they are celebrating the departure of death.

Posted by: Vallinique Martin at March 3, 2015 11:03 PM

Zekeriya Kayaselcuk

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA 09

October 8, 2015


Question: In Eudora Welty’s short story, “A Worn Path,” what is significant about the nickel? In your own words, explain your response.


Answer: When Phoenix met the hunter, he mocked the old lady based on her race. Phoenix was not too happy with the hunter’s jokes, but she realized a nickel dropped out of his pocket while he was dealing with the dogs. She picked up the nickel and scolded herself for stealing. “God watching me the whole time. I come to stealing." (Welty pg. 4). Although she stole the nickel, Phoenix probably felt justified for her action because the hunter was dishonest in return. “I’d give you a dime if I had any money with me.” (Welty pg. 5). The nickel meant something to Phoenix because she is a poor woman. Although the nickel would not affect the hunter; he is not in her condition. Toward the end of the story, the attendant offers the old lady a few pennies as charity. Phoenix replies, “Five pennies is a nickel” (Welty pg. 7). She receives the nickel and retrieves the other nickel from her pocket. Phoenix came to town because it was Christmas time; people would offer charity. All along, she needed a few coins to buy her grandson a little windmill. Without the coin, she would not have enough currency to buy the windmill.

Posted by: Zekeriya Kayaselcuk at October 8, 2015 01:38 AM

Maria Gonzalez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
08 October 2015

Question 9: In Eudora Welty’s short story, “A Worn Path,” what does Missy, the person who ties Phoenix’s shoelaces, represent? In your own words, explain your response. You must use quoted passages from the actual text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: Eudora Welty’s “A Worn Path” short story reveals the path that a grandmother, Phoenix, has made various times to receive the necessary medicine for her grandchild. When she arrives at the city of Natchez, the grandmother asks Missy, a girl whom she encounters in the street, to lace up her shoes. To understand what Missy represents, it is necessary to understand when the story takes place: in the years after the surrender of the South in the Civil War (Welty 7). When Phoenix asks Missy to lace up her shoes, Missy is annoyed, “What do you want Grandma” (Welty 5). But after Phoenix explains that she is from the country, Missy complies, “Stand still then, Grandma” (Welty 5). Therefore, Missy represents the white people who are not racist towards the blacks, or at least tolerate them and are willing to be helpful if asked.

Posted by: Maria Gonzalez at October 8, 2015 03:36 PM

Anayah McKenzie
Dr. Hobbs
English Academic Writing II
October 8, 2015

Question: THEME/MOTIF. Much like a theme, a motif, a unifying element in a piece of literature, may be created through recurrent images, symbols, character types, themes or stylistic formulas. An author usually incorporates motifs to aid in the development of the primary theme of her story. As you read “A Worn Path,” by Eudora Welty, note words that are associated with time. Why is the time motif significant to the development of Welty’s theme? In your own words, explain your response. You must use quoted passages from the actual text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words

Answer: Time is used as a motif to help develop Welty’s theme because time had a symbolic meaning which would hint at the theme in the story. Time shows that she had a goal that had to be accomplished. The elderly lady said to a hunter, "I bound to go to town, mister. The time come around." which supplies this evidence (Welty 4). Time is significant because it shows importance. Additionally, time could have been used to show death. When the walk first began she thought she saw a ghost and

Posted by: Anayah McKenzie at October 8, 2015 05:21 PM

Conner Knaresboro
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 Academic Writing II CA09
8 October 2015

Question: Why is "Phoenix, " an appropriate name for the protagonist? Note where the author refers to birds. Considering the symbolic meaning of birds, how does the bird motif contribute to the development of meaning? As you reread, note any other motifs you discover. In your words, explain your response. You must use quoted passages from the actual text to support the part of your answer that appears in your words.
Answer: Phoenix is the appropriate name for the protagonist because it is a bird and in this story the bird represents freedom. In the story, Phoenix lives free in the countryside." Far out in the country there was an old Negro woman with her head tied red rag, coming along a path through the pinewoods" (Welty 1). Also, the bird resembles a sign of God. Her hard journey to get her grandson's medicine is long and painful ""My little grandson, he sit up there in the house all wrapped up, waiting by himself," Phoenix went on. "We are the only two left in the world. He suffers and it doesn't seem to put him back at all" (Welty 7) just like the one Jesus did when carrying the cross and them both had helped. Phoenix had the young hunter, and Jesus had Simon. They both took the long on the long journey for someone else.

