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January 30, 2012

Prognosing Edith Wharton's “Roman Fever”


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Posted by lhobbs at January 30, 2012 06:29 PM

Readers' Comments:

Katie Ganning
Dr. Hobbs
English 122 CA 17
January 24, 2009
Roman Fever

In the short story, Roman Fever, two widowed women discover the ironic and jealous friendship carried throughout their lives. As the women meet in Rome, unknowingly of each others presence at first, they sit and discuss the present and a night many years ago that took place in this very city. In the last passage, the narrative story show’s detail, irony, jealousy and comparison of the title to the story.
The irony of this passage is Mrs. Slade thought she had everything she could have asked for and still was unhappy. Since she knew about the affair all along, she took matter into her own hands 25 years ago. By writing a letter to Mrs. Ansley, pretending to be Mr. Slade, and telling her to meet him in the Colosseum. She was expecting Mrs. Ansley to be dumped by him however, she did not think through the whole plan. “Mrs. Ansley hesitated, as though reflecting. “But I answered the letter. I told him I’d be there so he came.”(Wharton45). This shows irony because she didn’t think to expect a reply and thought all along that they would never met up that evening.
The author has given a complete detail of each woman’s thoughts and actions. At this time in the story, the women are sitting in the terrace and the sun is beginning to set. Mrs. Ansley has been completely reserved and relaxed, “But now she turned slowly toward her companion.”(Wharton 44). The women have already confronted each other about Mrs. Slade’s late husband and Mrs. Ansley at this point. Even though both women knew about the affair between Mr. Slade and Mrs. Ansley, Mrs. Slade was still in complete outrage after all these years. Expecting Mrs. Ansley to be filled with jealousy, it is actually the complete opposite. “Mrs. Slade sprang up from her leaning position. “Delphin there? They let you in?-Ah, now you’re lying!” she burst out with violence”(Wharton 106).
Jealousy played in important part of this story. Even though Mrs. Slade had a lovely lifestyle she was unhappy with her daughter. In the beginning of the story, she complains and reflects her daughter Jenny and wishing to have Mrs. Ansley’s daughter Barbara. At the very last moment the women sat outside the terrace and its beginning to get very cold. When they decide to leave Mrs. Ansley acknowledges her pity for Mrs. Slade. Outraged with Mrs. Ansley’s remark she defends herself quickly, “Yes; I was beaten there. But I oughtn’t to begrudge it to you, I suppose. At the end of all these years. After all, I had everything; I had him for twenty –five years. And you had nothing but that one letter he didn’t write.” (Wharton 44).
The narrator describes Mrs. Slade as feeling she had won the battle. Mrs. Ansley stayed reserved after being spoken to like so, at the very last sentence she returns with a great explanation as to why Mrs. Slade is surely false. “I had Barbara,” she said, and began to move ahead of Mrs. Slade toward the stairway.” I think this was the perfect way to end the story because you begin to feel sorry that Mrs. Ansley did not end up with her lover. However, Wharton completely tricks the reader by reminding us of her wonderful daughter and how much Mrs. Slade envied her. Even though Mrs. Ansley was not able to be with her lover she still found love through her late husband. When it comes to the title, Roman Fever was a type of cold you could catch during the time of the sun setting. Because Mrs. Ansley was extremely sick the night of the last affair, you would expect that being thee reason for the title, however I believe it was called Roman Fever because of the affair between Mr. Slade and Mrs. Ansley while in Rome The rage Mrs. Slade felt towards Mrs. Ansley was considered the Fever.


Works Cited
Wharton, Edith. Roman Fever. A Prentice Hall Pocket Reader. Ed. Balkun McAleer, Mary. Upper Saddle River, NJ. 2005 34.

Posted by: Katherine Ganning at January 26, 2009 07:16 PM

John Winans
ENG.122 CA16
Essay #5
Dr. Hobbs
10February 2009
“Structure of Roman Fever”
The main characters are very close friends who grew up together and knew each other’s husbands. As the story unfolds and the plot becomes appear ant the reader is drawn to the conflict of both women and their desire for the same man. They are in Rome now watching their daughters grow up and experience the world like they did. The influence of the setting in Rome is a place they were quite familiar with even to the point of knowing all of the main architecture and streets as well as the places they frequent. They are now reminiscing as widows when the conflict, one woman’s dilemma the other’s crisis comes to a climax.
The point of view is that from one of the main characters, one of the women Mrs. Slade as she talks of the past and how their daughters are living as they did and as their granddaughters most likely will. The women are alike in that they are about the same age with some of the same experiences growing up in the same neighborhood and both are now widowed with grown daughters of their own. Living mainly in the U.S. they met while visiting Europe and they spend time in both over the years. They enjoy knitting and were both interested in the same men at one time. The only difference would be the positions their husbands held and the financial situations of each.
Mrs. Ansley Sometimes thought Alida Slade was disappointed: on the whole she had had a sad life. Full of failures and mistakes: Mrs. Ansley had always been rather sorry for her… (Wharton, 38). As the structure of the story unfolds the reader sees they were all friends where as only one would end up marrying the young man, this exposition shows complication when they all shared a common love for one another and the wife of Dephin actually played a trick on the other with sending of a note portrayed as being from Dephin. The two women stood for a minute staring at each other in the last golden light. Then Mrs. Ansley dropped back into her chair. “Oh”, she murmured, and covered her face with her hands. Mrs. Slade waited nervously for another word or movement. None came, and at length she broke out: “I horrify you”. (Wharton, 42)
I believe Mrs. Ansley to be more hateful because of her being the butt of the joke when Mrs. Slade sent her the letter she thought was from Mr. Slade. Wharton makes note of the idea that girls are like this when she writes: “Well, girls are ferocious sometimes, you know. Girls in love especially.”(Wharton, 43). I think it is almost more amusing than ironic that even though one of the women got the best of men as husband, the other claims to have the best of daughters between the two. The conflict surely comes to a resolution as the women mend their scars of tension they have held over the years and continue in their friendship.


Works Cited


Wharton, Edith. “Roman Fever”. Mary McAleer Balkum. Literature: A Prentice Hall Pocket Reader.
Upper Saddle River: Prentice Hall, 2005. 34-45

Roberts, Edgar V. Writing About Literature. Brief 11th ed.
Upper Saddle River: Prentice Hall, 2005

Posted by: John Winans at February 16, 2009 08:44 PM

Chris Collier
Academic Writing II ENG 122
Dr. Hobbs
March 1, 2009
The Theme of Roman Fever
In “Roman Fever” by Edith Wharton, two middle-aged women that have been friends since childhood sit in Rome and discuss various aspects and people in their lives. In particular, they talk about how their lives were more exciting and slightly risqué compared to their daughter’s lives. Mrs. Slade has a deep resentment towards Mrs. Ansley, and the underlying theme in this story is jealousy. Mrs. Slade is jealous of her friend’s daughter being somewhat of a hellion while her own daughter is mild-mannered and well-behaved. The real jealousy, the thing that boils inside of Mrs. Slade is the letter she wrote to Mrs. Ansley pretending to be her fiancée.
Mrs. Slade sees herself as being higher and more privileged than Mrs. Ansley, yet Mrs. Slade sees her daughter’s attitude (or lack thereof) as being some sort of karmic justice. In other words, Mrs. Ansley is less privileged but she has the more interesting daughter, while Mrs. Slade is more privileged but has the boring daughter. Mrs. Ansley doesn’t believe that her daughter is that much different from Mrs. Slade’s as far as being loose with morals goes. She, Mrs. Ansley, is jealous of Mrs. Slade for having everything that she wants.
Mrs. Ansley’s biggest secret was she had feelings for Mr. Slade, naturally Mrs. Slade’s husband, and this only served to magnify Mrs. Ansley’s jealousy. The truth eventually comes out about her feelings when Mrs. Slade shouts at her about not being able to contain herself. However, the final blow to Mrs. Slade that completely capitalizes on her jealousy is when Mrs. Ansley basically tells her that Barbara (her daughter) is Mr. Slade’s.

Posted by: Chris Collier at March 3, 2009 03:53 AM

Shelby Rexroth
September 2, 2014
ENG 210CL


Question: 22 – Irony – Explain how the following quotation/element from the story is ironic: When discussing their daughters and themselves during their youth, Grace Ansley states “And perhaps we didn’t know much more about each other.”

Answer: When both Mrs. Slade and Mrs. Ansley were discussing their daughters and themselves during their younger year, which was that, they enjoyed running around town and exploring, their mothers had a tough time keeping them inside. You then find out that they were both once in love with the same man, Delphin Slade. Delphin decided to be with Alida instead of Grace. Alida knew how much Grace had also loved Delphin so she wrote a letter pretending to be him to Grace saying to meet her at the Coliseum. Alida did this because she knew if she waited long, she would’ve gotten sick from the cold. In the story it’s revealed that Delphin and Grace were having an affair. With that being said, it’s ironic in two situations. First the letter that was written was supposed to keep Grace and Alida far away from each other but instead it brought them together and years later they’re both widows and good friends. Secondly, both daughters are starting to act how their mothers were at their age, both eager to explore Rome.

Posted by: Shelby Rexroth at September 2, 2014 05:35 PM

18. The quotation “A full moon night, they would remember…” is a foreshadowing of what is to come because a full moon means an end to an event. The event that came to an end was the friendship of Alida Slade and Grace Ansley. Ailda and Grace both have two daughters; Alidas’ daughters name is Jenny Slade but unlike Alida who is described in the story as being vivid and dashing her daughter is described as being pretty,dull,and mousy which is the opposite of what her mother is. However, Graces daughter Barbara is described as being vivid and charming unlike her mom who in the past was like that but now is described as being fragile and quiet. Both women are envious but at the same time pity each other. As the story progresses Alida confesses to Grace that she tricked Grace into going to a Colosseum because she wanted to get rid of Grace as a competitor and she knew that Grace was immune to getting throat infection. But Grace reveals that even though Alida thought she tricked her, Delhpin the man both women were fighting over still saw her that night. Alida discouraged about Graces confession starts gloating about how she in the end got Delphin but Grace throws back at her that she has the daughter that Alida wishes she had. The end of the story reveals that Grace who is seen to be weak comes out on top as being victorious. It’s very ironic because as the two women sit on the terrace in Rome the sun is setting just like the sun is setting on their friendship. Their friendship is ending and the sun is setting too and that is how foreshadowing takes place in Roman Fever.

Posted by: Sharonda Byrd at September 2, 2014 06:25 PM

John Crane
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA07
2 September 2014
Roman Fever Question 23:
Explain how the following quotation/element from the story is ironic: Alida and Grace are described as “intimate friends coming to a new stage in their intimacy.”
ANSWER:
Alida and Grace have known each other for a very long time, and are described as “two ladies, who have been intimate since childhood” (Wharton 2); and their history together makes them intimate. When they were younger, Mrs.Slade wrote a letter to Mrs.Ansley, pretending to be the man Mrs.Slade was getting engaged to (Wharton 7). The irony in the new stage of intimacy is that Mrs.Ansley had no idea that Mrs.Slade wrote the letter, and because secrecy behind the letter, they lacked true intimacy.

Posted by: John Crane at September 2, 2014 06:49 PM

Elizabeth Brown
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA07
9/2/2014

Question #22: Irony- Explain how the following quotation/element from the story is ironic: When discussing their daughters and themselves during their youth, Grace Ansley states, “And perhaps we didn’t know much more about each other.”
Answer:
This statement that Grace Ansley makes is very ironic because herself and Mrs. Slade are very close lifelong friends, and yet neither one knew the truth of the other. All these years Mrs. Slade has been hiding and keeping the fact that Grace’s sickness was her fault. She ironically is the reason her husband and Grace ended up meeting at the Coliseum, when all these years she never knew Grace wrote back to the “fake” letter Mrs. Slade sent. This statement is also ironic, because Mrs. Slade has always envied Grace yet she was the woman who got to have Delphin for life and has the daughter that Grace envies so much. At the very end of the story, Grace finally realizes that her own daughter and her own life is far better than that of Mrs. Slade’s, because ironically enough she had peace of mind and a daughter so brilliant, she just never understood.

Posted by: Elizabeth Brown at September 2, 2014 07:08 PM

Matt Weller
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 201CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
2 September 2014

Question #5:
What is the meaning of the underlined words in the following paragraph from the story:
Yes; being the Slade’s widow was a dullish business after that. In living up to such a husband all her [Alida’s] faculties had been engaged; now she had only her daughter to live up to, for the son who seemed to have inherited his father’s gifts had died suddenly in boyhood. She had fought through that agony because her husband as there, to be helped and to help; now, after the father’s death, the thought of the boy had become unbearable.

Answer:
I believe the meaning of the underlined words is that Mrs. Slade thought that her boy would grow up to be just like his father and in his footsteps. The father, Delphin Slade, was a smart, intelligent, and exciting man.

“It was a big drop from being the wife of Delphin Slade to being his widow. She had always regarded herself (with a certain conjugal pride) as his equal in social gifts, as contributing her full share to the making of the exceptional couple they were: but the difference after his death was irremediable. As the wife of the famous corporation lawyer, always with an international case or two on hand, every day brought its exciting and unexpected obligation” (Wharton 3).

He was exciting and a well-known man. It seemed like they were also well off with money. “What, that handsome woman with the good clothes and the eyes is Mrs. Slade—the Slade's wife!” (Wharton 3). Mrs. Slade thought their boy would be just like his dad and learn all of his talents and gifts. Once the boy died, there was sadness felt in the family. However, they had a girl, Alida, who could then follow in Mr. Slade’s footsteps and continue his legacy. Once the father died though, there was no chance for any of the children to learn fully and follow Mr. Slade’s ways. It was so unbearable for Mrs. Slade to handle her boy’s death because he already had all the traits of Delphin.

Posted by: Matthew Weller at September 2, 2014 07:41 PM

Thomas Watson
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire in Literature CA02
2 September 2014

Question #27:
Explain how the following quotation/element from the story is ironic: Alida thought her letter worked; she thought that Grace waited at the Colosseum for Delphin and got sick from the cold dampness.

Answer:
What makes this ironic is the fact that everything Alida thought happened to Grace was quite the opposite. Alida's hate for Grace blinded her, thinking that Grace would wait for Delphin all night without him showing up and getting her sick in the process. However Alida didn't count on her then fiance' to actually see her, in fact Grace responded to the letter that Alida had written, "But I didn't
wait. He'd arranged everything. He was there. We were let in at once," (Wharton 9).

Alida knew that Grace had a thing for Delphin and attempted to sabotage Grace, but it backfired on her. Knowing after all these years that writing a letter that her husband didn't write, her husband saw her friend anyways.

Posted by: Thomas Watson at September 2, 2014 10:25 PM

Roslyn Thomas
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA07
02 September 2014


#24. Irony- Explain how the following quotation/elements from the story is ironic: Alida says “People always said that expedition was what caused your illness.”

Answer:
This is ironic because in the story it states that their fathers were successful men that died along the way, so with Alida says “People always said that expedition was what caused your illness.” She’s saying that the journey that has been taken through your lifetime is the purpose of your condition once your older.

