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November 01, 2009

Aping Humanity on Pierre Boulle's Alternative Planet


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Class,

In the comment box below,

. . . the note-taker/scribe from each group should retype the question your group discussed today in class and provide an answer with quotations from the text to support your answers. You MUST put the page number (or, paragraph number if there are no page numbers) in parentheses after any quotation used.

Enter your work on this text as prescribed in class. For example:

Remember: I have to "approve" all comments so you won't see it immediately after posting. After hitting submit, you should see a screen that confirms this.

We are beginning to use some concepts in our discussions that you may or may have had practice using before. I want to be sure that you have a clear understanding of the words we use in class (no more blank stares!) so be sure you are looking up words you don't feel you yet "own" (means, making it a part of your personal vocabulary) by utilizing your dictionaries to the fullest.

Dr. Hobbs

_____________________________________

To see other English-Blog entries on the subject of Literature, please click HERE.

Posted by lhobbs at November 1, 2009 05:33 PM

Readers' Comments:

Boulle's Monkey Planet and the Hero’s Journey

by Kristin Brittain

Joseph Campbell created a chart that roughly outlines a single structure in which most stories follow. He charted the map of the “hero’s journey,” and it encompasses a series of stages that can be applied to almost any narrative. The “monomyth” follows the progression of the protagonist throughout the three stages of the cycle. Although every story is founded on its own structure, according to Campbell’s monomyth, every narrative’s composition has the same premises. The monomyth extends itself to science fiction as well. Ulysse Mérou, the protagonist within the novel Planet of the Apes written by Pierre Boulle, evolves through the cycles of the hero’s journey.

The hero’s journey began with the Departure. Once Jinn and Phyllis found the message in the bottle floating around in outer space the story began; it was the birth of it all. Ulysse’s call to adventure began when he embarked on the journey into space with famed Earth scientist Professor Antelle and Levain a young physicist to the star Betelgeuse. When the trio landed after two years in space on the planet Soror where they encountered the “human savages” Ulysse crossed the first threshold into his journey when the primitives detained him and his two friends. He not only faced his first of many trials, but Ulysse also came across his supernatural aid, a female savage incapable of communication he named Nova; and, after the group is captured by the primitive humans Nova helplessly tried to assist them in assimilation with the primitive way. The final component of the departure stage is the belly of the whale and at this point while Ulysse is amongst the primitive human’s he is captured by the humanlike hunting party of gorillas and chimpanzees. This stage is the final separation between the hero and their known world, Ulysse found himself “traveling at high speed toward an unknown destination, terrified by the thought of the fresh horrors that awaited me on the planet Soror” (Boulle 75). He was brought to a laboratory in the apes’ city, which was an exact replica of 20th-century Earth.

The second component of the hero’s cycle is the Initiation phase. The first two stages of the second component took place once Ulysse is placed into the laboratory. The road of trials began once Ulysse was placed in the cage like the rest of the primitives. The main problem is Ulysse’s inability to communicate his higher intelligence with the simian beings; and, the experiments similar to Pavlov’s in which the apes place him under are minor in comparison. The meeting with the Goddess occurs at this time too. Ulysse was taken in by a female chimpanzee lab researcher named Zira when he fails to be conditioned by the experiments and began communication using geometrical figures and equations. Ulysse and Zira teach each other their languages’ and form a very tight intellectual based bond. Ulysse said of Zira, “it is her soul that communes with mine” (Boulle 260). Ulysse learned everything about the apes’ planet and even began a friendship with Zira’s fiancée Cornelius. With Zira and Cornelius’ help, Ulysse addressed a speech to the ape President and he is eventually freed from his cage and accepted by the ape society and thus completing the ultimate boon component of the Initiation phase. During this last stage the protagonist reached his ultimate goal; freedom.

The final component of the hero’s journey is the Return. At first the hero goes through the stage of refusal. Ulysse believed he was supposed to be the savior of the primitive human race and he had no immediate desire to return to Earth. Ulysse said, “Nothing happens by mere chance in the cosmos. My voyage to the world of Betelgeuse was decreed by superior consciousness. It is up to me to show myself worthy of the choice and to be the new savior of this human race in decline” (Boulle 219-220). At some point during the time Ulysse spent in captivity at the laboratory he impregnated Nova. During the anticipation of the child’s birth the apes’ were worried about Ulysse’s power and the possibility of the child possessing intelligence. The apes’ became nervous and concerned with Ulysse’s higher intelligence. The protagonist quickly passed through the stage of the master of the two worlds and into danger. Due to the apes’ fear, Ulysse and his new family were in danger of the apes’ and because of this the trio had to quickly escape before any harm could be done to them. It took two years to return to Earth. Throughout that time Ulysse acted as Nova’s tutor and she slowly evolved from her primitive state and their son grew and proved to be an intelligent being. However, Ulysse could not complete his journey because once he returned to Earth, to his surprise the planet was inhabited by intelligent simian beings. The group quickly boarded their ship and left the planet. With only an uncertain future left, Ulysse completed the hero’s journey and entered into the freedom to live stage.

References

Boulle, Pierre. Planet Of The Apes. New York: Ballantine Books, 1963.

Hobbs, Lee. “The Hero’s Journey (or the Monomyth)”. Illustration and definitions of terms based on Joseph Campbell’s Monomyth. Partly adapted from: Warren, Liz and Alan Levine. “The Hero’s Journey: Summary of Steps.” Maricopa Center for Learning and Instruction (MCLI): Maricopa Community Colleges. 19 Nov. 1999. 10 Oct 2007.

Posted by: Kristin Brittain at January 13, 2015 12:12 PM

Emily Finck
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literatures in Translation CA01
13 February 2015


“The anomaly lay in their emanation, a sort of void, an absence of expression” (Planet of the Apes, Ch. 5, page 30, Pierre Boulle).


Question:
Consider the above quote in terms of dichotomies, specifically Man vs. Nature, and identify the hegemony between the launch crew and the inhabitants of Betelgeuse: which is preferred or privileged?


Answer:
In Pierre Boulle’s Planet of the Apes, the relationship between the launch crew and the natives of Betelgeuse in terms of hegemonic dichotomies is, in this case, a reversed. Usually in the situation of Man vs. Nature, man would have the upper hand because of his adaptation and advances; however, nature has the upper hand this time. The reason being the launch crew is on a planet with creatures they know nothing about. In this case, the humans already on the planet represent nature, are far superior, and, for this reason, are privileged over the launch crew. For example, the girl watching the launch crew from the rocks ruthlessly kills Hector their chimpanzee “her body twanged like a bow. She seized him by the throat and closed her hands around his neck…he stiffened a few seconds later and fell dead…her attack was so swift we did not even have time to intervene” (Boulle 34). Thus proving that if she or any one of the inhabitants of Betelgeuse wanted to harm and kill any one of the launch crew they could at a moment’s notice.

Posted by: Emily Finck at February 12, 2015 07:35 PM

Ashtan Richey
ENG410 Reading the Planet CA01
Dr. Hobbs
12 February 2015

Second half of chapter two
“He often admitted he was tired of his fellow men.… ‘Men!’ Phyllis again exclaimed. ‘Yes, men,’ Jinn asserted. ‘That’s what it says’ (Pierre Boulle, Planet of the Apes, Ch.2, Pg.13).”

Question:
What dichotomies are presented in this chapter? What do they represent?

Answer:
Time vs. Time
There is a dichotomy proposed early in the text of the passage of time on Earth and the passage of time while on their journey, in outer space. “‘A few seconds for you and me, a few heartbeats, will coincide with the passage of several years on Earth’ (Boulle pg.12).” The main point of the passage is for the author to convey the message that the passengers have little or no ties to people on Earth now; this proven by their nonchalant demeanor when talking about the hundreds of years that will pass on Earth before their return.
Man vs. Man(?)
There is a dichotomy set up between the person(?) reading the note in the bottle and the storyteller, whom we know to be human. The difference between these people(?) is obviously the time periods and assumably distance as well. It is also assumable from the story reader’s tones that the manner in which the author is writing and his ideas are outlandish to the readers, Jinn and Phyllis.

Posted by: Ashtan Richey at February 12, 2015 10:25 PM

Hannah McCafferty
Dr. Hobbes
ENG 410 Reading the Planet
12 February 2015

Question: In the second half of chapter three, based on the description of the planet that Ulysse gives, what can you infer about the foreign planet’s inhabitants?
Answer: The residents of that world should be very similar to the human race because of Ulysse’s remarks of the planet’s striking resemblance to Earth. “He found that they had the same composition as the air on the Earth at a similar altitude. . . The planet bore a strange resemblance to the Earth” (Boulle 19). The planets inhabitants most likely are very structured and organized because of the way the planet’s towns were arranged. “We flew over a town: a fairly big town, from which roads radiated, bordered with trees and with vehicles moving along them. I had time to make out the general architecture: broad streets and white houses with long straight lines” (Boulle 20). This description suggests there this society puts a lot of stress on order. The long straight lines and white houses are almost too picturesque leaving the reader with an uneasy feeling

Posted by: Hannah McCafferty at February 13, 2015 01:22 AM

Deirdre Rowan
Dr. Hobbs
English 410 CA01 Reading the Planet-Comparative Global Literatures in Translation
13 February 2015

"As he passed close by, without noticing her, she sprang out. Her body twanged like a bow... This gorgeous creature-in a romantic flight of fancy I had christened her 'Nova,' able to compare her appearance only to that of a brilliant star-Nova had strangled a harmless pet animal with her own hands." (Chapter 5, pages 34-5, Xan Fielding translation)

Question: How is Nova seen by Ulysse in their first encounter?

Answer: Nova is a human woman, but Ulysse does not see her the same way that he does his fellow astronauts. She acts like an animal, killing the pet chimpanzee "with her own hands" and wears no clothes. Yet her nudity seems to have a mythical appeal that Ulysse finds alluring: "In a few seconds she had disappeared into the undergrowth that closed back around her golden body, leaving us standing aghast in the middle of the jungle"(Chapter 5, pages 35, Xan Fielding translation). He sees Nova as an Amazon from Greek Mythology with the sex appeal of a naked Artemis with tanned skin. He does not see her as a fellow human being.

Posted by: Deirdre Rowan at February 13, 2015 02:37 AM

Kristen Collins
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet
13 February 2015

“From what we had seen before landing, we knew that a civilization existed, too. Rational beings – we dared not call them men yet – had molded the face of the planet…We christened it Soror…” (Chapter 4: _Planet of the Apes_, pg. 23, par. 1 and 2)

QUESTION: What is the definition of Soror, and why is the name significant with the planet and the first contact with life? Why did they make a distinct difference between civilization, rational beings, and men?

ANSWER: The definition of Soror comes from the Latin root associated with Sorority, a sister or female figure. By being named this, Ulysse Merou meant that this new planet was to be considered a sister planet to Earth, with its similarities to structure and the natural world. With it as a female energy, it is ironic how the first life they come across is a naked and animalistic woman, paralleling the first encounter with the christening. As for the differing distinction between civilization, rational beings, and men, there are obviously standards and guidelines from each of these when traversing the universe. Civilization is defined by its based term, population through towns and cities, as opposed to the wilderness and nature. Rational beings and men show how other planets in universe of _Planet of the Apes_ have a distinguishing difference, where thought and higher processing thinking can easily be from an alien lifeform that has no similarities to human lifeforms. With having such a grand universe with the ability to travel many light-years, planets are defined by those three important key factors while exploring uncharted territory.

Posted by: Kristen Collins at February 13, 2015 06:47 AM

Lorie Jewell
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literature CA01
13 February 2015

Question: In the latter half of Chapter 7 in Planet of the Apes, who is in control; what evidence is there to support?

Answer: The woman, Nova, is the only one with complete command of the situation. Her fellow animal-like humans are absorbed in their own activities – eating, nesting – and the space traveler humans are stuck – they are exhausted, hungry, and at the mercy of their captors. Nova keeps an eye on the three as they trek through the forest to the village/habitat; she climbs the tree and shakes down bananas so they can eat, and she helps Ulysse build his nest. What is interesting here is that despite Ulysse’s vulnerability, he has a rather healthy ego that seems to make him think he actually has some control there. “After drinking some water from a stream, we decided to spend the night there” (50) – as if they really had a choice. They were deep in the jungle/forest and even if they had the ability to get back to their spaceship, it was not going anywhere. Then he compliments himself for being able to snuggle naked with a beautiful woman and not have any desire for sex with her. His ultimate display of ego is in thinking of Nova as “. . . this strangely beautiful and unbelievably mindless creature . . .” (51). She had enough presence of mind to know that the men needed to eat. Just because she does not wear clothes and does not communicate the way the space travelers do does not qualify her as mindless.

Posted by: Lorie Jewell at February 13, 2015 07:03 AM

Rebecca Maldonado
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet
13 February 2015

“The feeling of awe produced by such a sight cannot be described: a star, which only yesterday was a brilliant speck among the multitude of anonymous speacks in the firmament, showed up more and more clearly against the black background […]” ( Boulle 17).

Question: Can you draw any parallels between this statement and the story itself?

Answer: The feeling of awe Ulysse feels at the unknown stars become a force of it’s own could be foreshadowing. The awe felt for the star’s ability to become “brilliant” would soon be reflected upon the new planet discovered as well as it’s inhabitants. He had little time to be in wonder at the fact that the planet “possessed an atmosphere containing oxygen and nitrogen; it revolved around Betelgeuse at a distance equivalent to thirty times the space between the Sun and Earth, receiving a radiation comparable to that received by our planet […]” (Boulle 18). The planet itself parallels Earth but what lies on that planet would be far different than anything on our Earth.

Posted by: Rebecca Maldonado at February 13, 2015 08:19 AM

Shawn DeJesus
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410CL Reading The Planet CA01
12 February 2015
“I can understand that, too. In fact, that is the reason why we can hope to reach our destination before dying. But in this case, why a voyage of two years? Why not only a few days or a few hours?” (Chapter 2, page 12)
Question: Pierre Boulle wasted no time developing conflict; in this case a conflict resides in ideas for a space voyage between Ulysses and his superior, Professor Antelle. What might be Boulle’s reason for developing conflict so early on in the novel?
Answer: The beginning of a novel sets the tone for the rest of the narrative journey that the reader is going to embark on. Therefore, Boulle utilizes conflict early on to set the tone, begin development of the plot, set the stakes, and compare and contrast characters. In this case, Boulle is contrasting the youthful Ulysses’ cautiousness with the experienced ambitiousness of Professor Antelle.

Posted by: Shawn DeJesus at February 13, 2015 09:35 AM

Jahiedy Vinas
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet CA01
13 February 2015

“There was something tremendously moving about this excessive labor on the part of a human being to achieve an everyday expression, and with such a pitiful result. I suddenly felt extremely touched, filled with compassion as though for a crippled child.”(Beginning of Chapter 8 “Planet of the Apes” Xan Fielding Translation, ebook)

Question: Ulysse Mérou notices that these human beings “appeared to be completely devoid of the power of reason” (chapter 6). What kind of binary opposition can be formed with Ulyesse and these Soror humans and does Ulyesse act with power against these humans?

Answer: Ulysse sees that these human lack reason, therefore the binary opposition of reason vs instinct or feeling, human vs animal and man vs nature appear. Although Ulysse and his companions possess greater intelligence, their fascination and desire to understand Nova and her people incline them to do as they do to fit in. They allowed the men of Soror to destroy their launch pad and materials to survive. Ulysse and his companions have no intention to hurt the people of Soror and do their best to not upset them.

Posted by: Jahiedy Vinas at February 13, 2015 09:37 AM

Dalton Hart
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410: Comparative Global Literature CA01
13 February 2014

“They wandered over the universe for their pleasure – by sail.” (Chapter 1, page 10, par. 2)
Question: Although Boulle’s novel is considered science fiction, what effect does this intergalactic couple traveling through remote parts of space simply for enjoyment have on the reader?
Answer: In society today, there is a largely held view that space is mysterious and wonderful yet scary at the same. Therefore, the idea of a couple traveling through this seemingly dangerous part of the universe may seem very odd to the reader. The foreshadowing of a mysterious danger coming into the lives of the couple may seem warranted by the reader because it becomes that there are inherent risk when traveling through an unknown area. After finding what appears to be a message in a bottle floating outside of the ship, Boulle writes, “A puzzled expression came into [Jinn’s] eyes,” showing that there is the specter of the unknown currently hanging over the couple (Boulle 14). This risk becomes acceptable because of the environment that the couple are in.

Posted by: Dalton Hart at February 13, 2015 09:39 AM

Craig Graves
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literature CA01
13 February 2105

“An uncomfortable feeling, however, restrained him from starting to read a document that had fallen into their hands in such an incongruous manner, but Phyllis’ state of excitement decided him.” (Boulle 8)

Question:
Why might Jinn be apprehensive to read the mysterious message in a bottle? Who could it have come from, from where was it sent, and how timely is it? What does this reveal about the characters of Jinn and Phyllis/

Answer:
The message in the bottle that Phyllis and Jinn find is described as “written in the language of the Earth (Boulle 8).” According to this phrase, the Earth eventually became unified under one language. Though it is not said how or why this happened, it can be inferred that this unification occurred some time after the discoveries of other inhabitable planets as Jinn is revealed to have been partially educated on Earth. Based on this information, it is unclear what race or species Jinn and Phyllis are. They could be humans, or they could be any number of other extraterrestrial species. Early in the chapter, it is revealed that Jinn and Phyllis are travelling around space while on vacation, but it never says how long they have been on holiday, there is no real sense of how long that odd bottle had been floating around space. It can be assumed that it was floating around for a while, and a message in a bottle seems terribly antiquated in an age of space travel in special balloon ships. Based on the language the message is written in, Earth or a native of Earth could be the sender, which also make the message seem older than it may be. Jinn is uncomfortable with this message in a bottle because it is presumably older than anything else he has encountered and from a planet that may not have been traveled recently.

Posted by: Craig Graves at February 13, 2015 09:39 AM

Deirdre Rowan
Dr. Hobbs
English 410 CA01 Reading the Planet-Comparative Global Literatures in Translation
13 February 2015

"My disappointment was such that I immediately broke into a towering rage... there was nothing else I could but eat and rest while waiting for a more favorable opportunity to reveal my noble nature." (Chapter 12, pages 86-7, Xan Fielding translation)

Question: What is the irony of the above passage?

Answer: Ulysse has been captured by the apes and is now an observable specimen. He tries to convince his captors that he is as intelligent as they are, but when he fails: "When I had exhausted my repertoire of invectives I went on giving incoherent yells, the only result being that [the gorillas] shrugged their shoulders... The other captives, at first agitated by my demonstration, had resumed eating"(Chapter 12, pages 87, Xan Fielding translation). Ulysse did not impress anyone with his performance.

Posted by: Deirdre Rowan at February 14, 2015 01:07 AM

Emily Finck
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literatures in Translation
16 February 2015


“I had studied biology at one time, and Pavlov’s work held no secrets for me. Here they were, applying to men the very experiments he had carried on dogs” (Planet of the Apes, Ch.14, page 95, Pierre Boulle).


Question:
How has the dichotomy of Man vs. Nature become a paradox to Ulysses Merou, and how does he cope with the paradoxical situation?


Answer:
In Pierre Boulle’s Planet of the Apes, Ulysses Merou’s character becomes stuck in this situational dichotomy of Man vs. Nature. Man being represented by the intelligent apes that inhabit Soror and nature being represented by the wild, uncivilized men who also inhabit Soror. Merou’s situation proves to be not only a reversal of the dichotomy but a paradox as well because man becomes the hunted and nature becomes the hunter. Merou is an intelligent man caught in a very unfortunate event where he becomes unprivileged simply by being on the wrong planet at the wrong time. In order to cope with his subsequent capture, he tries his best to show the apes he is, in fact, capable of a higher faculty of mind. That he is indeed “intelligent” by “flawlessly executing” the tests meant to elicit classical conditioning (Boulle 96-97). However, this behavior impresses the apes they do little to nothing on the way of release. Instead, they subject Merou to more tests and more observation.

Posted by: Emily Finck at February 14, 2015 11:26 AM

Ashtan Richey
ENG410 Reading the Planet CA01
Dr. Hobbs
16 February 2015

First half of chapter sixteen
“But I must first describe how I had meanwhile distinguished myself still further in the eyes of the apes (Pierre Boulle, Planet of the Apes, Ch.16, Pg.105).”

Question:
How do Zauis, Nova, and Zira's reactions to Ulysse's actions differ?

Answer:
Zauis seems to be doing his absolute best to ignore Ulysse's obvious distinctions from the other humans. He is tightly holding on to the idea that Ulysse is simply just a little smarter than the other humans, and that all of his actions are trained responses.
Nova takes offense to Ulysse's actions. She cannot understand why he strives to communicate with the apes, and also why he is drawing extra attention to himself. She seems to resent Ulysse after each successful (on his part) attempt at distinguishment.
Zira is thriving off of Ulysse. She is obsessed with his differences and seems to be one of the only apes to have the capacity to understand just how unique Ulysse is compared to the other humans. The reader gets the feeling that Zira may know that there is something much larger going on than just a "smart" human.

Posted by: Ashtan Richey at February 17, 2015 06:08 PM

Kristen Collins
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet
18 February 2015

“The two warders with whom I dealt were probably lowly underlings incapable of interpreting my movements, but there surely existed other apes who were more civilized.” (Chapter 13: _Planet of the Apes_, pg. 87, par. 1)

QUESTION: What does the quote above say about view of Soror’s societal structure, and how does it parallel Earth’s own dichotomies of the rich vs. poor/civilized vs. uncivilized?

ANSWER: There is obviously a work and class structure already in place on Soror, with the differing clothes and the assortment of jobs that are present for the civilized part of the civilizations. The warders are simply the less intelligent and lower class apes, who do not have the diverse intellectual capacity to understand the significance of a human of Soror speaking in an organized, civilized language. Zira, on the other hand, is considered to be more civilized and it is reflected in her perceived job status. From the brief glimpse of her in chapter 13, her job seems to consist of being somewhat of a scientific researcher, whether it is on all fields or just the interactions with the ‘humans’, it is not specified. These views are definitely paralleled from Earth’s own dichotomies pertaining to class structure. The lower class are perceived to be less intelligent just from the amount of money and type of work they are able to participate in. But the irony in this is that the society creates these limitations, making the poor poorer and the rich richer, even though every job has its important and integral place in society. The term civilized becomes a word that not only holds understand and organized societies, but also how high or low on the social latter a person, or in this case, ape is.

Posted by: Kristen Collins at February 18, 2015 06:55 AM

Lorie Jewell
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literature CA01
18 February 2015

“As soon as I understood their plan, I felt more humiliated than I had ever been in my life and swore to die rather than lend myself to these degrading schemes” (Boulle 110).

Question: At the close of Chapter 16, Ulysse gets upset when he figures out the captor’s plan to study the mating rituals of the humans. Why does he calm down and feel less humiliated when he sees that Nova will be his partner? Besides the fact that she is hot?

Answer: Perhaps Ulysse’s anger is fear-based, despite the constant reminders of his healthy ego. On Earth, sexual relations are, for the most part, private; most men (and women) would vehemently oppose having their bedroom activities publicly observed. So Ulysse could be scared. His anger could also be his realization that the apes have upped the ante on their control over him and his powerlessness to bring some balance to the situation. But with Nova, he already has an intimate familiarity with her and feels superior to her. He may not have any power over the apes, but he believes he does over Nova.

Posted by: Lorie Jewell at February 18, 2015 07:43 AM

Hannah McCafferty
Dr. Hobbes
ENG 410 Reading the Planet
17 February 2015
Question: Based on the second half of chapter thirteen, do you believe that Zira, the she-ape, is going to be a friend or foe? Why or why not?
Answer: While the reader has only seen one interaction with Zira, they can assume that she may be a friend down the road. She showed particular interest in Ulysse and even projected a smile at him. It is clear that she will have a strong interest in him regardless whether that is a negative or positive aspect. “The warder fumbled in his pocket and took out a small white object that he handed to his superior. She herself put it in my hand with a charming smile. It was a lump of sugar” (Boulle 90). Her warm response and intrigue to Ulysse' sophistication, as well as her er reward of sugar for him, leads the reader to believe that she could become a friend of Ulysses’ over time.