Posted by: Conner Knaresboro at October 8, 2015 06:02 PM

Hana Lee
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
8 October 2015

“Then there was something tall, black, and skinny there, moving before her. At first she took it for a man. It could have been a man dancing in the field. But she stood still and listened, and it did not make a sound. It was as silent as a ghost.” (Welty 2)
“She shut her eyes, reached out her hand, and touched a sleeve. She found a coat and inside that an emptiness, cold as ice. “You scarecrow,” she said. Her face lighted. “I ought to be shut up for good,” she said with laughter. “My senses is gone. I too old. I the oldest people I ever know. Dance, old scarecrow,” she said, “while I dancing with you.” (Welty 3)

Question #19: In Eudora Welty’s short story, “A Worn Path,” what point about human nature is Welty making through Phoenix’s encounter with the scarecrow?

Answer: The point of human nature that Welty made through Phoenix’s encounter with the scarecrow is that it was depicted as alternately beautiful and as impediment to Phoenix’s progress. Phoenix perceived the landscape as a primary focus of the vividly evoked narrative.

Posted by: Hana Lee at October 8, 2015 07:24 PM

Shyiem-Akiem Brown
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
7 October 2015

SETTING. What is significant about Eudora Welty’s short story, “A Worn Path” being set in December, and during Christmas? In your own words, explain your response. You must use quoted passages from the actual text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: The main reason, in my opinion, that the author chose the setting of Christmas for this story is because this season brings to mind the virtues of love and self-sacrifice. Phoenix Jackson’s unselfish journey into the town to get medicine for her grandson’s throat is a perfect example of self-sacrifice. "Oh, that's just old Aunt Phoenix," she said. "She doesn't come for herself—she has a little grandson. She makes these trips just as regular as clockwork. She lives away back off the Old Natchez Trace." (Welty 6).

Posted by: Shyiem-Akiem Brown at October 8, 2015 11:16 PM

Michael Mooney
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
9 October 2015
Question: In Eudora Welty’s short story, “A Worn Path,” even though Phoenix is elderly, the white man treats her condescendingly, as if she were a child. Why do you think Welty does not give the man a name? What does he represent? What point might Welty be trying to make here? In your own words, explain your response.
Answer: Along her journey, Phoenix Jackson encounters a young hunter who helps her after she falls into a crevice. The young man (specified by Welty as a young white man), despite helping Phoenix, is very critical and condescending towards her. Specifically, of her race and age, “He gave another laugh, filling the whole landscape. ‘I know you old colored people! Wouldn't miss going to town to see Santa Claus!’” (Welty 4). The hunter constantly picks at Phoenix for her age, not knowing the obstacles she faces on her way to town to get medicine for her nephew (including a barbed wire fence, wild animals, and of course the weather). The man, an unnamed flat character, is a walking stereotype. He is unwise, racist, and lacks any compassion or care for others outside his station (and, as evidenced by pointing his gun at Phoenix, lacks common sense) and simply serves as an obstacle made to remind Phoenix of her “place in the world” as an old African American woman, “you must be a hundred years old, and scared of nothing. I'd give you a dime if I had any money with me. But you take my advice and stay home, and nothing will happen to you." (Welty 5). The man’s place in the story, however, can be up to speculation. The most obvious is that he is simply a reminder of the racism and misunderstandings of the times (post-civil-war America). Additionally, he can represent a lack of insight. It is true that Phoenix is an old woman, but despite her age and frailty she has made the journey dozens of times, not for her own gain but for the sheer love of her nephew.

Posted by: Michael Mooney at October 9, 2015 10:02 AM

Sidnee Yaeger
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
9 October 2015

Question: SETTING/CONTEXT. As you reread Eudora Welty’s short story, “A Worn Path,” note clues that help you determine when and where the story takes place. What is the context of the story? In your own words, explain your response. You must use quoted passages from the actual text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: One of the lines in the story is “Away back yonder”, talking like the story is taking place in the South probably near the 1940’s, around the time when the story was written (Welty 4). Later in the story it says, “There ahead was Natchez shining”, Natchez is a town in Mississippi (Welty 5). Mississippi was where the story was takin place, but it was not only in Natchez, it was also placed in the country, “Far out in the country…” (Welty 1).