Posted by: Roslyn Thomas at September 2, 2014 11:18 PM

Danielle Kluender
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA07
2 September 2014

Question #21:
Explain how the following quotation/element from the story is an example of foreshadowing: Great Aunt Harriet sent her younger sister to the Forum after sunset because they were in love with the same man. Explain how this can also be an example of irony.

Answer:
This quote is an example of foreshadowing because later in the story we discover that Mrs. Slade did the same thing to Mrs. Ansley. When they were young girls, Mrs. Slade heard the story about Great Aunt Harriet, which gave her the idea to lure her friend Mrs. Ansley to the Coliseum under similar false pretenses by sending her a fake letter from Delphin. It is ironic because although Mrs. Slade intended to trick Mrs. Ansley into going to the Coliseum to get her out of the way of her engagement, Mrs. Ansley ended up sharing a night of passion with Mrs. Slade’s fiancé, Delphin, and getting pregnant. Mrs. Slade was trying to be tricky by writing a fake letter but Mrs. Ansley replied to the letter and Delphin met her at the Coliseum, and she ended up having Barbra, which she revealed to Mrs. Slade at the end of the story.

Posted by: Danielle Kluender at September 3, 2014 12:13 AM

QUESTION #15:
What are the literal and figurative meanings to “Roman Fever”? How does Roman fever fit doubly into the story? Explain.

ANSWER:
The literal meaning to The Roman Fever is the ironic situation of two old friends discussing memories of their friendship like when it happened that they did not have a hones friendship. The story starts with two friends sitting on a terrace discussing about their memories and how their daughters are living the same events. During this discussion, a comparison of the daughters is brought up. The Slade family has a better daughter than the Ashley family. The Slade family’s daughter is more dynamic while the Ashley’s daughter is quieter (Wharton4). At the end of the story, one of the friends betrayed her friend by doing a cruel and dishonest action.

The figurative meaning to The Roman Fever is that you will never know someone even if you know that person for a long time. The personality and intentions will always remain a mystery to your knowledge.

The Roman fever fit doubly to the story because it is a friendly dinner and it is also about cruelty an irony.

Posted by: Mickael Dodard at September 3, 2014 09:52 AM

Alyssa Davis
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA07
September 3, 2014

Question #1:
Why didn't Grace publicly acknowledge her love for Delphin and force him to choose between her and Alida? Explain

Answer:
Grace was raised by her mother to always be ladylike, show etiquette and be poised at all times. Page 2 tells us how her friend described Grace when they were both young ladies growing up. Grace was 'exquisitely lovely, charming, and distinguished'. It was no surprised that Grace's parents gave her a pampered life, maintained, and protected her unblemished reputation at all cost. Grace could not publicly acknowledge her love for Delphin because she greatly feared the uproar it would cause if the secret was let out, but her mother knew the dreadful secret. Alida found out that Grace loved her fiancé so she wrote a letter to Grace pretending to be Delphin and sent it to Grace asking him to meet her down by the Coliseum. In those days the Coliseum was rumored to be so cold and damp that it would make anyone that visited there very sick and die as explained on page 6. What Alida did not know was that Grace had answered the letter and directly back to Delphin and he had agreed to meet her at the Coliseum. Everyone thought that Grace was going out there to see the moonrise. Page 9 tells us that Grace and Delphin did meet at the Coliseum & were intimate. Grace's sudden sickness was not from the cold and dampness in the Coliseum; Grace was pregnant and her mother very quickly realizing that, shipped her off to Florence to marry Horace Ansley. At the bottom of page 9 and 10, Grace admits that the now known ill-intentioned love letter was not all she had left of Delphin, she also had their daughter Barbara; Delphin's biological daughter.

Grace's character and reputation was thought to be good but we now know that it wasn't. She had intercourse with her friend's fiancé, got pregnant, married another man, and raised that child as her husband's child to hide the disgracefulness of her actions. If she publicly admitted she loved Delphin and tried to force him to choose her rather than Alida, then her big secret might be exposed if Delphin did not choose her and she would be forever publicly be known as the harlot that betrayed her friend with her fiancé.

Posted by: Alyssa Davis at September 3, 2014 11:00 AM

#2. Is it believable that Grace told Delphin about her pregnancy? Why or why not? Explain.
In my opinion, I believe that Grace was believable when she talked to Delphin about her pregnancy. On page 2, Grace felt raided, which is believable for someone who is trying to share such important news with their close friend. It was very sudden and shocking, but Grace seemed very serious when telling Delphin. That is also a serious matter and not to be joked about. Someone who that is not ready for a pregnancy would not joke about the issue, you can understand the tone and message that Grace is trying to give in this passage.

Posted by: Shyra Bryant at September 3, 2014 12:31 PM

Gianna Anderson
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
Eng 122 Academic Writing II Ca07
September 3, 2014

Question #25:
Irony- Explain the following quotation/element from the story is ironic: Grace says "The most prudent (sensible/cautious) girls are always prudent."

Answer:
The quotation from the story "The most prudent girls are always prudent," is ironic because girls that are prudent it is obviously shown that they are a certain way, they are uptight and aware of whats going on around them. So for girls that say they are prudent is no point of stating the obvious because you can tell by their demeanor of how that girl is.

Posted by: Gianna Anderson at September 3, 2014 01:25 PM

Rashard Knowles
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
English 122 Academic Writing II CA O7

Question:
Explain how the following element from the story is ironic .. Alida and Grace are describes as "Intimate Friends" [coming to] a new stag of their intimacy (look up the definition of intimate)

Answer:

Alida and Grace are described as intimate friends because they grew up together, know had and they think they know everything about each other for example the way they looked and shaped, the things they did.

The irony in this is that after years, they then find out that what they thought they knew about each other were far from reality. They were too busy with their individual lives, a lot has changed.

Posted by: Rashard Knowles at September 3, 2014 01:26 PM

Zailet Martinez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG210CL- Love and Desire in Literature
September 3, 2014

Question #4:
Is it believable that Grace told Barbara that she was Jenny’s biological half-sister? Why, or why not? Explain.

Answer:
I believe that Grace did not disclose the information to Barbara. Grace was married to Mr. Horace Ansley after the Colosseum incident happened. Seeing how the story ends, it seems that when Mrs. Ansley said, “I had Barbara” that was a confession to herself and Mrs. Slade. There was no reason for Grace to tell Barbara the truth. Barbara grew up with a father, even though he might not have been the biological father. No one saw it differently; no one doubted that Horace Ansley was Barbara’s father. For these reasons, I believe Grace never told her daughter the truth.

Posted by: Zailet Martinez at September 3, 2014 01:55 PM

Roman fever


Anthony Colello
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 210 CL
9/3/14

Question 16

Throughout the story Mrs. Slade’s sole focus is on Mrs. Ansley and where she stands in comparison while Mrs. Ansley’s focus is scattered between old friends, conversation, kids, and knitting. This is evident on page 4, the 8th paragraph down, “Mrs. Slade's eyes rested on her with a deepened attention. “She can knit—in the face of this! How like her...“ She has hated Mrs. Ansley since they met and considered her a rival. The competition for the better life extends all the way from their childhood to their children,

“She was simply absorbed in her work. What was there for her to worry about! She knew that Babs would almost certainly come back engaged to the extremely eligible Campolieri. "And she'll sell the New York house, and settle down near them in Rome, and never be in their way... she's much too tactful. But she'll have an excellent cook, and just the right people in for bridge and cocktails... and a perfectly peaceful old age among her grandchildren." (pg. 5 5th paragraph)

Mrs. Slade has allowed her hatred to consume her allowing her to hate even Babs as it is her daughter’s competition, the daughter of her rival.
Mrs. Slade gets further annoyed that she is not at the center of attention. She desires her attention so much because she feels guilty about what she has done in the past that she reveals a long ago secret that has been festering from the inside of Mrs. Slade torturing her, and causing here to relive the past each and every day until now when she tells Mrs. Ansley, "Well, my dear, I know what was in that letter because I wrote it!" (pg. 7, paragraph 11). As if she has not enough damage to Mrs. Ansley she continues to salt the wounds by saying, “"Yes, I was beaten there. But I oughtn't to begrudge it to you, I suppose. At the end of all these years. After all, I had everything; I had him for twenty-five years. And you had nothing but that one letter that he didn't write." (pg. 9, paragraph 16). Hoping to end the conversation with Mrs. Ansley defeated, she began to walk away until Mrs. Ansley tells Mrs. Slade that she did get something for her efforts all those nights ago, “"I had Barbara," she said, and began to move ahead of Mrs. Slade toward the stairway.” (pg. 10)
With these points highlighted one can see that Mrs. Slade has a deep seated hatred that has been burning for a long time, the kind of hatred that would allow a person to hurt a loved one or even kill. In life we will find that death is easy and that the worst pain will always come from those we love or have loved for it is love that makes such things matter to a degree that our hearts break.

Posted by: anthony colello at September 3, 2014 02:27 PM

In the story, Grace came off as a very introverted person. Being shy and introverted, I don’t think she would have had the nerve to ask Delphin to choose between her and Alida. Seeing as how Grace was known to be more quite and reserved, and Alida was known to be confident and told herself she was smart (though she was not as smart as she thought herself to be) there is a possibility that Alida came off as intimidating to Grace. Being a widow, Alida felt as if she had a reputation to maintain and keep everything together for everyone to see. Ironically enough, Alida admits to Grace that when she found out about her feelings, she hated her and was afraid of her “quiet ways” and her “sweetness.” This led her to write a nasty letter to scare Grace off for a short period of time until she could reestablish Delphin’s feelings. Towards the end of the story though, Alida rubbed it into Grace’s face that she had Delphin “for twenty-five years” and Grace had nothing but “that one letter that he didn’t write.” Grace quickly came back saying that she had Barbara, her daughter.

Posted by: Rebecca Messano at September 3, 2014 02:28 PM

Antonella Aviles
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Love and Desire in Literature
2 September 2014
Question: Alida Slade reflects ruefully that her daughter, Jenny, operates as a “foil” for Grace Ansley’s daughter, Barbara. What does she mean by that? How does it contribute to our understanding of the social environment of the time, and Mrs. Slade’s way of looking at things?
Answer: She says this to describe Jenny as a simple article that has no chance against Barbara because she is not as desirable and she is always sent with her as if to make Barbara look better being beside her hence give her attention for getting the Babs boy. Mrs. Slade just looks at things for how they truly are and doesn’t try to sugarcoat things like when she told Mrs. Ansley “That Campolieri boy is one of the best matches in Rome”. She knows that that is the purpose of sending the girls out together.

Posted by: Antonella Aviles at September 3, 2014 02:31 PM

Trejon Baynham
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG. 122 Academic Writing II
9 September 2014

QUESTION #14:
What are readers supposed to think of Delphine Slade? What can readers assume were Grace’s feelings towards Delphine when she went to the coliseum with her that night?

ANSWER:
Based on dialog and descriptions present in the text, Delphine Slade’s impression on readers is that of someone who is a somewhat shallow, flowery thrill-seeker in possession of a degree of envy towards Ms. Ansley. In her reflections regarding her relationship with her late husband, she dwells on the differences in status such as all the benefits that came included with being the wife of a famous corporation lawyer (Wharton 2). Her use of language possesses a sense of elegancy much like her attire demonstrated by her references to the moon during her conversation with Ms. Ansley and the headwaiter (Wharton 2).

Posted by: Trejon Baynham at September 3, 2014 02:46 PM

Rebecca Messano
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210 Love and Desire in Literature CA02
2 Sept. 2014

Question #1:
Why didn’t Grace publicly acknowledge her love for Delphin and force him to choose between her and Alida? Explain.

Answer:
In the story, Grace came off as a very introverted person. Being shy and introverted, I don’t think she would have had the nerve to ask Delphin to choose between her and Alida. Seeing as how Grace was known to be more quite and reserved, and Alida was known to be confident and told herself she was smart (though she was not as smart as she thought herself to be) there is a possibility that Alida came off as intimidating to Grace. Being a widow, Alida felt as if she had a reputation to maintain and keep everything together for everyone to see. Ironically enough, Alida admits to Grace that when she found out about her feelings, she hated her and was afraid of her “quiet ways” and her “sweetness.” This led her to write a nasty letter to scare Grace off for a short period of time until she could reestablish Delphin’s feelings. Towards the end of the story though, Alida rubbed it into Grace’s face that she had Delphin “for twenty-five years” and Grace had nothing but “that one letter that he didn’t write.” Grace quickly came back saying that she had Barbara, her daughter.

Posted by: Rebecca Messano at September 3, 2014 03:09 PM

Ashjan Alrashid
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
3 September 2014


Question #15:
What are the literal and figurative meanings to “Roman Fever”? How does Roman fever fit doubly into the story? Explain.


The literal meaning of “Roman Fever” is the deadly disease to which we now refer to as malaria.
The figurative meaning of it is this: Mrs. Ansley actually did not catch the fever that Mrs. Slade wanted her to catch, but she cought another thing, which was lust for Mrs. Slade’s husband.
"Of Roman fever or pneumonia! I remember how ill you were that winter. As a girl you had a very delicate throat, hadn't you” (Wharton 5)?
Even though Mrs. Ansley had a delicate throat and was afraid of catching the Roman Fever, she actually went to meet the man she loved and did get sick the next day, but it was not for the same reason Mrs. Slade planned for.

Posted by: ashjan alrashid at September 3, 2014 03:53 PM


Irma Sera
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire in Literature CA02
3 September 2014

Question #7: Consider the pattern of young women who are juxtaposed in the story as friends, “frenemies,” or sisters: great-aunt Harriet and he sister, Grace and Alida, Barbara and Jenny. How do their stories combine to shape our understanding of the main story here: Grace and Alida’s long standing relationship. Explain.

The stories combine to shape our understanding of the main story: Grace Ansley and Alida Slade’s long-standing relationship by providing us with similarities throughout the story before leading up to the climax. Both of the girls are running off with young men just as their mothers did when they were their age. Barbara is more energetic just as Mrs. Slade was (Wharton 2) and Jenny is more beautiful and calm just as Mrs. Ansley was. According to Mrs. Slade, Barbara will come back engaged to the available bachelor as she did to Mr. Slade 25 years ago (5). The fact that the girls are half-sisters, Grace’s Great-aunt Harriet story comes into play. Harriet and her sister were in-love with the same man and she tricked her into exposing herself to Roman fever (6). All of the events are parallel to one another; only to show that history has a great way of repeating itself.

Posted by: Do Over Irma Sera at September 3, 2014 04:52 PM

DO OVER
Samantha Witte
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA07
3 September 2014

QUESTION #28:
Irony- Explain how the following quotation/element from the story is ironic: Alida thought the letter did not have an effect on Grace since she was “married to Horace Ansley two months afterward…(her) mother rushed (her) off to Florence and married (her)…people wondered at it being done so quickly…”

ANSWER:
Authors often use irony throughout all kinds of literature to create humor within a piece of work. It is a literary style in which someone says or does something that takes on the complete opposite meaning from the truth. It often causes a misunderstanding among characters or a dramatic twist in the plot of the story. In the case of the story “Roman Fever, “ this ironic quotation is revealing a big secret between two characters that were supposed to know everything about each other.