Posted by: Hannah McCafferty at February 18, 2015 08:38 AM

Craig Graves
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literature CA01
18 February 2105

Question:
In chapter eleven, Ulysse seems baffled and troubled by the recent events and the role the apes play on this new planet. Why might he feel this way? Does he realize what is happening overall? If so, what exactly may be happening?

Answer:
Ulysse expresses that this new planet, Soror, is possibly more advanced than Earth that apes can perform more incredible tasks than apes on Earth. What Ulysse is confused by is why it is that humans are acting like the apes on Earth. He questions this notion that apes are the ruling species and desperately wants to believe that other humans are responsible. As he says, he “clung desperately to [that] explanation, recoiling in horror at the thought of another (Boulle 79).” This is to say that he found it inconceivable that anything but humans could be the cause of his present situation. It is horribly racist that Ulysse would consider any other species, but humans to be capable of free thought and civilized life. Ulysse is aware that apes are the species in power on Soror and humans are seen as a lower species, albeit he is reluctant to accept this set of facts.

Posted by: Craig Graves at February 18, 2015 10:04 AM

Lorie Jewell
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literature CA01
20 February 2015

“There in front of me, without moving his lips, while my heart went numb with horror, Professor Antelle gave vent to a long-drawn-out howl.” (Chapter 26: Planet of the Apes, page 187, para.2)

Question: Ulysse discovers that Professor Antelle has apparently lost all human intellect and ability to communicate and now exhibits animal-like behavior. How is it that Ulysse has remained intellectually sound while Antelle, his Earthly superior, regressed so quickly?

Answer: For one thing, Ulysse’s healthy ego has never lost its luster. He has a very high opinion of himself and his place in the world, even when he is naked, in a cage, and has to answer to apes. Perhaps Antelle was not as gifted with such a strong sense of self. Boulle also describes Antelle early on as “not interested at all in human beings” (Boulle 15); the professor was more interested in loading the spacecraft with plants, vegetables, and some animals while limiting the human element to just three. Since Antelle was confined with the animal-like humans, he did not have the same intellectual interaction Ulysse gradually gained with Zira. The relationship between Ulysse and Antelle is an example of a hegemonic dichotomy reversal; Antelle was the stronger, smarter man when they left Earth, but Ulysse took on that role toward the end.

Posted by: Lorie Jewell at February 18, 2015 01:45 PM

Deirdre Rowan
Dr. Hobbs
English 410 CA01 Reading the Planet-Comparative Global Literatures in Translation
19 February 2015

"I should have liked to go to a theater or a museum, but these entertainments were still forbidden to me. Only from books had I been able to acquire a few ideas about simian art... I could decently attend only open-air entertainments." (Chapter 23, pages 157-8, Xan Fielding translation)

Question: How does the above paragraph illustrate a key difference between the book and the two films (the 1968 version and the Tim Burton remake) based on it.

Answer: When Hollywood advertises a Planet of the Apes film to the public, do they show scenes of "a little winged monkey representing Cupid" or the idea that the apes "also had their impressionists, and a few contemporaries indulged in abstract art"(Boulle 158)? No; the apes of the films are focused on survival, coexisting with humans. This differs greatly from the book as the apes in that realm live just like humans. As such, they have time to leisure in the arts and create works that are visually pleasing. It might have a message behind it or just exist for no reason, but it gives the apes a more rounded purpose in the book than just being the static warriors depicted in the films.

Posted by: Deirdre Rowan at February 19, 2015 09:34 PM

Hannah McCafferty
Dr. Hobbes
ENG 410 Reading the Planet
20 February 2015

Question: In the second half of chapter 17, Ulysse gives into Zaius’ experiment. Do you think that he is going to give the apes continuously what they want?
Answer: In previous chapters Ulysee has proved to have a strong intelligence and an even stronger willpower. Ulysse managed had a significant detachment from human emotion and all that surrounded him.For instance, when his “companion” died he did not have any real feeling. Thus, providing him with a better chance of survival and a stronger determination to not do what he felt was wrong. However, Ulysse has begun to grow an attachment to Nova and has already started to go against his morals for her. When asked to perform a mating ritual with Nova, he immediately refused. However, when they took Nova away from him, he reassessed the situation and decided to do what they asked of him. “What more can I say? These emotions had broken down my resistance. I felt I would never be able to bear the sight of my nymph at the mercy of another man” (Boulle 114). While Ulysse has only given into the apes once for Nova, his connection with Nova is growing and so is his likelihood to bend for Nova again. It is easy to infer that Ulysse will form a habit and continue to give to the apes’ wishes for Nova.

Posted by: Hannah McCafferty at February 20, 2015 08:34 AM

Craig Graves
Dr, Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literature CA01
20 February 2015

Question:
Why is Zira so intrigued by the geometry Ulysse was drawing for her? Is their friendship allowed on the planet of Soror? Explain.

Answer:
With his geometric drawings, Ulysse was showing Zira that he was not an unintelligible being. He demonstrates some basic planar geometry with cones to produce ellipses, parabolas, and hyperbolas. These displays of intelligence helped build the friendship between him and Zira in that there was something they had in common. This link and intrigue are also evident in Ulysse’s attempt to show where he came from to Zira. Ulysses says that “by drawing another dotted line between Earth and Soror and marking in [the] vessel, on a different scale, on the trajectory (Boulle 124),” Zira understood better where he came from. According to Ulysse, they were both “moved” by their shared interest in mathematics (Boulle 123). The only issue with their friendship is that humans on Soror are not intelligent, and they are considered animals. It is most likely a high offence to be friends with one of them, which is seen in Zira’s haste to hide any evidence of Ulysse’s intelligence and mathematical drawings. In an odd way, this story is similar to the Disney version of Pocahontas, or rather Pocahontas is similar to The Planet of the Apes.

Posted by: Craig Graves at February 20, 2015 08:51 AM

Deirdre Rowan
Dr. Hobbs
English 410 CA01 Reading the Planet-Comparative Global Literatures in Translation
20 February 2015

"This slow development among the apes deserves a few comments... True, [humans] also have known a period of semi-stagnation. We, too, have had our orangutans, our falsified education and ridiculous curricula, and this period lasted a long time." (Chapter 28, page 200-1, Xan Fielding translation)

Question: How does this statement change the perception of the ape society?

Answer: Up to this point in the book, the apes have appeared to mirror human society as a realized utopia for their kind. Finding out that there are gaps in the historic knowledge concerning the genesis of the simian civilization, but "the ordinary ape had grown accustomed to finding this quite natural, never imagining a different state"(Boulle 201) challenges this idea. Acknowledging that certain information is withheld from the general public changes the view to that of a dystopian existence; the citizens maybe unhappy with not knowing more, but are willing live in ignorance as long as it maintains peace.

Posted by: Deirdre Rowan at February 20, 2015 10:18 PM

Emily Finck
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literatures in Translation
20 February 2015


“‘Listen to me, O Apes! For I can talk, and not, I assure you, like a mechanical toy or a parrot. I can think, I can talk, I can understand what you say just as well as what I myself say’” (Planet of the Apes, Ch. 25, page 174, Pierre Boulle).


Question:
What kind of paradox does Ulysses Merou create by addressing the Council of Apes in their native tongue, and what, if any dichotomies does he bust by doing so?


Answer:
In Pierre Boulle’s Planet of the Apes, the main character Ulysses Merou causes great uproar when he presents himself as “intelligible and competent” at the convention held by the Apes in the name of science (175). The reason being is he is a man, and on their planet, humankind is bestial and incapable of higher thought beyond animal instinct. For Merou to show such capacity for complex thought is astounding because it forces the Apes to think beyond the world they know as having the only intelligent life. Thus, breaking the dichotomy of narrow- mindedness/open- mindedness. The Apes then have to reevaluate their standing and position in the universe; and, thusly, Merou must do the same.

Posted by: Emily Finck at February 21, 2015 05:52 PM

Ashtan Richey
ENG410 Reading the Planet CA01
Dr. Hobbs
22 February 2015

Second half of ch. 27
“I often think of Nova. I cannot forget the hours I spent in her company (Pierre Boulle, Planet of the Apes, Ch.27, Pg.194).”

Question
What has changed between Ulysse and Nova?

Answer
Ulysse has gained his freedom and ultimately is in a separate distinction from the other humans in the apes minds. This seems to reinforce his previously dwindling faith that he is something more than the other humans, that his intelligence puts him on a higher level on the food chain. Suddenly Nova is lesser than him and he states "...I have never again entered her cage; human self-respect forbids me( Boulle pg. 194)."

Posted by: Ashtan Richey at February 22, 2015 09:16 PM

Ashtan Richey
ENG410 Reading the Planet CA01
Dr. Hobbs
22 February 2015

Second half of ch. 38
“'Men inspired by intelligence? No, that's not possible; there the author has gone too far (Pierre Boulle, Planet of the Apes, Ch.38, Pg.268).”

Question
Why does the author use Phylis and Jinn at the beginning of the novel and again in the end? What do these characters add or take away from the novel's plot?

Answer
Phyllis and Jinn discover the "message in a bottle" that is the script for the meat of the novel. The novel is told to the readers through Jinn's reading to Phyllis. At the beginning of the novel, there is a vague description of the features of Jinn and Phyllis, but never confirmation if they are human or otherwise. At the end of Ulysse's writing there is substantial foreshadowing that Earth has followed the same path as Betelgeuse and is now taken over by apes; but there is room for the most hopeful of readers to assume their own ending. The final chapter with Phyllis's disbelief that humans may possess intelligence solidifies that Ulysse most likely met a grim ending and that the apes have prevailed.

Posted by: Ashtan Richey at February 22, 2015 09:16 PM

Dalton Hart
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410: Reading the Planet CA01
23 February 2015

“our being equipped with four hands is one of the most important factors in our spiritual evolution. It helped us in the first place to climb trees, and thereby conceive the three dimensions of space, whereas man, pegged to the ground by a physical malformation, slumbered on the flat.” (Chapter 19, page 127, par. 1)
Question: How does the apes’ idea of evolution coincide or contradict the contemporary view of evolution?
Answer: In today’s society, social evolution is viewed as a result of the advance technology that society has been able to create, much like the apes view social evolution. Zira speaks of the advancements in technology, stemming from their ability to use four hands as opposed to four, which led to superiority of apes over man. Ulysse, after hearing Zira’s explanation of the superiority of the apes, claims, “On Earth I had frequently heard precisely the opposite argument used to explain the superiority of man. After thinking it over, however, Zira’s reasoning struck me as being neither more nor less convincing than ours,” (Boulle 127). Although Ulysse seems to suggest that the argument Zira is proposing is contradictory of human views, her argument coincides very well with the way that society views social and technological evolution in the world. Many people today are able to realize our superiority over animals because we are more technologically advanced than they are, and thus Zira’s reasoning becomes compatible with the way that humans view the world today.

Posted by: Dalton Hart at February 22, 2015 09:34 PM

Dalton Hart
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410: Reading the Planet CA01
23 February 2015

“The orangutans, as I’ve said before, make no distinction between one man and another.” (Chapter 37, page 250, par. 3)

Question: Viewing the dichotomy of Man vs. Animal within the context of the novel, is it fair to say that the hegemony within today’s world – Man being greatly preferred over animal – is conversely represented within the novel?

Answer: In today’s society, there is a clear dichotomy between Man and animals and the obvious hegemony belonging to Man. Within the context of the novel, the hegemony belongs to the Apes as they are the ones in power. Therefore, it can be concluded that the hegemonic representation is one that is similar to ours. In society we only view animals as somewhat similar if they are pets and this is echoed in Ulysse’s statements about Zira, “It would be unreasonable of me to fret. I have succeeded in saving the beings who are dear to me. Whom do I miss over there? Zira? Yes, Zira. But the emotions that came to life between us had no name on Earth,” (Boulle 251). The only reason that Ulysse views Zira in a somewhat loving way is because he became her “pet”. There is less of a dichotomy in regards to their relationship because it is portrayed in the same what that a man and his pet’s relationship is.

Posted by: Dalton Hart at February 22, 2015 11:13 PM

Kristen Collins
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet
20 February 2015

“I was in a gigantic amphitheater (which put me strangely in mind of Dante’s conical inferno) of which every row of seats both around and above me was swarmed with apes.” (Chapter 24: _Planet of the Apes_, pg. 166, par. 1)

QUESTION: Why does Ulysses reflect on the fact that the amphitheater reminds him if Dante’s inferno? What does this say about him? What does this say about the apes and what they embody?

ANSWER: At this point in the book, it is a literal moment of truth for Ulysses, and through his actions, he can either succeed or fail, going into the metaphorical pits of hell if not successful. The amphitheater is both his salvation and his hell depending on the outcome because this point will guide him further into figuring out the planet of Soror and its inhabitants. Just like Dante, Ulysses is going into uncharted territory, where he can learn an abundance of new knowledge (with the showcase being about the different scientific discoveries by apes) but also be at the mercy of the entire general public for his success or failure. The apes themselves represent, in this context, all of the higher powers within the inferno of hell, which is ironic in a sense because they should be the ones embodying Dante. Instead, the apes signify the judgment that will be placed on Ulysses depending on his performance in the amphitheater. Doing well allows him to continue learning and being able to have the freedom of exploring the world around him. On the flipside, during horribly will make him a scientific anomaly where experimentation on the brain will occur. Either way, this is the moment of truth where everything is on the line, and Ulysses must gamble his lot.

Posted by: Kristen Collins at February 23, 2015 05:33 AM

Kristen Collins
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet
23 February 2015

“I thus came to view the most diverse activities of our Earth with a new eye and to imagine them performed by apes…The most disturbing part of my present image was that, contrary to the phenomenon that shortly before had made me assign the form of gorillas or orangutans to the figure in the earthly scene, I now saw the members of the insane crowd in the guise of human beings.” (Chapter 30: _Planet of the Apes_, pg. 212 & 215, par. 4 & 4)

QUESTION: What is the significance of Ulysses continuing to keep reversing the imagery of ape and man in his head when thinking of Earth, humanity, and imitation? Is it a critic of the apes or is it critiquing humankind?

Humankind and ape-kind are interchangeable at this point, not because they parallel one another in societal structure, but instead from a standpoint of imitation. After having the realization that man most likely were present and were the intellectual species on Soror before the apes, Ulysses sees the disturbingly similar reality between the two. Imitation is such a powerful entity and state of mind, that everything imaginable can be mimicked with enough trial and error. Ulysses understands this and continues to find all of the parallels and explanation to all aspects of society. The gorillas are just of power and strength, giving them the ability to go through jobs that do not need as much thought put into them. On the other hand, the orangutans are a complete embodiment of the original imitation, strictly staying to the books and continuing to be the forefront of society. The only race out of the bunch that actually displays more than just imitation is the chimpanzees, where they think outside of the book. Unfortunately the most intelligent ones that are able to create change and progress the world do not have the social background, only able to share their discoveries amongst themselves. Whether or not it is true, this society can be a critique of Earth’s own with who is in power, who has the social backing, and who makes the discoveries/creates the new ideas fro knowledge.

Posted by: Kristen Collins at February 23, 2015 05:56 AM

Rebecca Maldonado
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet
23 February 2015
“The pompous humility of this opening had been suggested by Zira and Cornelius, who knew it was liable to touch the orangutans. I went on in a silence that was complete,” (Boulle 174).
Question: What irony can you spot in Ulysses’ introduction of himself to the apes in this chapter?
Answer: When reading the introductory lines of this chapter, one could say it is reminiscent of the way a court jester or lowly peasant would address the king. The irony of this particular situation in Planet of the Apes is the way man, who has always placed himself at the top of the social totem pole, is now resigned to approach the rule of the planet – the apes – in such a manner. Ulysses goes on to say “I know my appearance is grotesque, my figure repulsive, my features bestial, my smell sickening, the color of my skin disgusting,” (Boulle 173). Is this not the way we see animals? This is the way he has to present himself: as a lower, unworthy being. And that’s just to get their attention.

Posted by: Rebecca Maldonado at February 23, 2015 08:15 AM

Ashley Gross
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet CA01
22 February 2015

“The disturbing effect was an odd sensation that was to come over me later on many other occasions” (Boulle 183).

What effect is Ulysses describing while he is attending the party in Chapter 26?

He begins to realize that he was no longer looking at the inhabitants of Soror as apes; he was seeing them as their positions in society. “I can only describe it by saying that the nature of the figures around me became progressively less simian, whereas their function or the position they held in society became dominant. The head waiter, for instance, who came up obsequiously to show us our table, I saw only as the head waiter, and the fact that he was a gorilla tended to be obscured” (Boulle 183).

Posted by: Ashley Gross at February 23, 2015 08:17 AM

Hannah McCafferty
Dr. Hobbes
ENG 410 Reading the Planet
22 February 2015

Question: Due to what the reader is learning in the first half of chapter 35, what can the reader expect will happen to Ulysse and his newborn?
Answer: In this chapter, word begins to spread around Soror that men are starting to can talk. Ultimately, this separates them from a typical house pet or animal, and makes them potentionally more civilized. Ulysse explains, “As a result there is an uneasy atmosphere abroad, which is manifested by the increased wariness of the authorities about me, an attitude that is increasingly more disturbing” (Boulle 249). However, the problems that have already begun to arise have been occurring even with the lack of knowledge that the ape populations has about the civil war many years ago. Once this information is leaked, Ulysse is going to be a full-on threat because he could theoretically start a revolution. His baby brings a threat to Soror as well; he could expose more human capability. It is easy to infer that a mob mentality will begin, and Ulysse and his baby will be taken out, perhaps for experimentation so the apes could avoid this from ever happening again.

Posted by: Hannah McCafferty at February 23, 2015 08:42 AM

Shawn DeJesus
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410CL Reading The Planet CA01
18 February 2015
“No sooner had I seen the animal than I realized that he was not in any way disguised. The state in which I saw him was normal, as normal to him as nakedness was to Nova and her companions.” (pg. 60, par. 1, Xan Fielding translation)
Question: This is Ulysse’s first encounter with the apes on Soror. What was it about these apes that struck Ulysses with such awe and astonishment?
Answer: Ulysse is completely dumbfounded by the fact that these apes possessed “human characteristics,” even down to their manner of attire, being “dressed as you and I are…” Their actions closely resembled humans as well, such as “the cruelty of the hunter stalking his prey and the feverish pleasure he derived from this pastime…” He saw in this ape “a spark of understanding that I had sought in vain among the men of Soror.”

Posted by: Shawn DeJesus at February 23, 2015 08:52 AM

Shawn DeJesus
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410CL Reading The Planet CA01
20 February 2015
Zira: “’That’s where we perform certain extremely tricky operation on the brain: grafting; observation and alteration of the nervous centers; partial and even total ablation.’”
Ulysse: “’And you carry out these experiments on men!” (page 142, par. 3, Xan Fielding translation)
Question: This dialogue exchange between Zira and Ulysse represents an incredible irony. What is that irony, and how does it tie into Boulle’s message?
Answer: Ulysse is shocked at how the apes could use humans as scientific test subjects, and his astonishment is made clear by his response. The irony is that humans on Earth utilize animals in the same fashion and for the same purpose: to progress in the field of science. This irony ties into one of the underlying themes in the novel that perhaps we are not so different after all…

Posted by: Shawn DeJesus at February 23, 2015 08:57 AM

Craig Graves
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literature CA01
23 February 2015

“Imitation of what, of whom?” (Boulle 202)

Question:
What is the nature of Cornelius’s research and why does it require Ulysse’s presence?

Answer:
Cornelius, much like Ulysse and his companions at the beginning of the book, is a scientist. He is intrigued by the arrival of a knowledgeable human on his planet where humans are unintelligible animals. It seems Cornelius’s research is to understand why humans on Earth are more advanced than the sapiens on Soror. Ulysse explains that apes on Earth learn through imitation of humans, which according to Cornelius is a possibility for the delay of progress on Soror. The only issue with this answer is that there is no knowledge of what it was that the apes of Soror started to imitate. Ulysse asks, “Imitation of what, of whom? (Boulle 202),” which mean no one is sure how anything came to be on Soror. While Zira does say that there are apes who have had an original thought, no one seems to pay her much heed. Humans on Earth were able to progress by original thought so why is it out of the question that the apes of Soror might progress from original thought? Cornelius is taking the group to a ruined city to find out more answers to his questions about the origin of the apes of Soror.

Posted by: Craig Graves at February 23, 2015 09:05 AM

Lorie Jewell
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literature CA01
23 February 2015

“I know that after seven hundred years I shall find neither parents nor friends, but I can hardly wait to see proper men again.” (Planet of the Apes: Ch. 37, page 264, para. 3)

Question: How does Ulysses define “proper men” and does it reflect how the reader would define it, given his overall experience?

Answer: Ulysses is defining proper men as those who are like him – standing on two feet, able to communicate, demonstrate intelligence and reason, exercise compassion and empathy, and enjoy wearing clothes. As a reader, we can see all of those qualities in many of the apes – particularly with Cornelius and Zira. A blind man could easily mistake these two with ‘proper men’ – as long as he did not touch them.

Posted by: Lorie Jewell at February 23, 2015 09:05 AM

Emily Finck
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literatures in Translation
23 February 2015


“‘Nothing serious; but it’s important to enough to put the authorities on their toes. Nova is expecting’” (Planet of the Apes, Ch. 31, page 221, Pierre Boulle).


Question:
What does the impending birth of Ulysses’ baby mean to the apes? Being that the child will be a product of a man who possesses the brain/mind of an ape.


Answer:
In Pierre Boulle’s Planet of the Apes, the birth of Ulysses Merou’s child poses a possible threat to the ape’s existence. The child being the product of a man who has the brain of an ape could tear down the hegemonic dichotomy of man being the beast and ape being man. If this child is intelligent and competent, it could mean the end of all apes. The child and Ulysses can give rise to a new facet of the human race, one that can overthrow the apes and wipe them out altogether.
“I trembled at the new danger it represents,” upon the birth if Ulysses’ child who turns out to be a boy, he expresses fear and joy all at the same time. Ulysses is a father but his child being male carries the genetic component to create a new intelligent race of humans on the planet Soror, which could mean the eradication of the apes (Boulle 251).

Posted by: Emily Finck at February 23, 2015 04:56 PM

Shawn DeJesus
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410CL Reading The Planet CA01
24 February 2015
“Rational man having had his day, a superior being was bound to succeed him, preserve the essential results of his conquests, and assimilate them during a period of apparent stagnation before soaring up to even greater heights.” (Page 227, par. 2, Xan Fielding translation)
Question: What lead Cornelius to this ultimate conclusion, and how does it mirror some of the popular sentiments that Ulysse is accustomed to on Earth?
Answer: After excavating ancient ruins that predate simian civilization, Cornelius stumbles upon not only a human doll, but a massive grave consisting of only human skeletons. This discovery leads Cornelius to an indisputable truth: that apes descended from humans. The fact that apes have descended and eventually surpassed their predecessors leads Cornelius to believe that they will achieve “even greater heights” than what man was capable of, believing that apes are the supreme product of evolution. Interestingly enough, this is a common perception on Earth, where “…many men on Earth have had the presentiment of a superior being who may one day succeed them but that no scientist, philosopher, or poet has ever imagined this super-human in the guise of an ape.”