Posted by: Sidnee Yaeger at October 9, 2015 11:02 AM

Brittany Cordero
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
9 October 2015

Question: In Eudora Welty’s short story, “A Worn Path,” what is the significance of the title? In your own words, explain your response.

Answer: The worn path is a symbol of "an old
Negro woman with her head tied red rag," who is Phoenix. The path is her journey and her life. She travels down the same path and becomes very familiar with it. It is her never changing journey.

Posted by: Brittany Cordero at October 9, 2015 01:20 PM

Lawrence Watt
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
9 October 2015

Question: In Eudora Welty’s short story, “A Worn Path,” what does the grandson represent? Why is it significant that he cannot speak? In your own words, explain your response.

Answer:In Eudora Welty’s short story “A Worn Path,” Phoenix’s grandson represents her spirit, her will and determination to go into town and get the medicine that is needed to keep her grandson alive. She is old, she is frail, and she is poor but she continues to live strongly because of her grandson, she lives through him and for him. As she says in the story “We are the only two left in the world” (Welty 7). This just goes to prove how she sees life. She sees it as her and her grandson against everyone else. Also is shows how the grandson represents her spirit, her will, and her purpose by claiming that her and her grandson are the only things that matter in the world.

Posted by: Lawrence Watt at October 9, 2015 01:22 PM

Necdet Gurkan
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA09
09 September 2015

Question: Now that you have read Eudora Welty’s short story, “A Worn Path” in a single well developed sentence, express the primary theme of the story, according to this definition. In your own words, explain your response.

Answer: The theme of “A Worn Path” is strength in the face of adversity. It is transmitted from the third-person point of view, giving the reader just adequate distance from the key character and her battle to see features of conflict that she does not. The plot is driven by Phoenix Jackson, an old woman who travels an acquainted trail through the woods to town during Christmas. She is in a urgency to get drug for her grandson and reappearance to him, and she faces many problems over the sequence of the trip. The tightness of the story stems from the obstacles she encounters, which come from nature, society and herself, including barbed wire, a dog, a white hunter, and memories or illusions that involve her grandson.

Posted by: Necdet Gurkan at October 9, 2015 02:13 PM

Peyton Farrier
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II
9 October 2015

Question:In Eudora Welty's short story, "A Worn Path," why does the nurse label Phoenix "stubborn"? Is she stubborn? In your own words, explain your response.

Answer: The nurse labels Phoenix stubborn because she keeps asking Phoenix questions that she won't respond to. "Phoenix only waited and stared straight ahead, her face very solemn and withdrawn into rigidity" (Welty 6). Phoenix only sits and waits but doesn't respond to the nurse until she asks if her grandson is dead. The nurse tries to carry on a conversation with her but she doesn't respond to anything even though she asks her the same questions over and over again.

Posted by: Peyton Farrier at October 9, 2015 02:21 PM

Jorge Braham
Dr. Hobbs
ENG-122 Academic Writing II CA09
9 October 2015

Question:
What is symbolic about Phoenix’s journey back in Eudora Welty’s short story, “A Worn Path”? In your own words, explain your response. You must use quoted passages from the actual text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.
Answer:
In Phoenix journey back the symbolism of it was that she bought the windmill because in the beginning of the story her wish was to buy something for her grandson and when she had the money to do so she bought him a windmill and she said to herself ""This is what come to me to do," she said. "I going to the store and buy my child a little windmill they sells, made out of paper. He going to find it hard to believe there such a thing in the world. " (Welty 7) As soon as she had bought the windmill, Phoenix walked back with the same attitude as she had before when she first left to go get her grandson Medicine.

