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January 04, 2009

What's so Bizarre about James Joyce's "Araby"?


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Class,

In the comment box below,

. . . the note-taker/scribe from each group should retype the question your group discussed today in class and provide an answer with quotations from the text to support your answers. You MUST put the page number (or, paragraph number if there are no page numbers) in parentheses after any quotation used.

Enter your work on this text as prescribed in class. For example:

Remember: I have to "approve" all comments so you won't see it immediately after posting. After hitting submit, you should see a screen that confirms this.

We are beginning to use some concepts in our discussions that you may or may have had practice using before. I want to be sure that you have a clear understanding of the words we use in class (no more blank stares!) so be sure you are looking up words you don't feel you yet "own" (means, making it a part of your personal vocabulary) by utilizing your dictionaries to the fullest.

~Dr. Hobbs

_____________________________________

To see other English-Blog entries on the subject of Literature, please click HERE.

Posted by lhobbs at January 4, 2009 06:33 PM

Readers' Comments:

Allyn Tuff
Dr. Hobbs
English 122 CA 16
1/14/09
Araby
The story Araby was not created solely for the purpose of a reader’s entertainment, but to makes points about living in everyday life, and what obstacles to look out for. The three main points to the story Araby in my opinion, were to insist that a temporary passion should not oversee regular a day’s needs, that one shouldn’t get his or her hopes up to the point where you are no longer thinking tactically, and that you should not make a promise unless you are absolutely sure you can live up to it.
First, I am going to explain my reasoning for believing the first point of the story is that temporary passion should not oversee a regular day’s needs. School is a very important part of daily needs, because it determines whether or not somebody is educated. According to the story, on the morning the narrator went to the araby, he had school, but didn’t pay attention. It says in the story that he thought school was childish, and didn’t matter. Well as most would agree, school is very important and if someone doesn’t pay attention in school, they do not learn, and therefore they are not educated.
Next I am going to explain why the second point of the story is that one shouldn’t get his or her hopes up to the point where you can no longer think tactically. In the story, the uncle of the narrator didn’t want to listen to him when he asked to go to the Araby because he was in a hurry to leave the house. By the time his uncle got home it was already nine o’clock. Any person in the right mind would know that businesses usually close at nine or ten o’clock, but he was so set on going that he didn’t even think of this before he left. When he got there he found out that there was a very few amount of business stalls that were still open, and he was extremely let down. If he would have thought tactically, he would not have been so disappointed with the outcome.
Last, I am going to explain why the final point to this story is that one should not make a promise unless you are absolutely sure you can live up to it. There was a girl that the narrator had love for in the story. In fact she was the reason that he went to the Araby in the first place. She had came over to his house and asked him if he wanted to have her tickets to go to the araby because she had to go to a Christian retreat on that date. He took the tickets and promised her that he would buy her something, but couldn’t follow through with it because everything closed down. Now that that happened the situation got a lot worse because she thought she was going to get a gift from him, but he broke his promise and did not get her anything.
Araby is a good story once one can understand the essential points that the story makes. The points that were made in this story are that one should never let a temporary passion get in the way of every day needs, one should never get his or her hopes up to the point where they can no longer think tactical, and one should never make a promise he or she cannot keep. Once I found these points, I loved the story.

Posted by: Allyn Tuff at January 19, 2009 10:53 PM

Alicia Roddenberg
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 122 CA16
02-18-09
Setting of James Joyce’s “Araby”
In James Joyce’s “Araby”, the surroundings help to show the irony and set the mood. As the story begins there is plenty of detail to paint a picture of the desolate street in the readers mind. The main character, whom you are able to gather is a young boy, is vying for the attention of one of the neighborhood girls. Through out the story the setting switches between the inside of the young boys house, and the culdesack in which the house is located. The way in which Joyce gives specific details of certain backgrounds shows the importance to the story of this area. The setting plays such am important role in the development of the story that it can influence the characters and your opinions of them.
Through the descriptive words Joyce chose to describe specific object of the scenery allows for an atmosphere to develop. “If you find descriptions of shapes, light and shadows, animals, wind, and sounds, you may be sure that the author is creating an atmosphere or mood for the actions” (Roberts). The story is either taking place during dusk or in the night. “When we met in the street, the houses had grown somber” (Joyce). This shows that the streets were quiet and mainly empty; demonstrating the type of people who live in this area as well as possibly the way the young boy feels in the story. This can reveal the symbolism of the short story.
The end of the story has the young boy leaving the bazaar in anger, which leaves many questions unanswered. The question being what exactly does the author expect you to take away from this story, is there a lesson to learn? The character of Mangan’s sister is symbolic because she influences the main character through out the entire story. She represents something the boy wishes for, similar to other hopes her presumably has. The hope to better his situation is evident in the entire short story. It is easily noticed in the description of the boy’s home “The high cold empty gloomy rooms liberated me and I went form room to room singing” (Joyce).
From the story we are able to develop our own interpretation of the boys past. From his surroundings we learn a lot about the quality of life in Dublin at the time of the story. “One of the major purposes of literary setting is to establish realism or verisimilitude” (Roberts). The author allows the connections between the character and his settings to develop over time helps to create a realistic storyline. The young boy is driven by love, and is determined to demonstrate that to the one he yearns for. This is a relatable feeling for most, and makes the main character more full to the reader.
It is clear that without the descriptions of the settings in “Araby” we would be unable to relate to the characters. The settings allow for the atmosphere of the story to be placed, and opens the characters to the readers. Joyce maintains control of the situations the story travels through by giving effective descriptions and evolving the characters surroundings.


Works Cited
Joyce, James. “Araby”. A Prentice Hall pocket reader Literature.
edited by Mary McAleer Balkun. Saddle River, NJ: Pearson, 2005. pages 61-6
Roberts, Edgar V. Writing about Literature. Brief 11th ed. Saddle River, NJ: Pearson,
2006. page 109-18.

Posted by: Alicia Roddenberg at February 23, 2009 10:50 PM

Sasha-ann Jarrett
Dr. Hobbs
English 122 – CA17
March 3, 20009
Religious Beliefs Make Decisions
Araby, written by James Joyce, is the story of a young man with a lustful crush on his friend's sister. Throughout the story, religion is continuously being mentioned and can be identified as the writer’s use of symbolism. The careful use of symbolism relates to how the young man is torn in between his religious beliefs and his feelings.
At the beginning of the story, Joyce starts the reader off with a religious symbol in the first line, “North Richmond Street, being blind, was a quiet street except at the hour when the Christian Brothers’ School set the boys free (page 61).” The street is quiet and calm except when the boys are set free, from the eyes of the church and the eyes of parents. Thus giving the reader a reason why the main character is torn between his feelings. As the eyes of “God” are constantly watching his every move, making sure he abides by the rules of his religion.
Another symbolism within the story “Araby” is highlighted when the religious priest died behind the back of the main character’s house. The priest is also an obvious symbol, but the description of the room where he died is more revealing, “Air, musty from having been long enclosed, hung in all the rooms, and the waste room behind the kitchen was littered with old useless papers” (page 61). The priest’s old room smells like a jail cell, making the air a prisoner of the room. As the air is a prisoner of the room, so is the main character within his religion.
The main character is trapped within his religion because it restricts him from doing certain things. Similarly the air is trapped in the room. This symbolism of Araby and his religion could be said to be cultural. It can be interpreted as cultural, as the religion that he is a part of looks down upon young men, in his case, who choose to partake in secular activities rather than spiritual ones, especially because of his feelings for a girl. But yet his aunt still persuades his uncle to take him, which signifies the cultural aspect, for other members may not have allowed this. His intense urge to go to the bazaar, causes his aunt to notice it and says to him “I’m afraid you may put off your bazaar for this night of Our Lord” (page 64).
It is said that the religion that we belong to, influences our behavior and our decisions, but this has not yet been proven. However, the story of Araby could prove this to be true. The writer makes it appear this way because of how and where he places the symbols in the story. He makes the symbols give the reader a clear and vivid picture and the reason why they are situated in the story. It’s as though everything that the main character does, or rather the decisions he makes are all referred to something religious, making the reader grasp the intent and quickly connects the dots.