Posted by: Shawn DeJesus at February 24, 2015 04:53 PM

Chapter 12
“It was soon my turn. While one of the gorillas mounted guard, the other entered my cage and placed in front of me a bowl containing some mash, a little fruit, and a bucket. I had decided to do all I could to establish contact with these apes, who seemed to be the only rational and civilized beings on the planet. The one who brought my food did not look unpleasant. Observing my tranquillity, he even gave me a friendly tap on the shoulder. I looked him straight in the eye, then, putting my hand on my chest, gave a ceremonious bow. I saw intense surprise on his face as I raised my head again. I then smiled at him, putting all my heart into this gesture. He was just about to leave; dumbfounded, he stopped short and uttered an exclamation. At last I had succeeded in attracting attention to myself. Wishing to reinforce this success by showing all my abilities, I uttered rather stupidly the first phrase that came into my head:”
Why was it important for Ulysses to show the apes who he was?
Once Ulysses was captured, his main goal during his captivity was to reveal to the apes that he is a different type of human, in hopes that they would free him. When he first gets a chance to directly communicate with the apes, he bows his head after he is given a meal and the apes are shocked. However, he eventually begins to start yelling and cursing in a rage, as if he is not human, causing the apes attention to be taken away from him. However, his bow caught the attention of the apes.
Chapter 20
“And partly forgetting my true condition, as she still often did, she began advising me about my behavior, which humiliated me deeply.
“Above all, do be careful not to turn on passers-by or bare your teeth or scratch a trustful child who might come up and pet you. I didn’t want to muzzle you, but . . .”
She stopped short and burst out laughing.
“Forgive me, forgive me!” she cried. “I keep forgetting you have a mind like an ape.”
Why Did Zira believe that Ulysses had the mind of an ape?
Zira felt like since Ulysses had been captured for so long and been held captive by Apes, he had now had an ape like mentality. When she greets him at his cage, she pulls him out by his neck, as if he is not human. Men were now ruled by apes.

Posted by: Marcus Chisholm at February 25, 2015 08:59 AM

Emily Finck
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literature in Translation CA01
27 February 2015


Question: #10
What happens to Merou after he interrupts Dr. Zaius’s presentation, to make his astonishing “announcement” to the grand assembly? What was Dr. Zaius, initially, trying to accomplish in his presentation? What happens instead? Is Zaius pleased with these results? Why, or why not? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.


Answer:
In Pierre Boulle’s Planet of the Apes, Ulysses Merou creates quite an upset with Dr. Zaius after he interrupts his presentation. Merou shows, with perfect clarity that he is “intelligent, competent, and most of all possess the mind of an ape” (169). After Merou creates a grand uproar at the convention, the council decides that he is worthy of his freedom and should be permitted to walk around like a free “ape” (179). Dr. Zaius was not at all pleased with this sudden outburst because the convention was to prove that Merou was not intelligent, but in fact just a highly trained and adapted beast. Zaius was to have Merou perform a series of tasks that would prove not only his incompetence, but also disprove his “ape-like” behavior (Boulle 168), however this was not the case and the council granted favor to Merou, not Zaius.

Posted by: Emily Finck at February 26, 2015 08:02 PM

Dalton Hart
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410: Reading the Planet CA01
27 February 2015

Question: What happened to the three cosmonauts shortly after their swim and their discovery? What was the unfortunate end result of this encounter? What new details about the inhabitants of this planet did the gentlemen learn? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: When the three cosmonauts were swimming, they came across a female inhabitant of Soror whom Ulysse named Nova. After joyfully playing in the water with Nova, a chimpanzee, Hector, comes from the forest, and to the cosmonaut’s surprise, Nova kills the seemingly innocent Hector. After realizing the gravity of the situation, Ulysse remarks, “On the planet Soror reality appeared to be quite the reverse: we had to do with the inhabitants resembling us in every way from the physical point of view but who appeared to be completely devoid of the power of reason,” (Boulle 46). The cosmonauts were finally beginning to understand that the “humans” that inhabited Soror were far different than they were. They lacked any sense of normalcy compared to the humans of Earth. The inhabitants of Soror were a very primitive being that lacked communication skills and, as Ulysse points out, any power of reason.

Posted by: Dalton Hart at February 26, 2015 08:49 PM

Ashtan Richey
ENG410 Reading the Planet CA01
Dr. Hobbs
26 February 2015

Who are Jinn and Phyllis? What are they doing when we meet them, as readers, and why are they doing it? At this point in the story, what do we know about them, for sure? What is a frame tale, and how does this part of the narrative play into that concept? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Jinn and Phyllis take the ideas suggested by Pierre Boulle throughout the novel and ultimately apply them in a sense that makes the story "real" for the readers. We are introduced to Jinn and Phyllis at the beginning of the novel and the duration is then told through Jinn reading the "message in a bottle" that the couple has found in outer space. Upon the readers introduction to Jinn and Phyllis, they are very "human-like." The opening sentence states "Jinn and Phyllis were spending a wonderful holiday, in space... (Boulle pg. 1)," effectively establishing the setting and giving the assuming reader the sense that these are humans. Jinn and Phyllis show traits such as appreciation for leisure, curiosity, determination, and impatience; qualities which make them further "human" to the readers. "'Jinn, break it open; hurry up!' Phyllis begged stamping her foot. Less impatient, Jinn methodically chipped off the sealing wax (Boulle pg. 5)."
There is also an importance in the amount of advanced technology that Jinn and Phyllis are in control of and seem to live in a time where these things are normal. "In those days interplanetary voyages were an everyday occurrence, and interstellar travel not uncommon (Boulle pg. 1)." This is important because (after having read quite farther into the novel) the reader finds that the monkeys are only able to "imitate" human behavior. It is obvious that on both Betelgeuse and planet Earth upon Ulysee's return do not have such a furthered amount of technology. This may either prove to the passage of time before the message has been founded or it may disprove the theory of monkeys being capable of only "imitation."

Posted by: Ashtan Richey at February 26, 2015 10:37 PM

Ashley Gross
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet CA01
26 February 2015

Question #17:
What type of pet did the three visitors of earth bring with them on their spacecraft? What was its name and what happened to it? Who did something to the pet, and why? What ironies exist in the whole situation of the pet?

Answer:
The three visitors of Earth brought their pet Chimpanzee, Hector, with them to Soror. Shortly after the crew lands, Hector is strangled to death by the crew’s first contact on the planet, Nova, because she sees him as a threat. “As he passed close by, without noticing her, she sprang out. Her body twanged like a bow. She seized him by the throat and closed her hands around his neck, holding the poor creature firmly between her thighs. Her attack was so swift that we did not even have time to intervene. The monkey hardly struggled. He stiffened after a few seconds and fell dead when she let him go” (Boulle 34). The reason that Nova killing Hector is so significant is because they are both so similar in nature and physical makeup.“Then she uttered a last shrill cry, which could be interpreted as a shout of triumph or bellow of rage, and fled into the forest” (Boulle 35).
It is interesting to note that Nova is more hostile to this creature that is so similar to her own kind, than she is to the humans. This might show that she was less threatened by the humans and more interested in figuring them out.

Posted by: Ashley Gross at February 26, 2015 10:40 PM

Shaina McSweeney
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410: Reading the Planet-Comparative Global Literatures in Translation
26 February 2015

Question 6: On Soror, how are the apes’ cities, and the technology that apes use, similar to that which exists on Earth, and how do they differ? Explain, and be specific. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.
Shaina McSweeney
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410: Reading the Planet-Comparative Global Literatures in Translation
26 February 2015

Question 6: On Soror, how are the apes’ cities, and the technology that apes use, similar to that which exists on Earth, and how do they differ? Explain, and be specific. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.
Answer: The ape cities on Soror are very similar to the cities on Earth: “The houses were similar to ours; the roads, which were very dirty, looked like our roads” (137). In regards to technology, specifically when it comes to space travel, Earth’s technology is far more advanced: “Yes, but not so perfected. From what you’ve told me, we’re a long way behind you” (140). The ape’s have launched artificial satellites around the planet Soror; Earth, on the other hand, has managed to produce crafts capable of interstellar travel.

Posted by: Shaina McSweeney at February 26, 2015 11:57 PM

Deirdre Rowan
Dr. Hobbs
English 410 CA01 Reading the Planet-Comparative Global Literatures in Translation
27 February 2015

Question #16: What is significant about the meaning of Merou’s first name, Nova’s name, and Sirius’s name? What do these names mean, and how do/might they relate to the narrative?

Answer: Merou's first name, Ulysse, is from Homer's The Odyssey, where the protagonist Ulysses spend twenty years sailing around Mythical Greece after the Trojan War trying to return to his kingdom. Nova's name is Latin for new, as she is the first human being that Ulysse encounters on Soror, which could also being a subtle reference to Eve, the first woman, in the Biblical book of Genesis. "I shall never forget the impression her appearance made on me...It was plain to see that the woman possessed the most perfect body that could be conceived on Earth" (Chapter 5, pages 28-9 , Xan Fielding translation). Sirius' name derives from the Dog Star which, when viewed on Earth, is the brightest star in the night sky.
In the book, Ulysse is traveling around the far reaches of outer space. He encounters Nova on Soror where everything is new and their union conceives a son, Sirius, whom he considers "the pearl of the cosmos... I cannot wait to show him to the men on Earth" (Boulle 264). Ulysse travels back to Earth with his family, taking the time to teach them about his solar system. The protagonist (Ulysse) explores new places (Nova) that orbit distance stars (Sirius).

Posted by: Deirdre Rowan at February 27, 2015 12:17 AM

Kristen Collins
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet
27 February 2015

“He had evidently given little credit till now to Zira’s confidence, preferring to believe in some hoax. He started firing questions at me…Cornelius was particularly interested, of course, in the emergence of Homo sapiens on Earth and made me tell him again and again everything I knew about this subject.” (Chapter 22: _Planet of the Apes_, pg. 146-147, par. 9-10)

QUESTION: How does Cornelius react, initially, to Merou, himself, and Zira’s opinion of him? Is he receptive, skeptical, jealous, or frightened? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

ANSWER: At the very start, Cornelius dismisses Zira’s own thought and theories of Merou because of the sheer impossibility of humans being able to communicate and have advanced intellectual understanding. With him being a chimpanzee, his entire race is about research, understanding, and discoveries, so the initial skepticism is prevalent since he only had word-to-mouth conversation. But unlike Zaius, who even after seeing the evidence firsthand and did not belief it, Cornelius instead wants to further question Merou on his origins and test the bounds of human knowledge. After the initial skepticism, he becomes very receptive to Merou’s own cause and even brings him on an excavation, bringing up questions of Soror’s own planet’s origins of humans and apes. Chimpanzees as whole, are a lot more flexible with their worldly understanding and have a higher chance of accepting new ways of thinking and theories. One thing to point out though with this planet of apes that are solely reliant of science and empiricism, is the fact that this society probably has no means of religion. This is strange in itself, because humans have a variety of ways in seeing the world, whether it is through the varying religions, lack of belief, or though theories in science.

Posted by: Kristen Collins at February 27, 2015 06:41 AM

Lorie Jewell
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literature CA01
27 February 2015

Question 14: As a result of their intimacy, what results from the bond of Merou and Nova? Why does this suddenly become problematic? What are the institute’s plans and what does Merou decide to do? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: The snuggling between Ulysses Merou and Nova results in her becoming pregnant, which is a big problem for them and the child because Merou is already seen as a threat to the greater ape population because of his intelligence and ability to communicate it. The possibility that such a threat will double if his child turns out the same has ape leaders on edge. Cornelius tries to make Merou understand why they have to keep his knowledge of the pregnancy a secret: “If the authorities discovered you knew all about it, I should be dismissed, so would Zira, and you’d find yourself alone among . . .” (228) enemies. Later, Cornelius shares with Merou the Grand Council plans to separate his son from Nova, put him under the authority and watch of the orangutans, and eventually “there’s no question of doing away with him” (255). Merou decides it’s time to get the hell out of dodge, to leave the planet and return to Earth with Nova and their child. Cornelius and Zira, along with a small group of other chimpanzees, help them escape.

Posted by: Lorie Jewell at February 27, 2015 07:32 AM

Hannah McCafferty
Dr. Hobbes
ENG 410 Reading the Planet
26 February 2015

Question: How do the apes first react to Merou’s ability to mimic the things that they do seemingly? Are they convinced that he is as intelligent as them, or do they suspect something else? How might their suspicions and fears mirror the way some people in our time and place feel about advances in human understanding of the great apes of Planet Earth? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.
Answer: When Ulysse begins first to show signs of intelligence the apes, specifically Zauis, initially start to get angry--punishing Ulysse until he conforms to what they are used to. For instance, when Ulysse refused to participate in the mating ritual that all of the other unintelligent humans performed in; as a result Zauis stripped him of his mate. During this process an ape, Zira, took particular interest in Ulysse's abilities, however, the apes, even Zira, still believe that Ulysse, while more intelligent than the rest of the human race, is only able to mimic them. "Until then, though admitting the evidence while in my company, she would later begin doubting again. . . She subsequently told me that for a long time she had preferred to regard as a sorcerer or a charlatan rather than accept my statements" (Boulle 133). Once Ulysse's real intelligence is revealed all the apes become awestruck and commend him on his intellect, but, as time continues on, the apes begin to view Ulysse as threat. Could Ulysse single-handedly start a revolution and lead the human race to be superior to the apes? The apes begin to believe that it is possible. The reader can feel the quiet panic fall over the apes. This concept of a mob mentality towards the unknown is not something that the human race is unfamiliar with. Often, people would rather leave discoveries undiscovered rather than face the risk of what the development might cause. While apes share a large amount of the same genetics as humans, a significant number of humans are terrified to see the actual intelligence of apes out of fear that they may, over time, develop as we did. The human race does not like competition and prides itself on being the top of the food chain; however, apes present a quiet risk to human society.

Posted by: Hannah McCafferty at February 27, 2015 09:08 AM

Craig Graves
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literature CA01
27 February 2015

Question:
What did Messieurs Antelle, Levain, and Merou discover in the sand by the water once they landed, who or what was the surprising discovery connected to, and what did eventually end up, how long did it take them to get there, and what did Merou dub her and why? Explain.

Answer:
After they had landed, Merou, Levain, and Antelle decided to explore the planet. Eventually, they came across a waterfall with a sandy bank and a footprint in the sand. “‘It’s a woman’s foot,’ Arthur Levain declared (Boulle 27).” Levain is right about the footprint; it was a woman’s footprint as later a woman appeared on top of the waterfall while they were swimming. To try to lure her to them, they start frolicking in the water and paying her no heed to avoid scaring her away. It is not explicitly said how long it takes them to lure the girl to them aside from they were swimming for some time before she slipped into the water with them. Upon killing Hector, the chimpanzee, Merou decided to name her “‘Nova,’ able to compare her appearance only to that of a brilliant star (Boulle 35).” Since no age is given for Nova, it is a little creepy for the older Merou to call her ‘Nova’ because of her beauty, even if she was an alien-human. She could have also been called ‘Nova’ because she was the first person the explorers encountered on Soror and ‘Nova’ looks like a derivative for the word ‘new.’

Posted by: Craig Graves at February 27, 2015 09:47 AM

Ashtan Richey, Hannah McCafferty
ENG410 Reading the Planet CA01
Dr. Hobbs
28 February 2015

Gender Conflict I

Boulle used only male characters for his Earth characters in the novel, even though he might have known that the Soviets were sending a woman into outer space. Using a woman would have drastically changed many aspects of Boulle's novel. Altogether, this choice on Boulle's part was appropriate considering the time period in which he published.

*A woman on board the vessel would pose a conflict in one of the earlier scenes from the novel; as the men stripped and went into the lake. A woman character included in this scene would have caused complications.
*Nova posed as the "temptation" that drew the men away from their spacecraft. She is ultimately the reason why the men lost their clothing and ship. If Boulle had used a woman in place of one of the three men, the usage of Nova as a temptress would have been disturbed. The men are less likely to gawk at, and follow, a "divine" naked woman in the company of a fellow Earthling woman.
*Hegemony; man vs woman. For the time period, women were seen as wives. Boulle including a woman as one of the "intelligent" spacefarers may not have been easily accepted.
*The time period reflective idea of men as pioneers.
*The plot including Nova's pregnancy and birth. Assuming that this woman main character didn't perish early on in the novel during the hunt, seeing as there is a 1/3 chance of that happening, she would have ended up in a zoo or in the lab. Either way, she would have been both naked and "bred." Whether or not it would have gotten as far as "rape" or if she would have turned into Professor Antelle and lost her cognitive abilities, is another dilemma in itself. Then there could be the next assumption that if she was to live how would Boulle deal with a pregnancy? Nova's pregnancy was for the most part withheld from the reader and never described in detail; we can assume that this seems natural to the reader because she doesn't "think", but if there was an intellectual human woman impregnated there would have been necessary details.
*If Boulle had answered to all of these dilemmas, and used a woman as one of the characters from Earth to board the spacecraft, there would then be the possibility that the novel would have faced rejection due to the brutality of some situations.

Posted by: Ashtan Richey at March 1, 2015 06:22 PM

Emily Finck and Kristen Collins
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literatures in Translation CA01
2 March 2015


Question: # 22
Civilized vs. Uncivilized. There is a definite Othering of what is perceived as “savage beast” on the planet Soror. On Soror, what deems a species “safe” and another “unsafe”? This topic bleeds into some of the other dichotomies suggested in the other questions, such as enlightened vs. unenlightened, and verbal vs. nonverbal. Are apes and humans actually a dichotomy, or a false one? What other dichotomies presented/used to reinforce the “forced” dichotomy of Ape (good) vs. Human (bad)? Make charts showing where the hegemonies exist. Explain, your reasoning, providing as many citable, hard examples from the text as possible.


Answer:
Soror/Privileged/Ape Earth/Gray Area/Ulysses Soror/Unprivileged/Human
Evolved Evolved abortion Devolved
Safe Intelligent Unsafe
Enlightened Rational Unenlightened
Verbal Competent Nonverbal
Good Capable of Reason/verbal/nonverbal Bad
Civilized Sentient Uncivilized
“Human” Threat “Animal”


All of the dichotomies created between the apes and the humans hold no actual standing because, depending on the point of view, the characterizations are reversed. Planet of the Apes is just like, though to an extreme, first world civilizations, and third world civilizations. Technological advances are different, societal structures have varying standards and the entire civilization as a whole functions different from one another. From the small glimpse of human life in the novel, the humans seemed to have no problem foraging and surviving on their own, until the apes hunted them down, paralleling Earth’s view of animals in a way. The Earth that Ulysses is used too. However, the discovery of humans on the planet Soror is a bittersweet experience for Ulysses since human life as he knew it was not animalistic; “My hope of discovering a civilized human race became chimerical” (Boulle 82).


The apes, more specifically the orangutans, embody the linguistic ways of thinking, where only apes are truly capable of speech and higher thinking. Zaius cannot comprehend the fact that a human, something that is so primitive, is capable of perceiving the world as an ape does. “He was sweating, but nothing could shake his stupid skepticism” (Boulle 104). There also comes to question how the apes and the humans came to be on Soror since the progression was slower there than on Earth and the archeological findings of the human doll. There is also the fact that when away from the apes, Nova and her baby can articulate and begin simple words and conversation rather than animalistic grunts and cries.


The opposite happens as well with Professor Antelle, being so immersed in the society of Soror that he reverts to “animalistic behaviors” (Boulle 186). Something along the timeline of Soror must have created a world where the humans could not establish a more advanced society, turning the humans into Earth’s equivalent of “wild children.” Whether the apes were intelligent and the higher species in the first place, or the humans, is up for debate.


Extra Examples:
Quote/Paraphrased Section Page # Category
“Soror’s history and societal structure explanation” 126-150 Ulysses POV
“Speech to the apes at convention” 173 Ulysses POV
“The entire explanation of mimicking of Earth apes and Soror orangutans” 200 Ulysses POV
“I was expecting a cry…In our zoos, sometimes, young chimpanzees play, and wrestle together giving of such little cries.” 32 Human of Soror
“Kinnaman experiment (puzzle)” 108 Apes (Zira/Zaius)
“Pavlov experimentation (classical conditioning)” 92 Apes (Zira/Zaius)
“The she-ape took out a fountain pen from her pocket and inscribed several lines in her notebook.” 90 Apes (Zira)
“…each one towed by a sort of tractor…” 69 Apes (Gorillas)
“I followed the change in his expression…the human character of his expression…”
61 Apes
“He was dressed as you and I are…” 60 Apes

Posted by: Emily Finck at March 1, 2015 10:25 PM

Dalton Hart
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410: Reading the Planet CA01
2 March 2015

23-B. Is Boulle’s “science” problematic?

Answer: Boulle is attempting to use the term “race” to show the societal inaccuracy of the way race is viewed. Boulle, throughout the novel, compares the human race to the race of the apes on Soror, referring to them as the same race. With this, Boulle is showing that, on Soror, there is a vast difference between the races, as one is portrayed as civilized while the other is viewed as primitive, much like the view in differences in race on Earth. Although Boulle’s portrayal in the novel may be an exaggerated view of race in society, he is using it to point out the way that race acts as a divider in society, as with the humans and apes on Soror. After witnessing a female human on Soror attack an ape, Ulysse remarks, “A female savage… belonging to some backward race like those found in New Guinea or in our African forests?” (Boulle 43). This remark shows the societal view that those of a different race are considered foreign and savage. Although the savagery within the human on Soror is true, Boulle is pointing to a larger view within society of the “Other” and how race plays a large part within the negative views of the “Other”.

Posted by: Dalton Hart & DJ at March 1, 2015 10:28 PM

Nicholas Santos
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet: Comparative Global Literatures in Translation CA01
10 February 2016

“In spite of the despair I felt at seeing them pillage our precious vehicle, I pondered on their behavior and fancied I could discern an essential principle in it: these beings were roused to fury by objects. Things that were manufactured provoked their anger as well as their fear. When they seized an instrument, they held it in their hands only long enough to break it, tear it apart, or twist it. Then they promptly hurled it as far away as possible, as though it were a live coal, only to pick it up again and complete its destruction” (Page 46, Chapter Seven, Xan Fielding Translation).

Question: On the planet Soror, a sort of reversal of evolution seems to have occurred. Judging by the behavior of the humans that Ulysse and his partners encounter, what can we infer happened to them to make them act this way?

Answer: As Ulysse points out, the humans he meets appear to have an extreme dislike towards “objects” or “manufactured” things (46). From this, we can gather that the dominant force on the planet (the apes/monkeys) most likely experiment on humans regularly with procedures that lead to pain or death for the humans involved.

It’s possible that the humans on Soror were forced to live in the wilderness. They have a very primitive mindset, but are still able to notice certain things; this is a trait that is often exhibited by wild animals. The humans, for example, understand that Ulysses and his team are humans, but don’t understand why they aren’t naked; thus, they attempt to rip their clothes off. It is not until Ulysses thinks about the situation and why the humans “were not after [their] lives, but after [their] clothes” (46). Ulysse also curiously notices that the humans “had attacked [them] without a single weapon, without even using sticks,” which exemplifies even more their forced primitive nature (46).

Posted by: Nicholas Santos at February 9, 2016 07:23 PM

Annie Hays
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet: Comparative Global Literatures in Translation CA01
9 February 2016

“The Planet of the Apes” Ch. 1 Fielding Translation

“When she held the tiller, she would sometimes fire a broadside that swept them right to the borders of the stellar system, heedless of the resulting magnetic storm, which would start to upset the light-rays and to shake their skiff like a cockleshell” (Boulle 5).

Question: What is the conflict in Chapter 1?

Answer: Jim is much calmer than Phyllis. When she pilots the space sailboat, it occasionally creates magnetic storms, as shown in the quote above. When the two find the message floating through space Phyllis is very impatient to learn what the message says. She pesters Jim to get her to the bottle quickly and then begs him to read the message to her (Boulle 7-8). Jim never gets annoyed with her, but this may be a problem later in the book.

Posted by: Annie Hays at February 9, 2016 07:55 PM

Natalie Cassidy
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet CA01
9 February 2016

“He therefore yielded to his mate’s entreaties and smashed the glass with a hammer. The paper unrolled of its own accord. It consisted of a large number of very thin sheets, covered with tiny handwriting. The message was written in the language of Earth, which Jinn knew perfectly, having been partly educated on that planet” (Chapter 1, page 8, Fielding translation).

Question: Although it is only the first chapter of the novel, author Pierre Boulle includes the fact that Jinn knows how to speak the language of “Earth” (Chapter 1, page 8, Fielding translation). Why might this fact be important? Does this fact give the reader any impressions about Jinn as a character?

Answer: The way Pierre Boulle words the fact that Jinn is able to speak English, by saying that he can speak “the language of Earth,” informs the reader that this novel is somewhat futuristic and fantasy type novel (Chapter 1, page 8, Fielding translation). It also informs the reader that Jinn is an educated character. However, the fact that Jinn was only partly educated on earth causes the reader to question where else he could have been educated? This little piece of information gives the reader insight about the book as a whole, and about Jinn as a character.