Posted by: Jorge Braham at October 9, 2015 03:04 PM

Jacie Dieffenwierth
Dr. Hobbs
ENG122 Academic Writing II CA09
9 October 2015

Question 11

Question: In Eudora Welty’s short story, “A Worn Path,” What do the attendant’s pennies represent? In your own words, explain your response. You must use quoted passages from the actual text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: The pennies can symbolize various things. One thing it might represent is the social difference between whites and blacks. The white people in the story seem to have money. The hunter had spare change (Welty 4) as well as the nurse (Welty 7). The lady walking down the road that ended up tying Phoenix’s shoes also had her arms full of gifts she had purchased (Welty 5). The pennies could also symbolize how the nurse saw Phoenix Jackson. Just as she labeled the medicine “Charity”, she saw Phoenix as a charity case (Welty 7). It was something to feel good about after she donates a little bit of change and medication. For all we know, the hospital already caught on to Phoenix’s grandson being dead and are just giving her sugar water.

Posted by: Jacie Dieffenwierth at October 9, 2015 03:15 PM

Freddie Williams
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 Academic Writing II CAO9
October 9, 2015


THEME. In Eudora Welty’s short story, “A Worn Path,” define the treatment Phoenix experiences in the clinic. Provide some rationale for it. Are there any thematic similarities between the incident with the attendant and the encounter with the scarecrow? In your own words, explain your response. You must use quoted passages from the actual text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

At first the attendant lady was being very rude assuming that Phoenix was trying to check in or had other illinesses. "Speak up, Grandma," the woman said. "What's your name? We must have your history, you know. Have you been here before? What seems to be the trouble with you?" Old Phoenix only gave a twitch to her face as if a fly were bothering her. "Are you deaf?" cried the attendant.”(Eudora.pg6). I felt as if the attendant just didn’t really respect Phoenix jus because she was old. This had happened again when Phoenix ran into this older boy, who would pull a gun out on her but Phoenix wasn’t scared so he put the gun away and let her go on her way. I think the boy just assumed since Phoenix is a old lady, that she would just panic and scream but that wasn’t the case. The main point in this is that yes Phoenix is a old lady but she has the courage to go through this all again and again just so her grandson can get better and to also treat him well on Christmas by getting a paper wind mill.

Posted by: Freddie Williams at October 9, 2015 03:23 PM

Lois Martinez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
11 October 2015

Question: What are the top three differences between the text and adaptation of “A Worn Path” by Eudora Welty?

Answer: The top three differences between the text and adaptation of Welty's "A Worn Path" are in point of view and context of the story. The first noticeable change that the reader will see on the adaptation of "A Worn Path" is that the story is not narrated by an omniscient author. The film shows the old woman's actions in silence while she walks in the woods. Therefore, the readers could conclude that the adaptation is done in the first person. The other two differences lay in the action and setting of the places Phoenix goes. In the story, the woman approaches a well to drink water, and she says, "Sweet-gum makes the water sweet. Nobody know who made this well, for it was here when I was born," whereas in the adaptation the spectator only sees the old woman drinking water from a river for few minutes in silence and then leaves (3). The cut that the director made on this scene limits the spectator's capability to know a childhood experience from the character. Lastly, when Phoenix arrives in town, the authors describes how she notices how it is decorated with red and green lights everywhere; however, the film only showed kids playing at a park that had some big, white figures that resembled the forms of a reindeer. The adaptation limited many details that were fundamental to identify the mood, tone, and character description of the story.

Posted by: Lois Martinez at October 11, 2015 02:17 AM

Cannelle Samson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
11 October 2015

Question: Mark three main differences in the firm “A Worn Path” vs the narrative “A Worn Path”