Grace and Alida had been the best of friends for years, and found themselves out one day looking over the spot they first met, which was “down on the outspread glories of the Palatine and the Forum” (Wharton 1). It had been a while since the period of mourning they had experienced together when they both lost their husbands, which was when they had last seen each other. Now “they had run across each other in Rome, at the same hotel…the two ladies had never before had occasion to be silent together” (Wharton 3). They were enjoying each other’s company, talking about their daughters, and reminiscing about their husbands. It was among this silence that Alida and Grace admit to things that they both kept from one another.

The quotation above is ironic because Alida’s ideas about why Grace ran off so quickly to get married was the complete opposite of the truth, which Grace kept from her all of these years. Alida was married to a man named Delphin. She admitted to Grace that, at around the time Delphin proposed, she “hated (her). (She) knew (she) was in love with Delphin…so in blind fury (she) wrote the letter” (Wharton 8). The letter was a fake love letter that Alida had written as Delphin to Grace to meet him one night. This fact was something Grace had never known. Grace ended up “marrying so soon” after that night that it “convinced (Alida) that (Grace) never really cared” (Wharton 9). It was an ironic situation because Alida thought that she was the only one keeping secrets. She thought Grace ran off to get married and had her daughter Barbra with her new husband. Then she finds out that Grace “answered the letter…So he came” (Wharton 9). The irony is that Alida thought, even after all of this, she still had won because she ended up with Delphin, but then Grace tells her that her daughter Barbra was a result of that night. Alida tried to keep Grace away from her husband, yet in the end, the letter ended up being exactly what brought the two together and caused repercussions that she would never have imagined.

Posted by: Samantha Witte at September 3, 2014 06:00 PM

“Do Over”
Allison Ward
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 210 CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
3 September 2014

Question #20
Explain how the following quotation/element from the story is an example of foreshadowing. Alida makes a comment that is both complimentary and insulting…”wondering how two such exemplary characters as you and Horace managed to produce anything (babs) quite so dynamic.” Explain how this can also be an example of irony.

Answer
The following quotation is an example of foreshadowing by containing both the qualities of a compliment and an insult. The word dynamic can be interpreted in a good or bad way. The foreshadowing comes into play because of the quote before it, “that Campolieri boy is one of the best matches in Rome”(Wharton 4). The daughter of Horace and the wife may end up with the boy, or may have no chance with him. This can also be an example of irony by saying that two not good so people can create a unique human being.

Posted by: Allison Ward at September 3, 2014 06:06 PM

Stephanie Vera
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs, M.L.A., Ph. D.
ENG. 122 Academic Writing II CA07
September 3, 2014

Roman Fever
By: Edith Wharton


Question #10: The narrative voice is slippery in this story. Although most of it is told from an omniscient point of view- giving us the characters’ thoughts and histories, as well as their words and actions- occasionally it slips into a sort of ventriloquism, describing a character in the voice of another character. What does this add to the story? Explain.


Answer: Roman Fever is a story being told by a narrator allowing us to capture the emotions coming from within each character. The story then slips into another character’s voice as they begin to tell a story of their own. When this happens, the story then begins to have a different tone and it appears that the readers have a deeper connection with the characters. Throughout the passages, there are several dialogues amongst the characters expressing emotion through their own stories. For example, Mrs. Slade starts to reminisce on her childhood. “Grace Ansley was always old-fashioned,” she thought, and added aloud with a retrospective smile: “It’s a view we’ve both been familiar with for many good years. You remember!” “Oh, yes, I remember,” murmured Mrs. Ansley, with the same undefinable stress. (Pg. 1, 2)

Posted by: Stephanie at September 3, 2014 06:55 PM

Emily Finck
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
5 September 2014


Question #26:
Irony-Explain how the following quotation/element from the story is ironic: Alida thought the letter did not have an effect on Grace since she was “married to Horace Ansley two months afterward... (her) mother rushed (her) off to Florence and married (her)…People wondered at its being done so quickly…”


Answer:
The reason that the previous quotation/element of the story “Roman Fever,” by Edith Wharton is found to be ironic, is because Grace finally confirms the suspicion of an affair between her and Delphin, by revealing to Alida that she had Barbra (Wharton 10). Implying that Grace and Delphin consummated their love together and conceived a child, even though, Delphin was engaged to Alida and Horace to Grace. Based on speculation, Grace’s mother shipped her off to Florence to be married was so that no one would find out she was pregnant out of wedlock, and, with the child of another man nonetheless. The irony then lies, with, Alida still, because she thought that the letter was holding Grace together for all these years, when in reality it was the fact that Barbra belonged to Delphin.

Posted by: Emily Finck at September 4, 2014 04:29 PM

Zachary Gary
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA07
1 September 2014

Question #27:
Explain how the following quotation/element from the story is ironic: Alida thought her letter worked; she thought that Grace waited at the Colosseum for Delphin and got sick from the cold dampness.

Answer:
It is ironic that Alida thought her letter worked in getting Grace sick waiting for Delphin because, in fact, Grace had not waited at all. Delphin let her inside because Grace answered the letter that Alida wrote her but answered to Delphin. She told him that she would be there, and he came for her. So Grace did not get sick from what Alida had planned.

“”Mrs. Ansley's voice grew clearer, and full of surprise. “But of course he was there. Naturally he came"
"Came? How did he know he'd find you there? You must be raving!"
Mrs. Ansley hesitated, as though reflecting. "But I answered the letter. I told him I'd be there. So he came."
Mrs. Slade flung her hands up to her face. "Oh, God—you answered! I never thought of your answering.... "
"It's odd you never thought of it, if you wrote the letter."
"Yes. I was blind with rage."” (Page 9)

Posted by: Zachary Gary at September 4, 2014 10:16 PM

DO OVER: Brianna Broughton
ENC 210CL Love & Desire in Literature CA02
3 September 2014

Roman Fever

Question 10: The narrative voice is slippery in this story. Although most of it is told from an omniscient point of view ---giving us the characters’ thoughts and histories, as well as their words and actions—occasionally it slips into a sort of ventriloquism, describing a character in the voice of another character. What does this add to the story? Explain.

Answer:
The story will occasionally slip into a “ventriloquism”, where one character will describe another. Adding this element to the story adds perception of the character described through the character giving the description’s point of view. The longtime friends, Mrs. Slade and Mrs. Ansley, describe each other and since they have known each other for almost their entire lives they have their own opinions and thoughts about the other which show in their descriptions.

“Each one, of course, had a label ready to attach to the other's name; Mrs. Delphin Slade, for instance, would have told herself, or anyone who asked her, that Mrs. Horace Ansley, twenty-five years ago, had been exquisitely lovely—no, you wouldn't believe it, would you!” (Wharton, pg.). Mrs. Slade viewed her longtime friend as one of the most beautiful she had ever seen. She almost envied her in child hood and as an adult, she seemed to have the perfect life. Her daughter was beautiful and everyone thought of her as perfect, unlike her daughter. Although she wasn’t troublesome she wished her daughter could be more like her. Her husband, now deceased, was “well, just the duplicate of his wife.”(pg.2). Mrs. Slade describes him in the highest regards as she does Mrs. Ansley and her daughter. She is very admiring of the Ansley family and how they lived their lives

Mrs. Ansley, unlike Mrs. Slade, doesn’t see her life as something to be admire. More so as a “front”, or like she puts on an act, so other people will think highly of her. “Mrs. Ansley was much less articulate than her friend, and her mental portrait of Mrs. Slade was slighter, and drawn with fainter touches. ‘ Alida Slade's awfully brilliant; but not as brilliant as she thinks,’ would have summed it up;” (pg.23), Mrs. Ansley thought had the notion that Mrs. Slade was disappointed with her life. She was unemployed, and lost her husband who was the foundation of their family. His status as a prominent business man, their whole family was put to a higher standard in the community. However after the loss of her husband she was stricken with the grief of losing her husband and reliving the death of her young son. After having all these tragedies she puts up a façade of importance to distract from her current situation. The “vividness” of her personality makes that very easy. Mrs. Ansley feels sorry for her longtime friend.

Normally in a story the characters are described by the narrator, or if there isn’t one the author will reveal it through the story. In this short story it occasionally slips into a sort of ventriloquism, this adds perception to the story. You not only get a background of the characters you are reading about but you understand how the character doing the description feels about the person they are describing, whether it be admiration or envy.

Posted by: Brianna Broughton at September 5, 2014 12:04 AM

Do Over
Matt Weller
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 201CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
5 September 2014

Question #5:
What is the meaning of the underlined words in the following paragraph from the story:
Yes; being the Slade’s widow was a dullish business after that. In living up to such a husband all her [Alida’s] faculties had been engaged; now she had only her daughter to live up to, for the son who seemed to have inherited his father’s gifts had died suddenly in boyhood. She had fought through that agony because her husband as there, to be helped and to help; now, after the father’s death, the thought of the boy had become unbearable.

Answer:
The meaning of the underlined words is that Mrs. Slade thought her boy would grow up to be just like his father and in his footsteps. The father, Delphin Slade, was a smart, intelligent, and loving man. “It was a big drop from being the wife of Delphin Slade to being his widow. She had always regarded herself (with a certain conjugal pride) as his equal in social gifts, as contributing her full share to the making of the exceptional couple they were” (Wharton 3). Delphin was well liked and had a good job as a lawyer. “But the difference after his death was irremediable. As the wife of the famous corporation lawyer, always with an international case or two on hand, every day brought its exciting and unexpected obligation” (Wharton 3). He was exciting and a well-known man. It seemed like they were also well off with money. “What, that handsome woman with the good clothes and the eyes is Mrs. Slade—the Slade's wife!” (Wharton 3). Mrs. Slade thought their boy would be just like his dad and learn all of his talents and gifts. Once the boy died, there was sadness felt in the family. However, they had a girl, Alida, who could then follow in Mr. Slade’s footsteps and continue his legacy. Once the father died though, there was no chance for any of the children to learn fully and follow Mr. Slade’s ways. It was so unbearable for Mrs. Slade to handle her boy’s death because he already had all the traits of Delphin.

Posted by: Matthew Weller at September 5, 2014 10:19 AM

Shyra Bryant
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 CA02
2 September 2014
#2. Is it believable that Grace told Delphin about her pregnancy? Why or why not? Explain.
Answer:
In my opinion, I believe that Grace was believable when she talked to Delphin about her pregnancy. On page 2, Grace felt raided, which is believable for someone who is trying share such important news with their close friend. It was very sudden and shocking, but Grace seemed very serious when telling Delphin. That is also a serious matter and not to be joked about, a female especially one is not ready for a pregnancy would joke about the issue, you can understand the tone and message that Grace is trying to give in this passage.
Work Cited
From Roman Fever Story

Posted by: Shyra Bryant at September 5, 2014 12:43 PM

Shyra Bryant
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 CA13
4 September 2014

#5 How do you generalize the attitude of the men toward the woman?
Answer:
In the story Triffles, the men seem very concerned and conniving. They seem as if they put the pressure on the woman and have no sympathy. The men seem to blame the woman and tend to not to trust them. In the men eyes, everything seems to be the womans’ fault.
Work Cited
http://lgdata.s3-website-us-east-1.amazonaws.com/docs/797/1198975/1916_-_Glaspel__Susan_-_Trifles_-_Short_Play.pdf

Posted by: Shyra Bryant at September 5, 2014 12:57 PM

Danielle Kluender
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA07
2 September 2014
Do Over

Question #21:
Explain how the following quotation/element from the story is an example of foreshadowing: Great Aunt Harriet sent her younger sister to the Forum after sunset because they were in love with the same man. Explain how this can also be an example of irony.

Answer:
This quote is an example of foreshadowing because later in the story we discover that Mrs. Slade did the same thing to Mrs. Ansley. When they were young girls, Mrs. Slade heard the story about Great Aunt Harriet (Wharton 5), which gave her the idea to lure her friend Mrs. Ansley to the Coliseum under similar false pretenses by sending her a fake letter from Delphin. It is ironic because although Mrs. Slade intended to trick Mrs. Ansley into going to the Coliseum to get her out of the way of her engagement, Mrs. Ansley ended up sharing a night of passion with Mrs. Slade’s fiancé, Delphin, and getting pregnant. Mrs. Slade was trying to be tricky by writing a fake letter but Mrs. Ansley replied to the letter and Delphin met her at the Coliseum, and she ended up having Barbra, which she revealed to Mrs. Slade at the end of the story. (Wharton 10).

Posted by: Danielle Kluender at September 5, 2014 01:06 PM

DO OVER Mickael Dodard
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122: Academic Writing II CA07
3 September 2014

QUESTION #15:
What are the literal and figurative meanings to “Roman Fever”? How does Roman fever fit doubly into the story? Explain.

ANSWER:
The literal meaning to The Roman Fever is the ironic situation of two old friends discussing memories of their friendship like when it happened that they did not have a hones friendship. The story starts with two friends sitting on a terrace discussing about their memories and how their daughters are living the same events. During this discussion, a comparison of the daughters is brought up. The Slade family has a better daughter than the Ashley family. The author says, “the Slade family’s daughter is more dynamic while the Ashley’s daughter is quieter. “(Wharton 4) This means that the Slade family’s daughter has more potential to be successful than the Ashley Family. At the end of the story, one of the friends betrayed her friend by doing a cruel and dishonest action.

The figurative meaning to The Roman Fever is that you will never know someone even if you know that person for a long time. The personality and intentions will always remain a mystery to your knowledge.

The Roman fever fit doubly to the story because it is a friendly dinner and it is also about cruelty an irony.

Posted by: Mickael Dodard at September 5, 2014 01:50 PM

Revised
Sharonda Byrd
Dr.Hobbs
Love and Desire in Literature ENG-210CL
3 September 2014
Roman Fever


Question #18 Foreshadowing- Explain how the following quotation/element from the story is an example of foreshadowing: “A full moon night, they would remember…” Memento Mori – Latin phrase for “Be mindful of death.” Their friendship is coming to an end.
Answer:
The quotation “A full moon night, they would remember…” is a foreshadowing of what is to come because a full moon means an end to an event. The event that ended was the friendship of Alida Slade and Grace Ansley. Ailda and Grace both have two daughters; Alidas’ daughters name is Jenny Slade but unlike Alida who is described in the story as being vivid and dashing her daughter is described as being pretty,dull,and mousy which is the opposite of what her mother is. However, Graces daughter Barbara is described as being vivid and charming unlike her mom who in the past was like that but now is described as being fragile and quiet. Both women are envious but at the same time pity each other. As the story progresses Alida confesses to Grace that she tricked Grace into going to a Colosseum because she wanted to get rid of Grace as a competitor and she knew that Grace was immune to getting throat infection. Nevertheless, Grace reveals that even though Alida thought she tricked her, Delhpin the man both women were fighting over still saw her that night. Alida discouraged about Graces confession starts gloating about how she in the end got Delphin but Grace throws back at her that she has the daughter that Alida wishes she had. The end of the story reveals that Grace who is seen to be weak comes out on top as being victorious. It is very ironic because as the two women sit on the terrace in Rome the sun is setting just like the sun is setting on their friendship. Their friendship is ending and the sun is setting too and that is how foreshadowing takes place in Roman Fever.