Posted by: Natalie Cassidy at February 9, 2016 08:12 PM

Cheryl Nance
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literatures in Translation CA01
10 February 2016

“The result was encouraging: the air had the same composition as the Earth’s, in spite of some differences in the proportion of the rare gasses. It was undoubtedly breathable. Yet, to make doubly sure, we tried it out first on our chimpanzee.” (Page 22, Chapter 3, Xan Fielding translation)

Question: How does this scene exemplify a chimpanzee’s treatment on Earth? Does the chimpanzee’s role here add a sense of irony to what Ulysses Mérou later experiences on Planet Soror?

Answer: To be sure the air on planet Soror was breathable, the three men aboard the launch let the chimpanzee try to breathe on his own first. This experiment shows Earthlings use chimps for scientific research, and that an ape’s life is more expendable than a human’s. This moment later proves to be ironic when Mérou discovers that on Soror, humans are the lesser animals and apes are the most evolved beings. Mérou is hunted and locked in a cage. He describes his horror at discovering the apes were “applying to men the very experiments he had carried out on dogs” (95). Mérou is outraged over his treatment, yet gave no thought to his similar actions in regards to their chimp companion.

Posted by: Cheryl Nance at February 9, 2016 08:13 PM

Alexis Lebkey
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Global Comparative Literature CA01
09 February 2016

“We were silent and motionless for quite a time after making contact with the ground. Perhaps this behavior will seem surprising, but we felt the need to recover our wits and concentrate our energy. We were launched on an adventure a thousand times more extraordinary than that of the first terrestrial navigators and were preparing ourselves to confront the wonders of interstellar travel that have fired the imaginations of several generations of poets.”
(Chapter 4, page 21, Xan Fielding translation)

Question: This passage referred to when Ulysse Mérou and the others first landed on the planet. Ulysse says they were preparing to “confront wonders of interstellar travel”, did they prepare themselves for what they were about to face?

Answer: These men were prepared only for the trip there. It seems that they landed on the planet with nothing on them other than what they were wearing. They would have been better off preparing to meet threatening natives on the planet that they were about to land on. Instead, they showed up completely innocent to the possibility. When they later found the footprint, they clearly did not worry because they got naked and jumped into a lake instead of trying to assess the situation.

Posted by: Alexis Lebkey at February 9, 2016 09:57 PM

Jacie Dieffenwierth
ENG 410 Comparing Global Literatures
Dr. Hobbs
10 February 2016

Monkey Planet: Chapter 4 Section 3

“He went up to the edge of it, bent down, examined it, then cautiously touched it with his finger. Finally he scooped a little up in the palm of his hand, smelled it, and wetted the end of his tongue with it” (Chapter 4: Planet of the Apes, page 24 par. 12, Xan Fielding translation).

Question: Was Professor Antelle acting very scientific in his analyzation of the water?

Answer: The renowned Professor Antelle, a man of science, wards off his fellow adventurers from the water, only to touch and ingest it himself. He “cautioned us to behave with a little more prudence when coming up against the system of Betelgeuse for the first time. Perhaps this liquid was not water at all and might be extremely dangerous” (24). There are three issues with this approach. The first is Professor Antelle’s importance to the team. He is the supposed instigator of the entire trip, smart enough to get funding for this mission and have the foreknowledge to practically travel through time (10-12). If anyone was to sacrifice themselves for this mission, it should be Ulysse Merou who is just a journalist and has no scientific back ground like Arthur Levian or the Professor himself (15). Ulysee is expendable. The second issue is can we even trust Professor Antelle? I don’t know if I’d trust my life on an expedition led by a man who thinks the best way to see if the water is safe to drink is to stick his finger in it and put it on his tongue. This method just seems very beneath a man of his stature. Since this story is being told from Ulysse’s point of view, he can be seen as an unreliable source. If Ulysse has been lied to about the credentials of Antelle, we would never know. The last issue I have is that there was no need for the water. It was an unnecessary risk. They had everything they needed on their launch (14). 77 degrees isn’t even that hot (22). Both the swim and ingestion of the water were not needed to their survival.

Posted by: Jacie Dieffenwierth at February 10, 2016 02:48 AM

Lauren Kilton

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 410 Comparative Global Literatures in Translation

10 February 2016

“A few seconds for you and me, a few heartbeats, will coincide with a passage of several years on Earth.” (Ch. 2, p. 12, Xan Fielding Translation)

Question: What does the information in this passage about time in space travel suggest about the travelers’ physical and psychological relation with Earth?

Answer: This passage was found by Jinn and Phyllis in an account of a particular discovery in space by Ulysse, who wrote the message “in the language of the Earth” (8), and Professor Antelle. The language of the account indicates that the travelers are from Earth, though the dialogue implies that they are more concerned with the adventure of space travel than with their lives on Earth, as they are willing to pass hundreds of years in order to complete the journey. One can assume that Ulysse and Professor Antelle do not have any attachments with loved ones strong enough to compel them to stay. They will return to Earth when all of their acquaintances have died in the distant past.

Posted by: Lauren Kilton at February 10, 2016 10:35 AM

Amber Clidinst
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet: Comparative Global Literature CA01
10 February 2016

Ape Planet Ch 1

“Jinn and Phyllis were spending a wonderful holiday, in space, as far away as possible from the inhabited stars” (3).

Question: Via a close reading, what effect does opening the novel with this sentence have on the rest of the chapter?

Answer: This sentence sets up the entire scene and timeline for the chapter, and, basically the book. In this sentence alone time is established, in that it is clearly set in the future, and a sense of how long something like this has been happening. By defining “space” as something other than an “inhabited star,” Boulle is making clear that people have been living in space normally for quite some time and that our current concept of space, ie anything that isn’t Earth, is dated compared to the future concept.

Posted by: Amber Clidinst at February 10, 2016 11:06 AM

REVISED - Cheryl Nance
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literatures in Translation CA01
10 February 2016

“A new sun was born for us, a reddish sun, like ours when it sets, the attraction and warmth of which we could already feel” (Page 17, Chapter 3, Xan Fielding translation)

Question: Does this quote foreshadow what Planet Soror will be like? If so, how?

Answer: Describing Betelgeuse as being born to the travelers with the same appearance of how Earth’s sun sets foreshadows the travelers are in a universe of opposites. This idea is confirmed once they land on Soror and encounter wild humans behaving like animals and civilized apes ruling the planet. This foreshadow adds to the cryptic message at the beginning of Mérou’s message found in the bottle. He writes “I am confiding this manuscript to space, not with the intention of saving myself, but to help, perhaps, to avert the appalling scourge that is menacing the human race” (9). The reader is immediately aware that danger is lurking ahead for the spacemen.

Posted by: Cheryl Nance at February 10, 2016 11:41 AM

Daniella Zacarias Kattán
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 CA01 Reading the Planet - Comparative Global Literatures in Translation
10 February 2016

“It was a woman – a young girl, rather, unless it was a goddess. . . . After gazing at her for a long time, I was so dazzled that I could not discern any particular feature: her body as a whole hypnotized me. . . . Then I noticed, as though in a dream, a face of singular purity. Finally I looked at her eyes. . . . my attention sharpened, and I stiffened, for in her expression there was an element that was new to me. . . . an absence of expression, reminding me of a wretched mad girl I had once known. But no! it was not that, it could not be madness” (Pages 28-30, Chapter 5).
Question: Boulle has chosen to describe an almost primitive version of a female human being in the character of Nova. However, Xan Fielding (translator) has chosen the terminology in which to describe Nova in English. How does Fielding’s language create a strong female character through the use of terminology? Or do words fail to produce a strong character, and instead create a frail wild woman?

Answer: I believe that Boulle’s intention was to create an animalistic female, who just so happens to look human. Fielding’s intentions might have been accuracy over description continuity. I point this out because of the varying terms used to describe Nova; terms such as, “goddess,” “purity,” and “wretched man girl,” do not seem to be interconnected. Instead, because of this potpourri of descriptive words, Nova has failed to be presented as a strong character. By the end of chapter five, however, it is apparent that she is indeed animalistic and tough. Yet, her initial presentation lacks to support this.

Posted by: Daniella Zacarias at February 10, 2016 12:28 PM

Nicole Klukowski
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet CAO 1
20 January 2016

“This gorgeous creature--in a romantic flight of fancy I had christened her “Nova,” able to compare her appearance only to that of a brilliant star--Nova has strangled a harmless pet animal with her own hands.” (35 Chapter 5)
Question: Ulysse Merou, Professor Antelle, and Author Levain land on a new planet, which they named Soror, accompanied by their pet chimpanzee. Upon learning that the planet was inhabitable to humans, they removed their suits and let the monkey run free. Later, the animal returns to them while they are swimming in a lake with a native woman. Without hesitating, the woman strangles the chimpanzee between her thighs. What motivation could this seemingly tranquil woman have for killing the pet?

Answer: The woman the three explorers encounter is deeply afraid of all new things, but she does not attempt to destroy these new things. She does, however, destroy the pet chimpanzee. This indicates that the chimpanzee is not new to the woman but that she has a preconceived notion of hatred for the animal. Though the men do not understand her actions, this gives them another clue for piecing together the newly discovered world. The woman is barbaric. In addition to killing the chimpanzee, she does not speak but communicates through guttural noises (31). Ulysse remarks on how astounded he was with the supreme agility with which the woman descended the rocks (32). The most unnatural characteristic that stood out was the woman’s eyes. Ulysse cannot yet pinpoint what is new in her stare, but he notices something is missing and entirely different from the gaze of men on earth (30). The woman possesses “the joyful frenzy of an animal” and the conflict with the monkey solidifies the explorer’s suspicions (32).

Posted by: Nicole Klukowski at February 10, 2016 12:43 PM

Marie Umholtz
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 - Reading the Planet-Comparative Global Literatures in Translation
27 January 2016

“But although this girl was marvelously beautiful, I still did not regard her as a woman. Her manner was that of a pet animal seeking the warmth of its master. I appreciated the warmth of her body, without its ever crossing my mind to desire her.” (Chapter 7, pages 50-51, Xan Fielding translation)

Question: Here, the narrator, Ulysse Mérou, and his traveling companions settle down to sleep among their captors, and he continues to observe them, particularly Nova. Until this point, how has Mérou’s opinion of this race formed?

Answer: He seems uncertain of their humanity. Initially, Mérou, Antelle, and Levain marvel at Nova’s beauty, and question whether she is of a “‘backward race’” (37). Despite their outward appearance, Nova and her race display no human intellect or social attributes, such as smiling or language, and they disdain technology as well. While their mannerisms are particularly animalistic, Mérou still seems to view them as human “Men and women,” Because he “cannot see how else [he] can describe them” (49). Moreover, he still desires to understand them, and perhaps hopes to awaken their humanity, as he and his companions decide “to remain where [they] were and try to win over these disconcerting beings” (48). As Mérou “did not regard [Nova] as a woman,” and compares her to “a pet animal” (50-51), he no longer views her as human, based on her form, but an animal. As Mérou tries to understand this mysterious race, he must question and ponder what it means to be human.

Posted by: Marie Umholtz at February 10, 2016 01:02 PM

Giuseppe Donnian
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410
10 February 2016

The newly found planet is named Soror. Why do you believe they chose this name?

A simple web search of the word Soror provides the information that it is a Latin translation of the word sister. The people of Earth were searching for a planet to call their own.
I believe the feminine name choice is no coincidence. The feminine name suggests that the planet was expected to be vulnerable, but the irony is that the humans are the vulnerable ones.

Posted by: Giuseppe Donnian at February 10, 2016 01:07 PM

Leona Hunt
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410: Reading the Planet - Comparative Global Literature
10 February 2016

”It is hard to imagine the difficulty of establishing contact with creatures who are ignorant of the spoken word or of laughter.” (Chapter 6: The Planet of the Apes, page 34, par. 3, Pierre Boulle Translation)

Question 6.3) In chapter six of Pierre Boulle’s “Planet of the Apes,” one of the main problems faced by the travelers is the challenge of communicating with the “primitive” race. Why do the actions of the humans startle the inhabitants, and what are the implications of trying to communicate with the inhabitants by assuming that their thought processes are similar to humans?

Answer: For most of the chapter, the protagonist, Ulysse, and his companions try to get the attention of the inhabitants. However, the travelers’ odd mannerisms and their clothes, which are seen as “unbearable to them” (35), startle the inhabitants and cause them to regard the travelers with fear. Ulysse makes the mistake of trying to understand the inhabitants by presuming they think in the same manner of humans: Ulysse “clasped my hands in a friendly manner as possible, bowing at the same time, rather like the Chinese” (34), which is a series of actions that runs on the biased idea that the inhabitants should interpret some human greetings. When Ulysse and his companions tried to play with the inhabitants, they mistakenly regarded the invitation as “childish” and “unable to keep straight faces,” and ended up offending the inhabitants by their “bursts of wild and uncontrollable laughter” (35). Because the travelers do not understand the inhabitants’ history and culture, their mindless actions threaten to cause confusion rather than clarity. The travelers are unsuccessful, as of this moment, to correctly translate their intentions to the inhabitants because of their “human” biases in regards to communication.

Posted by: Leona Hunt at February 10, 2016 01:11 PM

Jonah Robertson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410: Reading the Planet-Comparative Global Literatures in Translation
2/10/16
“If you keep interrupting me every other second…we shall never get to the end. Do as I do: try to understand.” (Boulle 15)
Question: Identify a conflict in Chapter 2
Answer: Much of chapter two is simply Jinn and Phyllis reading the text that they have discovered, and Ulysse doesn’t have any major conflicts in the portions of his text that are read in this chapter. Therefore, the primary conflict to be found in the chapter is the friction between Jinn and Phyllis. Phyllis continually interrupts Jinn as he reads Ulysse’s writings, and Jinn grows progressively more and more agitated until he snaps at her in the quote above.

Posted by: Jonah Robertson at February 10, 2016 01:40 PM

Nicole Klukowski
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet CAO 1
20 January 2016

“I had been awake for an hour. Most of my companions were restlessly pacing up and down their cages in the manner of captive animals. When I realized I was doing likewise, and had been doing so for some time without noticing it, I was ashamed of myself and forced myself to sit down behind the bars, assuming as human and as pensive an attitude as possible.” (88 Chapter 13)

Question: What does Ulysse struggle with, now that he knows the gorillas are the intelligent species and the humans are treated like animals in Soror? What larger implications does this make?

Answer: Upon Ulysse’s capture by the gorillas, he struggles to find ways to set himself apart from the other human captives. He instinctively mimics the other captives by throwing fits and pacing until he decides to keep his temper hidden so that the apes will notice his ability to reason (87). Ulysse’s intellect battles against his primitive instincts. Just when he believes he has made progress, Zira, the manager of the compound, tosses him a lump of sugar as a treat. He comes close to breaking his promise to refrain from outbursts. He becomes so “discouraged by the humiliation of this reward, that [he] almost flung it back in her face” (91). Ulysse calms himself down and gracefully eats the sugar cube instead. These encounters make Ulysse question what it means to be human. On Soror, those who look like men act like animals, but those who look like animals act like men.

Posted by: Nicole Klukowski at February 10, 2016 04:24 PM

Nicholas Santos
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet: Comparative Global Literatures in Translation CA01
12 February 2016

“I was again spouting whatever nonsense came into my head, selecting only words in keeping with the polite tone I had made up with my mind to maintain. When I finished speaking, punctuating my speech with the gentlest of smiles, her surprise changed to stupefaction. Her eyes blinked several times and the wrinkles on her forehead grew more pronounced. It was obvious that she was trying desperately find the solution to a difficult problem. She in turn smiled at me, and I had the impression that she was beginning to suspect a part of the truth” (Page 89, Chapter Thirteen, Xan Fielding Translation).

Question: Is Ulysse helping or hindering his case in proving his intelligence to his ape captors? Why? Even though the female ape eventually responds to his actions with a “smile” and actual physical contact, has he really accomplished anything?

Answer: It appears as though Ulysse both helped and hindered his goal of convincing the apes of his intelligence. It is important to note that the apes surrounding the cages did not show “the hatred that the sound of [Ulysse’s] voice usually provoked in them” but instead “showed signs of curiosity” (89). This same kind of reaction can be seen in the female ape’s face, as she appears to be in a state of “stupefaction” (89); this suggests that he is, in some form or another, making progress. On the other hand, we learn, towards the end of the chapter, that Ulysse was given only a sugar cube after the confrontation; something a bit belittling. He could possibly be seen by the apes as, metaphorically, a child who believes he knows everything while, in reality, he really doesn’t. In this way, his attempts to ultimately change the apes’ minds about him failed in the long term, but it appears as though he is beginning to make an impression on them in the short term.

Posted by: Nicholas Santos at February 10, 2016 04:40 PM

Natalie Cassidy
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet CA01
10 February 2016

“A little girl had caught a piece of fruit in the air, when her neighbor rushed at her to snatch it away. One of the gorillas then brandished his pike, poked it through the bars, and pushed the man back as hard as he could; then he put another bit of fruit in the same child’s hand. I thus realized that these creatures were capable of pity” (Chapter 10, page 23, Xan Fielding Translation).

Question: Before this scene happened, the gorillas and apes had just finished brutally massacring hundreds of “people” on the planet Soror. Why are the gorillas being friendly to the people in the cages? Does this change your opinion about the gorillas?

Answer: It is odd that the gorillas show kindness to the people in the cages right after they violently killed hundreds of people. Perhaps they are being kind only because the girl in the scene is a child. Or maybe they have a plan to fatten up the creatures in order to eat them. Regardless, in my opinion, the gorillas are still characterized as brutal and ruthless characters at this point. However, throughout the novel their characterization may change.

Posted by: Natalie Cassidy at February 10, 2016 04:54 PM

Jacie Dieffenwierth
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literatures
11 February 2016

Monkey Planet: Chapter 14 Section 1

“All of a sudden I understood. Nova, the gorgeous Nova, had started watering at the mouth at the sight of this tidbit, like a dog when it is offered a lump of sugar” (Chapter 14: Planet of the Apes, page 94, par. 5, Xan Fielding translation).

Question: Discuss the irony of the experiments preformed on the captives.

Answer: The humans’ situation is very ironic because the test that humans generally preform on animals is now being performed on them by animals. The first experiment tested is a version of Pavlov’s dog. It conditions a dog to salivate as the sounds of a bell/whistle because they associate it with food. The apes try a similar thing with the humans and banana like fruit (93). It is interesting because Ulysse is on the receiving end of this experiment and you kind of get and inside look at what the dogs must have been thinking (94). Ulysse has “a distinct feeling of frustration” when he saw others get the reward for the experiment when he couldn’t figure it out (94). It took him observing others to figure out what was needed. It is also ironic how the apes treat the humans, as if they are beneath them, without feelings or emotions and are slaves to their instincts. This is exactly how people treat animals back in Ulysse’s world (94).

Posted by: Jacie Dieffenwierth at February 11, 2016 09:37 AM

Annie Hays
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet: Comparative Global Literatures in Translation CA01
11 February 2016

“The Planet of the Apes” Ch. 9 pt. 2 Fielding Translation

“A wild rage overcame me when I felt myself thus imprisoned, a rage stronger than terror, leaving me utterly incapable of thought” (Boulle 65).

Question: Who are the animals in this scene? Who are the humans? Is Ulysse turning into an animal?”

Answer: Both the human tribe and the apes seem to be animals in this scene. The humans cannot speak, and they are being hunted like game by the apes. While the apes are wearing clothes and using guns, they are acting like mindless predators by killing the humans for sport. Ulysse has reverted to an animal on the outside as he is thrashing around in a trap and naked, but he is still a man in his mind as he can reason. While even the humans could figure out when to bolt in front of the apes, Ulysse could discern that the hunter said, “an oath,” and he questioned whether he should be running like prey away from the apes (Boulle 64). “Should I, a man, really resort to tricks merely to get the better of an ape” (63)? The humans accept their fate as prey and simply run away without much thought, but Ulysse wants to hold onto his dignity.

Posted by: Annie Hays at February 11, 2016 01:37 PM

REVISED - Cheryl Nance
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literatures in Translation CA01
12 February 2016

“Could the inhabitants of this planet, the civilized beings whose towns we had seen, could they have succeeded in training apes so as to instill more or less rational behavior in them—this, after patient selection and efforts lasting several generations?” (Page 79, Chapter 11, Xan Fielding translation)

Question: The quote above references one hypothesis Mérou considers to explain the apes he has encountered on planet Soror. Does Mérou have another hypothesis, and if so, what is it?

Answer: Mérou says he desperately hopes his first theory is correct, as he “recoils in horror at the thought of another, simpler one” (79). He feels the only way he will be safe is if “there should exist on this planet properly rational creatures” (79). The simpler, scarier theory he doesn’t explain is that the apes are the most evolved beings on the planet. Based on what he has seen of their behavior so far, he fears for his life if this second hypothesis is right.

Posted by: Cheryl Nance at February 11, 2016 06:51 PM

Alexis Lebkey
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Global Comparative Literature CA01
11 February 2016

“I needed this intellectual exercise to escape from the despair that haunted me, to prove to myself that I was a man, I mean a man from Earth, a reasoning creature who made it a habit to discover a logical explanation for the apparently miraculous whims of nature, and not a beast hunted down by highly developed apes.”
(Chapter 11, page 77-78, Xan Fielding translation)

Question: This passage referred to when Ulysse Mérou was in a cage in the back of a vehicle with other captive native humans from the planet, and he was trying to make sense of what was happening around him. What is the main conflict from Chapter 11?

Answer: The main conflict in this chapter is Ulysse VS Self. He is shocked by the events that have happened since he arrived on Soror and is trying to make sense of everything. More than anything, he is attempting to convince himself that he is still a reasoning creature. Unfortunately, the humans that are around him are more like animals, and he has no one that he can communicate with at the moment because his comrades are now gone.

Posted by: Alexis Lebkey at February 11, 2016 08:18 PM

Lauren Kilton

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 410 Comparative Global Literature in Translation

11 February 2016

“Opposite me, Nova stopped munching every now and then to dart a furtive glance in my direction.” (Ch. 12, p.86, Xan Fielding Translation)

Question: How is Nova’s behavior toward Ulysse thus far?

Answer: From her first encounter with Ulysse, Nova has been perplexed and frightened by his paradoxical appearance of “ape-like” behavior with a human body. She seems to take an interest in him as a companion or mate, but when she is not expressing fascination or affection, she is greatly disturbed by his abnormal actions. Like the other humans, Nova often reacts negatively to Ulysse’s speech and mannerisms, yet when he waves to her, “she clumsily trie[s] to imitate” (84). Over time, Nova appears to adjust to Ulysse’s strange behavior, as she becomes more comfortable and willing to learn from him.

Posted by: Lauren Kilton at February 12, 2016 12:37 AM

Alyssa Barca
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410: Reading the Planet - Comparative Global Literature
11 February 2016

"We hastily dressed without taking our eyes off them. But scarcely had we put on our trousers and shirts than their agitation grew into a frenzy. It appeared that the sight of men wearing clothes was unbearable to them." (Boulle 42)

Question: In chapter six, the "goddess" inhabitant Nova (whom which Ulysse is infatuated with) did not feel threatened by him or his men when they were in the lake, naked, and playing around. However, when they got out of the water and started to get dressed, Nova and her native people became hostile and afraid. Could we possibly infer that the inhabitant of Soror have had human contact before?

Answer: Because Ulysse and his men were naked and swimming around, Nova inferred that the men were the same species as her because her body is identical to a human body. This is why she had no problem getting into the water after studying them from a rock in the distance and approaching them playing around. However, after she choked Hector to death and then came back with what appeared to be her father and others from her "tribe", they're curious attitude completely altered when they saw Ulysse and his companions getting dressed. Because of this behavior change, it is possible to infer that these natives have seen dressed humans before who were not welcomed on planet Soror. Nova and her people could have thought the travelers were one of them, but were quickly able to make a distinction that they were not and saw them as dangerous as soon as they began to get dressed. To me, this sounds like they have had some sort of threatening experience with humans before.