Posted by: Sasha-ann Jarrett at March 10, 2009 08:11 AM

Baumgardner 1
Ryan Baumgardner
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II
26 February, 2009
The factors of Araby’s Life
In this short story the author James Joyce creates many littler factors in Araby’s everyday life that hint to us the history and place of the story. He let us know how the main character feels about religion. He lets us know were the story takes place by giving us a real road name. Even though the story has a timeless theme, the theme of lost love, there are contextual clues to the stories origin. The time in history that Araby takes place is either very late 1800’s, but most likely very early 1900s.
The story starts off by the author telling us that the main character lives on “North Richmond Street” (Joyce 61). This gives us historical location. That street is a real street in Dublin Ireland, so that leads us to believe this is where Araby takes place. In the Roberts text he says “when reading for historical and contextual evidence, look to see is the characters are religious” (Roberts 147). Almost every paragraph in the story they mention the Christian religion, leading us to believe the main character was Christian. The story takes place in a time when Christianity was heavily dominating that also supports our early 20th century theory.
They mention how different characters meet for tea at different times which makes us think of Europe where tea is a favorite. Tea to people in England, France, and Ireland is cultural favorite. I think the author makes it tough at first when looking for historical information because he never tells a time or place, but he leaves little clues that take a second reading to catch. He mentions the different books the priest owned. All were published in the 1870’s letting us know it was after that time period.


Baumgardner 3
Work Cited
Joyce, James. “Araby.” Prentice Hall Pocket Reader. Ed. Balkun, Mary. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Prentice Hall, 2006. 61-66.
Roberts, Edgar. Writing About Literature. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Prentice Hall, 2006.


Posted by: Ryan Baumgardner at April 16, 2009 09:58 AM

Samantha Witte
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA07
September 28, 2014

QUESTION #4:
To what extent do these activities taking place in the Araby sustain its “magical name”?

ANSWER:
The Araby is seen as a special and mysterious place by the narrator, whom has never been. He thinks it is so amazing because the girl from his neighborhood that he has been crushing on is the one who told him about it. It is a very unique and when “a crowd of people press against the carriage doors; but the porters moved them back, saying it was a special train for the bazaar” (Joyce 5). The anticipation was building very high for the narrator as he imagined all of the stalls, beautiful merchandise, and the people all around. This was not particularly what he found when he walked away empty handed, and “gazing up into the darkness, [he] saw himself as a creature driven and derided by vanity; and [his] eyes burned with anguish and fear” (Joyce 6). The magic name was simply an amazing image that the narrator created for himself based upon his will to go buy something for the girl he was crushing on.

Posted by: Samantha Witte at September 28, 2014 07:02 PM

Elizabeth Brown
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG122 Academic Writing II
28 September 2014

Question #16:
16. In James Joyce’s short story, “Araby,” what striking images help readers understand the boy’s feelings? What images give his devotion a quasi-religious quality?

Answer:
The images that help me understand the boy in this stories feeling are the images he sees when he is waiting for the chance to go to the Araby. “What innumerable follies laid waste my waking and sleeping thoughts after that evening! I wished to annihilate the tedious intervening days. I chafed against the work of school. At night in my bedroom and by day in the classroom her image came between me and the page I strove to read. The syllables of the word Araby were called to me through the silence in which my soul luxuriated and castan Eastern enchantment over me.,” (James Joyce, pg.3) The fact that the girl lives in a convent and he religiously keeps up with watching her and loving her from a distance. “Every morning I lay on the floor in the front parlour watching her door. The blind was pulled down to within an inch of the sash so that I could not be seen. When she came out on the doorstep my heart leaped. I ran to the hall, seized my books and followed her. I kept her brown figure always in my eye and, when we came near the point at which our ways diverged, I quickened my pace and passed her. This happened morning after morning. I had never spoken to her, except for a few casual words, and yet her name was like a summons to all my foolish blood.” (James Joyce, pg.2)

Posted by: Elizabeth Brown at September 29, 2014 10:46 AM

Alyssa Davis
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG Academic Writing II CA07
29 September 2014

Question #1:
In James Joyce’s short story, “Araby,” why does the narrator want to go to the bazaar? Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parenthesis) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.
Answer:
The narrator wanted to go to the bazaar because they girl that he had a crush on was unable to go. Since she was unable to go the author was going to the bazaar and bring her back something. “If I go,’ I said, ‘I will bring you something,” (Joyce 3). The narrator really wanted to get this woman’s attention because he was highly interested in her. By him going to the bazaar and bringing her something back, he would be able to hopefully win her over and get her to gain interest in him.

Posted by: Alyssa Davis at September 29, 2014 11:19 AM

Zachary Gary
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA07
29 September 2014

Question #8:
In James Joyce’s short story, “Araby,” what is the role of the narrator’s uncle in the story? What values and attitudes does he represent? Are they preferable to those of the narrator? Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words

Answer:
From what I get from the story, the uncle is drunk that doesn’t really remember anything. (Joyce 5) Also he says he forgot all about what the boy wanted, like wanting to go to bazaar. (Joyce 5) The boy just wanted to grow up and be a grown man, whereas the grandfather just wanted to be kid and have fun. So they basically switched roles. (Joyce 4)

“I could interpret these signs. When he was midway through his dinner I asked him to give me the money to go to the bazaar. He had forgotten.”
“My uncle said he was very sorry he had forgotten. He said he believed in the old saying: ‘All work and no play makes Jack a dullboy.”
“He asked me where I was going and, when I told him a second time, he asked me did I know The Arab’s Farewell to his Steed. When I left the kitchen he was about to recite the opening lines of the piece to my aunt.”

Posted by: Zachary Gary at September 29, 2014 12:46 PM

Allison Ward
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
29 September 2014

Question #10
What is the search for the Holy Grail and how is it like the events of James Joyce’s short story “Araby”?

Answer
The search for the Holy Grail is, “the search for romance and enlightenment.”(British Library). It is like the events in this short story because the main character tries to find a way to get the love of Mangan’s sister. On page two, Joyce states that, “when she came out on the doorstep, my heart leaped.”(2) The story goes on to describe how the main character feels about the sister. The main character even says that if he goes to the bazaar that he, “will bring her something.”(Joyce 3). The main character goes to the bazaar in search of something for her, like searching for the Holy Grail.

Posted by: Allison Ward at September 29, 2014 08:12 PM

Rashard Knowles
Dr. B Lee. Hobbs
ENG122 Academic Writing
29 September 2014

Question
13. In the short story "Arby," why is the protagonist angry at the end of the story and why do his eyes burn with anguish?

At the end of the story, the protagonist is angry because, firstly his uncle arrives home late and forgot that he wanted to go to the bizarre, also, he arrived late and ended up missing all the stalls.

His eyes burned with anguish because he gazed up without blinking.

As seen on page 5 lines 28 - 29 "Nearly all the stalls were closed
and the greater part of the hall was in darkness."

Also page 6 lines 37 - 38 "Gazing up into the darkness I saw myself as a creature driven
and derided by vanity; and my eyes burned with anguish..."

Posted by: Rashard Knowles at September 29, 2014 10:02 PM

Sharonda S Byrd
B. LEE HOBBS
ENG 210CL
30 September 2014
Araby
Question: In James Joyce’s short story, “Araby,” what striking images help readers understand the boy’s feelings? What images give his devotion a quasi – religious quality?

Answer: In James Joyce’s short story Araby the narrator is a nameless boy who is experiencing love for his friend Mangan’s sister. The images that help the reader understand the boys feelings is the way he describes the way he describes his heart, “When she came out on the doorstep my heart leaped”, this quote describes that every time he sees her he feels like his heart is coming out of his chest. This girl intoxicates him with joy and elation and it’s a new feeling to him. “But my body was like a harp and her words and gestures were like fingers running upon the wires”, is another quote from the story which describes the feelings he has for this girl. It makes the reader understand that this girl has cast a spell on him and he has done so much to promise her that he will be at the bazaar and has bought her a gift as well. He describes that when he hears her name it summons his foolish blood, which means that she gets his body warm and fuzzy. He does not understand his infatuation because he calls it confused adoration so it’s more like he has puppy love more than real love for this girl.