Posted by: Sharonda Byrd at September 5, 2014 02:06 PM

DO OVER

Zailet Martinez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
3 September 2014
Question #4:
Is it believable that Grace told Barbara that she was Jenny’s biological half-sister? Why, or why not? Explain.
Answer:
Grace did not disclose the information to Barbara, she had no reason to do such a thing. Grace was married to Mr. Horace Ansley after the Colosseum incident happened. Seeing how the story ends, it seems that when Mrs. Ansley said “I had Barbara,” that was a confession to herself and Mrs. Slade. (Warthon 10) Also,just because Grace said "I had Barbara," it doesn't mean that Barbara is Mr.Slade's daughter.(10) Barbara grew up with a father, even though he might not have been the biological father. No one saw it differently, no one doubted that Horace Ansley was Barbara’s father. For these reasons, I can conclude that Grace never told her daughter the truth.

Posted by: Zailet Martinez at September 5, 2014 02:20 PM

Anthony Colello
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 210 CL CA02 love and desire in literature
9 september 2014

Question 16: What is the first indication in the story that the women actually hate each other? Which of the two women is more hateful?

Throughout the story Mrs. Slade’s sole focus is on Mrs. Ansley and where she stands in comparison while Mrs. Ansley’s focus is scattered between old friends, conversation, kids, and knitting. This is evident on page 4, the 8th paragraph down, “Mrs. Slade's eyes rested on her with a deepened attention. “She can knit—in the face of this! How like her...“ She has hated Mrs. Ansley since they met and considered her a rival. The competition for the better life extends all the way from their childhood to their children,

“She was simply absorbed in her work. What was there for her to worry about! She knew that Babs would almost certainly come back engaged to the extremely eligible Campolieri. "And she'll sell the New York house, and settle down near them in Rome, and never be in their way... she's much too tactful. But she'll have an excellent cook, and just the right people in for bridge and cocktails... and a perfectly peaceful old age among her grandchildren." (pg. 5 5th paragraph)
Mrs. Slade has allowed her hatred to consume her allowing her to hate even Babs as it is her daughter’s competition, the daughter of her rival.

Mrs. Slade gets further annoyed that she is not at the center of attention. She desires her attention so much because she feels guilty about what she has done in the past that she reveals a long ago secret that has been festering from the inside of Mrs. Slade torturing her, and causing here to relive the past each and every day until now when she tells Mrs. Ansley, "Well, my dear, I know what was in that letter because I wrote it!" (pg. 7, paragraph 11). As if she has not enough damage to Mrs. Ansley she continues to salt the wounds by saying, “"Yes, I was beaten there. But I oughtn't to begrudge it to you, I suppose. At the end of all these years. After all, I had everything; I had him for twenty-five years. And you had nothing but that one letter that he didn't write." (pg. 9, paragraph 16). Hoping to end the conversation with Mrs. Ansley defeated, she began to walk away until Mrs. Ansley tells Mrs. Slade that she did get something for her efforts all those nights ago, “"I had Barbara," she said, and began to move ahead of Mrs. Slade toward the stairway.” (pg. 10) This statement followed by an immediate exit leaves the reader with the feeling that Mrs. Ansley is the women with the last laugh.

With these points highlighted one can see that Mrs. Slade has a deep seated hatred that has been burning for a long time, the kind of hatred that would allow a person to hurt a loved one or even kill. In life we will find that death is easy and that the worst pain will always come from those we love or have loved for it is love that makes such things matter to a degree that our hearts break.

Posted by: anthony colello at September 5, 2014 02:23 PM

Rebecca Messano
Love and Desire In Literature CA02
2 Sept 2014
Dr. Hobbs

DO OVER

Question #1: Why didn't Grace publicly acknowledge her love for Delphin and force him to choose between her and Alida? Explain.

Answer:
In the story, Grace came off as a very introverted person. Being shy and introverted, I don’t think she would have had the nerve to ask Delphin to choose between her and Alida. Seeing as how Grace was known to be more quite and reserved, and Alida was known to be confident and told herself she was smart (though she was not as smart as she thought herself to be) there is a possibility that Alida came off as intimidating to Grace. Being a widow, Alida felt as if she had a reputation to maintain and keep everything together for everyone to see. Ironically enough, Alida admits to Grace that when she found out about her feelings, she hated her and was afraid of her “quiet ways” and her “sweetness.” This led her to write a nasty letter to scare Grace off for a short period of time until she could reestablish Delphin’s feelings. Towards the end of the story though, Alida rubbed it into Grace’s face that she had Delphin “for twenty-five years” and Grace had nothing but “that one letter that he didn’t write.” Grace quickly came back saying that she had Barbara, her daughter.

Posted by: Rebecca Messano at September 5, 2014 02:31 PM

Do Over: Irma Sera
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love & Desire in Literature CA02
2 September 2014

Question #7: Consider the pattern of young women who are juxtaposed in the story as friends, “frenemies,” or sisters: great-aunt Harriet and he sister, Grace and Alida, Barbara and Jenny. How do their stories combine to shape our understanding of the main story here: Grace and Alida’s long standing relationship. Explain.

The stories combine to shape our understanding of the main story: Grace Ansley and Alida Slade’s long-standing relationship by providing us with similarities throughout the story before leading up to the climax. Both of the girls are running off with young men just as their mothers did when they were their age. Barbara is more energetic just as Mrs. Slade was and Jenny is more beautiful and calm just as Mrs. Ansley was. According to Mrs. Slade, Barbara will come back engaged to the available bachelor as she did to Mr. Slade 25 years ago. “She knew that Babs would almost certainly come back engaged to the extremely eligible Campolieri” (Wharton 5). The fact that the girls are half-sisters, Grace’s Great-aunt Harriet story comes into play. Harriet and her sister were in-love with the same man and she tricked her into exposing herself to Roman fever. "But she really sent her because they were in love with the same man—" (Wharton 6). All of the events are parallel to one another; only to show that history has a great way of repeating itself.

Posted by: DO OVER: Irma Sera at September 5, 2014 02:52 PM

Do Over
Matt Weller
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 201CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
5 September 2014

Question #5:
What is the meaning of the underlined words in the following paragraph from the story:
Yes; being the Slade’s widow was a dullish business after that. In living up to such a husband all her [Alida’s] faculties had been engaged; now she had only her daughter to live up to, for the son who seemed to have inherited his father’s gifts had died suddenly in boyhood. She had fought through that agony because her husband as there, to be helped and to help; now, after the father’s death, the thought of the boy had become unbearable.

Answer:
The meaning of the underlined words is that Mrs. Slade thought her boy would grow up to be just like his father and in his footsteps. The father, Delphin Slade, was a smart, intelligent, and loving man. “It was a big drop from being the wife of Delphin Slade to being his widow. She had always regarded herself (with a certain conjugal pride) as his equal in social gifts, as contributing her full share to the making of the exceptional couple they were” (Wharton 3). Delphin was well liked and had a good job as a lawyer. “But the difference after his death was irremediable. As the wife of the famous corporation lawyer, always with an international case or two on hand, every day brought its exciting and unexpected obligation” (Wharton 3). He was exciting and a well-known man. It seemed like they were also well off with money. “What, that handsome woman with the good clothes and the eyes is Mrs. Slade—the Slade's wife!” (Wharton 3). Mrs. Slade thought their boy would be just like his dad and learn all of his talents and gifts. Once the boy died, there was sadness felt in the family. They had a girl, Jenny, who could then follow in Mr. Slade’s footsteps and continue his legacy. However, Jenny was dull and shy and did not poses the qualities Mr. Slade had. Once the father died though, there was no chance for any of the children to learn fully and follow Mr. Slade’s ways. It was so unbearable for Mrs. Slade to handle her boy’s death because he already had all the traits of Delphin.

Posted by: Matthew Weller at September 5, 2014 03:16 PM

Shelby Rexroth & Ahmed Almoailu
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210CL
September 6th, 2014

QUESTION: #25: Irony – Explain how the following quotation/element from the story is ironic: Grace says: “The most prudent (sensible/cautious) girls aren’t always prudent.”

ANSWER: The quotation is ironic because even though Grace made that comment, she was still the one who was prudent. She went behind Alida’s back and had an affair with Grace’s husband and decided to act discreet about the affair and then hide it from Alida.

Posted by: Shelby Rexroth at September 6, 2014 10:50 PM

DO OVER
Gabriel Navarro
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENC 210CL Love & Desire in Literature CA02
6 Sept. 2014


QUESTION #23:
Irony – Explain how the following quotation/element from the story is ironic: Alida and Grace are described as “intimate friends… [coming to] a new stage in their intimacy.”


ANSWER:
To be “intimate” with another person is to be closely acquainted. According to the text, Grace and Alida have “…been intimate since childhood” (Warton 3), so both seem to have an unbroken bound. However, irony is shown when true intimacy lacks between the both as betrayal takes place. Grace was once with Delphin and had his child in secret, as Alida wrote a letter to Grace acting as Delphin. It turned out to be that once both have “reflected how little they knew each other” (Warton 2), is when “a new stage in their intimacy” began.

Posted by: Gabriela Navarro at September 7, 2014 12:48 AM

“Do Over”
Emily Finck
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
7 September 2014


Question #26:
Irony-Explain how the following quotation/element from the story is ironic: Alida thought the letter did not have an effect on Grace since she was “married to Horace Ansley two months afterward... (her) mother rushed (her) off to Florence and married (her)…People wondered at its being done so quickly…”


Answer:
The reason that the previous quotation/element of the story “Roman Fever,” by Edith Wharton is found to be ironic, is because Grace finally confirms the suspicion of an affair between her and Delphin, by revealing to Alida that she had Barbra (Wharton 10). Implying that Grace and Delphin consummated their love together and conceived a child, even though, Delphin was engaged to Alida and Horace to Grace. Based on speculation, Grace’s mother shipped her off to Florence to be married so that no one would find out she was pregnant out of wedlock, and, with the child of another man, nonetheless. The irony then lies, with, Alida because she thought that the letter was holding Grace together for all these years. However, Grace says, “I cared for that memory” (Wharton 8), revealing to Alida that there is something else in which Grace was able to equate her love for Delphin; Barbra.

Posted by: Emily Finck at September 7, 2014 08:45 AM

Emily Finck & Allison Ward
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
8 September 2014


Question #21:
Foreshadowing- Explain how the following quotation/element from the story is an example of foreshadowing: Great Aunt Harriet sent her younger sister to the Forum after sunset because they were in love with the same man. Explain how this can also be an example of irony.


Answer:
Great Aunt Harriet, from Edith Wharton’s “Roman Fever,” can be considered an element of foreshadowing because she symbolizes the affair between Grace and Delphin. By bringing Great Aunt Harriet into the conversation, Alida is hinting to Grace that she suspects/knows about their affair. Hence Alida flat out saying, “But she really sent her because they were in love with the same man--” (Wharton 6). A little further into their exchange, Alida goes on to say to Grace that she scared her by getting sick the winter she was engaged to Delphin (6). This statement furthers the subtle accusations made by Alida about Grace’s affair with Delphin. This example of foreshadowing can also be considered ironic since later on in the story, Alida tells Grace that she was there the day she went to the Forum because she wrote the letter. What Alida later finds out is that Delphin was at the Forum with Grace, because she answered the letter. Leaving Alida dumbfounded, for she never expected Grace to respond to the letter.

Posted by: Emily Finck at September 7, 2014 10:01 AM

Brianna Broughton & Zailet Martinez
Dr. Hobbs
ENC 210CL Love & Desire in Literature CA02
5 September 2014

Roman Fever

Question 22: Explain how the following quotation/element from the story is ironic: when discussing their daughters and themselves during their youth, Grace Ansley states "And perhaps we didn't know much more about each other."

Answer: The above quote from the story is ironic because although Grace Ansley and Alida Slade have been friends since they were small girls, and lived across from each other, they had little knowledge about each other’s personal lives, or how much they had in common. Toward the end of the story where the author implied that Graces’ daughter, Barbara, was Delphin Slade’s daughter it was very clear how much the two longtime friends did not know about each other. “…I had him for twenty-five years. And you had nothing but that one letter that he didn't write.” said Alida. Grace answered solemnly, “’I had Barbara,’ she said, and began to move ahead of Mrs. Slade toward the stairway.” (Wharton, 9).

Posted by: Brianna Broughton at September 7, 2014 07:27 PM

Ashjan Alrashid and Thomas Watson
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
7 September 2014

Question #23 :
Explain how the following quotation/element from the story is ironic: Alida and Grace are described as “Intimate Friends .. [coming to] a new stag of their intimacy” Hint: look up the definition of intimate

Answer:
Alida and Grace who have known each other since childhood, seemed to have began “a new stage in their intimacy, and one with which she did not yet know how to deal”. (Wharton 3) Even though it might have been embarrassing at the beginning, they started to feel more comfortable around each other at the end. They even have started to remains about the old days and open up to one another. The Irony here is that as soon as they have entered this stage of intimacy, the things that they confessed about to one another is what brook them apart and probably ended their relationship.

Posted by: ashjan alrashid, Tomas Watson at September 7, 2014 08:39 PM

Irma Sera
Rebecca Messano
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210 Love and Desire in Literature CA02
5 September 2014

Question #20
Explain how the following quotation/element from the story is an example of foreshadowing: Alida makes a comment that is both complimentary and insulting “… wondering how two such exemplary characters as you and Horace managed to produce anything (Babs) quite so dynamic.” Explain how this can also be an example of irony.

Answer:
The comment Mrs. Slade makes to Mrs. Ansley, “… wondering how two such exemplary characters as you and Horace managed to produce anything (Babs) quite so dynamic” (Wharton 4), reveals how bitter and angry Alida is. Not only towards Mrs. Ansley, but towards the fact that her daughter is pretty much boring. The comment also indirectly foreshadowed the ironic ending of the story. It turned out Mr. Slade and Mrs. Ansley did, in fact, meet up. "But I didn't wait. He'd arranged everything. He was there. We were let in at once" (9). While Alida believed she won the battle in the end, Mrs. Ansley revealed that her daughter (Babs) is the daughter of Mrs. Slade late husband.

Posted by: Irma Sera & Rebecca Messano at September 7, 2014 10:39 PM

Anthony colello,
Gabriela Navarro 
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 love and desire in literature CA02
 
Question 24: 
irony-explain how the following quotation/element from the story is ironic: alida says "people always said that expedition was what caused your illness."

Answer:
So there is a slight foreshadowing here of the confrontation from Mrs. Slade to Mrs. Ansley about the truth of the night when Mrs. Ansley went to meet Mr. Slade. We believe that the line is ironic because Mrs. Ansley went there that night to meet Mr. Slade  because Mrs. Slade sent her there and rather than Mrs. Ansley getting sick and leaving him alone so Mrs. Slade could secure her marriage, Mrs. Ansley got pregnant.