Posted by: Alyssa Barca at February 12, 2016 11:46 AM

Marie Umholtz
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 - Reading the Planet-Comparative Global Literatures in Translation
12 February 2016
“They chatted together happily in an articulate language, and each moment their faces expressed human sentiments, not a trace of which I had found in Nova.” (Chapter 10, page 68, Xan Fielding translation)

Question: Here, Boulle describes the human qualities of the apes, which the actual humans lack. How is this comparison relevant to the plot?

Answer: Previously, the narrator articulates his observations of Soror’s humans, and he concludes they are unintelligent and animalistic. In chapter nine, he describes the human-like qualities in the apes’ clothing and manner. In chapter ten, he further describes the human parallels in the apes as they mirror the social conventions of hunting parties and nobility. He now begins to compare their intellect to that of the humans; he pieces together his observations of both parties and realizes this planet’s role reversal. On Soror, the narrator appears as a simple-minded animal to the dominant apes, when in fact, his intellect is equal to theirs. He sees the cruelty of the apes’ manner though he does not seem to equate this “grotesque and diabolical quality” (70) to the human way of life on earth. He sees their human parallels in social aspects, but, as prey, now describes them as morbid and antagonistic.

Posted by: Marie Umholtz at February 12, 2016 01:06 PM

Leona Hunt
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410: Reading the Planet - Comparative Global Literature in Translation CA01
12 February 2016

“My disappointment was such that I immediately broke into a towering rage. I, too, began shaking the bars, baring my teeth and cursing them in every language I knew. When I had exhausted my repertoire of incentives I went on giving incoherent yells, the only result being that they shrugged their shoulders.” (Chapter 12: The Planet of the Apes, page 63, par. 3, Pierre Boulle Translation)

Question 12.3) In chapter twelve of Pierre Boulle’s “Planet of the Apes,” one of the main problems faced by the protagonist is his inability to communicate with his captives. How does Ulysse’s trouble communicating with the apes parallel his initial difficulty when he tried to communicate with Nova (and the other inhabitants)?

Answer: There is a contrast between the human inhabitants (like Nova) and the apes on the planet Soror: the apes are more intelligent while the inhabitants are more animal-like. The protagonist, Ulysse, during his capture, reflected that “my hope of discovering a civilized human race became chimerical” (61), and his belief system of his race’s superiority is overthrown by the discovery of the ape city. When Ulysse tries to communicate with the apes, he finds himself in the exact position as Nova when he first arrived on the planet. In other words, Ulysse’s role is reversed and he becomes the observed rather than the observer. When Ulysse tries to reason with the apes, the apes “looked at each other for a moment and began roaring with laughter (63),” which prompts Ulysse to angrily lash out in a way similar to when Nova and her people became frenzied by the travelers responses in chapter 6. Basically, Ulysse is in a position where he suffers from a lack of communication with another race, and is looked down upon in his cage.

Posted by: Leona Hunt at February 12, 2016 01:13 PM

Giuseppe Donnian
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410
12 February 2016

"I had had to think about it before recognizing it as a paradox. I pondered over this at great length and, for the first time since my capture, I deplored the disappearance of Professor Antelle. In his wisdom and knowledge he would doubtless have been able to find an explanation for these paradoxes"

What is the paradox of the Monkey Planet this is being discussed?

The paradox is that on Earth humans evolved from primates and in turn kept them as pets and inferior companions. In comparison on the Ape Planet the humans are kept as pets and viewed as inferior. What has been viewed as comical behavior in primates on Earth is now expected of them and almost commonplace. The roles of humans and apes have changed and created a paradox.

Posted by: Giuseppe Donnian at February 12, 2016 01:24 PM

Daniella Zacarias Kattán
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 CA01 Reading the Planet - Comparative Global Literatures in Translation
12 February 2016

“Yet my skill and excess of zeal had a very different result from what I had expected. They went away wiothout giving me the fruit, which one of them started munching himself. There was no longer any point in rewarding me, since the desired end had been achieved without it.” (Page 96, Chapter 14).

Question: Throughout chapter fourteen there is a reversal of roles between the apes and humans. In Soros, apes have become the preferred side to the human-ape hegemony. They experiment and keep humans, as human keep and experiment with apes on Earth. Is this a call to action against animal testing? Or is it simply sci-fi being sci-fi?
Answer: The resemblance between animal testing on Earth and human testing on Soros is too comparable to ignore, or simply label it sci-fi. Ulysses’ train of thought into understanding what his ape scientists want from him is very animalistic; slow and celebrated once success is achive, yet there is no price for the testee.

Posted by: Daniella Zacarias at February 12, 2016 01:26 PM

Nicole Alvarez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literature in Translation CA01
10 February 2016

“’A female savage,’ I said, ‘belonging to some backward race like those found in New Guinea or in our African forests?’
I had spoken without the slightest conviction. Arthur Levian asked me, almost violently, if I had ever noted such grace and fineness of feature among primitive tribes. He was a hundred times right and I could think of nothing else to say.”
(Boulle Pg. 31, Ch. 6).

Question: Here Ulysses postulates a comparison between Nova and her actions and the “primitive” tribes of Earth. Even though he is the one who brings up the suggestion, he says so “without conviction” and Arthur Levian reprimands him. Why is Ulysses so hesitant to liken Nova to a primitive creature and why does Arthur think so highly of her?

Answer: Ulysses is hesitant to think of Nova as anything less than simply amazing because she is beautiful and exotic to him. Despite the fact that he cannot think of her as a woman but as a “young girl” he cannot help but be hypnotized by Nova. Arthur Levian shares this similar opinion, however, it appears that Levian is more sexually attracted to Nova than Ulysses is; at the very least he is more open about his feelings than Ulysses is. In addition, one reason why Ulysses could lack conviction in his assessment of Nova is that he, Levian, and Antelle had seen advanced civilization and believing that humans, or a species that closely resembles humans, could be anything less advanced than what they perceive them to be is a disconcerting thought and brings to mind a question. If it was not humans who cultivated the fields and built the cities, then what was it? This question does not settle well with Ulysses so he consciously does not think about it.

Posted by: Nicole Alvarez at February 12, 2016 01:46 PM

Nicole Alvarez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literature in Translation CA01
12 February 2016

“I succeeded in sleeping till daybreak through a defense mechanism against the intrusion of thoughts that were too unbearable. My sleep was interrupted, however, by feverish nightmares, in which Nova’s body appeared in the guise of a monstrous serpent wound around my own body. I opened my eyes to the light. She was already awake. She had drawn a little away from me and was watching me with her eternally bewildered gaze.” (Boulle Pg. 59, Ch. 12).

Question: After being captured and driven towards the city by the apes, Ulysses has a brief dream where Nova appears to be a serpent wound about his body. Could this imagery be foreshadowing hidden information about Nova or could Ulysses’ dream be interrupted differently?

Answer: Ulysses seeing Nova as a serpent wound about his body could be thought of as foreshadowing of Nova’s character. Already it has been established that Nova is not quite like the other members of her tribe. She is more curious and willing to take risks to get to know Ulysses, Levian, and Antelle. The image of a serpent or a snake is usually symbolic of a deceiver. Nova as a serpent wound about Ulysses could indicate that Nova is lying to Ulysses about something, probably through omission, and that she has control of Ulysses’ emotions.

Posted by: Nicole Alvarez at February 12, 2016 02:07 PM

Nicole Klukowski
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet CAO 1
12 January 2016

“A look of terror came into the she-ape’s eyes. She quickly crumpled up the paper, put her notebook back in her pocket, and, before the orangutan had reached us, placed her forefinger in her mouth with an air of entreaty. She was counseling me not to show myself in my true colors to Zaius.” (124 Chapter 18)

Question: By drawing a diagram of the solar system, Ulysse convinced Zira that he is not a man-animal but came to Soror from Earth. Zaius interrupts her discovery, and she hastens to ensure Ulysse will not reveal this secret to her boss. Why would Zira want to keep this phenomenon from her boss, Zaius?

Answer: The reason for Zira’s secrecy is still a mystery at this point. But, the exchange provides insight on the relationship of Zira and Ulysse and the relationship between Zira and Zaius. Zira frequently hides Ulysse’s accomplishments. Ulysse obeys Zira “without understanding the reason for these mysteries” and is convinced she is his ally (124). Zira does not tell her boss about her discovery. There is no concrete reason given for Zira secrecy, but it does help define more of the ape’s world. Zaius could prove to be trouble for Ulysse, as Zira seems to think.

Posted by: Nicole Klukowski at February 12, 2016 05:31 PM

Jacie Dieffenwierth
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literatures
13 February 2016

Planet of the Apes: Ch. 25 Sec 1

“Illustrious President, Noble Gorillas, learned orangutans, wise chimpanzees, O apes! I, a man, be leave to address you” (Chapter 25: Planet of the Apes, page 173, par. 1-6, Xan Fielding translation).

Question: Describe how the ego of man and ape are parallels of each other.
Answer: Ulysse has to play on the ego of the apes to get what he wants. This is much like men in general. People like to feel esteemed and looked up to. The phrase, flattery will get you everywhere, comes to mind. Being a higher, intellect species, men feel superior to most things. Especially if they come from a higher class, they expect to be treated a certain way. Since the apes in Pierre Boulle’s novel have the same mental capacity as men, they need to be treated the same way. In this section, you see Ulysse go as far as to humiliate his own species to get the favorable opinion of the apes. Ulysse says, “I know my appearance is grotesque, my figure repulsive, my features bestial, my smell sickening…” (Boulle 173). Having to lower himself that much, to a species of animal he is so use to being lower than himself, has to be hard.

Posted by: Jacie Dieffenwierth at February 13, 2016 01:05 AM

Natalie Cassidy
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet CA01
14 February 2016

“There are three distinct families, as you have noticed, each of which has its own characteristics: chimpanzees, gorillas, and orangutans. The racial barriers that used to exist have been abolished and the disputes arising from them have been settled, thanks mainly to the campaigns launched by the chimpanzees. Today, in principle, there is no difference at all between us” (Chapter 19, page 127, Xan Fielding Translation).

Question: In this passage, Zira explains to Ulysse the hierarchy between the monkeys. She also explains that the racism that used to exist between the monkeys has been abolished. Does the fact that hegemony exists among the monkeys make them more human like?

Answer: One would not assume that racism, or hegemony occurs between monkeys. The fact that there used to be a hierarchy among the chimpanzees, gorillas, and orangutans causes the reader to view them more like humans. It is clear that the hegemony among the monkeys is not fully abolished due to the fact that there are still leaders among the groups.

Posted by: Natalie Cassidy at February 13, 2016 01:26 PM

Leona Hunt
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410: Reading the Planet - Comparative Global Literature CA01
15 February 2016

“Unaware of where they come from, who they are, or where they are going, they no doubt suffer from this lack of knowledge. Might it not be this feeling that inspires them with a sort of frenzy for biological research and that gives such a special slant to their scientific pursuits?” (Chapter 22: The Planet of the Apes, page 155, par. 2, Pierre Boulle Translation)

Question 22.2) In the last half of chapter 22, Ulysse points out the critical flaws on the Ape’s society (which contrasts with his initial focus on the Ape’s innovations). In the above passage, how does Ulysse’s come to his conclusion and what key information has he discovered from studying Simian society that particularly supports him in this passage?

Answer: When Ulysse mentions that the Simian society uses a “special slant,” he is basically referring to how the orangutans have altered the advancement of science, because the “school textbooks still stated that the planet Soror was the center of the world” (153). Because of the apes’ egotistical existence, Ulysse is in danger if he reveals his intelligent nature; it is the reason Zira has hidden Ulysse since the accepted belief is that “apes alone can have a soul” (153) and anything to disapprove the theory would cause uproar. Ulysse’s ability to continue to ask questions in order to learn about the Simians, to try and figure out why they wouldn’t accept him on equal terms, contrasts him as a human scientist among ape scientists. Even in the passage, Ulysse makes conclusions about the Simians’ society based off of his observations, and his knowledge of the social gaps between gorillas, orangutans, and chimpanzees (151-2) allows him to assume of how “unaware” Simian society is.

Posted by: Leona Hunt at February 13, 2016 10:09 PM

Annie Hays
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet: Comparative Global Literatures in Translation CA01
14 February 2016

“The Planet of the Apes” Ch. 17 pt. 1 Fielding Translation

“In anguish I watched my friend Nova being bundled off and was horrified to see her put into the cage directly opposite, delivered to a man with hefty shoulders, a sort of hair-chested colossus, who started dancing around her, embarking with frenzied ardor on the curious love display I have already described (Boulle 113-4).

Question: Does Ulysse love Nova or is he just possessive of her? Why?

Answer: Ulysse seems more possessive than loving towards Nova. He is constantly annoyed at Nova’s animal behavior and lack of emotion, but Ulysse has explained how gorgeous she is since he met her. When Ulysse first saw Nova, he wrote “I was so dazzled that I could not discern any particular feature: her body as a whole hypnotized me” (Boulle 29). Ulysse never appreciates Nova for anything but her beauty and how she sleeps with him, and he feels great shame for mating with her. In fact, he only mates with her because he does not want the hairy man to mate with her, which is a sign of possessiveness (114-5). Later when Ulysse begins to learn from Zira, he shines a flashlight in Nova’s face when she annoys him, and he ignores her cries when he spends time with Zira (134, 150). If Ulysse truly loved Nova he would have been less callous in his behavior towards her.

Posted by: Annie Hays at February 14, 2016 11:51 AM

Nicholas Santos
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet: Comparative Global Literatures in Translation CA01
15 February 2016

“I welcomed a visit to the zoo. At first I felt no surprise. The animals bore many similarities to those on Earth. There were felines, pachyderms, ruminants, reptiles, and birds. If I noticed a sort of camel with three humps and a wild boar with horns like a stag, they could in no way astonish me after what I had already seen on the planet Soror” (Page 158, Chapter Twenty-Three, Xan Fielding Translation).

Question: As “Monkey Planet” progresses, we are increasingly shown the similarities between Soror’s main species, the apes, and Earth’s main species, humans. As chapter Twenty-Three in particular progresses, we are shown that humans are displayed as the main exhibit in the zoo Ulysse is taken to. In what ways does this relate to Ulysse’s own realistic connection to the apes? Does this in any way correlate to Boulle’s decision to make apes the primary inhabitants of the planet Soror, and what does this decision allude to?

Answer: Ulysse expresses that he, when observing the humans at the zoo, “felt […] hot with shame when [he] once again noticed how closely they [the caged humans] resembled [him] physically; after what Ulysse “had already seen on the planet Soror,” it’s nearly impossible for him to be surprised by the way the humans are acting (158-9). It seems, in this way, that there is a connection between humans and apes that Boulle directly meant to explore; a connection that Ulysse himself clearly feels. The apes are artists, government officials, athletes, bodyguards, and leaders. They have museums and zoos and put wild animals in cages. Ulysse himself feels odd comparing himself to the physical nature of creatures that behave in a manner that other creatures, apes and monkeys, normally would on Earth. It appears that Boulle’s decision alludes to the physical and mental closeness of apes and humans.

Posted by: Nicholas Santos at February 14, 2016 07:06 PM

Alexis Lebkey
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Global Comparative Literature CA01
13 February 2016

“‘I did it out of love for science,’ she said, blushing. ‘You are a unique case that must be preserved at all costs.’
My heart overflowed with gratitude. I yielded to the soulfulness of her expression, managing to overlook her physical appearance. I put my hand on her long hairy paw. A shiver went down her spine and I discerned in her eyes a gleam of affection. We were both deeply moved and remained silent all the way back.”
(Chapter 21, page 148, Xan Fielding translation)

Question: This passage referred to when Ulysse Mérou and Zira were in the car after he met Dr. Cornelius. Zira insisted that she was helping Ulysse for science. Does what she is saying correlate with her actions?

Answer: It seems from her actions that Zira is developing feelings for Ulysse, perhaps romantic feelings. Not only did she "blush" when he said, “I shall owe you my liberty and my life”, she also shivered when their hands met (148).

Posted by: Alexis Lebkey at February 14, 2016 10:20 PM

Lauren Kilton

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 410 Comparative Global Literature

14 February 2016

“‘Mr President, I insist with the greatest respect, but also with the utmost firmness, that this favor be granted me. Once I have explained myself, I swear on my honor that I shall bow to the demands of the very illustrious Zaius.’” (Ch. 24, p. 170, Xan Fielding Translation)

Question: Why is it crucial that Ulysse speaks in long, eloquent sentences and maintains a highly professional and respectful demeanor during his presentation?

Answer: Ulysse had no other choice but to learn the language of the apes fluently. His other attempts at proving his intelligence are usually “interpreted as the mere result of good training” (169). The only way for the apes to take him seriously and rule out the possible reason of mimicry is for Ulysse to speak in such a way that indicates his intentional communication and original thought. Additionally, he must remain respectful, even of those who oppress him, because he would never be granted the freedom he desires if he were seen as a threat.

Posted by: Lauren Kilton at February 14, 2016 11:27 PM

Ashley Reynolds
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literature in Translation CA01
10 February 2016

Then, two years after leaving our Earth, we came down gently and landed without a jolt in the middle of the plateau, on green grass reminiscent of our meadows in Normandy. (Boulle 20, chapter 3, Ballantine ed.)

Question: What is the key conflict in chapter 3?

Answer: The primary conflict in this chapter is man versus the unknown. The novel begins in 2500, after mankind has mastered space flight. Ulysse, Dr. Antelle, and Arthur Levain, have undertaken a voyage to the distant star Betelgeuse. Even though they are well prepared, they are entering into unknown territory. What are conditions in this system? What will they find on the planet? What dangers will they face? The trio is faced with uncertainty. The only thing they know about the strange planet where they land is that it is, in fact, inhabited: “Nothing in the planet’s topography recalled either our Old or New Worlds. Nothing? Come now! The planet was inhabited” (Boulle 20, chapter 3, Ballantine ed.). The fact that the planet is inhabited is fascinating, but proves hazardous. There could be conflict between the main characters, who are aliens, and the planet’s natives. Nevertheless, the trio is excited to explore the new planet. The only way to conquer the unknown is to make it known.

Posted by: Ashley Reynolds at February 14, 2016 11:35 PM

Ashley Reynolds
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literature in Translation CA01
12 February 2016

Stupefaction overrode all other emotion when I saw this creature on the lookout, lying in wait for the game. For it was an ape, a large-sized gorilla. It was in vain that I told myself I was losing my reason: I could entertain not the slightest doubt as to his species. But an encounter with a gorilla on the planet Soror was not the essential outlandishness of the situation. This for me lie in the fact that the ape was correctly dressed, like a man of our world…
(Boulle 59-60, chapter 9, Ballantine ed.)

Question: What is so shocking about the ape Ulysse encounters?

Answer: Ulysse is shocked by the gorilla’s civilized appearance, especially when compared to the humans he has previously met. Ulysse is surprised to discover it is a gorilla that is organizing the human hunt. What’s more, the ape is clearly superior to the uncivilized humans in the jungle. The ape was “dressed as you or I are, I mean as you or I would be if we were taking part in one of those drives organized for ambassadors or other distinguished persons at official shooting parties” (Boulle 60, chapter 9, Ballantine ed.). This suggests that the ape is part of a complex society similar to that of the humans on Earth. The narrator makes it clear that this is not simply a parlor trick or someone’s trained animal. In fact, the ape clearly is comfortable in his position: “The state in which I saw him was normal, as normal to him as nakedness was to Nova and her companions” (Boulle 60, chapter 9, Ballantine ed.). On Soror, it is the apes that have become civilized while humanity has become feral.

The ape’s civility is a stark contrast from the humans Ulysse has encountered thus far. On Earth, humans are the dominant, intelligent species. Men wear clothes, walk upright, and organize animal hunts. Apes, on the other hand, are little more than brutes. They show more intelligence than other animals, but cannot compare to the obvious superiority of humans. On Soror, it is the opposite. Men are savages running naked through the jungle while apes are the clearly superior species. The dichotomy of men and animals has been reversed. On Earth, men are the hegemony, while on Soror, apes are the hegemony.

Posted by: Ashley Reynolds at February 14, 2016 11:36 PM

Ashley Reynolds
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literature in Translation CA01
15 February 2016

These emotions had broken down my resistance. I felt I would never be able to bear the sight of my nymph at the mercy of another man […] I, a man, excusing myself on the grounds of exceptional cosmic circumstances, and persuading myself for the moment that there are more things on the planets and in the heavens than have ever been dreamed of in human philosophy, I, Ulysse Merou, embarked like a peacock around the gorgeous Nova on the love display.
(Boulle 114-5, chapter 17, Ballantine ed.)

Question: What is problematic about Ulysse’s sexual encounter with Nova?

Answer: Even though Nova is a willing partner, there is something that seems entirely unethical about their relationship. Ulysse’s sexual encounter with Nova raises several questions about the ethics of sex. Even though she and Ulysse are technically part of the same species, their levels of intelligence are vastly different. Earlier in the novel, Ulysse found in Nova and the other humans “a lack of conscious thought; the absence of intelligence” (Boulle 41, chapter 6, Ballantine ed.). Nova and her fellow humans are more like animals than the humans Ulysse is familiar with.

Trying to pin down an analogy for Ulysse and Nova’s sexual relationship is extremely difficult. Is their encounter like a man having sex with a person of extremely low IQ? Or is it more like a man having sex with an animal? Physically, Ulysse is human, but mentally, he is like an ape. In this case, would it be more appropriate for Ulysse to have sex with an ape? Which one would be the more ethical decision?

It’s clear that Ulysse is attracted to Nova’s body and can’t “bear the sight of [his] nymph at the mercy of another man” (Boulle 114, chapter 17, Ballantine ed.). But wouldn’t it be better for Nova to be with someone of her same species and intelligence level? Ulysse lusts after Nova’s gorgeous body. Even though he knows it’s wrong, he has sex with Nova simply so she can’t have sex with anyone else. He views Nova as a possession. On Earth, it would be wrong to view a human woman as a possession because she is capable of her own thought and free will. Since Nova lacks that thought and free will, is it more acceptable to view her as a possession? Is this jealousy acceptable or laughable? Despite these ethical concerns, Ulysse engages in sex with Nova and continues a sexual relationship with her while in captivity.

Posted by: Ashley Reynolds at February 14, 2016 11:37 PM

Daniella Zacarias Kattán
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 CA01 Reading the Planet - Comparative Global Literatures in Translation
14 February 2016

“. . . I can certainly be useful to you by virtue of my earthly knowledge; for my part, I have learned more things during a few months’ captivity among you than in all my previous existence. Let us unite our efforts! Let us establish contacts with the Earth! Let us march forward hand in hand, apes and men together, and no power, no secret of the cosmos will be able to resist us!” (Page 176, Chapter 25).

Question: In chapter 25 Ulysses gives a speech to his Ape Overlords. Does Ulysses seem to be genuine in his speech, or is he simply being sycophantic in from of the Apes?

Answer: The way Ulysses starts his speech reads quite sycophantic from the get-go, “Illustrious President, Noble Gorillas, Learned Orangutans, Wise Chimpanzees, O Apes!” His praises for them and juxtaposition in his way of addressing himself are obsequious. The Apes react positively to his praises for them, and his “self-awareness” when he describes his “grotesque. . . repulsive. . . [and] bestial” features. (173).

Posted by: Daniella Zacarias at February 15, 2016 12:50 PM

Amber Clidinst
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet: Comparative Global Literature CA01
13 February 2016

Ch 13

“Most of my companions were restlessly pacing up and down their cages in the manner of captive animals. When I realized I was doing likewise, and had been for some time without noticing it, I was ashamed of myself and forced myself to sit down behind the bars, assuming as human and as pensive an attitude as possible” (88).

Question: In this passage, the narrator still considers the apes around him to be inferior, however, he is exhibiting what he considers to be animalistic qualities. Is the author, in this passage, commenting on the equality between animal and man, or man’s faults?

Answer: In this same chapter, Boulle describes the apes as demeaning to the narrator, rewarding him with a sugar cube for acting out what they believed to be a trick. This act likens the narrator to an animal further, therefore reinforcing the lack of control man has in comparison to what he believes he deserves, and commenting on the faults that men have.