Answer: One of the main differences between the movie and the narrative of “A Worn Path” is that in the narrative “A Worn Path” is taking place during the winter. In the movie, there is absolutely no clue that the story is taking place in the winter. The only hint given to the watcher is that people from the town are buying presents and wrapping paper for Christmas time. However, in the narrative it is cold and snowy. The narrative states, “It was December—a bright frozen day in the early morning” (Welty, “A Worn Path”). This means that in the narrative a cold, frozen day is captured. In the movie; however, one may think it is summer. There is no sign of it being cold. The forest looks as if it could have been summer. Another difference between the movie and the narrative is that in the movie Phoenix Jackson is portrayed as a weak, crazy, and extremely old women. However, in the narrative, descriptions of her are portrayed as Phoenix being old but strong. The narrative states, “Her eyes were blue with age. Her skin had a pattern all its own of numberless branching wrinkles and as though a whole little tree stood in the middle of her forehead, but a golden color ran underneath, and the two knobs of her cheeks were illumined by a yellow burning under the dark. Under the red rag her hair came down on her neck in the frailest of ringlets, still black, and with an odor like copper” (Welty, “A Worn Path”). Although Pheonix is described as all, she has a presence to her of power. Her hair is still black rather than gray or white. She is old but she is still taking a long walk into town. She seems determined and strong-willed. In the movie, she simply seems weak and crazy. Another difference found from the movie and narrative is that the movie seemed to drag along. It was actually a bit boring. Watching the movie, I was not able to get a clear understanding of Phoenix. I simply saw her as old, weak, and crazy. However, when described in the narrative, Phoenix, seems strong-willed, powerful, smart, tricky, lonely, and interesting. It seems as if in the narrative everyone is underestimating her.

Posted by: Cannelle Samson at October 11, 2015 11:15 AM

Matthew Beebe
Dr. B. Lee Hobs
ENG122 – Academic Writing II CAO3
October 11, 2015

Question: What are the top three differences between text and adaptation point of views of the story “A Worn Path”. Tone? Mood? Characters? Explain in detail.

Answer: The first thing I noted was in the adaptation of the text she just ran into the scarecrow and yet it did frighten her there was no really big deal of it. In it the texts it says “Then there was something tall, black, and skinny there, moving before her. At first she took it for a man. It could have been a man dancing in the field. But she stood still and listened, and it did not make a sound. It was as silent as a ghost” (Wetly 2). This made a big deal of the scare and she thought it was someone following her or even a ghost. In the adaption of the movie when the old lady comes across the dog and the man in the woods he shoots the dog and in the text all we can tell is that a gunshot went off. “Phoenix heard the dogs fighting, and heard the man running and throwing sticks. She even heard a gunshot.” (Wetly 4) Lastly, i at the end of the story the texts says “Then she gave a tap with her cane on the floor” (Wetly 7). In the movie it clearly shows her using an umbrella and not a cane to assist her.

Posted by: Matthew Beebe at October 11, 2015 04:28 PM

Lady Hernandez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
11 October 2015

Question: what are three things that are different or similar in the story “A worn path” and the short film based on the story?

Answer: Reaching the clinic, Phoenix is treated with disrespect as a “charity case,” but she endures the humiliation in order to get the medicine that will relieve her grandson’s suffering. In the movie she is treated with respect and on the way an elder white women tied her shoe laces for her. Phoenix follows a rugged path through the countryside that takes her to a road into the city. She knows the way by heart, having made the trip many times. In the movie we can tell that she knows her way around the path even when she felt lost in the corn field. The nickel symbolizes her fear of God. In both the film and story she takes the nickel from the hunter even after him helping her and uses that nickel towards buying her grandson his windmill toy.

Posted by: lady hernandez at October 11, 2015 09:50 PM

Sabrina McIntyre
Dr. Hobbs
11 October 2015
English 122 Academic Writing II CA03

Question: Top three differences between text and adaptation. The tone? Setting? Point of view? Mood? Characters? Explain in detail.

Answer: The top three differences is that the movie expresses how sad Aunt Phoenix appeared to be. The second would be that the movie expresses the setting just a little bit more by the music playing throughout the movie and the word “colored” on the door as Aunt Phoenix walked up stairs. Third, the story mostly identified that the time was during the early 1900’s in the south by the way the language was presented. The tone is sad because you can tell that Aunt Phoenix is poor by the way she stole the man’s nickel that fell out of his pocket. Second, it was humorous because she was talking to herself on her way into town. The story states, “"Sun so high!" she cried, leaning back and looking, while the thick tears went over her eyes. "The time getting all gone here” (Welty 2). The setting is definitely described as in the South, just by the way the language is spoken. At first, I thought it was during slavery, but then once the men referenced Aunt Phoenix as “you colored folk” that’s when I realized where the setting was. The point of view is in third person just by the way the author is talking about Aunt Phoenix. The mood I got from the story was sad.