Posted by: sharonda byrd at September 30, 2014 11:02 PM

Shelby Rexroth
September 30th, 2014
ENG210

8) In James Joyce’s, “Araby,” what is the role of the narrator’s uncle in the story? What values and attitudes does he represent? Are they preferable to those of the narrator? Use passages from the text (with page numbers in the parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

The role of the narrator’s uncle in the story is important due to the fact that it doesn’t discuss him specifically but by reading the story you know that the narrator lives with his uncle and aunt. His uncle showed himself to be unreliable and didn’t have any care for his nephews needs. The narrator had told his uncle many times about the bazaar he wanted to attend. “(13) On Saturday morning I reminded my uncle that I wished to go to the bazaar in the evening. He was fussing at the hall-stand, looking for the hat-brush, and answered me curtly:” He reminded his uncle until the day of, which he had not come home the day of the bazaar. “(16) When I came home to dinner my uncle had not yet been home. Still it was early.” Hours later, his uncle came home, and have forgotten about the bazaar that his nephew had been constantly reminding him about. “At nine o’clock I heard my uncle’s latchkey in the hall door. I heard him talking to himself and heard the hall-stand rocking when it had received the weight of his overcoat. I could interpret these signs. When he was midway through his dinner I asked him to give me the money to go to the bazaar. He had forgotten.”

Posted by: Shelby Rexroth at October 1, 2014 12:25 AM

Anthony Colello
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 210 CA02 Love and Desire in Literature
1 October 2014

Question:
What might be the symbolic meanings of both the deserted train and the dark bazaar?

Answer:
The empty train and bazaar represent, and foreshadow the absence of reciprocity from the female sister character that the main character is in love with. The lack of reciprocated love is evident when he is at the bazaar alone when the last light goes out, "the hall was now completely dark" (Joyce, 6).  It is in the dark that the main character finally sees the truth. He will never realize his love with this girl, "Gazing up into the darkness I saw myself as a creature driven and derided by vanity" (6). Vanity, meaning something worthless or pointless can refer to his efforts to meet with his beloved. The fact that vanity drives him means that his love and desire for this girl has lead him to an ostentatious attempt to woo her. In his attempt to impress a girl, he perceives himself as adding value to this girl's life. After sitting in the dark, he realizes that the very passion that drove him to this point is the same emotion that now mocks him In the shadows.

Posted by: Anthony Colello at October 1, 2014 10:17 AM

Rebecca Messano
ENG 210 Love and Desire in Literature
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
September 30, 2014

QUESTION 3: In James Joyce’s short story, “Araby,” what doesn’t the narrator buy anything for Mangan’s sister?

ANSWER:
In this short story, I understood it, but at the same time, I was confused when it came to answering this question. The narrator went to Araby to buy something for Mangan’s sister because she enamored him. His uncle promised he would take him, but he got home late, and apologized saying, he was “very sorry he had forgotten” and his aunt said that he should “give him the money and let him go.” (pg. 5) His uncle ended up coming around and letting him go. He took the train to get there and when he arrived at the store, there was a group of people talking. They looked at him and asked if he wanted to buy anything, and he felt that the way she asked was “out of a sense of duty” (pg. 6) and then he politely said no. The very last sentence, he said he saw himself “as a creature driven and derided by vanity; and my eyes burned with anguish and fear.” (pg. 6) I guess that means that he did not feel as if she cared if he bought something or not.

Posted by: Rebecca Messano at October 1, 2014 11:12 AM

Irma Sera
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG. 210CL Love & Desire in Literature CA02
30 September 2014

Question #1:
In James Joyce’s short story, “Araby,” why does the narrator want to go to the bazaar?

Answer:
The narrator wants to attend the Bazaar so that he could get his lover a gift from the event. One day she spoke to him and mentioned that she was unable to attend because she had a retreat to attend with her “covenant.” Therefore, he made a promise to her that he would bring her something back from the Araby. ”She could not go, she said, because there would be a retreat that week in her convent” (James Joyce, 3.9). “‘If I go,’ I said, ‘I will bring you something” (James Joyce, pg. 3.11).

Posted by: irma sera at October 1, 2014 11:41 AM

Danielle Kluender
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 122 CA07 Academic Writing II
28 September 2014

Question #6:
In James Joyce’s short story, “Araby,” define the narrator’s feelings for Mangan’s sister. To what extent is she the cause of those feelings? What, as they say, does he see in her?

Answer:
The narrator was very infatuated with Mangan’s sister. They were always looking at her dress and the way it “swung as she moved her body, and the soft rope of her hair tossed from side to side.” (Joyce 2). When the narrator finally spoke to her, he was very nervous and could not recall the words that came out of his mouth. Her image was beautiful to him.

Posted by: Danielle Kluender at October 1, 2014 12:59 PM

Gabriela Navarro
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
1 Oct 2014

QUESTION #2:
In James Joyce’s short story, “Araby,” why does the narrator arrive so late?

ANSWER:
The narrator states to his uncle that "on Saturday morning I reminded my uncle that I wished to go the bazaar in the evening," (Joyce, 13) in which the uncle did not follow through with the timing. Once the uncle arrives at 9 o'clock and then began reciting opening line, the narrator flees to the bazaar. Once at the train station, the narrator then begins on his way, but only "after an intolerable delay" (Joyce, 24) with the train. Arriving and struggling through a crowd of people, the narrator finally arrives to the bazaar but with only a short amount of time left.

Posted by: Gabriela Navarro at October 1, 2014 01:17 PM

Thomas Watson
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
1 October 2014

QUESTION #11:
In James Joyce’s short story, “Araby,” how do the physical conditions where the narrator lives influence or develop his character?

ANSWER:
There are various conditions within the text that dictates how the character will behave. For instance, the neighborhood he lived in was a quiet, dark, and still. “North Richmond Street, being blind, was a quiet street”(Joyce 1). “The other houses of the street, conscious of decent lives within them, gazed at one another”(Joyce 1). “When we met in the street the houses had grown sombre”(Joyce 1). Our shouts echoed in the silent street”(Joyce 2). That translates into his development as being fairly quiet and reserved much like the community he resides.



Whenever his uncle would come home, he’d hide in the shadows and wait until he was inside, and the same goes for Mangan’s sister whenever she’d arrive. His infatuation with Mangan’s sister helped him get through hostile places, thinking of her to get him through tough situations. “Her image accompanied me even in places the most hostile to romance”(Joyce 2). “We walked through the flaring streets, jostled by drunken men and bargaining women, amid the curses of labourers, the shrill litanies of shop-boys”(Joyce 2). “These noises converged in a single sensation of life for me: I imagined that I bore my chalice safely through a throng of foes. Her name sprang to my lips at moments in strange prayers and praises which I myself did not understand”(Joyce 2). At the end of the story, you can see that this condition finally gave the narrator a moment of clarity. What made him get through tough situations has gone against him. “Gazing up into the darkness I saw myself as a creature driven and derided by vanity; and my eyes burned with anguish and fear”(Joyce 6).

Posted by: Thomas Watson at October 1, 2014 02:01 PM

Thomas Watson
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
1 October 2014

QUESTION #11:
In James Joyce’s short story, “Araby,” how do the physical conditions where the narrator lives influence or develop his character?

ANSWER:
There are various conditions within the text that dictates how the character will behave. For instance, the neighborhood he lived in was a quiet, dark, and still. “North Richmond Street, being blind, was a quiet street”(Joyce 1). “The other houses of the street, conscious of decent lives within them, gazed at one another”(Joyce 1). “When we met in the street the houses had grown sombre”(Joyce 1). Our shouts echoed in the silent street”(Joyce 2). That translates into his development as being fairly quiet and reserved much like the community he resides.