Posted by: Amber Clidinst at February 15, 2016 01:00 PM

Amber Clidinst
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet: Comparative Global Literature CA01
14 February 2016

Ch 23

“Cornelius was eager for my state to be recognized and my liberty to be restored so that he could study me closely – collaborate with me, he corrected himself, at the gesture of annoyance that escaped me when he spoke like this” (157).

Question: In this passage, Cornelius claims to be supportive of the narrator, but then speaks down to him as nothing more than the animal that he is on this planet. Is Cornelius’ offering of help genuine or is it a false generosity that stems from selfishness?

Answer: In the previous chapter, Cornelius meets the narrator, and at the beginning he treats him as an animal, and even after proving his intelligence, the narrator is made to walk behind the couple and act as a subordinate. The narrator, himself, states that Cornelius viewed him as “an object of great interest to him,” and that Cornelius “would have given a great fortune to have [him} in his laboratory” (147). Because of this, it can be assumed that Cornelius is interested in himself and in his scientific discoveries more than the freedom of a man he considers to be beneath himself.

Posted by: Amber Clidinst at February 15, 2016 01:00 PM

Alyssa Barca
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410: Reading the Planet - Comparative Global Literature
15 February 2016

"Finding myself placed in a group of extremely handsome men and women, I tried to persuade myself that this was because we were the most remarkable subjects, deriving a bitter consolation from the thought that the apes, at first glance had judged me worthy of being included in an elite." (Boulle 74)

Question: In chapter ten, Ulysses, his companions, and the natives are captured by the Apes and taken captive. From this quote, what can be inferred about Ulysses personality?

Answer: Judging by this quote, Ulysses sounds very self-absorbed and narcissistic. In the previous chapters, he had shown signs of thinking he is superior by refusing the recognize the natives as humans, and at the end of the chapter when Nova did not snuggle up next to him like she did the previous night, he is almost offended by her lack of affection. Additionally, his mindset that he could have possibly been captured because he is a great and mighty human shows how close-minded he is. However, he thinks this way because he has not yet accepted or realized that the Apes are superior to him.

Posted by: Alyssa Barca at February 15, 2016 01:05 PM

Jonah Robertson and Nicole Alvarez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410
2/15/16
Group Work 2/15/16
1. In chapters nine and ten the only new characters introduced are the gorillas and the chimpanzees, there are no named characters introduced.
2. The apes are the impetus for all of the events that occur in these two chapters. They capture the humans, and begin the hunt, and Ulysse is simply along for the ride, so to speak.
3. Arthur dies, Ulysse is dealing with the amount of slaughter and death around him, Ulysse is captured by the apes, and he struggles to believe that the apes are advanced.
4. Man vs. Ape is the only dichotomy present in the conflicts found in this chapter.
5. This dichotomy falls on the side of the hyper-privileged (the apes) and the humans are marginalized.
6. Thesis: Humans should be civilized, Anti-Thesis: Apes are civilized. In chapters 9 and 10 there isn’t much of a synthesis. Ulysse is horrified by the apes, and the apes treat all the humans like chattel. Both sides would have to get over their prejudices to accept a synthesis between the two ideas.

Posted by: Jonah Robertson and Nicole Alvarez at February 15, 2016 02:09 PM

Rachel Andrews & Amber Clidinst

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 410 Reading the Planet: Comparative Global Literatures in Translation CA01

10 February 2016

In chapters 15-16 one new character is introduced, an Orangutan whose name is not revealed until later in the novel. Orangutan's are the highest class of apes in this world. Two apes in these chapters are given names but they are not newly introduced characters. They are named Zoram and Zanam. The main players of this chapter are the narrator Ulysses and Ziaus, the orangutan introduced. The conflicts in these chapters are Freedom vs Captivity and Civilized vs Animal Instinct. The freedom vs captivity is one of the overall themes of the novel, but it can be seen in these chapters when Ulysses is caged and is bargaining for his freedom. The other conflict, is when Ulysses is caged with a woman and he gives into his animal instinct to claim his territory and they have sex. Afterward he feels shame because he is starting to behave like the animals the apes think humans are. The hyper-privileged, or preferred, side is Freedom and Civilized while the underprivileged, or non-preferred, side is Captivity and Animal Instinct.

Posted by: Rachel Andrews at February 15, 2016 02:21 PM

Alexis Lebkey and Will Mcdermott
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literature
16 February 2016
Group 2: Group Work

Chapters 3 and 4

1. In Chapters Three and Four, no new characters have been introduced.
2. The character that is “driving” the story in Chapters Three and Four is Professor Antelle because he is the one testing the air and water on the new planet to be sure it is safe for everyone.
3. There are a few conflicts occurring in these chapters: Ulysse VS Self, Them VS Nature (this new planet), and Them VS Possible Other.
4. The conflict framed as a dichotomy is Them VS Nature.
5. They are obviously the preferred because Ulysse is telling the story.
6. The thesis that the main characters have in this chapter is this new unknown environment is possible dangerous. They are performing tests to conclude if that is true or not, and are willing to accept the idea of rational beings on the planet. The main thing they must do to know for sure if they are in danger on this planet is meet the beings that are dominant on the planet.

Posted by: Alexis and Will Mcdermott at February 16, 2016 09:16 PM

Alexis Lebkey and Will Mcdermott
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literature
16 February 2016
Group 2: Group Work

Chapters 3 and 4

1. In Chapters Three and Four, no new characters have been introduced.
2. The character that is “driving” the story in Chapters Three and Four is Professor Antelle because he is the one testing the air and water on the new planet to be sure it is safe for everyone.
3. There are a few conflicts occurring in these chapters: Ulysse VS Self, Them VS Nature (this new planet), and Them VS Possible Other.
4. The conflict framed as a dichotomy is Them VS Nature.
5. They are obviously the preferred because Ulysse is telling the story.
6. The thesis that the main characters have in this chapter is this new unknown environment is possible dangerous. They are performing tests to conclude if that is true or not, and are willing to accept the idea of rational beings on the planet. The main thing they must do to know for sure if they are in danger on this planet is meet the beings that are dominant on the planet.

Posted by: Alexis and Will Mcdermott at February 16, 2016 09:16 PM

Cheryl Nance
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literatures in Translation CA01
16 February 2016

“I often think of Nova. I cannot forget the hours I spent in her company. But I have never again entered her cage; human self-respect forbids me. (Page 194, Chapter 27, Xan Fielding translation)

Question: What reason does Mérou give for no longer entering Nova’s cage? Do you think his reasoning is just? Why or why not?

Answer: Now that Mérou is free, he questions the relationship he once had with Nova. He asks himself “Is she not an animal?” (194). He doesn’t see any way for him to indulge in the relationship now that he lives “in the highest scientific circles” (194). I do not feel this is objective reasoning. Mérou was already a highly evolved being when he became involved with Nova. He seems to excuse his behavior based solely on how he is viewed by the society he lives in. When the apes see him as an animal, he has no problem using that excuse as a reason to be Nova’s mate. If Mérou’s line of reasoning is to hold up, then he never should have become involved with Nova in the first place.

Posted by: Cheryl Nance at February 16, 2016 11:41 PM

Natalie Cassidy, Cheryl Nance, Jacie Dieffenwierth
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet CA01
16 February 2016

1. Characters in chapter one: Jinn and Phyllis. Characters in Chapter 2: Ulysse Merou, Arthur Levain and Professor Antelle.

2. Ulysse Merou drives chapter one due to his message in the bottle. He also drives chapter two because he begins to tell his story about the planet Soror.

3. The conflict in chapter one and two is man vs. nature. Man is traveling through space attempting to explore nature.

4. In chapter one and two the dichotomy occurs between the humans on the spaceship and the chimpanzee Hector on board. Humans are viewed as superior to chimps.

5. In our evaluation of the dichotomy, the humans fall on the side of the hyper-privileged, and the chimpanzee is the underprivileged. The chimp does not receive a name until almost the end of the second chapter, which reveals his lesser value. This is ironic due to the fact that later in the novel the monkeys are the superior race.

6. The mainstream point of view in chapters one and two is that man is superior to the chimpanzee on the spaceship. There is no sign of an anti-thesis, and there is no sign of a synthesis yet. This is due to the fact that in chapter one and two Ulysse is the only one giving his opinion and telling his story.

Posted by: Natalie Cassidy at February 17, 2016 09:16 AM

Annie Hays and Nicholas Santos
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet: Comparative Global Literatures in Translation CA01
17 February 2016

“The Planet of the Apes” Ch. 7-8 Fielding Translation

“As to these, I could not be mistaken. They were gunshots echoing through the jungle: one, two, three, then several more, at irregular intervals, sometimes one at a time, at other times two consecutive shots, strangely reminiscent of a double barreled gun” (Boulle 57).

Question: In Chapters 7 and 8, how does the conflict shift? How does the cultural hegemony appear in Chapter 7, and is it the same in Chapter 8?

Answer: In Chapter 7, Ulysse, Professor Antelle, and Levian are taken hostage by the human tribe. Although these humans are more like animals, it still appears that they are the dominant species on the planet as there are so many of them. The men of Earth are completely vulnerable as they are, “disarmed, stripped, obliged to march barefoot at too fast a pace” (Boulle 47). These animal humans have reduced the civilized humans to their level. However, in Chapter 8, unknown attackers destroy the humans’ forest and attack them. These unknown attackers suddenly become the alpha species, as they have guns shown in the quote above. In Chapter 7 the thesis for the cultural dichotomy seems to be men of Sorror/ men of Earth as the men of Earth are easily captured. However, this thesis is destroyed in Chapter 8, and the new dichotomy is unknown attacker/ all men.

Posted by: Annie Hays and Nicholas Santos at February 17, 2016 10:30 AM

Alyssa Barca & Nicole Klukowski
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet: Comparative Global Literatures in Translation CA01
17 February 2016

Group 9:
Chapters 17 & 18


In chapters 17 and 18, there are no new characters that are introduced who haven’t appeared before. The driving characters within these assigned chapters are Zira and Ulysses. The conflicts that are present in chapter 17 are mainly about Ulysses battle with himself on what to do about Nova. He clearly has a strong attraction to Nova, and does not want to see her be removed and put into another native’s cage. However, he wants Zira and Zaius to realize that he in intelligent, which he cannot do being paired with Nova. When Nova is taken to another natives cage, he reacts like a “madman” and “behaving in short in a thoroughly bestial fashion.” In chapter 18, the main conflict is Ulysses showing his intelligence to Zira. Ulysses takes Ziras notebook and draws a picture of Nova, which frightens Zira at first, but she then becomes interested with Ulysses abilities. When Ulysses starts drawing geometric figures and the solar system, Zira becomes extremely frightened and warns him to never show what he drew to Zaius. This scene serves as an example of Ulysses still struggling between staying animalistic to be with Nova, or show his human-like traits. The dichotomies that are within these assigned chapters are evidently Human vs. Animals. Throughout the entirety of these chapters, Ulysses battles with adapting animal-like behaviors to fuel his attraction and comfort of being with Nova, or being released from his captivity once the apes realize he is a human. The hyper-privileged or preferred would be the apes who are clearly the authoritative beings, and the humans are the non-preferred because they are the ones who are captive and being researched. The thesis of this chapter would be that if Ulysses continues to behave like one of the natives, then he will be able to stay with Nova. The anti-thesis is that if he tries to prove his intelligence, then him and Nova will never be able to stay together. The synthesis is still undetermined because we do not know which side Ulysses will choose because he is still having an internal battle with staying human or acting animalistic.

Posted by: Alyssa Barca at February 17, 2016 10:54 AM

Alyssa Barca
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet: Comparative Global Literatures in Translation CA01
17 February 2016

"And besides," she went on, "we'll be left in peace here. There are not many people about and it's time for us to have a serious conversation." (Boulle 138)

Question: In chapter 20, Zira takes Ulysses out of the cage and into town with her. When Ulysses and Zira get into her car, she drives to a park and suggests they go for a walk together. Based on this quote, what do you think this serious conversation will entail?

Answer: I think that Zira is going to warn Ulysses about something bad that the apes might be planning to do with him. In chapter 20, the friendship between Zira and Ulysses really takes off which is evident by the fact that Zira takes Ulysses out of his cage and into town with her. That probably is something uncommon for a researcher to do with their captive. She clearly trusts and has an interest in Ulysses, and sees something in him that no one else has realized yet. I think she may explain to him the extent of the research that will take place on him, and maybe it will become extreme and almost brutal. Zira seems like she wants to save Ulysses from what may happen to him in the midst of the research, or warn him about what they plan to do with Nova. Furthermore, there is something unpleasant that is about to take place.

Posted by: Alyssa Barca at February 17, 2016 11:26 AM

Giuseppe Donnian
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410
17 February 2016

"I tried to put myself in her place. She could only be profoundly shocked by my description of the men and above all of the apes on our Earth"- (Page 105, Chapter 20).

How does the previous quote create irony in the story?

The quote is ironic because Ulysse "tried" to put himself in Zira's place. In reality he was in a very similar situation as her. The only difference is that he did not have to imagine a world where ape's are above all men. He was experiencing it first hand.

Posted by: Giuseppe Donnian at February 17, 2016 12:27 PM

Marie Umholtz
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 - Reading the Planet-Comparative Global Literatures in Translation
15 February 2016
“‘our being equipped with four hands is one of the most important factors in our spiritual evolution. It helped us in the first place to climb trees, and thereby conceive the three dimensions of space, whereas man, pegged to the ground by a physical malformation, slumbered on the flat. A taste for tools came to us because we had the potentiality of using them with dexterity. Achievement followed, and it is thus we have raised ourselves to a level of wisdom.’
“On Earth I had frequently heard precisely the opposite argument used to explain the superiority of man. After thinking it over, however, Zira’s reasoning struck me as being neither more nor less convincing than ours.” (Chapter 19, page 130, Xan Fielding translation)

Question: Here, Zira explains her reasoning and explanation of how apes and humans evolved on Soror. How does Ulysse’s reaction challenge his view of human understanding and superiority?

Answer: Zira’s explanation for the apes’ superior intellect is nearly a mirror image for humans’ evolutionary understanding on earth. Because both reasons may be argued as “more nor less convincing” than the other, Ulysse begins to understand the subjectivity of distinctions on both planets; he even sees prejudice between the apes. Ulysse begins to grasp the hegemonic qualities of superior species on both Earth and Soror; as the apes reason in favor of their superiority, he sees parallels to human reason on Earth. He finds that the reason behind human intellect could also argue against it if seen from another perspective.

Posted by: Marie Umholtz at February 17, 2016 01:08 PM

Nicole Klukowski
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet CAO 1
17 February 2016

“I [Ulysse] have seen him [Ulysse’s son]. He’s a splendid baby. He was lying on the straw like a new Christ, nuzzling against his mother’s breast.” (250 Chapter 35)

Question: Nova has just given birth to Ulysse’s baby boy. By the time Ulysse is granted permission to see him, he is three days old. Ulysse remarks that his son is “like a new Christ”. In what ways can the baby be compared to Christ?

Answer: Like Christ, this baby’s parentage is unnatural. Born to a dumb mother by a super intelligent father resembles how Christ was conceived by a lowly woman and an intelligent God. Both characters have a mission. Christ was born for the salvation of the people. Ulysse declares that his duty is reviving the human race. “Thanks to me,” he says, “a new human race is rising” (251). Both children were expected to save mankind as early as their birth. They are each expected to grow up and bring bug changes. Ulysse’s baby is seen as a new branch, the first one of its kind (251). So it is with Christ, who is the first human to live without sin and gain eternal life. Both Christ and the baby boy pose a threat to s specific division of their current population: Christ to sin itself and the baby to the apes. Ulysse’s child makes a family of three: Ulysse, Nova, and the baby (251). This resembles the Trinity: Father, Son, and Spirit. The seemingly flamboyant comparison between the two characters holds deeper implications for Ulysse’s baby.

Posted by: Nicole Klukowski at February 17, 2016 05:15 PM

Natalie Cassidy
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet CA01
18 February 2016

“Last week he chased me out of my bedroom. I had to sleep in an armchair in the sitting room. Not daring to scold him, I tried to win him over with kindness. He laughed in my face and his demands increased. I was too miserable. I abdicated” (Chapter 34, page 244, Xan Fielding Translation).

Question: In this section, an unconscious human recites what happened when mankind fell to the apes. Why would the humans give up so easily to the apes? And why would the humans not “dare to scold” them (Chapter 34, page 244, Xan Fielding Translation)?

Answer: It is odd to think that humans could feel bad scolding an ape. Or that humans would “sleep in an armchair,” because they were afraid of a monkey (Chapter 34, page 244, Xan Fielding Translation). The humans in the novel probably gave up so easily to the apes due to the fact that they were out numbered. Also, apes can grow to be extremely large, therefore able to over power the humans. Regardless, the humans could have tried to kill the apes. Also the humans should have never trained the monkeys to be servants.

Posted by: Natalie Cassidy at February 17, 2016 08:54 PM

Cheryl Nance
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literatures in Translation CA01
19 February 2016

“I am going to have a child on the planet Soror by a woman for whom I feel a great physical attraction and sometimes even compassion but who has the mind of an animal. No other being in the cosmos has found himself involved in such an adventure.” (Page 224, Chapter 32, Xan Fielding translation)

Question: What does the quote above say about Mérou’s overall attitude? Do you believe this way of thinking contributed to the downfall of humankind on both Earth and Soror?

Answer: Mérou is once again stating his superiority as a human being. He believes it is his sole responsibility to make the human race rule again on Soror. In regards to the baby, Mérou says “I now see exactly how the mission with which I have been entrusted can be accomplished” (225). He fails to take into account the regression of Professor Antelle, a human who was even more learned than Mérou. It is exactly this attitude of complacency and supremacy that allowed the apes to take over on both planets.

Posted by: Cheryl Nance at February 18, 2016 04:29 PM

Nicholas Santos
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet: Comparative Global Literatures in Translation CA01
19 February 2016

“These apes, all these apes, have been ceaselessly multiplying, although it looked as though their species was bound to die out at a certain period. If this goes on, they will almost outnumber us … and that’s not all. They are becoming arrogant. They look us straight in the eye. We have been wrong to tame them and to grant those whom we use as servants a certain amount of liberty. They are the most insolent of all. One day I was jostled in the street by a chimpanzee. As I raised my hand, he looked at me in such a menacing manner that I did not dare strike him” (Page 242, Chapter Thirty-Four, Xan Fielding Translation).

Question: Cornelius’ female test subject has been experimented on so much by the ape species that memories of her past and memories of Soror’s human past are expressed through her like an auditory vessel. When she begins, she expresses a scenario in which chimpanzees have become “arrogant” and directly challenge humanity. How does this scenario compare to more recent “Planet of the Apes” storylines?

Answer: This particular scenario sounds relatively similar to the plot found in the film adaptations of “Monkey Planet.” One of these instances, “Rise of the Planet of the Apes,” details a scenario in which a few apes, particularly one named Caesar, are experimented on with a supposed gene that would give them human-like intelligence. After being abandoned by his caretaker, Caesar creates an uprising with other apes, monkeys, and chimpanzees, giving them access to the same gene, allowing them to have the same intelligence level as humans. Much like the scenario presented to us by the experimented human woman, this film adaptation refers to monkeys “outnumber[ing]” humans (242).

Posted by: Nicholas Santos at February 18, 2016 08:57 PM

Alexis Lebkey
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Global Comparative Literature CA01
18 February 2016

“It seems to me nonetheless that her present condition has given her a personality and dignity she did not have before.”
(Chapter 32, page 229, Xan Fielding translation)

Question: This passage referred to when Ulysse Mérou found out that Nova is pregnant, and he goes to visit her. It seems that Ulysse is saying that Nova was becoming more intelligent because he got her pregnant. What does this say about Ulysse’s character?

Answer: It seems that Ulysse thinks highly of himself, especially in comparison to the other humans on the planet. For example in Chapter 18, he says, “My superiority over the other prisoners, which I no longer exercised to the point of startling the wanders, made me the most brilliant subject in the establishment.” (120). Ulysse believes that he is superior to not only the other humans but the monkeys on the planet as well, which is something that is more of a disadvantage for him until he finds an ally in Zira.

Posted by: Alexis Lebkey at February 18, 2016 09:03 PM

Lauren Kilton

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 410 Comparative Global Literature

18 February 2016

“It was men I thus saw shrieking, barking, and swinging about on ropes to reach their destination as fast as possible.” (Ch. 30, p. 215)

Question: What is Ulysse implying about humanity and intelligence in this passage?

Answer: Just as Ulysse sees the “apes in hysteria” without a “glimmer of intelligence” in their eyes (214/15), he visualizes humans acting the same way in their daily activities. Ulysse is suggesting that human actions can be characterized by animal instincts and mimicry, as those of the apes are, and the high intelligence of which humans regard themselves is not as vastly different, superior, or common as they tend to believe. Ulysse causes one to question what intelligence is and what makes human behavior different from that of other animals, if it even is.

Posted by: Lauren Kilton at February 18, 2016 10:37 PM

Annie Hays
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet: Comparative Global Literatures in Translation CA01
19 February 2016

“The Planet of the Apes” Ch. 29 pt. 2 Fielding Translation

“Oh, it was not much of a speech! It uttered one word, one simple word of two syllables: pa-pa” (Boulle 207).

Question: What are the implications of the talking human doll? How does this destroy the dichotomy of civilized ape/ uncivilized humans?

Answer: Because the doll is clearly a clothed, talking, human doll in ancient ruins, this shows that humans like Ulysse inhabited these ruins. It is unclear how humans arrived on the planet Sorror so many centuries before Ulysse, but there is no other explanation for how the doll got there. Earlier Ulysse told Cornelius that apes are inclined to mimic humans, and, “the verb ape is synonymous with imitate” (Boulle 200). This town and the current cities of the apes mimic the cities of Earth humans (204). This implies the apes learned how to build cities from the Earth humans. This idea destroys the current dichotomy of civilized apes vs uncivilized humans as the apes learned everything they know now from civilized humans on their planet.

Posted by: Annie Hays at February 19, 2016 10:52 AM

Amber Clidinst
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet: Comparative Global Literature CA01
18 February 2016

Ch 37

“I am not alone. With me are Nova and Sirius, the fruit of our interplanetary passion, who can say “papa,” and “mama” and many other words” (261).

Question: In relation to the story, what is the importance of the child being names Sirius?

Answer: In Indian lore, Sirius is a character who travels across the sky in search of Heaven (Sirius). This reflects the journey that Ulysses and his family are taking. As they travel across space in return to Earth, Ulysses believes what he will return to is his home, a place of familiarity and comfort, as one would consider Heaven. What they return to, however, in relation to the child’s name, is ironic.

"Sirius Is Dog Star and Brightest Star | EarthSky.org." EarthSky. EarthSky, 10 Feb. 2016. Web. 19 Feb. 2016.

Posted by: Amber Clidinst at February 19, 2016 11:21 AM

Giuseppe Donnian
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410
19 February 2016

"He let out the sail, exposing it to the combined rays of the three suns. Then he began to manipulate the driving levers, using his four agile hands, while Phyllis, after dismissing a last shred of doubt with an energetic shake of her velvety ears, took out her compact and, in view of their return to port, touched up her dear little chimpanzee muzzle."
(End of chapter 38, closing statement of novel)

Why is the previous passage ironic?

The previous passage is ironic because the reader is under the impression that Jinn and Phyllis are both humans. After reading Ulysse transcript they state that the story is must be fiction. The audience assumes that Jinn and Phyllis must not believe what they read because of the intelligent apes. In reality, Jinn and Phyllis could not believe what they read because of the rationality of humans and their intelligence. It is not until this moment that the reader is enlightened that Jinn and Phyllis are actually apes.