Posted by: Anthony Colello at September 8, 2014 08:56 AM

Sharonda Byrd
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENC 210CL Love & Desire in Literature CA02
7 September 2014
Roman Fever
Question #26: Explain how the following quotation/element from the story is ironic: Alida thought the letter did not have an effect on Grace since she was “married to Horace Ansley two months afterward… (Her) mother rushed (her) off to Florence and married (her)… People wondered at its being done so quickly…”

Answer: This passage is ironic because Alida Slade thought she was to trick Grace into going to the Coliseum to find that Delphine was not there but the ironic part of this is Grace did meet with Delphine. Alida Slade maliciously wrote a letter to Grace to meet her at the Collesum at night knowing that Grace could become ill going out that late but Grace wrote back to Delphine and they ended up meeting anyway. Mrs. Slades plan did not work but even though Grace and Delphine had that night together and Grace loved him they still did not end up being together.

Posted by: Sharonda Byrd at September 8, 2014 12:08 PM

Sharonda Byrd
Matt Weller
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENC 210CL Love & Desire in Literature CA02
7 September 2014
Roman Fever
Question #26: Explain how the following quotation/element from the story is ironic: Alida thought the letter did not have an effect on Grace since she was “married to Horace Ansley two months afterward… (Her) mother rushed (her) off to Florence and married (her)… People wondered at its being done so quickly…”

Answer: This passage is ironic because Alida Slade thought she was to trick Grace into going to the Coliseum to find that Delphine was not there but the ironic part of this is Grace did meet with Delphine. Alida Slade maliciously wrote a letter to Grace to meet her at the Collesum at night knowing that Grace could become ill going out that late but Grace wrote back to Delphine and they ended up meeting anyway. Mrs. Slades plan did not work but even though Grace and Delphine had that night together and Grace loved him they still did not end up being together.

Posted by: Sharonda Byrd at September 8, 2014 12:10 PM

Shyra Bryant
Dr.B. Lee Hobbs
Eng 122
7 September 2014
#11 As the reader, when do you begin to sympathize Farquhar- before or after his introduction in section II? Why?
Answer:
As the reader I began to sympathize for Farquhar because he genuinely seemed like a good guy, and he seemed very dedicated. Farquhar seems as if he wants the best for himself and others. He states in section II “he felt the opportunity of distinction would come, as it would come in all wartime.” So therefore he did what he could. He also states, “No service was too humble for him to perform in the aid of the south.” To me that shows dedication and wellbeing. He did not give up on his works, and for that, I have sympathy for him.

Posted by: Shyra Bryant at September 8, 2014 01:21 PM

Repost
Antonella Aviles
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Love and Desire in Literature
2 September 2014

Question: Alida Slade reflects ruefully that her daughter, Jenny, operates as a “foil” for Grace Ansley’s daughter, Barbara. What does she mean by that? How does it contribute to our understanding of the social environment of the time, and Mrs. Slade’s way of looking at things?

Answer: She says this to describe Jenny as a simple article that has no chance against Barbara because she is not as desirable and she is always sent with her as if to make Barbara look better being beside her hence give her attention for getting the Babs boy. Mrs. Slade just looks at things for how they truly are and doesn’t try to sugarcoat things like when she told Mrs. Ansley “That Campolieri boy is one of the best matches in Rome”. She knows that that is the purpose of sending the girls out together.

Posted by: Antonella Aviles at September 8, 2014 03:31 PM

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*NOTE* The deadline for this particular assignment has now passed. Any comments listed below are *ONLY* for the reposting of comments that I specifically asked to be revised or are ones from non-student posters. Any 'student' posts below that missed the assignment deadline will not get credit for the assignment. ~ Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: Dr. B. Lee Hobbs at September 15, 2014 04:29 PM

Jan Urbaniak
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 CA12
January 22nd 2015

Question: What are the literal and figurative meanings to Roman Fever? How does Roman fever fit doubly into the story?

Answer: In the story of Edith Wharton the title “Roman Fever” means several things. In the very beginning of the plot, we can easily see the Mrs. Slade wanted that Mrs. Ansley would catch Malaria. That is the systematic name of the Roman Fever illness, so this is the literal meaning. In figurative meaning, author has used it as the expression of the jealousness of Mrs. Slade toward Mrs. Ansley since the Slade daughter is dealing with things better than the Ansley daughter.

Posted by: Jan Urbaniak at January 22, 2015 02:03 PM

Delphin could come off to most readers and sneaky , this is because dolphin was married for twenty five years at least and has been keeping the encountering he had with Grace a secret from his wife which he was with at the moment. Readers can assume that Grace was anxious to go meet Delphin at coliseum that night, considering the fact that she had already had feelings for him before the note. Also she showed interest in him by responding to the letter that Mrs. Slade wrote, even though she thought it was Delphin.

Posted by: Amber Dunlap at January 22, 2015 04:31 PM

Rachel Addington
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
22 January 2015

Question: Is it believable Grace told Delphin about her pregnancy? Why, or why not? Explain.

Answer: It is not believable that Grace told Delphin about her pregnancy because it was her best friend, Mrs. Slade’s, husband. Also Grace’s mother rushed her into marriage two months later to hide her pregnancy. If Grace would have told Delphin it would have ruined her best friend’s marriage and they would not be having the conversation they were having.

Posted by: Rachel Addington at January 22, 2015 04:58 PM

Mallory Delay
Dr. Hobbs
ENC 122 Academic Writing CA012
22 January 2015

Question: Alida Slade reflects ruefully that her daughter, Jenny, operates as a "foil" for Grace Ansley's daughter, Barbara. What does she mean by that? How does it contribute to our understanding of the social environment of the time, and Mrs. Slade's way of looking at things?
Answer: When Alida Slade says that her daughter Jenny is a "foil", she means that her daughter is being used as a way to hold back the actions and ambitions of Barbara Ansley. Jenny Slade is the young beautiful girl that does no wrong. Mrs. Slade loves her daughter but wishes Jenny could be more outgoing, "She wished that Jenny would fall in love- with the wrong man, even; that she might have be watched, out-maneuvered, rescued" (Wharton 3). The social-environmental cues of the time and Mrs. Slade's view are very much the same. Women were seen as the young romantics that should be going out and falling in love with young men. They are to be wild and crazy now while they have the chance to have "an edge-as they say" (Wharton 2). Mrs. Slade is disappointed that her daughter "had none of her mother's-well, "vividness", someone had once called it" (Wharton 3).

Posted by: Mallory Delay at January 22, 2015 08:21 PM

Emily Buckley
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing 2 CA12
January 22, 2015

Roman Fever
Question 19: Foreshadowing- Explain how the following quotation/element from the story is an example of foreshadowing: The Coliseum is looming with its “outlying immensity” in the background.
Answer: The Coliseum is a symbol for the visitation incident in their youth between Mrs. Ansley and Mrs. Slade’s fiancé at the time. During the conversation between Mrs. Ansley and Mrs. Slade did not want to confront each other, the topic was looming in the back of both of their minds. It was greatly outlying the conversation, and the issue would need to be addressed to give peace of mind. (Wharton, 7)

Posted by: Emily Buckley at January 22, 2015 09:31 PM

Kathleen Sholl
Dr. Hobbs
English 122 CA12
22 January 15

“Roman Fever” Discussion Questions

Question: What is the first indication in the story that the women actually hate each other? Which of the two women are more hateful? Explain your reasoning with clear examples from the text.

Answer: In this short story titled Roman Fever, the first indication that the women actually hate each other is when the women hear their two daughters depart to go out for the day with some boys. Mrs. Ansley states, “I suppose they’ll want to wait and fly back by moonlight” (Wharton 2). It appears to Mrs. Slade that Mrs. Ansley has a better relationship with both the young girls than she does. Mrs. Slade gives the impression that she envy’s the relationship between Mrs. Ansley and the two daughters. The reader can determine this first indication from the text because Mrs. Slade says, “Moonlight-moonlight” (Wharton 2). She had no indication that her daughter was going out in the first place. As the short story progresses, there are many other signs that the women hate each other such as, “she felt her unemployment more than poor Grace ever would” (Wharton 3). Betrayal and competition are a significant trait that both of these mothers possess. Mrs. Slade gives the impression of being the most hateful one out of the two women because she states, “I must make one more effort not to hate her” (Wharton 5).

Posted by: Kathleen Sholl at January 22, 2015 10:36 PM

Vallinique Martin
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Romans Fever
22 January 2015

Question: 3. Is it believable that Grace told Horace that he was not Barbara’s biological father? Why or why not?
Answer: No. She married him two months after being with Delphin Slade so that Horace would believe Barbara was his daughter. Also it seemed like she was admitting for the first time to anyone when she told Mrs. Slade “I had Barbara.”

Posted by: Vallinique Martin at January 22, 2015 10:49 PM

Selena Hammie
Dr. B. Hobbs
Academic Writing 122
January 22, 2015

Question #3
Is it believable that Grace told Horace that he was not Barbara's biological Father? Why, or why not? Explain.

While I was reading this short story I found it difficult to understand. From what I gather, I do not think it was believable the Grace told Horace that he as not Barbara's biological father because there was no clear evidence that lead me to believe she said anything.

Posted by: Selena Hammie at January 22, 2015 11:22 PM

Kaitlin Murphy
Dr. Hobbs
Academic Writing II ENG-122-CA12
22 January 2015

Question: What is Alida Slade's opinion of Grace Ansley? What is Grace's of Alida? How are the opinions different/similar? Explain.

Answer: Alida Slade's opinion of her lifetime friend Grace Ansley is that she has envied her for her entire life after their trip to Rome as teenagers. She figured out that her fiancé and Grace were into each other and she figured that out by writing a fake letter to Grace. Her hate for Grace just continued to grow over the years, "...and I hated you, hated you. I knew you were in love with Delphin..."(Edith 8). Grace Ansley's opinion of her friend Alida Slade is that she has always looked at her as being a good friend that has always been around. She did have feelings for Alida's husband in which the night that Grace was set up to go "meet him" which indeed did happen, was the night that, Grace's daughter, Barbara (Babs) was conceived.
These opinions are different because Alida never really saw Grace as being a true friend and always knew it. As Grace never really thought Alida knew of the secret that happened between her and Alida's husband long ago, so she always thought of her as being a good friend. They are similar due to the fact that each one of them has acted to be good friends with one another for such a long time when both have been hiding so much from each other over the years.

Posted by: Kaitlin Murphy at January 22, 2015 11:23 PM

Charis Lavoie
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA01
23 January 2015

Question: The narrative voice is slippery in this story. Although most of it is told from an omniscient point of view- giving us the characters’ thoughts and histories, as well as their words and actions- occasionally is slips into a sort of ventriloquism, describing a character in the voice of another character. What does this add to the story? Explain

Answer: The ventriloquist voice in this story gives us a look at the inner workings of the character's minds and assumptions that each has about the other. One such example is found in paragraph twenty-three, Mrs. Ansley reflects that "Alida Slade's awfully brilliant; but not as brilliant as she thinks.” This displays that while Mrs. Ansley has respect for Mrs. Slade’s intelligence, she is still a bit dense on some of the other more important aspects of her life.

Posted by: Charis Lavoie at January 23, 2015 08:30 AM

In "Roman Fever" there is a brief anecdote on Great Aunt Harriet. The story was about her treachery against her sister for the affections of a boy which then caused her sisters' death. " "Well, that was the family tradition. They said Aunt Harriet confessed it years afterward. At any rate, the poor little sister caught the fever and died. Mother used to frighten us with the story when we were children.And you frightened me with it, that winter when you and I were here as girls. The winter I was engaged to Delphin."
The story was used by Mrs. Slade to remind Barbra about the dreaded Colosseum nights and to remember the tales told to them when young.

Posted by: Rously Paul at January 23, 2015 09:05 AM

Victoria Markou
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 121 Academic Writing II CA 12
23 January 2015

“It was a big drop from being the wife of Delphin Slade to being his widow. She had always regarded herself (with a certain conjugal pride) as his equal in social gifts, as contributing her full share to the making of the exceptional couple they were: but the difference after his death was irremediable. As the wife of the famous corporation lawyer, always with an international case or two on hand, every day brought its exciting and unexpected obligation: the impromptu entertaining of eminent colleagues from abroad, the hurried dashes on legal business to London, Paris or Rome, where the entertaining was so handsomely reciprocated; the amusement of hearing in her wakes: "What, that handsome woman with the good clothes and the eyes is Mrs. Slade—the Slade's wife! Really! Generally the wives of celebrities are such frumps.” (Roman Fever, page 4, par. 2, Edith Wharton)
“In living up to such a husband all her faculties had been engaged; now she had only her daughter to live up to…” (Roman Fever, page 3, par. 3, Edith Wharton)
Question: How does Alida Slade view her life when her husband is alive? How does she view her life now? If the views are different, explain how.
Answer: When Mrs. Slade’s husband is alive, she views herself as an equal to her husband. She is excited to unexpectedly entertain his colleagues. Being Mr. Slade’s wife and all of the entailed obligations kept her occupied and she took great pride in that. Now that he is gone, she feels that she has too much time on her hands, and has downgraded from her previous life. She only has one daughter to look after, and she doesn’t even need to do that because her daughter is too perfect. “There was nothing left but to mother her daughter;and dear Jenny was such a perfect daughter that she needed no excessive mothering.” (Wharton 3)

Posted by: Victoria Markou at January 23, 2015 10:32 AM

Alison Colon
Dr.Hobbs
Eng 122 Academic Writing 2
21 January 2015

1. Why didn’t Grace publicly acknowledge her love for Delphin and force him to choose between her and Alida? Explain.

I feel that Grace was so hurt and embarrassed by the situation that she did not want people knowing of it. In the text is explains how Grace is more shy and quiet so I don’t think she would appreciate people finding out about her affair with a man while not only being in a relationship herself but the man was her friends later husband. As stated in the story “Grace Ansley was always old-fashioned” this shows the manner in which Grace carries herself so I don’t believe she wanted to tarnish that reputation.. I think another major point is that Alida was a good friend of hers and she knew what she was doing was wrong . The repercussions of her affair would have effected there families and friendships in a terrible way.

Posted by: Alison Colon at January 23, 2015 11:20 AM

"I'll cure him of wondering," said Mrs. Slade, stretching her hand toward a bag as discreetly opulent-looking as Mrs. Ansley's. Signing to the headwaiter, she explained that she and her friend were old lovers of Rome, and would like to spend the end of the afternoon looking down on the view—that is, if it did not disturb the service! The headwaiter, bowing over her gratuity, assured her that the ladies were most welcome, and would be still more so if they would condescend to remain for dinner. A full moon night, they would remember."( Pg.2 "Roman Fever", by Edith Wharton (1862-1937)

Question: Why didn't Grace publicly Acknowledge her love for Delphin and force him to choose between her and Alida? Explain.


Answer: Grace seemed to by a shy and introverted person so I don't think she would have admitted or talked about the affair to anyone, so she wouldn't have made it public. I doubt she would have even told anyone she was actually close to. I also wondered who Delphin really loved. Was he really in love with Alida since he married her? If he was then why did he have the affair? Or was he actually in love with Grace? Maybe Grace did force Delphin to choose between the two and he chose Alida. Maybe because he was really in love with her or maybe he married her for her money? I'm kind of straying from the story now, but I'm not sure about that. It would have been interesting to see what happened between Grace and Delphin after that night at the Colosseum.