Whenever his uncle would come home, he’d hide in the shadows and wait until he was inside, and the same goes for Mangan’s sister whenever she’d arrive. His infatuation with Mangan’s sister helped him get through hostile places, thinking of her to get him through tough situations. “Her image accompanied me even in places the most hostile to romance”(Joyce 2). “We walked through the flaring streets, jostled by drunken men and bargaining women, amid the curses of labourers, the shrill litanies of shop-boys”(Joyce 2). “These noises converged in a single sensation of life for me: I imagined that I bore my chalice safely through a throng of foes. Her name sprang to my lips at moments in strange prayers and praises which I myself did not understand”(Joyce 2). At the end of the story, you can see that this condition finally gave the narrator a moment of clarity. What made him get through tough situations has gone against him. “Gazing up into the darkness I saw myself as a creature driven and derided by vanity; and my eyes burned with anguish and fear”(Joyce 6).

Posted by: Thomas Watson at October 1, 2014 02:01 PM

Zailet Martinez

B. Lee Hobbs

ENG210CL- Love and Desire in Literature CA02

1 October 2014

Question #9:

Find patterns I\in James Joyce’s short story, “Araby” that show relevance to “light,” “vision,” and “beauty” Use quoted passages from the text(with page numbers in parentheses)to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer:

Throughout the story we see examples of light, vision, and beauty. Beauty being the most prominent in how he sees this girl that he loves. The narrator says “her figure defined by the light from the half-opened door,” he gives us insight of her beauty (Joyce, 2). He thinks she is the most beautiful girl he has ever seen. “The light from the lamp opposite our door caught the white curve of her neck, lit up her hair that rested there,” this quote also gives us insight of how the boy admires the girls beauty and he thinks of her everywhere he goes (Joyce, 3). In both of the passages, he uses light to reference her beauty. It is as if the girl brings life into his dead world. All this leads to the vision that the narrator has to have the Mandan’s sister as his lover. “When she came out on the doorstep my heart leaped. I ran to the hall, seized my books and followed her. I kept her brown figure always in my eye and, when we came near the point at which our ways diverged, I quickened my pace and passed her” (Joyce, 2). The narrator always looked forward and waited until the girl walked to school so he can follow her. He followed her and always went their separate ways in the end. When he found out that she wasn’t able to attend the bazaar that was something, she really wanted to do. He wanted to buy her gift to please her. When the day of the bazaar came he waited for his uncle to take him but he stayed at work until late. The boy got to go to the bazaar but arrived closed to closing, when he approached one of the stores the clerk did not approach him nicely, and he decided not to buy anything. He decided to do this because he knew he would not be able to win the girls love with gifts, and his vision changed about her, and his world became dark.

Posted by: Zailet Martinez at October 1, 2014 02:05 PM

Matt Weller
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 201CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
1 October 2014

Question #15:
Fill in the gaps of your knowledge, and look up the word “epiphany,” if you do not know it. In James Joyce’s short story, “Araby,” where’s the epiphany for the main character? What does the boy realize about himself? Is anything gained by the narrator through his frustration and humiliation?

Answer:
The epiphany for the main character is when he first notices the girl that lives next door. At first sight, he loves this girl, but does not have enough courage to talk to her. “I stood by the railings looking at her. “ Her dress swung as she moved her body, and the soft rope of her hair tossed from side to side. Every morning I lay on the floor in the front parlour watching her door” (Joyce 2). This girl appears to be god-like to the boy. He’s always thinking about her and cannot focus on anything else. The boy realizes that he is in love with the girl, but still does not have the courage to talk to her. They exchange a few words to each other, but he is never able to tell her what he truly thinks of her. The boy becomes frustrated and humiliated with himself when he goes to the bazaar and does not buy her anything. He feels like he should have bought her something to show that he cares for her, but he still is too afraid to show his affection towards her.

Posted by: Matthew Weller at October 1, 2014 02:14 PM

Emily Finck
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
3 October 2014


Question #4:
In James Joyce’s short story “Araby,” enumerate the activities taking place at the Araby. To what extent do these activities sustain its “magical title”? Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.


Answer:
In the short story “Araby” by James Joyce, the activities of the Araby are nonexistent. Most of the stalls were closed, people were huddled around the few still open stalls, a few men were counting down their earnings, and a stall owner was talking to two young men.


None of these events seems to illuminate the “magical title” of the market. The feel of the market is so lackluster since the main character had to wait all day to go. In the story, it says he arrives at the market “ten minutes to ten” (Joyce 5). Hence, the closed stalls and how a few men were counting down their earnings. Also, as the main character walks up to a stall to examine the merchandise the stall owner barely notices him. When she does see him, she seems bothered to have to help him “her tone was not encouraging: she seemed to have spoken to me out of a sense of duty” (6). The owner of the stall would have used a much more light, and pleasant tone had the main character been to the market during business hours.

Posted by: Emily Finck at October 2, 2014 09:26 PM

Allison Ward/Rebecca Messano
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature
8 October 8, 2014

Question #13
In James Joyce’s short story “Araby” why is the protagonist angry at the end of the story and why do his eyes burn with anguish?

Answer
His eyes burned with anguish because when he went to the bazaar, he couldn’t find anything for the woman he loved. When he was at the bazaar, a woman running a stand asked if he wanted to buy anything. “The tone of her voice wasn’t encouraging; she seemed to have spoken to me out of a sense of ,”(Joyce 6) The lady didn’t seem willing to help him out, and the narrator seemed to freeze up when she spoke to him, so he got frustrated and gave up. It is a failed attempt at getting the “holy grail.”

Posted by: Allison Ward/Rebecca Messano at October 8, 2014 03:03 PM

Matt Weller
Martin Terrasi
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 201CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
8 October 2014

Question #8:
In James Joyce’s short story, “Araby,” what is the role of the narrator’s uncle in the story? What values and attitudes does he represent? Are they preferable to those of the narrator? Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer:
The narrator’s uncle plays the role of someone who is needed for financial help. The narrator needs his uncle to come home on time so that the narrator can catch the train. The uncle ends up not making it home at a reasonable time, and the narrator thinks that he is going to miss his chance to catch the train. Finally, the uncle makes it home at nine o’clock. The uncle forgot he was supposed to give the boy money for him to get onto the train. The uncle also plays the role of a guardian that tries to explain that one has to work for the things that they desire for. The uncle says to the boy, “all work and no play makes Jack a dull boy” (Joyce 5). He tries giving the boy a life lesson by saying these words. The narrator does not want to hear this lesson from his uncle, so he ends up leaving while the uncle tries to recite an old poem to him. All the boy wanted was for his uncle to give him money in time for him to board the train. He later learns that he did not “work” hard enough for the girl that he desired.

Posted by: Matthew Weller at October 8, 2014 03:15 PM

Zailet Martinez and Ashjan Alrashid
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL- Love and Desire in Literature
8 October 2014

Question #7:
In James Joyce’s short story, “Araby,” what purpose might the writer have had in choosing not to mention the object of the narrator’s affections until the middle of the third paragraph? Describe the context into which she is introduced. In what ways is she part of the world of North Richmond Street? Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer:
The purpose the narrator had in choosing not to mention the girl until the middle of the story is because he felt that it was his obligation to give us a background of his life. We needed to know about his life so we can begin to understand how different the girl is from everyone else. He wanted to introduce the environment before introducing the girl. When he describes his surroundings we can conclude that the narrator lives in a middle-class community, no one is rich or poor they just live comfortably. The girl is introduced as an exotic creature that does not belong where they are. “I kept her brown figure always in my eye,” we can see how this nameless girl was different (Joyce, 2). She had darker skin, and she was beautiful, and she infatuated the narrator. Also, the story makes it seem that she is older than the narrator and that maybe the reason she is like a fantasy to him, she is like something he knows he will never have. The way she is made to see makes her an outsider to the world of North Richmond Street. She is a gem in the narrator’s world, and she is so precious that at the end of the story the narrator realizes he will never be able to have possession of.

Posted by: Zailet Martinez and Ashjan Alrashid at October 8, 2014 05:31 PM

Shelby, Gaby, Ahmed
October 6th, 2014
ENG210 CA02


10) What is the search for the Holy Grail and how is it like the events of James Joyce’s short story, “Araby”? Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support that appears in your owns words.