Posted by: Sabrina McIntyre at October 11, 2015 11:08 PM

ENG 122 CA03

"A Worn Path"

Video/Text

10th October 2015


Question: What are the three key differences between text and adaptation? Ex. Point of view, tone, setting, and character.

Answer: There are some differences from the text and the video of "A Worn Path". One of these details includes the tone, which is a very subtle and unknown sense that comes over the old lady. She is not knowing or remembering her reason for travel in the movie compared to the story. Another key difference is the encounter of the man and the dog in the woods as she was traveling to downtown. The third difference is the reason for her travel to downtown. The setting was the rural woods and the tone was quiet mysterious.

Posted by: Tannor Berry at October 12, 2015 09:38 AM

Clark de Bullet
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA06
23 February 2016

Worn Path

Question #1: In Eudora Welty’s short story, “A Worn Path,” what is the significance of the title? In your own words, explain your response.

Answer: A worn path indicates a path that is used often. From the dialogue with the nurse we can tell that Phoenix Jackson “makes these trips just as regular as clockwork” (Welty 6). Not only does a worn path speak of the literal path that Phoenix takes, but it also shows that she’s never been willing to try a different path and always chooses the same one she always takes. It symbolizes her unwillingness to admit her grandson is dead and move on with her life.

Posted by: Clark de Bullet at February 23, 2016 02:17 AM

Randawnique Coakley
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA 06
22 January 2016

Question: 23. In Eudora Welty’s short story, “A Worn Path,” why will Phoenix buy her grandson a windmill? In your own words, explain your response. You must use quoted passages from the actual text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

In the short story, "A Worn Path", the reader is introduced to the protagonist, Phoenix. This old lady is traveling on a journey to retrieve medicine for her grandson who throat closes up, which prevents him from swallowing, as described by the Phoenix (Welty 7). After Phoenix receives the medicine, the attendee gives Phoenix a nickel, because "it's Christmas time (7)." Then Phoenix thought to buy her grandson a windmill because "He going to find it hard to believe there such a thing in the world (7)." Her grandson is sick and sitting "there in the house all wrapped up, waiting by himself (7)." This suggests that her grandson is isolated from the world and does not get to experience the world. Therefore, buying this windmill would be a fascinating souvenir for the world he does not get to visit, as suggested by Phoenix when she said it would her grandson would find it difficult to believe. Also, the windmill she is planning to buy symbolizes the endless cycle. At first, it is rather odd to refer to a windmill, a random object in the last few lines of the short story; however, the windmill is not so random. The windmill is significant to the story because it the spins in circles. Therefore, the windmill symbolizes the endless cycle that Phoenix and her grandson has to go through. Phoenix mentioned to the nurse and the attendee that her grandson is "not dead, he just the same. Every little while his throat begin to close up again, and he not able to swallow. He not get his breath. He not able to help himself. So the time come around, and I go on another trip for the soothing medicine (7)." Phoenix's diction suggests that her grandson is going to suffer from the throat ailment for the rest of his life. For example, the grandmother states he is the same, suggesting his condition has not changed. Also, the word soothing suggests that the medicine is comforting the grandson temporarily; however, the medicine is not healing his throat. Therefore, the grandson will be subjected to this ailment for the rest of his life without his throat improving, and as a result, Phoenix has to continue to go on these trips because he probably won't get better. The windmill symbolizes this endless cycle without change. And if the grandson gets the message the windmill as a never changing object, he can find comfort in his grandmother's never ending love and determination despite his condition remaining the same.

Posted by: Randawnique Coakley at February 23, 2016 02:26 AM

Nastassja Sielchan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA06
23 February 2016

Question: SETTING/CONTEXT. As you reread Eudora Welty’s short story, “A Worn Path,” note clues that help you determine when and where the story takes place. What is the context of the story? In your own words, explain your response.

Answer: Eudora Welty does a good job at explaining the setting right away. She uses descriptive words that paint a picture in one’s mind. In the first paragraph, she explains that it is an early, cold morning in December. She goes on to say that this story will take place in the country with pinewoods. Welty explains, “Far out in the country there was an old Negro woman with her head tied red rag, coming along a path through the pinewoods” (Welty 1). Then it is explained that there is an African American woman, Phoenix Jackson, that is walking through these pinewoods, and this is where the story will take place.