Posted by: Madison Helms at September 1, 2015 03:13 PM

Jaclyn Taylor
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122
1 September 2015

Question: 18 – Foreshadowing- Explain how the following quotation/element from the story is an example of foreshadowing: “A full moon night, they would remember…” Memento Mori- Latin phrase for “Be mindful of death.” Their friendship is coming to an end.
Answer: “A full moon night, they would remember…” The writer ending the sentence the way that he did gave a great foreshadowing because he left it for the reader to think what was going to happen next. As you look over the end sentence you can tell the way that the author has written it that it seems that the two women may be in for a rough night that they will certainly remember. As you read throughout the story you come to the conclusion that that moon night was one that they would remember for years.

Posted by: Jaclyn Taylor at September 1, 2015 08:41 PM

Tannor berry
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210CL Roman Fever CA09
1 September 2015

Roman Fever
Question: How does Alida Slade view her life when her husband was alive? How does she view her life now? If the views are different, explain how.

Answer: In the story “Roman Fever,” Alida Slade viewed her life as a place where she felt particularly special and felt that all eyes were on her. She felt as if her companion didn’t grasp her style of living. "I'll cure him of wondering," said Mrs. Slade, stretching her hand toward a bag as discreetly opulent-looking as Mrs. Ansley's.” (Wharton). As her husband had passed, Mrs. Slade revealed that her life had been a social setback and she felt bad for herself, which came from the many failures she had. The views are different because she realized after all what she went through and was missing.

Posted by: Tannor Berry at September 1, 2015 09:15 PM

Johnny Nguyen
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122
1 September 2015

Question: Is it believable that Grace told Delphin about her pregnancy? Why or why not?

Answer: I don't think Grace told Delphin because she was scared it would mess up her friendship with Alida when she really hates her. Also, she ended up getting married just to cover up her pregnancy. At the very end of the story, Grace replies with the last note "I had Barbra." and then walked off. She's probably saying this to insult Alida because if Delphin would've known he and Grace were having a daughter, Alida and Delphin probably wouldn't of gotten married.

Posted by: Johnny Nguyen at September 1, 2015 11:32 PM

Zach Pottle
Professor Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
1 September 2015
Question: What are readers supposed to think of Delphin Slade? What can readers assume were Grace’s feelings towards Delphin when she went to the Coliseum that night?

Answer: In the first part of the story, Delphin is portrayed as the loving husband of Alida Slade. The reader learns that Alida and Delphin have a daughter Jenny together. After learning about Delphin’s infidelity with Alida, the reader gets a true picture of Delphin’s personality. It is up to the reader to decide for themselves whether or not his unfaithfulness to Alida can be validated. One could argue that it was wrong of him to do so, yet, on the other hand, one could argue that he was following his heart.

In part two of the story, the two women -Alida and Grace- start to ponder their relationship. The reader learns that the two women come to realize how little they know about each other. “And for a few moments the two ladies, who had been intimate since childhood, reflected how little they knew each other” (Wharton 2). Grace learns that the night she went to the Colosseum to meet Delphin when she was young, Alida was the one who wrote the note saying that he would meet her there. Grace, although hurt by this remark, acts calm and continues to tell Alida that she won in the end because she has the better daughter.

Posted by: Zach at September 2, 2015 08:43 AM

Luis Bautista

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 122

1 September 2015

"Mrs. Slade broke off this prophetic flight with a recoil of self-disgust. There was no one of whom she had less right to think unkindly than of Grace Ansley. Would she never cure herself of envying her! Perhaps she had begun too long ago." (Warthog, Edith, page 5).

Question: Alida Slade reflects her daughter Jenny, operates as a "foil" for Grace Ansley's daughter, Barbara. What does she mean by that? How does it contribute to our understanding of the social environment of the time, and Mrs. Slade's way of looking thins?

Answer: When Slade refers to her daughter as Ansley's daughter's "foil" she is clearly showing admiration for her friend and her daughter but and the same time envy. In fact, She sees her daughter as a foil of her friend because she recognize that she was more attractive and brilliant. However, she keeps her pride and her daughter pride by defending her and claiming; "my daughter is an angel too". Is clear that between the two friends there's an environment of envy and eager to be better than each other.

Posted by: Luis Bautista at September 2, 2015 09:03 AM

Lois Martinez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
1 September 2015

Question: The narrative voice is slippery in the story. Although most of it is told from an omniscient point of view—giving us the characters’ thoughts and histories, as well as their words and actions—occasionally it slips into a sort of ventriloquism, describing a character in the voice of another character. What does this add to the story? Explain.
Answer: Throughout the story, the reader encounters many moments where the omniscient author is describing the thoughts, feelings, and actions of the two ladies in detail to paint a clear picture of the scene. The author also writes as if the characters are describing each other in their thoughts which adds a sense of truth and realism to the story. Moreover, this realism or truth provides flashbacks to their past and background on how they used to know each other. However, as the conversation of the two childhood friends progressed, they noticed that they still have much to learn from one another. "I've come to the conclusion that I don't in the least know what they are, and perhaps we didn't know much more about each other," replied Mrs. Ansley after Mrs. Slade questioned if their daughter were as sentimental as they were, assuming that her friend was as sentimental as she used to be (Wharton 2). Due to moments like this, the character sat in silence often and traveled back in time questioning one another in each other's mind and responding as her friend would with their words. This sort of ventriloquism helps the reader understand that these voices, which often take place in thoughtful, quiet moments, support the assumptions of the characters, therefore, adding focus towards the discomfort of not quite knowing each other as well as they thought.

Posted by: Lois Martinez at September 2, 2015 09:20 AM

Cannelle Samson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
2 September 2015


Redo

Question: What is Alida Slade’s opinion of Grace Ansley? What is Grace’s opinion of Alida? How are the opinions different and similar? Explain


Answer: Alida Slade’s opinion of Grace Ansley is determined by the envy and hate that Alida feels toward Grace. Although, they have been friends since childhood Alida finds herself showing strong jealousy towards Grace. Alida finds Grace to be old fashioned, sentimental, boring, prudent, and too much absorbed in her work. For example, as Alida is enjoying the spectacular view Grace is knitting, and not paying much attention to what Alida is saying. In “Roman Fever” Alida’s thoughts are expressed, “Mrs. Slade's eyes rested on her with a deepened attention. “She can knit—in the face of this! How like her....” Although envious, Alida finds Grace to have been lovely, charming, and distinguished. Alida also believed Grace to have been beautiful, even more beautiful then Grace’s daughter. As Alida examines Grace, she thinks, “Though, of course, still charming, distinguished.... Well, as a girl she had been exquisite; far more beautiful than her daughter…” However, Alida finds that Grace lacks the humor and edge of Babs.
Grace, contrary to Alida, is not absorbed by hate and envy towards her friend. On the other hand, Grace pities Alida. It seems as if Grace does not give much thought to Alida. Grace believes Alida to be “Slade's awfully brilliant; but not as brilliant as she thinks.” Grace also believes that Alida has a pretty and clever daughter who is missing Alida’s vividness.
The differences between Alida and Grace’s opinions of each other is that Alida is motivated of viewing Grace through eyes of hate and envy. Grace, on the other hand, doesn’t think much of Alida and when she does she sees Alida through eyes of pity. The similarities between Alida and Grace’s opinion of each other are that they both see each other more of a negative way then positive. They also believe that each is in some way better than their daughters. They have also each underestimated the other. One can see this in the end when it is found out that Alida is the one that wrote and send the letter from Delphin to Grace, and how Grace replied and Delphin actually showed up.

Posted by: Cannelle Samson at September 2, 2015 10:26 AM

Matthew Beebe
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 - Academic Writing II CAO3
August 31, 2015

Question: What is the first indication in the story that the women hate each other? Which of the two women is more hateful? Explain your reasoning with clear examples from the text.

Answer: When reading the short story, the first moment the reader can tell both these women hates each other is when both the women were looking at the beautiful view. Then, they start to compare their daughters and their lives against one another. Alida is more jealous and hateful to Grace than Grace is to Alida. Alida is one who starts bringing up arguments and points to compare each other’s lives. A couple of reasons that it is clear that these two women don’t like each is when they mentioned that they were both in love with the same man, and they fought over him. Alida kept pushing Grace and making fun of her that Grace was only able to spend one night with him while she (Alida) got to spend twenty-five years with the man. After Alida keeps spitting off information to Grace, Grace comes back and says to Alida that she had him for more than one night because she had Barbara. Barbara would, therefore, be Grace’s and the man’s child.

Posted by: Matthew Beebe at September 2, 2015 10:30 AM

Do Over - Sabrina McIntyre
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
31 August 2015

Question 4: Is it believable that Grace told Barbara that she was Jenny's biological half-sister? Why, or why not? Explain.

Answer: No, it is not believable that Grace told Barbara that she was Jenny's half-sister because of many reasons. First, Grace and Alida both lived many different lives from one another. For example, on one hand, Wharton expresses how high-maintenance and classy Alida is. On the contrary, Wharton reveals how quiet and old-fashioned Grace is. Second, Wharton exaggerates how envious Alida is for Grace because Grace's daughter, Barbara, has much more charisma then Alida's daughter, Jenny. Alida proved her jealousy of Barbara stating, "No I don't; I appreciate her. And perhaps envy you. Oh, my girl's perfect; if I were a chronic invalid I'd-well, I'd think I'd rather be in Jenny's hands. There must be times...but there! I've always wanted a brilliant daughter...and never quite understood why I got an angel instead" (Wharton 5). Lastly, Alida and Grace both lived opposite lives of each other. Because Horace Ansley, husband of Grace, wasn't a man of importance, Grace and him lived quiet, uneventful lives. On the contrary, Delphin Slade, husband of Alida, was a famous corporate lawyer, who both had lived exceptional and luxurious lives. All in all, Alida hated Grace because of her past affair with her deceased husband, Delphin; in which Grace thought Alida had no idea. They both had kept this secret for twenty-five years, thus, making it utterly unbelievable for Grace to reveal the truth to Barbara before revealing it to Alida.

Posted by: Sabrina McIntyre at September 2, 2015 10:45 AM

DO OVER
Zeida Alvarez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122CL Academic Writing II CA03
1 September 2015

Question: Irony- Explain how the following quotation/element from the story is ironic: Grace says, "The most prudent (sensible/cautious) girls aren't always prudent."

Answer: The quotation, "The most prudent girls aren't always prudent," said by Grace in the short story "Roman Fever" is ironic. The quotation is Grace explaining herself to Alida when she was trying to get Grace to admit that she had left to the Colosseum at night, for a rendezvous. Alida had started implying that Grace had gone by saying, “You don't remember? You don't remember going to visit some ruins or other one evening, just after dark, and catching a bad chill! You were supposed to have gone to see the moonrise. People always said that expedition was what caused your illness" (Wharton, 6). Alida added that Grace was always cautious about her throat by saying, "I mean – because everyone knew you were so prudent on account of your throat" (Wharton, 6). This is seen as an ironic statement because she, Grace, had contradicted what she had previously said. Alida was able to tell her the reason she was sick, and ask her why she had gone, but Grace was not truly considering the consequences it had on her throat, because she was able to see the man she loved, Delphine.

Posted by: Zeida Alvarez at September 2, 2015 02:10 PM

Alexis Clayton
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122-Academic Writing 2 CA3
1 September 2015


Question #24: Explain how the following quotation from the story is ironic: “ Alida says “ People always said that expedition was what caused your illness.”


Answer: Alida was a jealous person who was out for revenge on Mrs. Ansley for loving the same guy she had, Delphin. He Had proposed to Alida, but that was not enough for her to accept when she knew her dear friend loved him too. Alida tricked Mrs. Ansley to “ meet” up with Delphin by writing a fake letter addressed from him hoping she would catch the Roman fever aka malaria. Alida called her friend out by saying," yes you think i'm bluffing don't you? Well, you went to meet the man i was engaged to." The irony of the expedition that her friend went to is Mrs. Ansley and Delphia fell in love and brought them together this fake letter instead of dragging them apart.

Posted by: alexis Clayton at September 3, 2015 05:52 AM

Lady Hernandez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 academic writing II CA03
1 September 2015

Question: Consider the pattern of young women who are juxtaposed in the story as friends, “frenemies,” or sisters: great-aunt Harriet and her sister, grace and Alida, Barbara and jenny. How do their stories combine to shape our understanding of the main story here: grace and Alida’s long-standing relationship? Explain.


Answer: Both grace and Alida sat down at a table in a terrace restaurant and their daughters walk by saying that their mothers have nothing better to do than knit all day. The mothers responded with, “That’s what our daughters think of us.” Alida was married to a wealthy business man. Jenny is Alidas daughter. Grace has a daughter named Barbara. They have been friends since childhood and they fell in love with the same man. Alida was engaged to him and did everything she could to keep him and grace apart. In the end, her plan back fired and her husband is the father of Barbara.

Posted by: lady hernandez at September 3, 2015 03:20 PM

REDO
Emma Duncan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CAO3
31 August 2015

Question: Delphin and Horace are depicted second-hand, through their wives’ point of view, and from what we learn of their actions. From this ambiguous source, what do we know about them? What are some mysteries (particularly about their motivations)? Explain.

Answer: In the story, Mrs. Slade is married to Delphin, and Mrs. Ansley is married to Horace. Horace and Delphin have both died, and the ladies are at a Roman restaurant chatting. Throughout their conversations, you find out that Delphin was a famous corporate lawyer and often had international business that caused him to travel a lot. It seems as though he was highly respected. In “Roman Fever” the author described how eloquent Delphin’s everyday life was by saying, “…everyday brought its exciting and unexpected obligation: the impromptu entertaining of eminent colleagues from abroad, the hurried dashes on legal business to London, Paris or Rome, where the entertaining was so handsomely reciprocated…”(Wharton 3). When Delphin and Mrs. Slade were engaged Mrs. Ansley and Delphin were secretly seeing each other. Mrs. Slade found out and sent Mrs. Ansley a fake letter from Delphin not expecting her to reply. Mrs. Slade finds out from Mrs. Ansley that she responded to the letter that Mrs. Slade had written acting as Delphin, and he did come to see Mrs. Ansley. After Mrs. Ansley had got better from her sickness, her mother whisked her off to marry Horace. The two ladies don’t chat much about Horace. This could be considered mysterious because it was Mrs. Ansley’s husband. Another mystery is why Delphin was seeing Mrs. Ansley when he was already engaged. The story even reveals, “…What, that handsome woman with the good clothes and the eyes is Mrs. Slade – the Slade’s wife! Really! Generally, the wives of celebrities are such frumps.”(p.3). Other people saying this about her shows that she was a beautiful woman. It seems as if Delphin had the perfect life set up for himself so it is sort of a mysterious thing that he would go secretly see Mrs. Ansley. I think Delphin was only motivated to keep building his reputation, make lots of money and be with any woman he desired.