The search of the Holy Grail is like the events of the short story, “Araby” written by James Joyce due to the fact that the girl he wants to win over isn’t seeing him the way he wants her to see him. He tries to win her over by getting her something from the bazaar that he had told his uncle all week he wanted to attend. “I lingered before her stall, thought I knew my state was useless, to make my interest in her wares seem the more real. Then I turned away slowly and walked down the middle of the bazaar. I allowed the two pennies to fall against the sixpence in my pocket. I heard a voice call from one end of the gallery that the light was out. The upper part of the hall was now completely dark. (36) He came to his senses and realized it wasn’t meant to be and decided to change his mind in getting her something.

Posted by: Shelby Rexroth at October 8, 2014 06:52 PM

Emily Finck and Irma Sera
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 210CL Love and Desire in Literature CA02
10 October 2014


Question #15
Fill in the gaps of your knowledge, and look up the word “epiphany,” if you do not know it. In James Joyce’s short story, “Araby,” where's the epiphany for the main character? What does the boy realize about himself? Is anything gained by the narrator through his frustration and humiliation? Use quoted passages from the text with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.


Answer:
An epiphany is a sudden insight or realization. The main character in James Joyce’s short story “Araby” experiences his epiphany towards the end of the story. He realizes that his idea of reality naïve, “Gazing into the darkness I saw myself as a creature driven and derided by vanity; and my eyes burned with anguish and fear” (6). The main character’s sudden realization is he is in over his head, out of his league, and misguided by adolescent lust. The main character learns that there is more to life than just looks and infatuation. Moreover, he sees that he was childish for offering to go the bazaar for a girl he knows little about.

Posted by: Emily Finck at October 9, 2014 11:14 PM

Sharonda S Byrd
Antonella Aviles
B. LEE HOBBS
ENG 210CL
8 October 2014
Araby
Question: 6. In James Joyce’s short story, “Araby,” define the narrator’s feelings for Mangan’s sister. To what extent is she the cause of those feelings? What, as they say, does he see in her?
Answer: The boy in the story is infatuated with his friend’s sister, he describes that when he hears this girls name it summons his foolish blood.The boys feelings for Mangan’s sister are defined as being a school boy crush for example, he offers to buy her a gift if she attends that bazar. When someone has feelings for someone they want to buy them nice things to keep their attention only on them. The girl does not do anything to cause the feelings that the narrator has for her. She goes on with her day to day life not even really noticing that the narrator has a crush on her. The narrator thinks that she is a beautiful girl, he describes her hair and her dress but he never says what he sees in her. The narrator feels lust towards her and not really lust, the narrator is portrayed as being a young boy and the girl is portrayed as being Mangan’s older sister so this is probably his first crush so he does not understand what he is feeling inside.

Posted by: sharonda byrd at October 11, 2014 07:34 PM

Emily Buckley
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
11 February 2015

Question: In James Joyce’s short story, “Araby,” why does the narrator want to go to the bazaar? Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: The narrator wants to go to the bazaar to bring back something for the girl he admires. He offered to bring her something because she said she wished she could go, but she could not.
“She asked me was I going to Araby... I would be a splendid bazaar; she said she would love to go…She could not go, she said, because there would be a retreat that week in her convent… ‘If I go,’ I said, ‘I will bring you something.’” (Joyce 3)

Posted by: Emily Buckley at February 11, 2015 12:18 PM

Selena Hammie
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing CA12
11 February 2015

“Araby”

Question #5: In James Joyce’s short story, “Araby,” What had the narrator expected to find at the Araby? What was the basis of his expectation?

The narrator expected to find enchantment and beauty at the Araby but was disappointed once they got there. Instead, all they found were cheap goods. The narrator went into one of the stalls that were still open a lady observed her “the young lady came over and asked me did I wish to buy anything. The tone of her voice was not encouraging; she seemed to have spoken me to me out of a sense of duty.” (Joyce paragraph 33)

Posted by: Selena Hammie at February 11, 2015 02:39 PM

Kathleen Sholl
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA 12
11 February 15

“Araby” Discussion Question

Question 12: In James Joyce’s short story, “Araby,” why does the dialogue the narrator overhears at the bazaar trigger the climax of the story and the insight described in the final paragraph.

Answer: In the short story called “Araby,” the dialogue the narrator overhears at the bazaar ultimately triggers the climax of the story. The young boy who was searching for something to bring back to the girl he admired encountered a worker whose, “tone of her voice was not encouraging; she seemed to have spoken to me out of a sense of duty” (Joyce 6). When the narrator walked into the bazaar, the worker was talking to a group of men who said to her “O, there’s a…fib” (Joyce 6). The young boy felt that his “stay was useless” (Joyce 6). It was then that the boys “eyes burned with anguish and fear” (Joyce 6) because he realized that he does not have enough money to purchase the girl a gift.

Posted by: Kathleen Sholl at February 11, 2015 06:22 PM

Mallory Delay
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
12 February 2015

Question 3: In James Joyce's short story, "Araby" what doesn't the narrator buy anything for Mangan's sister? Use quotes passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in tour own words.

Answer: The narrator does not buy anything for Mangan's sister because he is intimidated by the young lady who works the stall. He wants to purchase a beautiful vase or tea set but when he interrupts her conversation with the two men, "the tone of her voice was not encouraging" (Joyce 6) Mangan's sister is older than the narrator is as is the lady of the stall. Her looking down at him makes him feel like Mangan's sister would do the same. When the narrator mentions, "I lingered before her stall, though I knew my stay was useless" the same could be said for his crush on his friend's sister. He would never find a way to her he was really interested.

Posted by: Mallory Delay at February 12, 2015 07:46 PM

Charis Lavoie
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
13 February 2015

Question 2: In James Joyce’s short story, “Araby,” why does the narrator arrive so late? Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.
Answer: The narrator arrived so late do to his uncle forgetting that he had wished to go to the Araby (Joyce 5).

Posted by: Charis Lavoie at February 12, 2015 08:37 PM

Amber Dunlap
Dr.Hobbs
ENG Academic Writing II CA12
13 February 2015

Question 13:
In james joyce's short story why is the protagonist angry at the end of the story and why do his eyes burn?
Answer:
Towards the end of the story the protagonist comes to know what he is and what he should not have done. He realizes that with his little money, he cannot buy anything for her. It was his vanity when he promised to bring something for her. This is the sense of reality that makes his eyes begin burn with anguish and anger.

Posted by: Amber Dunlap at February 12, 2015 11:13 PM

Aderias Ewing
Dr. Hobbs
Academic Writing 2
12 February 2015

Question 11: In James Joyce’s short story, “Araby,”how do the physical conditions where the narrator lives influence or develop his character?

To him, Araby is the romantic, exotic somewhere where a boy’s dream of Fair women is realized. His experiences at the fair are much more like Joyce’s own reality and every man’s non-romantic, frustrating, and only partially realized, if at all. Say’s here in the story pg3 that “I did not know whether I would ever speak to her or not or, if I spoke to her, how I could tell her of my confused adoration. However, my body was like a harp and her words and gestures were like fingers running upon the wires.”

Posted by: aderias ewing at February 12, 2015 11:27 PM

Alison Colon
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 122 CA02
12 February 2015

Question 12. James Joyce’s short story, “Araby,” why does the dialogue the narrator overhears at the bazaar trigger the climax of the story and the insight described in the final paragraph?