Posted by: Giuseppe Donnian at February 19, 2016 12:21 PM

Erin Gaylord and Lauren Kilton
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410: Comparative Global Literature
15 February 2016

Chapters 22-23
1. Character introduces Zira female chimp who has a fiance.
2. Nova, Zira, and Ulysse are the important characters in these chapters.
3. Ulysse makes intelligence known to Zira, but she’s struggling to understand. He’s showing them he knows what they’re doing with their training. Zira and Ulysse go to a zoo where Ulysse is surprised by the behavior of the captive. “It was certainly a sight. They were all intent on winning favor with the little apes surrounding their cage, who now and then threw them some fruit or pieces of cake” (Boule ch. 23, pg.159).
4. The false dichotomy of these chapters is: you’re either an unintelligent human or an intelligent ape you can’t have both.
5. Apes prefer the humans who do their tests the way they’re supposed to because they receive rewards easier, so dumb humans preferred because the apes get a reward with less work.
6. Argument: Apes cannot be this intelligent, counter argument: they can be taught to be smarter and do some of these things. Some think apes can do these things or can learn to do the things they can in this novel, while others believe they are incapable of this level of intelligence.
7. Zira is able to see that Ulysse is different. He may be more intelligent than most.

Posted by: Erin Gaylord at February 19, 2016 12:51 PM

Erin Gaylord
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literature
15 February 2016

Chapter 4 End
Question: What is the importance of their discovery at the end of chapter four? Do you think Antelle was being wise when warning the others about their behavior on the planet?

Answer: They discover that the planet is habitable and is similar to Earth. “We christened it, Soror, because of its resemblance to our Earth” (Boulle ch. 4, pg. 23). They had just landed on the planet and discovered that the air pressure is very similar to their own on Earth. After using the chimp to test this theory, they exited the ship and looked around. I think Antelle was doing the right thing by warning the others because the water could have been something harmful on this particular planet, and I don’t think the others were thinking that it would be any different than Earth. They were just happy that they had discovered another planet that could support living beings. Also, if they would have jumped in the water, the human footprint may have been missed, and they wouldn’t have known that humans do live there.

Posted by: Erin Gaylord at February 19, 2016 01:02 PM

Leona Hunt
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410: Reading the Planet - Comparative Global Literature CA01
19 February 2016

“You’re right, Jinn. That’s what I think. … Rational men? Men endowed with a mind? Men inspired by intelligence? No, that’s not possible; there the author has gone too far. But it’s a pity!” (Chapter 38: The Planet of the Apes, page 267, par. 1, Pierre Boulle Translation)

Question 22.2) At the end of the novel, it is revealed that the travelers Jinn and Phyllis are actually Chimpanzees rather than humans. Why is this plot twist relevant? What is the irony of the above passage?

Answer: When Jinn and Phyllis disregard the message in a bottle because it portrays humans as rational, the novel parallels modern society and its egocentric culture which disregards the possibility of different animals having intelligence. Phyllis, after mulling over the message even more, dismisses “a last shred of doubt with an energetic shake of her velvety ears” (267) the idea that a creature other than her own species can write such an elaborate story. Jinn and Phyllis are as biased in their mindsets as Ulysse’s was when he first visited Soror. The irony of the ending gives the reader more of a reason to believe in the protagonist, Ulysse; the readers is left to wonder if all humans in the universe have been outsmarted and replaced by apes.

Posted by: Leona Hunt at February 19, 2016 01:04 PM

Marie Umholtz
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 - Reading the Planet-Comparative Global Literatures in Translation
19 February 2016
“He will be a man, a proper man, I’m sure. Intelligence sparkles in his features and in his eyes. I have revived the sacred flame. Thanks to me, a new human race is rising and will bloom on this planet.” (Chapter 35, page 251, Xan Fielding translation)

Question: Here, Ulysse expresses that he believes his son has human intellect. How does Ulysse’s son bring him hope for the human race?

Answer: Ulysse sees human character and behavior in the baby, such as “crying like a human child and not whining” (251). Along with the baby’s birth, Ulysse sees Nova in a more human light as well, as he explains, “this birth has raised her a few degrees higher on the human scale. The fleeting gleam in her eye is now a permanent glow,” and he now considers Nova to be “one of us” (251). As Ulysse likens the baby as “a new Christ” (250), perhaps he sees a redemptive quality in the baby, and believes he will elevate and restore humankind to its original state.

Posted by: Marie Umholtz at February 19, 2016 01:32 PM

Cheryl Nance
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literatures in Translation CA01
19 February 2016

Question #14: As a result of their intimacy, what results from the bond of Mérou and Nova? Why does this suddenly become problematic? What are the institute’s plans and what does Mérou decide to do? Explain.

Answer: Nova becomes pregnant as a result of the intimacy between her and Mérou. The baby is a problem because it is highly likely he will be like Mérou, and an increase in the number of intelligent humans on planet Soror could be a threat to the apes. Cornelius confirms this threat when he tells Mérou not only are the apes scared he “might found a new race on this planet,” (256) but also his presence “might sow unrest among the men” (256). To guard against this, the institute plans to lock up the baby and either eliminate Mérou and Nova or render them harmless by removing part of their brain. With the help of Cornelius and Zira, Mérou decides to escape Soror with Nova and their son. Even as he makes this plan, he vows he will one day “come back with trump cards in my hand” (259). He feels he is deserting his fellow humans, but says “above all I must save my son and Nova” (259). His family will remain his utmost concern as seen when he takes off from Earth after discovering it is now controlled by apes.

Posted by: Cheryl Nance at February 19, 2016 05:28 PM

Annie Hays
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet: Comparative Global Literatures in Translation CA01
20 February 2016

“The Planet of the Apes” Fielding Translation

Question: With his new societal status, what does Merou want to do about Professor Antelle? What does Merou discover? What has happened to Professor Antelle, and why? Explain.

Answer: Ulysse wanted to free the professor from the zoo because he believed the professor was trapped with mindless animals (Boulle 160). However, when Ulysse got the professor away from the animal humans, he discovered the professor had become an animal himself. Even when the apes left the room, the professor would not act intelligent. In fact, he actually became afraid of Ulysse as Antelle, “gave vent to a long-drawn-out howl” when Ulysse cornered him (187). Antelle seems to have lost his human intelligence due to his long confinement with the animal humans as there was a constant struggle to get food from the zoo patrons (159). Even after Antelle was separated from the other animal-humans, he never regained his former intelligence (196).

Posted by: Annie Hays at February 20, 2016 03:14 PM

Natalie Cassidy
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet CA01
22 February 2016

Question: On Soror, how are the apes’ cities, and the technology that apes use similar to that which exists on earth, and how do they differ?

Answer: Ulysse states that the cities on Soror are very similar to those on earth. When Ulysse is first let out of his cage and into the city, he states, “the houses were similar to ours; the roads, which were fairly dirty, looked like our roads. The traffic was less heavy than at home” (Chapter 20, page 137, Xan Fielding Translation). One of the differences that he notices is that pedestrians crossed the street by swinging on metal bars that hung above the traffic. In terms of technology, the apes also launch satellites, however their satellites are “not so perfected” (Chapter 20, page 140, Xan Fielding Translation). Although monkeys inhabit Soror, there are few differences among cities and technologies than that which exists on earth.

Posted by: Natalie Cassidy at February 21, 2016 02:38 PM

Alexis Lebkey
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Global Comparative Literature CA01
21 February 2016

Instructor-Provided Questions #1

Question: Who are Jinn and Phyllis? What are they doing when we, as readers, meet them and why are they doing it? What do we know about them? What is a frame tale and how does this part of the narrative play into that concept?

Answer: Jinn and Phyllis are introduced as a wealthy couple spending their vacation in space. They are “distinguished in their cosmos for their originality and a few grains of poetry” (3). They were “lying side by side in the middle of the spacecraft” when Phyllis saw something (5). A frame narrative is a literary technique that provides the framework for connecting a series of otherwise related stories, a story within a story.

Posted by: Alexis Lebkey at February 21, 2016 02:51 PM

Ashley Reynolds and Daniella Zacarias Kattán
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 CA01 Reading the Planet - Comparative Global Literatures in Translation
15 February 2016

Chapters 11-12:
Questions: What new characters are introduced in these chapters that did not appear before? Which characters are “driving” the chapters you were assigned? I.e. who are the main players? What conflicts are present in the chapters you were assigned? Of the conflicts, which of them are framed as dichotomies, even if they are false dichotomies? In your evaluation of the dichotomies, which fall on the side of the hyper-privileged (preferred) and which fall on the side of the underprivileged (non-preferred)? Who, or what is marginalized? As you begin to form the pieces of the puzzle that is a cultural hegemony, in a Hegelian sense, what constitutes a “thesis” or mainstream point of view in you chapters? If there is an “anti-thesis” either stated or implied, what is it? Is there any sign of moving toward a synthesis? Why, or why not? What are the weak links to both sides that might have “to go” before a synthesis can be arrived at?
Answers: In chapters 11 and 12, Ulysses is caught by the apes and placed in a cage and truck, where he is transported to the gorillas’ estate. Here, we see the dichotomy between the “captured” and the “captive.” This relationship is a stark contrast to the human hunter and its trophy on Earth. The current hegemony is apes over humans; apes are preferred over the humans, and the capturer is preferred over the caught. By chapter 12, Ulysses and a couple of other humans, are taken to a facility where humans are experimented on. Ulysses tries to communicate but is laughed at; until he begins to show signs of comprehension. After several tests, the dichotomy changes from apes over humans, to apes over Ulysses and Ulysses over the other humans.
Thesis: Apes have developed and humans have not.
Anti-thesis: Ulysses shows up proving that humans are capable of civilization.
Synthesis: Humans are not civilized, apes are, but Ulysses is the exception because he is an alien.

Posted by: Daniella Zacarias at February 21, 2016 04:21 PM

Nicholas Santos
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet: Comparative Global Literatures in Translation CA01
22 February 2016

“He learned to talk. He refused to do any work. A month ago he ordered me to do the cooking and washing up. He began to use my plates and knives and forks. Last week he chased me out of the bedroom. I had to sleep in an armchair in the sitting room. Not daring to scold him or punish him, I tried to win him over by kindness. He laughed in my face and his demands increased. I was too miserable. I abdicated” (Page 244, Chapter Thirty-Four, Xan Fielding Translation).

Question: Much like Plato’s “Allegory of the Cave,” there seems to be a big divide between the enlightened creatures of Soror and the unenlightened one. It takes an outsider, rather than a mutant, to shake up the system. Where is the grey area between knowledge and ignorance in “Monkey Planet?” Is there real hope that the unenlightened primates of Soror can actually be educated out of their ignorance, or is that only a pipe-dream? Is this the goal of the ape scientists who are studying and testing the captured humans, or do their studies actually have some purpose? There are Greek allusions in the story. Is there also a metaphorical “Pandora’s Box” situation in the apes’ search for “truth” about human beings? Explain your reasoning, providing as many citable, hard examples from the text as possible.

Answer: There seems to be a large difference between the enlightened creatures of Soror (the apes) and the unenlightened ones (humans). However, it is important to note that there was a particular point in time in which the humans and the apes were in the same area of enlightenment. What originally appeared as a “cerebral laziness” that was commonplace for apes on Earth eventually took over the humans as well (243). Because of the transformation that the apes of Soror (Earth) went through to become the dominant species on the planet, there is an inherent possibility that the same could happen for humans again. Cornelius, the ape scientist working with the captive humans and electrodes, doesn’t appear to have wanted to help the humans find a way to regain their intelligence; rather, he was just experimenting with them for research purposes. For example, when he discovers the first type of ape to rebel against humanity was a chimpanzee, he openly exclaims his original belief about it to be true (242). Zira also shows a similar interest when Ulysse is first captured, with Ulysse pointing out that rather than be interrogative, “it was obvious that she was trying desperately find the solution to a difficult problem” (89). It is possible that, through the apes’ search for knowledge about humanity, that humanity will in turn gain their knowledge back. As readers, we may speculate that humans may either 1) once again become the dominant species on Earth or 2) live in coexistence with the apes.

Posted by: Nicholas Santos at February 21, 2016 05:46 PM

Daniella Zacarias Kattán
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 CA01 Reading the Planet - Comparative Global Literatures in Translation
19 February 2016

“We climbed out of the launch, accompanied by Hector. Professor Antelle insisted first of all on analysing the atmosphere by a more precise method. The result was encouraging: the air had the same composition as the Earth’s, in spite of some differences in the proportion of the rare gases. Yet, to make doubly sure, we tried it out first on our chimpanzee.” (Page 22, Chapter4).
Question 17: What type of pet did the three visitors of earth bring with them on their spacecraft? What was its name and what happened to it? Who did something to the pet, and why? What ironies exist in the whole situation of the pet? Explain.
Answers: The men took with them Hector the chimpanzee. Hector was chocked and killed by Nova, who thought of Hector as one of the apes’ native to Soros. Hector’s situation is ironic because he is a chimpanzee from a planet where humans are the “top” species, and lands on a planet where he would be the preferred species only to be killed by the “lesser” species. As noted in the quote above, Hector was used as a way to experiment if Soros’ atmosphere was safe for the three men. This simple act is reflected later on in the novel when Ulysses observes the human experiments at the laboratory.

Posted by: Daniella Zacarias at February 21, 2016 08:55 PM

Nicole Klukowski
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet CAO 1
22 February 2016

“Then, two years after leaving our earth, we came down gently and landed without a jolt in the middle of the plateau, on green grass reminiscent of our meadows in Normandy.” (20 Chapter 3)

Question: Where did Messieurs Antelle, Levain, and Merou eventually end up, how long did it take them to get there, and what did they name the place once they arrived? Explain.

Answer: Professor Antelle, Levain, and Merou spent two years in route to a planet near the star Betelgeuse (13). The star is 300 light years away from Earth but only takes two years to reach, including the time needed to accelerate to “the speed of light minus epsilon” and decelerate upon nearing the planet (11). Though their voyage only takes two years, 700 years will have passed on Earth (265). After reaching the solar system of Betelgeuse, the travelers discover an inhabited planet (20). They land on the planet and learn it is compatible with their needs. Merou tells readers, “there was no doubt that we were on a twin planet of our Earth” (22). Because of the likeness between Earth and the new planet, they named it Soror (23). Soror refers to sharing a characteristic, as in a sorority.

Posted by: Nicole Klukowski at February 22, 2016 12:00 PM

Marie Umholtz
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 - Reading the Planet-Comparative Global Literatures in Translation
22 February 2016
Homework/Study/Discussion Questions for Pierre Boulle’s La Planète des Singes (Monkey Planet)
Question 16: The significance of names. What is significant about the meaning of Merou’s first name, Nova’s name, and Sirius’s name? What do these names mean, and how do/might they relate to the narrative? Are there any other significant names used in the story? If so, what? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Ulysse’s name references Ulysses from Odyssey, perhaps because he makes a great journey. Ulysse’s journey has a legendary component as well; when Jinn and Phyllis read the end of his story, the idea of intelligent humans seems too farfetched for them to take seriously, yet Phyllis still believes “parts of the story . . . seemed to contain a germ of truth” (Boulle 267). Ulysse gives Nova her name because he is “able to compare her appearance only to that of a brilliant star” (Boulle 35). Nova’s name reinforces her beauty in Ulysse’s eyes, upon which he places high value and emphasis. Ulysse Names Sirius after “the brightest-appearing star in the heavens, located in the constellation Canis Major” (“sirius”). As Sirius’ mother is named after a beautiful star, Sirius is named after a bright and brilliant star, because he shows signs of human intelligence and brilliance, unlike the animalistic humans of Soror.

Work Cited
"sirius". Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition. HarperCollins Publishers. Web. 22 Feb. 2016.

Posted by: Marie Umholtz at February 22, 2016 01:14 PM

Giuseppe Donnian
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410
22 February 2016

What happened to the three cosmonauts shortly after their swim and their discovery? What was the unfortunate end result of this encounter? What new details about the inhabitants of this planet did the gentlemen learn?

Shortly after the three cosmonauts swim and their discovery of the primitive humans they were attacked by the civilized Gorillas. The unfortunate end result of this encounter was that a good majority of the humans were either killed or captured. Ulysse writes, “A crowd of fugitives who have escaped being shot had let themselves be caught as I had (Boulle 17). This encounter led the professor to become familiar with the paradox of the planet. On Soror, apes are superior to humans.

Posted by: Giuseppe Donnian at February 22, 2016 01:19 PM

Amber Clidinst, Rachel Andrews, Jacie Dieffenwierth
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literatures
22 February 2016

Question 20

Question: Gender conflict II: Readers don’t see a lot human female characters in the story, but some exist. Nova gets the most face time (I’d say she gets the most speaking lines, but she doesn’t really speak). (a.) Does hegemony exist in the male/female dichotomy of the “savage” humans? If so, which “side” has the privileged position? (b.) Does hegemony exist in the male/female dichotomy of the “civilized” apes? If so, which “side” has the privileged position? How are these structures similar/dissimilar to the gender hegemonic dichotomy on Planet Earth? Explain, your reasoning, providing as many citable, hard examples from the text as possible.

Answer: We know that females can have high positions in society by when Ulysse saw“…a new figure enter the room accompanied by the two warders. It was a female chimpanzee, and I realized from the way the gorillas kept in the background that she held an important post in the establishment” (88). We never see any other females in high positions so Zira’s position may be unusual. However, if Ulysse, the narrator, comes from a male dominated society, he may not deem it worthy to mention the females in society. We never see enough of the savages to really judge them either. Nova chooses Ulysse as a mate and isn’t challenged by any male which might show that Nova comes from a female dominated society (50). We still don’t have enough information to prove this however.

Posted by: Jacie Dieffenwierth at February 22, 2016 02:14 PM

Nicole Alvarez, Erin Gaylord, Annie Hays
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literature in Translation CA01
22 February 2016

Question 21:Where is the grey area between knowledge and ignorance? Is there real hope that the unenlightened primates of Sor can actually be educated out of their ignorance or is that only a pipe dream? Is this the goal of the ape scientists who are studying and testing captured humans, or do they their studies actually have some other purpose? There are Greek allusions in the story. Is there also a metaphorical “Pandora’s Box” situation in the apes’ search for the “truth” about human beings?

Answer:
- The apes are civilized and they learn things but most of them are only mimicking. The chimpanzees are typically the ones to come up with new ideas whereas the gorillas and orangutans are mostly mimicking.
- The ending proves that educating them out of their ignorance is only a pipe dream. The apes are able to drive space ships in the future but the ignorance is too ingrained into the apes at this point in the book’s timeline. There is also a part where the characters say that the word “aping” means to mimic. “They mimic us in everything we do, I mean in every act that does not demand a rational process of thought. So much so that with us the verb ape is synonymous with imitate” (Pg. 200, Ch. 28).
- Their goal is to figure out the human origins. Cornelius, Zira, and Helios wanted to find these origins but the other apes had no care for it. Only the chimpanzees were actually striving towards this goal. This means that the goal of the ape scientists is to find new knowledge, but since the other apes do not want to hear about it, the research is ignored.
- Helios’ research was to get human beings to speak. One of the humans that they had taught to speak told the story of how the apes took over the planet. Getting the humans to talk was the “Pandora’s Box” situation, especially when they found the human ruins and found an old talking doll to support the humans’ claims.

Posted by: Nicole Alvarez at February 22, 2016 02:22 PM

Nicole Klukowski, Marie Umholtz, Lauren Kilton
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet CAO 1
24 February 2016

“’It was only a century ago,’ [Zirah] said dogmatically, ‘that we made some remarkable progress in the science of origins. It used to be thought that species were immutable, created with their present characteristics by an all-powerful God. But a line if great thinkers, all of them chimpanzees, have modified our ideas on this subject completely. Today we know that species are mutable ad probably have a common source.’” (126).

Question 23b: Is Boulle’s “science” problematic? Discuss problems with his usage of “race” and more, indicating other areas where these inconsistencies either kill his ethos and the verisimilitude of the story or helps prove his point (whatever it is) about either race or species issues in our time and place. Explain, your reasoning, providing as many citable, hard examples from the text as possible.

Answer: Boulle uses the terms race and species almost interchangeably. His main character, Ulysse Merou, struggles with this definition throughout the novel. Race is understood to mean divisions of humankind that usually share the same ethnicity. Species is a scientific term used to categorize animals. These definitions are challenged on Soror because apes, a species of animal, share the same culture as man, making them the same race.
When Ulysse first arrived at Soror he saw Nova’s footprint and immediately assumed she was human--like him in every sense of the word-- and claims her to be “of the white race” (29). After he observes her watching, he noticed something different “from individuals of our own species” (30). Nova appears to be human but holds a “bestial expression” (34). Already Ulysse is confused on how to refer to her and questions if she is “a female savage belonging to some backward race” (37). After the travelers have seen the group of humans living on Soror, they admit they are “sturdy, handsome specimens of humanity” (39). Ulysse witnesses a “fierce hatred between the two races” during the hunt (68). He is referring to the humans of Soror and the apes that he has not yet come into contact with. For Ulysse, the difference between race and species comes down to the capacity for thought. He is willing to categorize apes and men of Soror in the same race because they have no capacity for reason.
The humans of Soror are not of the same race as humans from earth; they are separated by intellect. A closer tie to the humans of Earth is found in the apes, who possess “a spark of understanding that [Ulysse] had sought in vain amoung the men of Soror” (61). Possibly Ulysse’s best relationship with someone of Soror is with Zirah, who is “remarkably alert and intelligent” (88). When Ulysse recounts the similar characteristics the apes share with humans, such as language and clothes, he refers to the apes as a “species” (59). When referring to apes as a group, the apes are their own species. The apes used to have “racial barriers” amongst themselves segregating the species (127).
By the end of Ulysse’s experience, he differentiates race from species. He writes the letter to save the human race (9). The human species is not threatened, men and women still reproduce, but the intellectual human race is becoming extinct. The apes are their own species, but the “simian race” has the ability to think (228). Of course, all these problems on the usage of race and species could stem from mistranslation.

Posted by: Nicole Klukowski at February 22, 2016 06:04 PM

Jacie Dieffenwierth
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literatures
23 February 2016

Planet of the Apes: Ch 31 Sect 1

“My self-respect notes with satisfaction that apes have invented nothing, that they are mere imitators. My humiliation derives from the fact that a human civilization could have been so easily assimilated by apes” (Ch. 31: Planet of the Apes, pg 217-18, par 2, Xan Fielding translation).

Question: Why did Ulysse take his revelation so personally?

Answer: Being trapped in an unfamiliar world, Ulysse has really clung onto his thoughts and memories of home. Back there, things were normal and certain. Man had dominion over the earth and monkeys were still monkeys. By finding out that here on Soror man was the originator much like Earth and somehow humans slowly declined into a bestial state really scared him. Ulysse’s said that it was “[t]rue, we have long known that our civilizations are mortal, but such a complete disappearance makes the senses reel” (pg 218, par 3). If it was possible here then what was it like back home? Was this his future?

Posted by: Jacie Dieffenwierth at February 23, 2016 11:22 AM

Jacie Dieffenwierth
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literatures
23 February 2016

Question 15

“You must get away. You must leave this planet, to which you should never have come. You must go back to where you belong, to Earth. Your son’s safety and your own demand it” (Ch. 36: Planet of the Ape, pg. 257, par 26, Xan Fielding translation).

Question: What is ironic, for Earthlings, about the “animal” chosen to test the vehicles that the apes of Soror are designing and testing for space travel? How will this play into Merou’s plans? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: Cornelius reveals that there is a satellite manned by a man, a woman, and a baby to tests the “effects of certain rays” on their bodies (258). The irony is that the apes on Soror use humans just like humans use apes back on earth. This plan works out perfectly for Merou because he can get himself, Nova, and his child on it aboard without any fuss. Ulysse thinks that “this indeed is more than likely. To most of the apes, a man is a man and nothing more. The differences between one individual and another do not strike them” (258). This previous quote contains another piece of irony, in that, like humans think all apes look alike, all apes thinks humans look alike.

Posted by: Jacie Dieffenwierth at February 23, 2016 11:42 AM

Cheryl Nance, Alexis Lebkey, and Daniella Zacarias Kattàn
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literatures in Translation CA01
22 February 2016

Question #19: Why might Boulle have chosen to exclude female (human) cosmonauts? How does this affect the narrative? How might it have been different, had there been a human female cosmonaut in the story?