Posted by: Emma Duncan at September 3, 2015 10:46 PM

Sabrina McIntyre
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Ac jm9ademic Writing II CA03
18 September 2015

Question: Discuss Setting: Location? Multiple? Time Frame? Era? Multiple? Space? Public? Private? Both? Context?

Answer: Roman Fever was in Rome but has many references to the ladies' homes in New York. The story was during the 1920's where there was not much technology. Grace and Alida sat at the restaurant in Rome, and they spoke about the Colosseum. Also, in some ways, I believe that mostly the story was private because the women mainly sat in the restaurant. However, it could be public because a restaurant has many people in it, even though the author didn't mention it. The story states, "Signing to the headwaiter, she explained that she and her friend were old lovers of Rome, and would like to spend the end of the afternoon looking down on the view—that is, if it did not disturb the service!" (Wharton 2). Furthermore, the quote sums up whether the text was private.

Posted by: Sabrina McIntyre at September 19, 2015 02:48 PM

Chloe Lelliott
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 210
19 January 2016

Question:Is it believable that Grace told Delphin about her pregnancy? Why or why not? Explain.

Answer: To say that Grace told Delphin about her pregnancy , would be a very believable statement. This is because, on page 8, Mrs slade says "I'd found out - and I hated you, hated you. I knew you were in love with Delphin". Therefore if Grace was in love with Delphin she would have wanted to tell him about her being pregnant to pressure him to be with her as she would need a man to look after her and the baby. As well as this, to Grace's knowledge, Delphin had written her the letter asking to meet at the coliseum, so should would have thought he was someone she could trust to tell such a thing.

Posted by: Chloe Lelliott at January 19, 2016 08:46 PM

Nastassja Sielchan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122
18 January 2016

Question: Is it believable that Grace told Horace that he was not Barbara’s biological father? Why or why not? Explain.

Answer: It is not believable that Grace told Horace that he was not Barbara’s biological father. Grace told Alida Salde that she had burned the letter as soon as she read it, which one can assume meant that Grace did not want anyone to see the letter. “…”I don’t know how you knew, I burned that letter at once.”” (Wharton pp. 7) Also, Grace married Horace so quickly, which gave Grace enough time to find out she was pregnant, possibly tell her mother, and later get married before she started to show so that no one could know she would have a baby out of wedlock. “…How could I, when you were married to Horace Ansley two months afterward? As soon as you could get out of bed your mother rushed you off to Florence and married you….” (Wharton pp. 8)

Posted by: Nastassja Sielchan at January 19, 2016 08:47 PM

Randawnique Coakley
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA 06
19 January 2016

Question:13. What is the significance of the story about Grace's great-aunt Harriet? What purpose does it serve in the advancement of the story? Explain.

Answer: The story of Grace's great-aunt Harriet is significant and allows this short story, "Roman Fever" by Edith Wharton, to develop. The story, as Grace describes it, entails her great-aunt sending her sister to pick flowers at Forum at night "but she really sent her because they were in love with the same man ", resulting in the sickness with the Roman Fever and eventual death of Harriet's sister (Wharton 5-6). First, the story is important because the story is a model or a guide for Alida's attempt to make Grace sick and the story explains and gives insight into Alida's motivation and her choice of method in her attempt to separate Grace from Delphin. Alida states the story that Grace told of her great-aunt "made such an impression on me"(Wharton 6), suggesting that she was inspired by Harriet . Alida, who appears to have the same thought process as Grace's great-aunt, was motivated by envy and the need to be the only contender for Delephin's affection. Alida was so blinded by her rage(Wharton 9) that she resorted to eliminating the competition even though it could have killed Grace and the story of the Harriet introduced this concept and transition Alida into revealing what that she wrote the letter (Wharton 7) . Therefore, the story of Grace's great-aunt Harriet essentially introduced the concept of killing for love to the audience and served as a model and an inspiration for Alida's plan to eliminate the competition for Delephin's -her fiancé at the time- affection.
Additionally, the story of Grace's great-aunt allows the story to advance and reach its high point (climax) by creating a shift in the mood. After the story, the ladies' tone and the atmosphere alters. The story of Harriet allows for the atmosphere and the conversation between the girls to go from being tranquil and cordial to being nasty and tense. Before the story of Harriet was mentioned by Alida, Grace and Alida was being cordial, for example, Alida says that she envies that Grace and "Horace managed to produce anything quite dynamic" referring to Barbra (Wharton 4). However, after the story of Harriet is mentioned, the ladies are being rather cruel to each other. This is shown when Alida is boasting that she deceived Grace while streaks of tears are rolling down Grace's face: "And I wrote. Yes; I wrote it! But I was the girl he was engaged to. Did you happen to remember that?"(Wharton 7). The short sentences and the ladies cutting each other off when the other talks, when Grace interrupts Alida while she is inquiring if Grace still went, creates tension and adds to the change in the mood (Wharton 7). The story creates conflict and tension between the two ladies, resulting in the shocking revelation.

Posted by: Randawnique Coakley at January 19, 2016 09:02 PM

Vincia Mitchell
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing 11 CA06
19 January 2016
Question: How does Alida Slade view her life when her husband was alive? How does she view her life now? If the views are different, explain how:
Answer: In the text, “Roman Fever”, Alida Slade’s life was exciting and amusing when her husband was alive. Her husband, Delphin Slade, was a famous Corporation Lawyer, which meant that he would be on many exciting business trips around the world. In addition, his wife would accompany him on these trips so she would have the opportunity to meet new people and explore other countries. Based on the statement “What, that handsome woman with the good clothes and the eyes is Mrs. Slade- the Slade’s wife! Really! Generally the wives of celebrities are such frump” (Wharton 3), the reader gains the knowledge that people are in awe to see that Mrs. Slade is attractive and has manage to maintain her beauty.
However, her life was stripped of its beauty and pleasure after her husband died. Her status had fallen and she was just an ordinary woman without her dear husband to stand by her side or even to escort her on his business trips. “Mrs. Slade reflected, she felt unemployment more than Grace ever would” (Wharton 3), which makes it vivid to the reader that Mrs. Slade was distress. Furthermore, instead of Mrs. Slade watching over Jenny, it was Jenny who was watching over her and taking care of her mother; keeping her out of drafts and making sure she takes her tonic

Posted by: Vincia Mitchell at January 19, 2016 09:32 PM

Hannah Rowe
Dr. Hobbs
Academic Writing 122 CAO6
19 January 2016

“Roman Fever”

Q: Consider the pattern of young women who are juxtaposed in the story as friend, “frenemies”, or sisters: great aunt Harriet and her sister, Grace and Alida, Barbara and Jenny. How do their stories combine to shape our understanding of the main story here: Grace and Alida’s long standing relationship? Explain.
A: Similar to all these pairs of characters, each one doesn’t know what the other one is thinking, or if they are friends, “frenemies” or sisters…it is all a big mystery. For example, Harriet sent her sister out to bring her supposedly back a flower for her album. However, she was doing it because her and her sister both loved the same man. Harriet wanted her sister out of the way, so her seemingly good intentions were malicious ones. Grace and Alida had been friends for years. However, “Mrs. Slade drew her lips together in retrospect; and for a few moments the two ladies, who had been intimate since childhood, reflected on how little they knew each other” (Wharton 2). Clearly this is true because these two “frenemies” have both been hiding a dark secret from each other for years. Lastly, Jenny and Barbara start out as friends but, after the story’s dark secrets have been revealed, turn out to be half-sisters.

Posted by: Hannah Rowe at January 19, 2016 11:49 PM

Heather Hauck
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II
20 January 2016

Question: Delphin and Horace are depicted second-hand, through their wives’ point of view, and from what we learn of their actions. From this ambiguous source, what do we know about them? What are some mysteries (particularly about their motivations)? Explain.
Answer: Mrs. Alida Slade and Mrs. Grace Ansley were childhood friends, and later, neighbors for many years in New York. During their adolescent years, Mrs. Slade was engaged to Delphin, an upcoming Wall Street corporation lawyer, and Mrs. Ansley was apparently dating Horace but was secretly seeing Delphin. From what I gather, Horace was a very wealthy man who married Grace in Florence, both at a very young age, because Grace was pregnant (assuming the baby was his child); however, the story doesn’t reveal this until the resolution, Mrs. Slade “had [Delphin] for twenty-five years. And [Grace] had nothing but that one letter that he didn’t write” (De Maupassant 9). Mrs. Ansley rebutted, “I had Barbara” (De Maupassant 10). I am curious who the father of Jennifer is because she is an angel versus Mrs. Slade wanting a “brilliant daughter,” brilliant referring to her husband’s traits (De Maupassant 5). Is it possible that Mrs. Slade had an affair with Horace just to spite her envy for Grace? Nevertheless, Mrs. Slade lives her entire life in jealousy of Grace and thought, for once, she could belittle Grace and gain a sense of power over her, but she failed.

Posted by: Heather Hauck at January 20, 2016 12:26 AM

Phillip Moss
English 122
Dr. Hobbs
19 January 2016

Question: Is it believable that Grace told Barbra that she was Jenny’s half biological sister why or why not?

Answer: I believe that Grace would not tell Barbra for the sake of appearing as a good wife and staying faithful to her relationship with her husband Horace when in reality, she had an affair with Delphin, which was accidentally set up by Aldia this can be found of page 8 “You tried your best to get him away from me, didn't you? But you failed, and I kept him. That's all.".

Posted by: Phillip Moss at January 20, 2016 08:22 AM

Clark de Bullet
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA06
20 January 2016

Roman Fever

Question #13: What is the significance of the story about Grace’s Great-aunt Harriet? What purpose does it serve in the advancement of the story? Explain.

Answer: The story about Great-aunt Harriet was used to foreshadow the conflict between the main characters. It was the first obvious clue as to what the issue between these two women would be and was meant to guide the reader to the inevitable conclusion. Aunt Harrad aiet “really sent her, because they were in love with the same man" (Wharton 6). This conflict creates a wedge of jealousy that ends up ruining the girls’ relationships with each other. It was unknown to Mrs. Slade how deep Mrs. Ansley’s and her husband’s relationship went, and at the end of the story it was revealed to her that Mrs. Ansley h child with her husband (10).

Posted by: Clark de Bullet at January 20, 2016 09:51 AM

Jennifer Belcastro
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II
20 January 2016

Question: Alida Slade reflects ruefully that her daughter, Jenny, acts like a “foil” for Grace Ansley’s daughter, Barbara. What does she mean by that? How does it contribute to our understanding of the social environment of the time, and Mrs. Slade’s way of looking at things?

Answer: In the story, Mrs. Slade says her daughter acts as a “foil” for Barbara because she is keeping her from finding love. "...Jenny has no chance...that's why Grace Ansley likes the two girls to go everywhere together! My poor Jenny as a foil" (Wharton 4). Mrs. Slade says this figuring out how they are different from their daughters. The women were talking about how they found someone to marry while in the city and hope their daughters would do the same. Mrs. Slade way of looking at things seems a little bleak. She says "... our girls have done away with sentiment and moonlight" (Wharton 4). She has this idea that the girls will have sentiment but, in the end, knows they do not.

Posted by: Jennifer Belcastro at January 20, 2016 11:35 AM

Justin Robinson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing 2 CA06
20 January 2016

Question: 14.) What are readers supposed to think of Delphin Slade? What can readers assume were Grace's feelings towards Delphin when she went to the coliseum that night?

Answer: 14.) Readers are supposed to think of Delphin Slade as this strong business man. He was a successful corporation lawyer who was always busy with cases, that everyone liked this man he was very popular and well known, you could say he was famous. Readers can assume the Grace was very fond of Delphin when she went to the coliseum that night, that she was in love with Delphin. The main thing they can assume is that Grace wanted to be with Delphin at last.

Posted by: Justin Robinson at January 20, 2016 01:59 PM

Matt Scharr
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122CA06 Academic Writing II
20 January 2016

Question: What does the setting add to the story? How would the story be different if it took place in a different major city? Could it work in an obscure town or village in the country? Why or why not?

Answer: The setting adds to the story because Rome is such a prestigious place in the world. When people think of romantic and beautiful places, most of the time Rome will come to mind. The setting helps put an image in the reader’s mind of elegance and wealth paired with the beauty of the surroundings. The story could have had the same feel if it were to have taken place in Paris as well I believe. Paris has the same reputation for fancy restaurants and beautiful scenery so one could almost just substitute everything referring to Rome in this story and replace it with Paris and we would still achieve the same feeling the author is trying to deliver.

Posted by: Matt Scharr at January 20, 2016 02:03 PM

Allison Cobb

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 122 Academic Writing 2 CA06

20 January 2016


Question:The narrative voice is slippery in this story. Although most of it is told from an omniscient point of view -- giving us the characters’ thoughts and histories, as well as their words and actions -- occasionally it slips into a sort of ventriloquism, describing a character in the voice of another character. What does this add to the story? Explain.


Answer: Switching from a straight 3rd person point of view to slightly inside the minds of the characters allows the reader to see things from particular character’s points of view. The author wanted the reader to see Mrs. Ansley from Mrs. Slade’s point of view and vice versa, including the bias from the character doing the describing. And so the story slips into Slade’s point of view, where it’s written, “Mrs. Delphin Slade, for instance, would have told herself, or anyone who asked her, that Mrs. Horace Ansley, twenty-five years ago, had been exquisitely lovely—no, you wouldn't believe it, would you! though, of course, still charming, distinguished” (Wharton 2). The same is done for Mrs. Ansley, who’s image of Mrs. Slade is an “extremely dashing girl; much more so than her daughter, who was pretty, of course, and clever in a way, but had none of her mother's—well, "vividness," someone had once called it” (Wharton 3). This slipping into different points of views creates images of the character's with the bias of the one doing the describing.

Posted by: Allison Cobb at January 20, 2016 02:16 PM

Travis Farmer
Dr. Hobbs
English 122 Academic Writing II CA06
20 January 2016

Question: 5.) What is the meaning of the underlined words in the following paragraph from the story:
Yes, Being the Slade's widow was a dullish business after that. In living up to such a husband all her [Aldia's] faculties had been engaged; now she had only her daughter to live up to, for the son who seemed to have to have inherited his father's gifts had died suddenly in boyhood. She had fought through that agony because her husband was there, to be helped and to help; now, after the father's death, the thought of the boy had become unbearable.

Answer: When her son had died, she found solace in the fact that her husband carried her child's memory. However, now that both her husband and son are gone she cannot find the values she loved in either of them. [Wharton 3]

Posted by: Travis Farmer at January 20, 2016 02:18 PM

Nastassja Sielchan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA06
18 January 2016

Question: Is it believable that Grace told Horace that he was not Barbara’s biological father? Why or why not? Explain.

Answer: It is not believable that Grace told Horace that he was not Barbara’s biological father. Grace said to Alida Salde that she had burned the letter as soon as she read it, which one can assume meant that Grace did not want anyone to see the letter. Grace was surprised when Alida told Grace that she knew about the letter saying, “I don’t know how you knew, I burned that letter at once” (Wharton 7). Also, Grace married Horace so quickly, which gave Grace enough time to find out she was pregnant, possibly tell her mother, and later get married before she started to show so that no one could know she would have a baby out of wedlock. Alida explains, “you were married to Horace Ansley two months afterward? As soon as you could get out of bed your mother rushed you off to Florence and married you” (8).