Posted by: Nastassja Sielchan at February 23, 2016 08:40 AM

Hannah Rowe
Dr. Hobbs
English 122 Academic Writing II CAO6
22 February 2016

“The Worn Path”

Q: #10 In Eudora Welty’s “The Worn Path,” what does the grandson represent? Why is it significant that he cannot speak?

A: In Eudora Welty’s “The Worn Path,” the grandson represents the old woman. It is significant that he cannot speak because he is trapped inside her head, as she is. She says, “My little grandson, he sit up there in the house all wrapped up, waiting by himself”(Welty 7). This is what the woman does. This is why she is so far from town because she lives alone in the woods.

Posted by: Hannah Rowe at February 23, 2016 09:10 PM

Vincia Mitchell
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing 11 CA06
22 February 2016

Question: SYMBOLISM. In Eudora Welty’s short story, “A Worn Path,” What do the attendant’s pennies represent? In your own words, explain your response. You must use quoted passages from the actual text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: In the short story, “ A Worn Path,” Phoenix Jackson was set on a journey to seek medicine for her grandson who has lye poisoning in his throat (Welty 7). She has encountered numerous obstacles such as being attacked by a black dog, while on her journey to the hospital (3). After being asked a series of questions at the hospital and failed to response, Phoenix openly admits that her memory has left her (6). Furthermore, after she received the medicine and was about to leave, the attendant gave her a few pennies (7).These pennies represents the old woman’s strength, positivity, and pure energy, which she used to reach her destiny. These qualities were evident throughout the story because she was persistent in completing her quest despite being told to turn back and go home by a white hunter. She overcame the obstacles that stood in her way by fighting back when the black dog attacked her and crawled under the fence without losing a limb or destroying her garment.

Posted by: Vincia Mitchell at February 23, 2016 10:33 PM

Jennifer Belcastro
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122-Academic Writing II CA06
24 February 2016

Question: According to Perrine’s Literature, “[t]he theme of a piece of fiction is its controlling idea or its central insight. It is the unifying generalization about life stated or implied by the story. To derive the theme of a story, we must determine what its central purpose is: what view of life it supports or what insight into life it reveals.” Now that you have read Eudora Welty’s short story, “A Worn Path,” in a single well developed sentence, express the primary theme of the story, according to THIS definition (which differs from Edgar V. Roberts’s definition). In your own words, explain your response.

Answer: The theme of “A Worn Path” is Phoenix’s deep love for her grandson that never ceases. The grandma makes clockwork trips to the doctors get medicine for him. The narrator states, “She doesn’t come for herself—she has a little grandson. She makes these trips just as regular as clockwork” (Welty 6). The grandma travels very far to come to the doctor’s office out of the love for her grandchild.

Posted by: Jennifer Belcastro at February 24, 2016 10:33 AM

Omar Martinez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA06
23 February 2016

Question: In Eudora Welty’s short story, “A Worn Path,” what is significant about the nickel? In your own words, explain your response.

Answer: Phoenix was given medicine as a charity from the nurse that was talking with her. The nurse also asked her if she could give her pennies, she wanted a nickel. “"It's Christmas time, Grandma," said the attendant. “Could I give you a few pennies out of my purse?" "Five pennies is a nickel," said Phoenix stiffly. "Here's a nickel," said the attendant (Welty 7).”

Posted by: Omar Martinez at February 24, 2016 10:53 AM

Matt Scharr
Dr. Hobbs
English 122 CA 06 Academic Writing II
24 February 2016
Question 4.) What is significant about Eudora Welty’s short story being set in December and during Christmas?
Answer: The fact that this story takes place in December and around Christmas time is significant because Phoenix is traveling alone as an older lady. Christmas time is usually meant to be spent with family and friends to rejoice on the happiness of life. However through her travels Phoenix encounters several people and incidents that are far from the warm fuzzy feeling of Christmas. The story starts off with, “It was December- a bright frozen day in the early morning.” (Pg. 1) right away the reader gets a feel for where the story is taking place. The setting is even more significant when you realize that Phoenix is traveling so she can get medicine for her grandson, it puts a pit in the reader’s stomach knowing that she is doing such a nice thing for someone she loves. The fact that she is mistreated so much throughout the story during Christmas time really gives the story the extra touch that makes it great.