Answer: Boulle may have chosen to exclude human female cosmonauts because one would have altered the storyline or either not been a significant part of it at all. All of Boulle’s female characters are subordinates ruled mainly by their emotions. This portrayal is evident in the fact that Zira’s belief about Mérou being an intelligent being is shrugged off by Zaius. Her intervention on Mérou’s behalf only received “an incredulous smile from the two scientists” (107). Even her fiancé Cornelius must see it with his own eyes to believe. He is shocked when he meets Mérou and looks at Zira “in utter bewilderment” (146). Zira is then depicted as one ruled by her emotions, especially when Cornelius admits it is only because of her feelings for Mérou that he is helping him escape. Nova is portrayed as an unintelligent being until she becomes pregnant with Mérou’s child. Mérou felt the pregnancy had given Nova “a personality and dignity she did not have before” (229). After the baby was born, Nova was raised “a few degrees higher on the human scale” (251). Even Phyllis, the female ape cosmonaut who found Mérou’s story, is a bad driver and not as educated as her partner Jinn.

If a human female cosmonaut had been included, she would have likely met her demise during the hunt or had the same fate as Professor Antelle. If she had been caged in the lab with Mérou, the presence of two intelligent humans would have likely frightened the apes to the point where neither would have been freed. It also may have prevented the emotional connection between Mérou and Zira, which aided in his escape from Soror.

Posted by: Cheryl N, Alexis L, Daniella K at February 23, 2016 06:23 PM

Nicholas Santos, Ashely Reynolds, Seger Sipe
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet: Comparative Global Literatures in Translation CA01
24 February 2016

“The apes are not divided into nations. The whole planet is administered by a council of ministers, at the head of which is a triumvirate consisting of one gorilla, one orangutan, and one chimpanzee. In conjunction with this government, there is also a parliament composed of three chambers: the Chamber of Gorillas, of Orangutans, and of Chimpanzees, each of which attends to the interests of its respective members” (Page 150, Chapter Twenty-Two, Xan Fielding Translation).

Question: In “Monkey Planet,” race/species seems to be compounded with class. The apes seem to be ordered, for the most part, according to subspecies. Furthermore, it would seem that the job assignments for the overall ape society also seem to fall along species divisions, e.g., chimps perform certain tasks, orangutans perform certain tasks, gorillas perform certain tasks, etc. So, when we discover the hierarchy of the ape civilization, and there definitely seems to be one, which “positions” seem dominant over the others, and which species typically hold these positions? Answer the same question for the lowest positions. Explain your reasoning, providing as many citable, hard examples from the text as possible.

Answer: Judging by what Ulysse learns about the apes on the planet Soror, there is a distinct hierarchy to their civilization. The hierarchy appears to favor gorillas (the physically capable) the most; orangutans (the academically capable) are in the middle of the hierarchy; and chimpanzees (the intellectually capable) appear to be at the bottom of it. Most of the differences between the apes are highlighted in Chapter Twenty-Two: a detailed explanation of the apes’ class system. Examples will follow below.

One example of the gorilla’s dominance over the other apes in the hierarchy is shown in the way they dress. The gorillas, in Chapter Nine, are revealed to be hunters. According to the way in which the gorilla hunters dress, which Ulysse describes as being “easy,” “natural,” and of nobility as one gorilla’s jacked “seemed to be made by the best Paris tailor and revealed underneath a checked shirt of the kind our sportsmen wear (60). In other words, the gorillas are hunting purely for the sake of hunting, or, in another point of view, hunting for sport to prove their superiority over their prey since they deem it necessary to do so. The gorillas were also defined in Chapter Twenty-Two as having a “preserved taste for authority” and were “the most powerful class” (150). Physical labor is highly regarded in Soror, and as such, gorillas are the most important.

Orangutans are described by Ulysse as being “pompous, solemn, pedantic, devoid of originality and critical sense, intent on preserving tradition, blind and deaf to all innovation,” among other things (152). One of the orangutans that Ulysse meets, Ziaus, is described as having a face that was “frozen in an expression of pedantic mediation” and wearing “a long black frock coat with a red star in the buttonhole and black-and-white striped trousers” (99). He is clearly in a high position, and this is demonstrated by the fact that his “secretary,” a chimpanzee, is seen carrying this orangutan’s heavy briefcase everywhere for him before he gives her a “condescending” wave (100). This personality is one of a pompous authority, but because of his physical weakness, he is not seen as highly as the gorillas since they are “official science” and mostly engage in “politics, the arts, and literature;” things that gorillas would never be interested in.

Chimpanzees are held in a high regard by Zira, who is a chimpanzee herself. However, the chimpanzee race is “despised” by both gorillas and orangutans (such as in the above example with Ziaus’ secretary). Ulysse describes the chimpanzees as representing “the intellectual element of the planet” and being highly attuned to research (153). However, because of their societal status, they are able only to perform research and not actually act on anything. They are the polar opposite of gorillas, the dominant ape race, who “are known more for their appearance than their subject matter” (154).

Altogether, it appears that, while all of the races contribute equally to the existence of Soror, gorillas are the most dominant and chimpanzees are the least dominant.

Posted by: Nicholas Santos, Ashley Reynolds, Seger Sipe at February 23, 2016 08:37 PM

Leona Hunt
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410: Reading the Planet - Comparative Global Literature CA01
21 February 2016

Question 2: Who are Messieurs Antelle, Levain, and Merou? What are their occupations and specializations, where, exactly, are they going, and for what purpose? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words. (The Planet of the Apes, Pierre Boulle Translation)

Answer: Messieur Antelle is a professor of botany and agriculture, Messieur Arthur Levain is a physician, and Messieur Ulysse Merou is a journalist. The three men are going to “the region of space where the super-gigantic star Betelgeuse reigns supreme” (10) in order to study the closest planet (which will take two years to get to) that may be inhabited. The main energy that drives the men to pursue travel is their ambition for discovery; hence, why Ulysse, the main protagonist, joined because it was “an outstanding opportunity” even if the story would be published for hundreds of years (15).

Posted by: Leona Hunt at February 24, 2016 12:24 AM

Ashley Reynolds
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literature in Translation CA01
19 February 2016

I stop and take her in my arms. She is as upset as I am. I see a tear coming down her muzzle while we stand locked in a tight embrace. Ah, what matter this horrid material exterior! It is her soul that communes with mine. I shut my eyes so as not to see her grotesque face, made uglier by emotion. I feel her shapeless body tremble against mine. I force myself to rub my cheek against hers. We are about to kiss like lovers when she gives an instinctive start and thrusts me away violently. (Boulle 260, chapter 36, Ballantine ed.).

Question: How is Ulysse’s relationship with Zira different than his relationship with Nova?

Answer: Ulysse lusts after Nova, but loves Zira. Zira and Nova serve as foils in the text; Zira has a hideous body but a beautiful mind, while Nova has a perfect body but an undeveloped mind. Ulysse is thus torn between the desires of his body and the desires of his mind.

At first, Ulysse refuses to have sex with Nova, but when the scientists try to separate them, Ulysse gives in and has sex with her. At first he is humiliated but he eventually takes pleasure in the act. Still, he does not take his relationship with Nova seriously; she is incapable of intelligent thought, much less of speaking with him. His relationship with Zira, on the other hand, gradually develops as she surprises him with her intelligence and wit. Ulysse is immensely grateful to Zira for educating him and helping him escape from the research facility. Even though Zira is engaged (and an ape), it is clear romantic feelings grow between them.

In the end, however, it is Nova Ulysse ends up with. Nova has become pregnant as a result of their intimacy, and Ulysse must leave Soror in order to protect the child. He embraces Zira, wishing he doesn’t have to leave her. As they are about to kiss, Zira pushes him away: “She hides her head in her long hairy paws and this hideous she-ape bursts into tears and announces in despair: ‘Oh, darling, it’s impossible. It’s a shame, but I can’t, I can’t. You are really too unattractive!’” (Boulle 260, chapter 36, Ballantine ed.). For Zira, the problem isn’t necessarily that they are two different species; the problem is Ulysse’s ugliness. Like Ulysse, she also chooses her repulsion to Ulysse’s body over her attraction to his mind. As a result, Ulysee goes into space while Zira stays on Soror with her fiancé.

Posted by: Ashley Reynolds at February 24, 2016 11:25 AM

Nicole Alvarez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literature in Translation CA01
15 February 2016

“Only from books had I been able to acquire a few ideas about simian art. I had admired some reproductions of classical paintings, portraits of celebrated apes, country scenes with lascivious she-apes around whom fluttered a little winged monkey representing Cupid, military paintings dating from the time when there were still wars and depicting terrifying gorillas wearing flamboyant uniforms. The apes had also had their impressionists, and a few contemporaries indulged in abstract art. All this I had discovered in my cage, by the light of my flashlight.” (Boulle Pg. 111, Ch. 23).

Question: Ulysses notes several similarities between ape culture and his own culture, going into detail specifically with simian art. Despite the fact that Ulysses notes all these similarities, how is it that he has not begun to suspect how a supposedly different planet in a different part of the galaxy has so many similarities to Earth?

Answer: Ulysses likely has not begun to suspect something is wrong with the situation he has found himself in because his mind wants to reject the idea before even giving the idea that Soror and Earth are the same any actual thought. The repercussions of giving any credit to such a thought could affect Ulysses negatively and any hope of returning home or effectively establishing himself within the simian society may die out. Ulysses later finds Professor Antelle in a zoo exhibit later in this same chapter and actually cries at the state that he finds the professor in. His only hope at this point is going before congress and be recognized as a rational being because at this point, Ulysses still believes that the humans he sees and himself are two different species from different planets.

Posted by: Nicole Alvarez at February 24, 2016 11:47 AM

Alyssa Barca, Natalie Cassidy, Giuseppe Donnian
ENG 410 Reading the Planet: Comparative Global Literatures in Translation CA01
24 February 2016

Question 22: Civilized vs. Uncivilized

Answer: On Soror, the Apes would be considered the species that are “safe”, and the humans would be considered “unsafe”. The Apes have the language and communication skills that allow them to build cities and create a functioning civilization whereas the humans are opposite in the sense that they communicate with each other only in the way that animals do. They do not have the intelligence to develop a language that could help one another create a civilization like the way the Apes did. Additionally, the Apes would be considered the enlightened and superior species on Soror. The Apes have jobs, conduct research, wear clothes, communicate efficiently, and are undeniably intelligent. The humans would be considered inferior due to the fact that they act like animals not wearing clothes, and their language is more like sounds and grunts like the way animals communicate with one another in the wild. Moreover, the Apes are evidently the verbal species whereas the humans are non-verbal. The dichotomy that is clearly presented is Ape vs. Human. In this case, the Apes are the superior, intelligent, and civilized being that they dominate planet Soror. The humans are essentially the animals that are undoubtedly inferior in the sense of intelligence, communication, and the inability to civilize. They are on total opposite sides of the spectrum in terms of civilized (Apes) vs. uncivilized (humans).

Posted by: Alyssa Barca at February 24, 2016 11:49 AM

Ashley Reynolds
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literature in Translation CA01
22 February 2016

Question 20: Readers don’t see a lot human female characters in the story, but some exist. Nova gets the most face time (I’d say she gets the most speaking lines, but she doesn’t really speak). (a.) Does hegemony exist in the male/female dichotomy of the “savage” humans? If so, which “side” has the privileged position? (b.) Does hegemony exist in the male/female dichotomy of the “civilized” apes? If so, which “side” has the privileged position? How are these structures similar/dissimilar to the gender hegemonic dichotomy on Planet Earth? Explain, your reasoning, providing as many citable, hard examples from the text as possible.

Answer: Among the uncivilized humans, there does not appear to be a bias towards male or female. Both the men and women are equally stupid. There is no clear dichotomy or hierarchy between the genders. In fact, Nova is relatively smart compared to the others. She is the first one to encounter Ulysse, Professor Antelle, and Arthur Levain. She leads the humans into the water while “the others followed with varying degrees of hesitation” (Boulle 40, chapter 6, Ballantine ed.). This shows Nova has some sort of leadership position with the humans despite being a woman. Ulysse also comments on her intelligence compared to the other uncivilized humans: “I cannot help noting that she is an exceptional subject and I am glad of that. With her I obtain better results than with the others […] Even before I have opened my mouth she tries to pronounce the three of for syllables she has learned” (Boulle 194, chapter 27, Ballantine ed.). Nova holds privileged social status and is smarter than the other humans, including the men. This raises an interesting question: is gender hegemony a result of civilization?

When compared with the apes, the answer to this question is “yes.” Ironically, the society of the apes on Planet Soror is more similar to human society on Planet Earth. On Earth, males are privileged over females, something reflected in the he-ape dominance over she-apes. While the text does not explicitly say that male apes are privileged over female apes, the lack of female apes in the story speaks for itself. The only females mentioned in the story are those at the hunting lodge, Zira, and the socialites. During the human hunt, only male apes actually do the hunting while the female apes socialize and pose for photos with the dead humans. The she-apes sit patiently in the hunting lodge, where they “wait for their lords and masters,” the he-apes (Boulle 69, chapter 10, Ballantine ed.). The situation is very similar amongst the socialites, where the female apes ogle Ulysse and dance together, but have no meaningful conversation (Boulle 183, chapter 26, Ballantine ed.). In this society, only the male apes have agency. The only exception is Zira, who holds a relatively powerful position, but she has to report to several male apes, including Zaius. Zira is clearly more intelligent and capable than Zaius, but he still holds a higher position in society.

Posted by: Ashley Reynolds at February 24, 2016 12:05 PM

Alyssa Barca
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet: Comparative Global Literatures in Translation CA01
24 February 2016

"After ten minutes the whole of the wretched girl's left side was shaken by convulsive spasms, a dreadful sight, growing more and more rapid and more and more violent." (Boulle 237)

Question: In chapter 33, Ulysses is witnessing a gruesome research experiment being conducted on a human girl which greatly disturbed him. On Soror, the Apes are the ones who run tests on humans, but on Earth the humans run tests on the animals. How does this relate to the research that humans conduct on animals on Earth? Do you think this was an eye-opening scene for Ulysses?

Answer: Ulysses was incredibly disturbed and disgusted by the Ape's giving the young girl epilepsy where she was laying on the operating table convulsing and spasming violently. As he was watching this take place, he became furious and almost brought to tears that the Apes would conduct this type of research on a young girl. However, this is exactly what humans do to animals on Earth. It's almost hypocritical for Ulysses to become upset because the hegemony on Earth, humans like himself, would do similar types of experiments on the inferior species which would be animals. Lastly, Ulysses does recall a time when he watched this same experiment take place on chimpanzees. This scene is a total representation of how opposite Earth and Soror are.

Posted by: Alyssa Barca at February 24, 2016 12:17 PM

Nicole Alvarez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literature in Translation CA01
17 February 2016

“’You did say, didn’t you, Ulysse, that on your Earth the apes are utter animals? That man has risen to a degree of civilization equal to our own and which, in certain respects, even …? Don’t be frightened of making me angry; the scientific spirit ignores all self-esteem.’
‘Which, in many respects, even surpasses it – yes, that’s undeniable. One of the best proofs is that I am here. It seems to me you have only reached the state …’”
(Boulle Pg. 136, Ch. 28).

Question: Here Cornelius brings up a very important question that gives an extremely big hint about the actuality of what the planet Soror, the simians, and the humans really are and what they came from. It is thus interesting that it is Cornelius, and not Ulysse, who has begun postulating this question and the theory that comes with it. Why is it that Cornelius is the one who has brought up this question?

Answer: Cornelius is the one who begins suspecting something is not quite right with the history of Soror and what Ulysse has been saying about Earth because he appears to be the most open-minded individual that has so far been introduced in the novel. Zira, Ulysse, and all of the other apes have been refusing to take a good look at the facts that have presented themselves; they are willingly remaining ignorant about the truth. Cornelius points out how for ten thousand years, simian society has remained stagnant and Ulysse’s arrival has given him something else to think about and incorporate into his theory of the origins of simian society and of humans on Soror. The fact that he is the only one who is actively looking for the truth behind their origins and is doubting the teachings of the orangutans, supports Cornelius being the only actually open-minded character.

Posted by: Nicole Alvarez at February 24, 2016 12:24 PM

Nicole Alvarez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literature in Translation CA01
22 February 2016

Question: Who invites Merou to an archeological dig and what is discovered at the site? Describe the major find in detail. Why is this a significant find? What does it have to do with the apes’ mythology? What are (or might be) the implications of this find? Will it be controversial? Will it shake up the system? (Question 12).

Answer: Ulysse is invited to the archeological dig by Cornelius once he has gained his rights and freedom from congress. While there, the archeological team discovers a china doll in the ruins. What is important about this china doll is that it is shaped in the form of a human instead of an ape. Cornelius is the one who finds the doll and immediately brings it to the attention of Ulysse. What is more unusual about the doll is that it is made of china and is clothed. What is even more important about the doll as Ulysse points out is that “[t]he doll talks. It talks like a doll at home” (Boulle Pg. 142, Ch. 29). The fact that this doll exists means that the humans that are considered nothing more than animals once had an advanced civilization. It was also this once-upon-a-time civilization that the simian civilization is based upon and from which simian culture has received all of its knowledge. This new knowledge would shake up everything that apes would think to be true, especially in concern of humans. Many apes, like the orangutans, will probably think it is some error or a joke of the scientific field. Jinn and Phyllis are proof that the revelation was dismissed entirely as they discard Ulysse’s manuscript as nothing more than a piece of fiction.

Posted by: Nicole Alvarez at February 24, 2016 12:57 PM

Amber Clidinst
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet: Comparative Global Literature CA01
21 February 2016

Question: . How does Cornelius react, initially, to Merou, himself, and Zira’s opinion of him? Is he receptive, skeptical, jealous, or frightened? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: When Cornelius first meets Merou he responds with shock, asking Zira “So it’s true?” indicating that he had not believed what she had told him about Merou. Merou himself states that Cornelius “gave very little till now to Zira’s confidences,” and berates him with questions that Zira has most likely already given him answers about (146). Even as they spend time together, Cornelius seems to view Merou as a scientific wonder, and does not take the same personal interest in him as Zira does. Merou muses that Cornelius would have “given a fortune to have [him] in his laboratory” (147).

Posted by: Amber Clidinst at February 24, 2016 07:05 PM

William McDermott
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410

Planet of the Apes Question 18

The ending to Planet of the Apes reveals that Earth has succumbed to the same fate as Soror, with the apes evolving and overtaking the humans.

However, how did the Earth become this way? On Soror the apes were able to mimic the humans because they became domestic servants and were always around humans. There is no indication of apes being man’s servants on Earth in the novel; Ulysse and his team bring along a chimpanzee on their interstellar voyage, but the animal was treated more as a companion than a servant.

Another plot hole opens up when analyzing the human test subjects who are able to repeat human history when their brains are prodded with electricity. Even in a science fiction novel it is strange for the human test subject to recount the downfall of humanity from several different sources. This could make sense if each voice that was mimicked had been a part of the test subject’s genetic family, but the voices all seem like they are separate people experiencing the downfall of humanity at the same time.

The reveal at the end of the novel that the two beings that were reading Ulysse’s story were apes comes off as odd, mainly because they reject the idea of an intelligent human as ridiculous. The two apes are chimpanzees, which were said to be the more liberal ape race and more accepting of the idea that man could be capable of intelligence. During Ulysse’s time on Soror he was paraded around as a celebrity and would have no doubt would have been recorded in Soror’s history.

Posted by: William McDermott at February 25, 2016 10:54 PM

Seger Sipe and Leona Hunt
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literatures in Translation CA01
15 February 2016
Group 3: Chapters 5-6

1.) An important character introduced is Nova, who strangles Hector, the chimpanzee.
2.) The characters driving the chapters are Ulysse Mérou and his two friends, Arthur Levain and professor Antelle.
3.) In chapter five and and chapter six, there is a problem with communication because the travelers cannot communicate with Nova or the herd of humans because of lack of intelligence. When the travelers try to mimic them, it ends up backfiring, because the travelers’ odd attire, mannerisms and facial expressions frighten the humans.
4.) Intelligence vs. savageness can be viewed as a dichotomy.
5.) The apes are preferred over humans, being superior. The travelers may show intelligence, but they are seen as a threat to the apes’ lifestyle and beliefs.
6.) The thesis is that the travelers are smart, having better knowledge than the humans on Soror. The antithesis would be that the humans on Soror are uneducated, not having too much of an advantage in comparison to the apes. Arguably, the build-up synthesis would be understanding that all humans have the ability to be able to learn, under the correct and not threatening, fear conditioning methods.

Posted by: Seger Sipe at February 26, 2016 10:33 AM

Seger Sipe
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literatures in Translation CA01
10 February 2016

“I watched her in silence and sighed as I remembered her cruelty to our poor monkey. She had probably also been the cause of our misadventure by pointing us in out to her companions. But how could one hold this against her when faced with the perfection of her body?” (Chapter 8, page 53, Xan Fielding translation).

Question: How does Ulysse feel about Nova? Does he view Nova in a respectable manner?

Answer: Ulysse uses interesting language when speaking about Nova, practically saying he cannot blame her fully due to “the perfection of her body” (53). When Ulysse reaches out to touch Nova on the shoulder, while smiling broadly towards her, he is under the impression that he may be capable to having Nova tamed. After thinking about that possibility, he states, “I was intoxicated by this success, and was even more so when I thought she was trying to imitate me” (54). Ulysse may want to help Nova with communication, but nonetheless, he views her as inferior, and readers may question how Ulysse would react if Nova wasn’t as beautiful as described, and whether Ulysse would have been as accepting.

Posted by: Seger Sipe at February 26, 2016 10:57 AM

Seger Sipe
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Comparative Global Literatures in Translation CA01
15 February 2016

“He was an orangutan, the first I had seen on the planet Soror. He was shorter than the gorillas and slightly round shouldered. His arms were relatively longer so that he often touched the ground with his hand as he walked, which the other apes did only rarely” (Chapter 15, page 99, Xan Fielding translation).

Question: What is the significance of Zaius’s introduction? How does he differ from the other apes?

Answer: As Ulysse stated in the aforementioned passage, Zaius is the first orangutan he sees in the ape society. Zaius appears formal, being described by Ulysse as “dressed quite differently from the others, in a long black frock coat with a red star in the buttonhole and black-and-white-striped trousers, both somewhat dusty” (99-100). Following Zaius is a small chimpanzee, carrying Zauis’s heavy briefcase. Ulysse deduces that “her attitude suggested that she was a secretary” (100). Zaius is established as an authority figure, being perceived as a learned elder who should be respected by both ape and man.

Posted by: Seger Sipe at February 26, 2016 11:12 AM

Alyssa Barca
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet: Comparative Global Literatures in Translation CA01
26 February 2016

Question: What did Messieurs Antelle, Levain, and Merou discover in the sand by the water once they had landed, who or what was the amazing discovery connected to, and what did eventually end up, how long did it take them to get there, and what did Merou dub her, and why? Explain. Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: Ulysses, Professor Antelle, and Levain found a human footprint in the sane when they first landed on Soror. This discovery was connected to the notion that humans inhabited planet Soror, and that there must be human life on this planet currently because the footprint appeared as if a human was just there before they arrived. In chapter five, Ulysses describes the footprint as "the slimness, the elegance, the singular beauty of the footprint had disturbed me profoundly. There could be no doubt as to the humanness of the foot." (Boulle 27) This human footprint ended up being Novas. Ulysses referred to her as a "female savage" (37) because her behavior was so animal-like. Even though she had the body of a human, her mannerisms were animal-like. She could only communicate with sounds and had no language abilities. The expedition took Ulysses, Professor Antelle and Levain "two years after leaving Earth" (20) to land on Soror.

Posted by: Alyssa Barca at February 26, 2016 11:49 AM

Jonah Robertson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 410 Reading the Planet: Comparative Global Literatures in Translation
2/26/16
Q: Identify the Conflict in Chapter 9
A: The conflict is primarily Ulysse’s discovery of the carnage around him, and the apes that are causing it. His first encounter with the large ape at the beginning of the chapter (59) confuses him and he believes for a moment that his sanity is escaping him. However, as he then sees the deaths of multiple humans he understands that he must escape.

Posted by: Jonah Robertson at February 26, 2016 11:54 AM

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