Answer: The conversation overheard at the bazaar triggered the climax as well as the insight because his dreams and idea of the bazaar that he had been yearning to go to for so long had been crushed. He realized that it wasn’t all that he hoped it to be. He states that he feels the lady only spoke to him “out of duty” (Joyce 6) and you can tell by that statement that he felt he deserved better then that. Majority of the stalls were closed, and the items in which he did see he was not interested in or even want to pay mind to as stated in the text he says “ I lingered before her stall, though I knew my stay was useless, to make my interest in her wares seem the more real”. He was so eager to come to the bazaar and get something for the girl in which he was interested in but he soon realized that he had the wrong idea. Not only was the place not as expected but neither was the sister. He was chasing the idea of the girl and getting this gift that was going to impress her but the simple and meaningless conversation in which the lady was having showed the girl of his dreams in a different light. He also made a misjudgment of what the bazaar would be like , he had such high expectations that were let down. He had let his emotions get the best of him and had spent his time infatuated with the idea of Mangan’s sister rather then actually knowing her. He states, “he was a creature driven and derived by vanity”(Joyce 6). The conversation triggered him to think about what he was really after and the vanity and such high expectations that were involved The narrator was more interested in the beauty of the sister (the pedestal that he put her on) rather then actually knowing her and the idea of impressing her rather then realizing he was getting so carried away. It started with him wanting to impress this girl and get her something and turned into him realizing that the girl he idolized was nothing more then just a girl. All the effort he put towards going to the bazaar was meaningless. The idea of the sister and all the emotions towards it were misleading. The narrator expected everything to be so complex and beautiful and overhearing that idle conversation triggered the realization of what it really was which in turn caused him to feel disappointed and fearful of what he had become while going through all of this. He basically was more involved for the appearance and vanity of it all .

Posted by: Alison Colon at February 13, 2015 12:21 AM

Vallinique Martin
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
12 February 2015

Question: Where’s the ephiany for the main character? What does the boy realize about himself? Is anything gained by the narrator through his frustration and humiliation?

Answer: The boy's epiphany is when he is forced to understand the difference between from romance and reality. The boy than begins to see himself clearly, causing him to realize that the feelings he thought he had for Mangan's sister were just a figment of his imagination. After hearing the three people chatting is when the boy realizes his feelings for Mangan sister were foolish all along. “I remarked their English accents and listened vaguely to their conversation.” 'O, I never said such a thing!'
'O, but you did!'
'O, but I didn't!'
'Didn't she say that?'
'Yes. I heard her.'
'O, there's a... fib!'”. (Joyce 6) The conversation connected the boy back to the event of the bazaar. The narrators frustrations only leads him to believe that he will never be able to satisfy his desires. "Gazing up into the darkness I saw myself as a creature driven and derided by vanity; and my eyes burned with anguish and anger." (Joyce 6)

Posted by: Vallinique Martin at February 13, 2015 01:16 AM

Rachel Addington
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
12 February 2015

Question: In James Joyce’s short story, “Araby,” what might be the symbolic meanings of both the deserted train and dark bazaar”?

Answer: The deserted train is a symbol in the story Araby. It's a symbol because it represents the gloom, disappointment, and loneliness he's going to be stuck with in the end. The desertedness of the train, it's delay, and slowness all represent the disappointment that the boy will face. "I took my seat in a third class carriage of a deserted train. After an intolerable delay the train moved out of the station slowly."(Pg.5) The dark bazaar symbolizes the narrators ignorance. "At Westland row station a crowd of people pressed to the carriage doors; but the porters moved them back, saying that it was the special train for the bazaar. I remained alone in the bare carriage."(Pg.5) He says that he'll buy the girl something but he doesn't know he doesn't have enough money. This is why the bazaar shows his ignorance. The darkness of the bazaar is also a symbol it symbolizes the bitter realities of life such as him being immature and inexperienced and does not know anything about the power of money.

Posted by: rachel addington at February 13, 2015 02:13 AM

Emma Riemer
Dr.Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing 2
13 February 2015

Araby

Question 7: In James Joyce’s short story, “Araby,” what purpose might the writer have had in choosing not to mention the object of the narrator’s affections until the middle of the third paragraph? Describe the context into which she is introduced. In what ways is she part of the world of North Richmond Street?

Answer: The affections of the narrator are not mentioned until the middle of paragraph three in order to give context to the situation and describe the setting. She is introduced as the speaker’s friend’s sister and the speaker tells of all the times he sees her. He barely knows her but he thinks about her all the time. She is part of the world of North Richmond Street because she is a part of his everyday life, something that he will continue to encounter.

Posted by: Emma Riemer at February 13, 2015 03:33 AM

Victoria Markou
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA 12
12 February 2015

Question 8: In James Joyce’s short story, “Araby,” what is the role of the narrator’s uncle in the story? What values and attitudes does he represent? Are they preferable to those of the narrator?

Answer: The narrator was observing his uncle “fussing at the hall-stand, looking for the hat-brush, “thinking that he was unorganized and in a rush (Joyce 4). He waited impatiently for his uncle to come home, he “sat staring at the clock for some time,” hinting that his uncle is forgetful and that he is not his top priority (Joyce 4). “The meal was prolonged beyond an hour and still my uncle did not come,” the narrator impatiently waited for his uncle who promised to give him money for the Bazaar (Joyce 4). When his uncle finally arrives, he tries to convince him not to go, “the people are in bed and after their first sleep now.” (Joyce 5). His wife finally convinces him to let him go since he’s waited long enough. “All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy,” the uncle justifies his stance but gives in (Joyce 5). The narrator says, “I told him a second time,” again showing the uncle’s forgetfulness (Joyce 5). The narrator respects his uncle as a parental figure but doesn’t prefer his forgetfulness and how he isn’t put as a priority over his work.

Posted by: Victoria Markou at February 13, 2015 09:00 AM

Rously Paul
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA12
13 February 2015

Question: . In James Joyce’s short story, “Araby,” define the narrator’s feelings for Mangan’s sister. To what extent is she the cause of those feelings? What, as they say, does he see in her?

The narrators’ love for Mangan’s sister is that of a love for the variety of the bazaars of Arabia his sense of adventure and wanderlust has taken over his attractions; this shows true when the narrator has an epiphany about the source of his feelings and realizes he only covets her as a trophy rather than legitimate romance. When the narrator says: “Gazing up into the darkness I saw myself as a creature driven and derided by vanity, and my eyes burned with anguish and fear.” His vanity becomes apparent to even himself and chooses to pursue no longer.

Posted by: Rously Paul at February 13, 2015 09:19 AM

Jan Urbaniak
Dr. Hobbs
ENG122 Academic Writing 2 CA12
13 February 2015
Question: 4. In James Joyce’s short story, “Araby,” enumerate the activities taking place at Araby. To what extent do these activities sustain its “magical name”? Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.
Answer: 1) People are talking to each other. “Remembering with difficulty why I had come, I went over to one of the stalls and examined porcelain vases and flowered tea-sets. At the door of the stall a young lady was talking and laughing with two young gentlemen. I remarked their English accents and listened vaguely to their conversation.” (6 James). 2) People were fighting for their caps. “. She could not go, she said, because there would be a retreat that week in her convent. Her brother and two other boys were fighting for their caps, and I was alone at the railings.” (6 James).

Posted by: Jan Urbaniak at February 13, 2015 09:58 AM

Zeida Alvarez
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG122 Academic Writing II CA03
23 September 2015

Question: In James Joyce’s short story, “Araby,” what purpose might the writer have had in choosing not to mention the object of the narrator’s affections until the middle of the third paragraph? Describe the context into which she is introduced. In what ways is she part of the world of North Richmond Street? Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: James Joyce’s did not mention, Mangan’s sister, until the middle of the third paragraph, to allow the setting of a dark, dull street to be developed. “The other houses of the street, conscious of decent lives within them, gazed at one another with brown imperturbable faces” (Joyce, 1). Once Mangan’s sister is introduced, she is seen as the “friend’s hot sister” since the boys would stare at her when she would call Mangan in for tea. “…we watched her from our shadow peer up and down the street. We waited to see whether she would remain or go in and, if she remained, we left our shadow and walked up to Mangan’s steps resignedly” (Joyce, 2). Mangan’s sister is seen as the “light” on North Richmond Street by the narrator, since he is, in a sense, obsessed with the idea of her. He explains the way the light always touches her and highlights different parts of her body, “The light from the lamp opposite our door caught the white curve of her neck, lit up her hair that rested there, and falling, lit up the hand upon the railing” (Joyce, 3).