Posted by: Matt Scharr at February 24, 2016 01:48 PM

Hussam Babge
Dr. Hobbs
ENG-122 Academic Writing
February 24, 2016

Q13/ THEME. In Eudora Welty’s short story, “A Worn Path,” define the treatment Phoenix experiences in the clinic. Provide some rationale for it. Are there any thematic similarities between the incident with the attendant and the encounter with the scarecrow? In your own words, explain your response. You must use quoted passages from the actual text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.


Answer:
The way of treatment that Phoenix got by the nurse at the doctor’s office, was the same way she treats others sense of belittlement. Once she got there The Thought Phoenix is a charity case. The nurse replies that it is "just old Aunt Phoenix” came to get medicine for her grandson. The nurse loses patience and urges the old woman to "tell us quickly about your grandson. “Warn Path” [ P. 6 [

Posted by: hussam at February 24, 2016 02:00 PM

Hussam Babge
Dr. Hobbs
ENG-122 Academic Writing
February 24, 2016


Q13/ THEME. In Eudora Welty’s short story, “A Worn Path,” define the treatment Phoenix experiences in the clinic. Provide some rationale for it. Are there any thematic similarities between the incident with the attendant and the encounter with the scarecrow? In your own words, explain your response. You must use quoted passages from the actual text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.


Answer:
The way of treatment that Phoenix got by the nurse at the doctor’s office, was the same way she treats others sense of belittlement. Once she got there The Thought Phoenix is a charity case. The nurse replies that it is "just old Aunt Phoenix” came to get medicine for her grandson. The nurse loses patience and urges the old woman to "tell us quickly about your grandson. “Warn Path” [ P. 6 [

Posted by: hussam at February 24, 2016 02:02 PM

Phillip Moss

Dr. Hobbs

Eng 122 Academic Writing CA06

24 February 2016

Question: THEME/MOTIF. See the question above, or, fill in the gaps of your knowledge and look up the meaning of the word, “motif.” In Eudora Welty’s short story, “A Worn Path,” sight is another motif. Note places where Welty refers to either eyes or sight. How does Phoenix’s inability to see well help establish the nature of her journey? In your own words, explain your response. You must use quoted passages from the actual text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: The word “motif” can be defined as a dominant idea in a literary work. In the short story “A Worn Path” by Eudora Weltly the motif can be seen as the constant trifles the woman overcomes in the story. Phoenix Jackson is traveling through a treacherous path to obtain medicine for her son. “She followed the track, swaying through the quiet bare fields, through the little strings of trees silver in their dead leaves, past cabins silver from weather, with the doors and windows boarded shut”(Weltly 7)

Posted by: Phillip Moss at February 24, 2016 02:13 PM

Justin Robinson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA06
24 February 2016

Question: 8.) SYMBOLISM. In Eudora Welty’s short story, “A Worn Path,” what does Natchez represent? Its oak trees? Its steeple and cabins? Its little children whirling around her? Its paved streets? In your own words, explain your response. You must use quoted passages from the actual text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: 8.) Natchez represents its Oak Trees, the whole time while Phoenix was walking to Natchez she was passing through Oak trees. “Up above her was a tree in a pearly cloud of mistletoe” which was an oak tree which also represents her journey to Natchez. When she passes all the oak trees it symbolizes that she is almost at Natchez.

Posted by: Justin Robinson at February 24, 2016 02:31 PM

Chloe Lelliott
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic writing 2 CA06
29 February 2016

Question 5)As you read "a worn path" by Eudora Welty note words that are associated with time. Why is this time motif significant to the development of Welty's theme? In your own words explain your response.

Answer 5)In a worn path time is significant in showing that love can be so deeply installed in someone that it becomes natural for them to exist upon conscious thought and this is shown in Phoenix Jackson's search for her grandsons medicine. Time is also significant because Phoenix faces demeaning treatment time and time again, yet not for a second does her courage waver. Lastly, the time zone in this story is important because racism is still going on and this is represented by the hunter in the story.

Posted by: Chloe Lelliott at February 29, 2016 03:17 PM

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