Posted by: Revised - Nastassja Sielchan at January 20, 2016 03:17 PM

Hannah Rowe
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CAO6
19 January 2016

“Roman Fever”

Q: Consider the pattern of young women who are juxtaposed in the story as friend, “frenemies”, or sisters: great aunt Harriet and her sister, Grace and Alida, Barbara and Jenny. How do their stories combine to shape our understanding of the main story here: Grace and Alida’s long standing relationship? Explain.

A: Similar to all these pairs of characters, each one doesn’t know what the other one is actually thinking, or if they are friends, “frenemies” or sisters…it is all a big mystery. For example, Harriet sent her sister out to supposedly bring her back a flower for her album, however she was really doing it because her and her sister both loved the same man. Harriet wanted her sister out of the way, so her seemingly good intentions were really malicious ones. Grace and Alida had been friends for years. However, “Mrs. Slade drew her lips together in retrospect; and for a few moments the two ladies, who had been intimate since childhood, reflected on how little they knew each other” (Wharton 2). Clearly this is true, because these two “frenemies” have both been hiding a dark secret from each other for years. Lastly, Jenny and Barbara start out as friends but, after the story’s dark secrets have been reveled, turn out to be half-sisters.


Posted by: Hannah Rowe at January 20, 2016 03:25 PM

Revision Randawnique Coakley
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA 06
19 January 2016

Question:13. What is the significance of the story about Grace's great-aunt Harriet? What purpose does it serve in the advancement of the story? Explain.

Answer: The story of Grace's great-aunt Harriet is significant and allows this short story, "Roman Fever" by Edith Wharton, to develop. The story, as Grace describes it, entails her great-aunt sending her sister to pick flowers at Forum at night "but she really sent her because they were in love with the same man ", resulting in the sickness with the Roman Fever and eventual death of Harriet's sister (Wharton 5-6). First, the story is important because the story is a model or a guide for Alida's attempt to make Grace sick and the story explains and gives insight into Alida's motivation and her choice of method in her attempt to separate Grace from Delphin. Alida states the story that Grace told of her great-aunt "made such an impression on me"(6), suggesting that she was inspired by Harriet . Alida, who appears to have the same thought process as Grace's great-aunt, was motivated by envy and the need to be the only contender for Delephin's affection. Alida was so blinded by her rage(9) that she resorted to eliminating the competition even though it could have killed Grace and the story of the Harriet introduced this concept and transition Alida into revealing what that she wrote the letter (7). Therefore, the story of Grace's great-aunt Harriet essentially introduced the concept of killing for love to the audience and served as a model and an inspiration for Alida's plan to eliminate the competition for Delephin's -her fiancé at the time- affection.

Additionally, the story of Grace's great-aunt allows the story to advance and reach its high point by creating a shift in the mood. After the story, the ladies' tone and the atmosphere alters. The story of Harriet allows for the atmosphere and the conversation between the girls to go from being tranquil and cordial to being nasty and tense. Before the story of Harriet was mentioned by Alida, Grace and Alida was being cordial, for example, Alida says that she envies that Grace and "Horace managed to produce anything quite dynamic" referring to Barbra (4). However, after the story of Harriet is mentioned, the ladies are being rather cruel to each other. This is shown when Alida is boasting that she deceived Grace while streaks of tears are rolling down Grace's face: "And I wrote. Yes; I wrote it! But I was the girl he was engaged to. Did you happen to remember that?"(7). The short sentences and the ladies cutting each other off when the other talks, when Grace interrupts Alida while she is inquiring if Grace still went, creates tension and adds to the change in the mood (7). The story creates conflict and tension between the two ladies, resulting in the shocking revelation.

Posted by: Randawnique Coakley at January 20, 2016 08:26 PM

Revised – Heather Hauck
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA06
21 January 2016

Question #8: Delphin and Horace are depicted second-hand, through their wives’ point of view, and from what we learn of their actions. From this ambiguous source, what do we know about them? What are some mysteries (particularly about their motivations)? Explain.

Answer: Mrs. Alida Slade and Mrs. Grace Ansley were childhood friends, and later, neighbors for many years in New York. During their adolescent years, Mrs. Slade was engaged to Delphin, an upcoming Wall Street corporation lawyer, and Mrs. Ansley was apparently dating Horace but was secretly seeing Delphin. From what I gather, Horace was a very wealthy man who married Grace in Florence, both at a very young age, because Grace was pregnant (assuming the baby was his child). The story does not reveal this until the resolution when Mrs. Slade stated, “I had him for twenty-five years. And you had nothing but that one letter that he didn’t write” (Wharton 9). Mrs. Ansley rebutted, “I had Barbara” (Wharton 10). Her statement clearly revealed to us that Mrs. Slade’s husband was the father. I am curious who the father of Jennifer is because she is an “angel” versus Mrs. Slade commenting on wanting a “brilliant daughter,” referring to her husband’s traits (Wharton 5). Is it possible that Mrs. Slade had an affair with Horace just to spite her envy for Grace? Nevertheless, Mrs. Slade lives her entire life in jealousy of Grace, and thought, for once, she could belittle Grace and gain a sense of power over her, but she failed.

Posted by: Heather Hauck at January 21, 2016 08:22 AM

Revision-Jennifer Belcastro
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA06
20 January 2016

Question: Alida Slade reflects ruefully that her daughter, Jenny, acts like a “foil” for Grace Ansley’s daughter, Barbara. What does she mean by that? How does it contribute to our understanding of the social environment of the time, and Mrs. Slade’s way of looking at things?

Answer: In the story, Mrs. Slade says her daughter acts as a “foil” for Barbara because she is keeping her from finding love (Wharton 4). Mrs. Slade said," [. . . ]Jenny has no chance [. . . ]that's why Grace Ansley likes the two girls to go everywhere together! My poor Jenny as a foil" (4). Mrs. Slade says this figuring out how they are different from their daughters. The women were talking about how they found someone to marry while in the city and hope their daughters would do the same. Mrs. Slade way of looking at things seems a little bleak. She says "... our girls have done away with sentiment and moonlight" (4). She has this idea that the girls will have sentiment but, in the end, knows they do not.

Posted by: Jennifer Belcastro at January 21, 2016 11:19 AM

Vincia Mitchell
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing 11 CA06
19 January 2016

Question: How does Alida Slade view her life when her husband was alive? How does she view her life now? If the views are different, explain how:

Answer: In the text, “Roman Fever”, Alida Slade’s life was interesting and amusing when her husband was alive. Her husband, Delphin Slade, was a famous Corporation Lawyer, which meant that he would be on many exciting business trips around the world. In addition, his wife would accompany him on these trips so she would have the opportunity to meet new people and explore other countries. Based on the statement “What, that handsome woman with the good clothes and the eyes is Mrs. Slade- the Slade’s wife! Really! Generally the wives of celebrities are such frump” (Wharton 3), the reader gains the knowledge that people are in awe to see that Mrs. Slade is attractive and has managed to maintain her beauty.

However, her life was stripped of its beauty and pleasure after her husband died. Her status had fallen, and she was just an ordinary woman without her dear husband to stand by her side or even to escort her on his business trips. “Mrs. Slade reflected, she felt unemployment more than Grace ever would” (Wharton 3), which makes it vivid to the reader that Mrs. Slade was distress. Furthermore, instead of Mrs. Slade watching over Jenny, it was Jenny who was watching over her and taking care of her mother; keeping her out of drafts and making sure she takes her tonic.

Posted by: Vincia Mitchell at January 21, 2016 02:41 PM

Heather Hauck / Hussam Babge
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA06
25 January 2016

Question #20: Foreshadowing – Explain how the following quotation/element from the story is an example of foreshadowing: Alida makes a comment that is both complimentary and insulting “…wondering how two such exemplary characters as you and Horace managed to produce anything (Babs) quite so dynamic.” Explain how this can also be an example of irony.

Answer: Alida described Grace and Horace as being "nullities as parents" and “museum specimens of old New York” (Wharton 2). Later in the story when Alida stated, “wondering how two such exemplary characters as you and Horace had managed to produce anything quite so dynamic,” it foreshadowed the truth about Barbara’s real father (Wharton 4). Obviously, if they are both insignificant, how could they possibly birth such an intelligent daughter (Wharton 4)? In the resolution, it is ironic how she belittled Grace as she arrogantly stated, “I had everything; I had him for twenty-five years. And you had nothing but that one letter that he didn’t write” (Wharton 9). Alida thought she had finally won; however, the joke was on her as Grace departed the restaurant and stated, “I had Barbara” (Wharton 10).

Posted by: Heather Hauck at January 25, 2016 09:20 PM

Matthew Scharr, Justin Robinson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA06
25 January 2016

Question 18.) Foreshadowing: Explain how the following quotation/ element from the story is an example of foreshadowing: "A full moon night, they would rather..." Memento Mori- Latin phrase for "Be mindful of death." Their friendship is coming to an end.

Answer: 18.) Edith Wharton is foreshadowing when he says, “A full moon night, they would remember…” because they are in Rome and they are always commenting on how nice the scenery is. After reading this the story and looking at the quote I can see how this quote is foreshadowing.

Posted by: Justin Robinson, Matthew Scharr at January 25, 2016 10:07 PM

Randawnique Coakley and Vincia Mitchell
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA 06
27 January 2016

Explain how the following quotation/elements from the story is ironic: Alida and grace are describe as “intimate friends …[coming to] a new stage in their intimacy.” Hint: look up the definition of intimacy.” Hint: look up the definition of intimacy.

In the story, "Roman Fever" by Wharton, Alida and Grace are portrayed as "intimate friends"(Wharton 3) who are coming to "a new stage in their intimacy"(3). Intimacy can be defined as having a close bond or having a caring friendship. However, Alida and Grace's relationship is not friendly or close; in fact, they are enemies seemingly hating each other and envying each other possessions. This is why the phrase is ironic and contradictory because the ladies are not intimate or affectionate but rather cold and harsh to each other. An example of where Alida and Grace's behavior contradicts the statement, which states that they are intimate, is when Alida admits that she is envious of Grace because Grace's daughter is dynamic, unlike her daughter – Jenny - who is rather dull(Wharton 4). If Alida and Grace were in an intimate relationship, they would not envy each other but be excited for each other's daughter. Another reason that the statement of Alida and Grace is ironic is because Alida and Grace have a heated argument. Their argument escalated to being heated with Grace crying and Alida boasting, "And I wrote. Yes; I wrote it! But I was the girl he was engaged to. Did you happen to remember that?"(7). They are nasty to each other and not loving. Therefore, this does not support the statement of them being intimate friends but rather contradicts this statement. It is clear that Wharton creates irony, when he writes the statement of the two ladies being "intimate friends"(3).

Posted by: Randawnique Coakley and Vincia Mitchell at January 26, 2016 12:04 AM

Phil Moss, Omar Martinez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA06
25 January 25, 2016

Question: Explain how the following quotation/element from the story is an example of foreshadowing: Great Aunt Harriet sent her younger sister to the Forum after sunset because they were in love with same man. Explain how this can also be an example of irony.

Answer: It is an example of foreshadowing because the two daughters are representing a younger version of their mothers. They both spend the afternoon with two Italian men looking for some sort of husband. It is ironic because their mothers did the same thing and ruin their friendship.

Posted by: Omar Martinez at January 26, 2016 09:29 PM

Hannah Rowe, Chloe Lelliott
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CAO6
26 January 2016

“Roman Fever”

Q: Explain how the following quotation/element from the story is an example of foreshadowing: The colosseum is looming with its “outlining immensity” in the background.

A: This is an example of foreshadowing in the way Wharton is describing the colosseum. “Looming” depicts a frightening structure that can easily destroy something…just as the truth destroys Mrs. Slade and Mrs. Ansley’s friendship. Moreover, when it talks about “outlining immensity,” it is foreshadowing the dark secret that will be revealed.

Posted by: Hannah Rowe at January 26, 2016 11:08 PM

Clark de Bullet, Jennifer
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA06
26 January 2016

Roman Fever

Question #17: Foreshadowing- Explain how the following quotation/element from the story is an example of foreshadowing: “when discussing the beautiful view from the balcony, Grace Ansley states “It always will be to me.” She stresses the word me, Alida notices but says nothing.

Answer: Mrs. Slade innocently mentions the view toward the beginning of the story by saying, "Well, I don't see why we shouldn't just stay here…After all, it's still the most beautiful view in the world” (Wharton 1). This is foreshadowing the later revealed conflict of Mrs. Ansley’s relationship with Delphin, Mrs. Slade’s husband. By her stating that the view is “the most beautiful view in the world” it is sort of like she is claiming it. The view is something she can behold and have. By Mrs. Ansley interjecting with “it always will be to me”, she is stating that, just like the view, Delphin was truly hers. There is a lot of underlined tension between the two about the subject of Delphin until it is later revealed that Delphin fathered a child with Mrs. Ansley (10).

Posted by: Clark de Bullet, Jennifer at January 27, 2016 12:14 AM

Heather Hauck / Matthew Scharr
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA06
4 February 2016

Question A: What is the plot of “Roman Fever?”

Answer: The plot of “Roman Fever” is Mrs. Alida Slade and Mrs. Grace Ansley and Slade against herself. At the beginning of the setting, the rising action begins and reveals the tension between Slade and Ansley. Barbara, Ansley’s daughter, made a sly comment about her mother and Slade. Slade said to Ansley, “That’s what our daughters think of us” and Ansley quickly “replied by a deprecating gesture” (Wharton 1). Obviously, this remark suggests there is some hostility towards Slade. Wharton described both women in the setting that portrayed Slade as the more eloquent of the two and competed with Ansley. Since they were younger than their daughters were, Slade’s animosity towards Ansley grew because she feared she would lose her boyfriend to her and over the years, her life was “full of failures and mistakes” (Wharton 3).

Questions B: What is the climax and main conflict in “Roman Fever?”

Answer: “Roman Fever” is about two middle-aged women, Mrs. Alida Slade and Mrs. Grace Ansley, who take a trip with their daughters to Rome. Slade and Ansley sat in a restaurant directly across from the Colosseum and reminisced about their younger years. The rising action in the plot began when Slade compared her precious Jenny to Barbara in finding a mate and simultaneously reflected on the same predicament of her and Ansley from years ago and compared it with Barbara’s future. Slade’s thoughts came back to reality “with a recoil of self-disgust” and questioned if she would ever “cure herself of envying her,” referring to Barbara’s mother (Wharton 5). Slade positioned herself to strike against Ansley by asking about her adulteress great-aunt then lead in to the night Ansley caught “Roman Fever” at the Colosseum and admitted that she wrote the letter to her as a joke (Wharton 7). The crisis, climax, and resolution occurred together when Slade tells Ansley she “had everything; I had him for twenty-five years. And you had nothing but that one letter that he didn’t write” (Wharton 9). Ansley replied with arrogance, “I had Barbara” (Wharton 10).

Posted by: Heather Hauck at February 4, 2016 12:55 PM

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