Posted by: Zeida Alvarez at September 24, 2015 01:30 PM

Emma Duncan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
24 September 2015

Question 5: In James Joyce’s short story, “Araby”, what had the narrator expected to find at Araby? What was the basis of his expectation?
Answer: The narrator had high expectations for what he would find at Araby. It has a lot to do with the search that he felt he was given by Mangan’s sister. He was so focused on the task he could barely focus. The narrator says, “I wished to annihilate the tedious intervening days. I chafed against the work of school” (Joyce, 3). Because the narrator views the bazaar with the same romantic illusion, if you will, as he views his relationship with Mangan’s sister it shows his expectations are high. The reality when he gets there is upsetting. It also brings the narrator to see the truth of his relationship with Mangan’s sister.

Posted by: Emma Duncan at September 24, 2015 07:44 PM

Alexis Clayton
Doctor Hobbs
Academic Writing 11 CA03
24 September 2015

Question 1: In James Joyce’s short story, “Araby,” why does the narrator want to go to the bazaar?

Answer: The narrator wants to go to bazaar because he said he would buy his crush a present. She is a crush by when Joyce wrote, " At last she spoke to me. When she addressed the first words to me I was so confused that I did not know what to answer." He was eager to go and get it for her to impress her. For example he said, "If I go,’ I said, ‘I will bring you something." This is why the narrator wanted to go to the Bazaar so bad.

Posted by: Alexis Clayon at September 24, 2015 08:37 PM

Lady Hernandez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
23 September 2015

Question: What is the role of the narrator’s uncle in the story? What values and attitudes does he represent? Are they preferable to those of the narrator?

Answer: The unnamed narrator fell in love with a girl and wishes to surprise her with a gift. He lives with his aunt and uncle and they are suffering economically and his uncle is not understanding why he must go to Araby to buy a gift and why he is worried about a girl rather than helping his family. They treat the narrator as a distant family member and not as a son. The uncle was able to give the narrator some money but it was not enough for the gift he wanted or could find by the time he arrived at the shopping plaza.

Posted by: lady hernandez at September 24, 2015 09:18 PM

Johnny Nguyen
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 CA03
24 September 2015

Question: In James Joyce’s short story, “Araby,” why does the narrator want to go to the bazaar? Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.
Answer: The narrator cannot wait to go to the Araby bazzar because he wanted to procure for his beloved some grand gift that will endear him to the girl. the bazaar. In the story, it quotes “She asked me was I going to Araby. I forgot whether I answered yes or no. It would be a splendid bazaar; she said she would love to go” (Page 3) and then says ‘If I go,’ I said, ‘I will bring you something.’ I asked for leave to go to the bazaar on Saturday night. My aunt was surprised, and hoped it was not some Freemason affair. (Page 4)

Posted by: Johnny Nguyen at September 24, 2015 11:19 PM

Catalina Suarez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
25 September 2015

Question #10: What is the search for the Holy Grail and how is it like the events of James Joyce’s short story, “Araby”?
Answer: When the boy talks to the girl, states how much she wishes to go to the Araby. He promised her that he’ll go and bring something back. I feel like this can relate his trip to the Araby as him going to a holy crusade as a knight that is in search of the ‘Holy Grail’ by him going there for the girl whom he really adores and is getting something for her to prove his adoration while the knight is getting the Holy Grail for his loyalty to his religion. “‘If I go,’ I said, ‘I will bring you something.’ What innumerable follies laid waste my waking and sleeping thoughts after that evening! I wished to annihilate the tedious intervening days. I chafed against the work of school. At night in my bedroom and by day in the classroom her image came between me and the page I strove to read. The syllables of the word Araby were called to me through the silence in which my soul luxuriated and cast an Eastern enchantment over me.” (Joyce, 3). It also shows how desperate the boy is to accomplish his goal.

Posted by: Catalina Suarez at September 25, 2015 02:01 AM

Lois Martinez
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
24 September 2015


Question: In James Joyce’s short story, “Araby,” why does the dialogue the narrator overhears at the bazaar trigger the climax of the story and the insight described in the final paragraph?


Answer: The conversation that the protagonist in the story overheard was an important psychological factor that triggered previous feelings of self-consciousness in the character. Throughout the story we learn the struggle that the boy has to face; he did not have the courage to talk to the girl who he liked. All he did was stalk her and wish that one day he could talk to her. Towards the dénouement, the character finally talks to her and promises her that he will bring something to her if he goes. The rising action becomes clearer with the details in the section where the boy is waiting for his uncle, but he did not arrive on time. Joyce emphasizes the importance and worth of this trip with the line, "Remembering with difficulty why I had come, I went over to one of the stalls and examined porcelain vases and flowered tea-sets (Joyce 6)." This trip was essential for the character's relationship's development with the sister of his friend, for he will have a reason to return to her. However, when he talked to the owner of the story, she seemed unmotivated and rude; as a consequence, he loses his courage to buy something for the girl. At this point of the story the conflict becomes man versus self.

Posted by: Lois Martinez at September 25, 2015 02:33 AM

Zachary Pottle
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA03
25 September 2015

Question:

In James Joyce’s short story, “Araby,” what doesn’t the narrator buy anything for Mangan’s sister?

Answer:

In James Joyce's "Araby" the narrator decides to buy something for Mangan's sister. When the narrator goes to the bazaar to buy something for her. It becomes unclear what the narrator wanted to buy. As the narrator states, "I went over to one of the stalls and examined porcelain vases and flowered tea-sets" (Joyce 6). The narrator never ends up buying anything for the sister, but went to the bazaar to look for something.

Posted by: zachary Pottle at September 25, 2015 02:55 AM

Jaclyn Taylor
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing CA03
24 September 2015

Question 4: In James Joyce’s short story, “Araby,” enumerate the activities taking place at Araby. To what extent do these activities sustain its “magical name”?

Answer: Not much was seen at the Araby because he had come so late and only a few of the stalls, which held products of what the owners or sellers had made for people to come out and buy. There was much more than meets the eye towards the end due to its abrupt ending with the fear and anguish that burned in his eye.

Posted by: Jaclyn Taylor at September 25, 2015 08:40 AM

Matthew Beebe
Dr. B. Lee. Hobbs
ENG122 Academic Writing II CAO3
September 25, 2015

Question: In James Joyce’s short story, “Araby,” define the narrator’s feelings for Mangan’s sister. To what extent is she the cause of those feelings? What, as they say, does he see in her? Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: It is clear that the narrator is only interested what his fevered romantic imaginings make her. The fact that she was never given a name in the story but is able to develop feelings for the character clearly shows that he attracted to her. “Her brother always teased her before he obeyed, and I stood by the railings looking at her. Her dress swung as she moved her body, and the soft rope of her hair tossed from side to side” (Joyce 2). This is an example of complimenting her all the time without even knowing her name.

Posted by: Matthew Beebe at September 25, 2015 09:36 AM

Jennifer Belcastro
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122-Academic Writing II CA06
10 February 2016

Question: In James Joyce’s short story, “Araby,” why does the narrator arrive so late?

Answer: The narrator comes home so late because their uncle just was getting home or Mangan’s sister called for him to get home. The narrator states that “If my uncle was seen [ . . . ] we hid in the shadow until we had seen him safely housed” (Joyce 2). The narrator would wait until their uncle was home because they did not want to get in trouble by him. The narrator also states if “Mangan’s sister came out on the doorstep to call her brother in [ . . . ] we waited to see whether she would remain or go in” (2). The narrator and Mangan would wait to see if the sister would leave because they did not want to go home.

Posted by: Jennifer Belcastro at February 9, 2016 11:59 AM

Randawnique Coakley
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 121 Academic Writing II CA 06
9 January 2016

Question: In James Joyce’s short story, “Araby,” what purpose might the writer have had in choosing not to mention the object of the narrator’s affections until the middle of the third paragraph? Describe the context into which she is introduced. In what ways is she part of the world of North Richmond Street? Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: In the first two paragraphs of the short story, "Araby", by James Joyce, Joyce creates a setting that intrigues the reader. The first thing the reader learns about the street the narrator lives on is that is "blind (1)." Blind suggests without sight and with some form of direction, and by describing the street as blind, Joyce strikes the reader. Then, the author continues to describe "an uninhabited house of two storeys stood at the blind end, detached from its neighbors in a square ground. The other houses of the street, conscious of decent lives within them," The house being separated from the other neighbors suggests isolation. Also, the fact that the priest died in the house creates an eerie and odd feeling. From this description of where he lives and the setting exuding blindness, isolation, and eeriness, the narrator seems to have no sense of direction or purpose and distant from the world. This setting also keeps the reader in suspense wondering what and how the narrator will go through this story. However, this intrigue is soon put to rest when the reader is introduced to the narrator's affections in the third paragraph. Mangan's, the narrator's friend, sister is revealed to be the narrator's interests. And Joyce describes her as "she was waiting for us, her figure defined by the light from the half-opened door (3)." Joyce's use of the word, "light" suggests hope and purpose. And by using light to describe her essence implies that the narrator, who once was lost, has found an interest and direction. This suggests that Mangan's sister's presence on the street for the narrator is the saving grace and light in his path of darkness, which even hints at religious implications. Therefore, Joyce painted this setting skillfully to illustrate to the reader that the narrator, who in the first two paragraph was surrounded by a dark, isolated, and creepy atmosphere, has found direction in his friend's sister.

Posted by: Randawnique Coakley at February 9, 2016 07:30 PM

Vincia Mitchell
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing 11 CA06
8 February 2016
Question: Find patterns I\in James Joyce’s short story, “Araby” that show relevance to “light”, “vision,” and “beauty” Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: In James Joyce’s short story, “Araby”, both light and vision are related, or it is safe to say that without light, human’s ability to discover things or gather information would be hopeless. This is evident in the story as the light in the kitchen extends its borders to the streets, which allows the narrator and his fellow colleagues to discover that the narrator’s Uncle is approaching the area, and they hid (Joyce 2). At another point in the story, light was used to reveal Mangan’s sister’s figure, whom the narrator admires deeply (2). It is also clear to the reader that Mangan’s sister’s beauty causes the narrator to be speechless and confused, which results in the narrator’s inability to tell her that he adores her (3). Therefore, without light, the narrator would not be able to see Mangan’s sister’s beauty, and he would not be able to hide when his Uncle is approaching the area.

Posted by: Vincia Mitchell at February 9, 2016 09:02 PM

Nastassja Sielchan
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA06
9 February 2016

Question: In James Joyce’s short story, “Araby,” what doesn’t the narrator buy anything for Mangan’s sister?

Answer: The narrator did not buy anything for Mangan’s sister because he realized that he is only there for her and not for himself. He knew that she always wanted to go to Araby and after only talking to the narrator for a few moments she was able to indirectly convince the narrator to go and get her something. The narrator realizes at the end, “Gazing up into the darkness I saw myself as a creature driven and derided by vanity; and my eyes burned with anguish and fear” (Joyce 6).

Posted by: Nastassja Sielchan at February 9, 2016 09:23 PM

Hannah Rowe
Dr. Hobbs
English 122 Academic Writing II CAO6
9 February 2016

“Araby”

Q: In James Joyce’s short story, “Araby,” where’s the epiphany for the main character? What does the boy realize about himself? Does the narrator through his frustration and humiliation gain anything?

A: The epiphany for the main character happens at the end of the story when he is racing to the bazzar to buy his love a gift. Instead of being a positive epiphany, it is a negative one in that he decides to give up on his infatuation for this girl, and just to go home to his routine boring lifestyle. As he is going to leave, he admits he “saw myself as a creature driven and derided by vanity”(Joyce 6) meaning he feels foolish for being so absorbed in this fantasy of having this girl. The narrator does not gain anything because he is bitter about his “failure” and quitting is not the way to solve anything. Just because his night did not go as he is planning does not mean everything went wrong between him and that girl, but now he has given up.

Posted by: Hannah Rowe at February 9, 2016 09:40 PM

Clark de Bullet
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA06
10 February 2016

Araby

Question #11: In James Joyce’s short story, “Araby,” how do the physical conditions where the narrator lives influence or develop his character?

Answer: The house the boy lives in, the previous man, a priest, had died (1). The dead priest can be linked to the development of the boy. A priest, devoted to his love of the church but ends up dying alone. The boy, devoted in love to Mangan’s sister, and ends up alone. They both lived in the same house, separated from the others (1). They both look back on their lives and think of a better use of their time. “Gazing up into the darkness I saw myself as a creature driven and derided by vanity; and my eyes burned with anguish and fear,” the boy says at the end of the story (6). The boy develops more sense by the end of the story and learns the consequences of letting something consume your mind.

Posted by: Clark de Bullet at February 10, 2016 12:55 PM

Matt Scharr
Dr. Hobbs
English 122 CA06 Academic Writing II
10 February 2016

Question 5.) What does the Narrator expect to find at the Araby?
Answer: The narrator expects to find something sacred or valuable to purchase. The narrator writes, “…fearing that the bazaar would be closed, I passed in quickly” (Pg. 5) The aunt pleas for the boy to be given money so he can go because it has already gotten late. She too is worried that the boy may not make it to the Araby in time.

Posted by: Matt Scharr at February 10, 2016 02:11 PM

Phillip Moss
English 122 Academic Writing II CAO6
Dr. Hobbs
10 February 2016

Question: In James Joyce’s short story, “Araby,”define the narrator’s feelings for Mangan’s sister. To what extent is she the cause of those feelings? What, as they say, does he see in her? Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.


Answer: The narrator obviously has a “crush” on Mangans sister. He speaks highly of her and claims that her image accompanies him. “Her image accompanied me even in places the most hostile to romance” (Joyce 5) The narrator describes her vividly and claims that he spends a good amount of his time looking for her.

Posted by: Phillip Moss at February 10, 2016 02:20 PM

Justin Robinson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing II CA06
10 February 2016

Question: 6.) In James Joyce’s short story, “Araby,” define the narrator’s feelings for Mangan’s sister. To what extent is she the cause of those feelings? What, as they say, does he see in her? Use quoted passages from the text (with page numbers in parentheses) to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

Answer: 6.) The narrators feelings for Mangan’s sister are very strong he has deep love and respect for her and like a young boy with a huge crush, he was mesmerized by the look of her, as he said, “When she came out on the doorstep my heart leaped” (Joyce, 2). Although he had never talked to her he was still in love with her, even the thought of her. The reason he has these feelings for her is because of her looks, he says how “her figure defined by the light from the half-opened door” (Joyce,2) describing the way she looks after that by a brown figure. What he sees in her is her hair, her dress and her figure.

Posted by: Justin Robinson at February 10, 2016 02:27 PM

Allison Cobb

Dr. Hobbs

ENG 122 CA06

10 February 2016



Question: In Joyce’s short story, why doesn’t the narrator buy anything for Mangan’s sister?




Answer: The narrator appears to be overwhelmed by the time he gets to bazarr. He is confused, shown when Joyce writes “remembering with quite difficulty why I had come” (Joyce 6). It is late at night and the narrator was frustrated by the train and his family. He has also sought out Mangan’s sister for a long time, watching her and following her but never actually developing any sort of relationship with her. In the end, he realized that buying her something would be useless. He’s rather upset about this, as told by the last line where Joyce writes “my eyes burned with anguish and fear” (Joyce 6).

Posted by: Allison Cobb at February 10, 2016 02:34 PM

Chloe Lelliott
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 122 Academic Writing 2 CA06
11 February 2016

Question 8)In James Joyce's short story, "Araby" what is the role of the narrators uncle in the story? What values and attitudes does he present? Are they preferable to those of the narrator?

Answer 8) In the Story, the narrator lives with his Auntie and Uncle. His Auntie appears to be caring and kind however, his uncle seems to be less caring and forgetful. During the story, the narrator wishes to go to Araby. He tells his uncle this, who is going to give him the money to go. On the day of Araby, the narrator waits at home for his uncle to arrive so he can give him the money to go, however he waits hours on end. Eventually when his uncle gets home, he has forgotten all about it and the narrator has to remind him.

This shows us that the uncle is somewhat forgetful and does not have the narrators best interest's at heart like the Auntie does, which you can tell when she says to the uncle "Can you give him the money and let him go? You've kept him late enough at it is". However you can tell the uncle still cares for him when he is apologetic for forgetting.

Posted by: Chloe Lelliott at February 11, 2016 01:27 PM

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