« Scholarly Articles: What Are They & How Are They Found? | Main | Why are ‘Examples’ Important as a Writing Strategy? »

September 15, 2008

The Angst in *The Aeneid* - Virgil's Latin Epic


Image Source: http://aura.gaia.com/photos/4/38690/large/Virgil004s.jpg

10 September 2008

ENG 225 Students,

Please find below . . .

. . . our ongoing course material for our coverage of Virgil's The Aeneid.

For the time being, please find the questions from the in-class reading check. As mentioned in class, you should be logging these questions (collecting them in your journal) as ANYTHING discussed in class or assigned for out-of-class is fair game for the mid-term and final examinations.

More to follow soon. In the meantime, enjoy this "History Channel" version of the Aeneid in less than two-minutes...animated, no less:

Also, here is a brief, one-minute biography of Virgil, author of The Aeneid:

1. Discuss briefly what takes place in Book I of The Aeneid, a section called the “Prologue.” What is happening? What is going on? What is being introduced?, etc.

2. Discuss briefly what takes place in Book II of The Aeneid, a section called “How They Took the City.” Specify characters and plot details.

3. Discuss briefly what takes place in Book IV of The Aeneid, a section called “The Passion of the Queen.” Specify characters and plot details.

4. Who wrote The Aeneid and from what time period (roughly) did the author write?

5. The Aeneid is translated into English from what original language?

6. Briefly describe Aneas: Who is Aneas? What is Aneas’s background? Why is Aneas “famous”?, etc.

7. Briefly describe Dido: Who is Dido? What is Dido’s background? Why is Dido “famous”?, etc.

8. There are several conflicts in The Aeneid. Identify and explain one primary conflict.

9. Think about the model of the monomyth. Aneas has several “tests” and tribulations along his “road of trials.” Identify and explain one of Aneas’s “trials.”

10. In the hero’s journey model, all heros “depart” from somewhere (their ordinary world) as they begin their adventure in a “special world.” Identify and explain the ordinary world of Aneas.

11. In the hero’s journey model, all heros “depart” from somewhere (their ordinary world) as they begin their adventure in a “special world.” Identify and explain the special world of Aneas.

12. From our past two lectures and the information I repeated on the English-blog, who is credited with authorship of the “hero’s journey” or the “monomyth” model?

From September 17th, here are The Aeneid Book VI: “Aeneas in the Underworld” Reading-Check Questions:

1. Why does Aeneas lead his fleet to Cumae?

2. What does Deiphobe—who is possessed by Apollo—prophesy about Aeneas and the Trojans in Italy?

3. What does the sibyl tell Aeneas that he must to enter the underworld?

4. Explain the role of the two doves in the story—who sent them and why?

5. When Aeneas meets Dido in the underworld, what form is she in? How is she different from Aeneas?

6. Explain what kind of people live in the underworld in The Aeneid.

You don't have to post your answers to the questions from the 17th on the blog. Take a break. Catch up on your readings. Get that first draft ready for our upcoming, in-class, peer-review session.

We did look at the following film clips in class, however, if you missed that meeting. Here's a YouTube film clip from Monty Python and the Holy Grail (1975), a spoof on the British legend of King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table, obviously, a story set in times much later than the period proposed for Virgil's The Aeneid. However, in this scene, the Monty Python comedy troupe spoofs the Greek's "Trojan Horse" weapon-of-mass-deception with their own "Wooden Rabbit" (and later, a Wooden Badger) to enter a French castle:

We also discussed the significance of the subject in this sculpture (Laocoön and his sons) and our readings. Would you be prepared to answer questions about it on our mid-term exam?


Image Source: http://www.astrozenith.com/BAR_lacoon_05.jpg

Since we have discussed different ways to "approach" works of literature, especially for a written analysis as you will do for your upcoming paper, I brought in one more option--an option that will always require more scholarly research but open to you nonetheless if you can tie it in to your own ideas about the work. Previously, you have been given an overview of the tools and language of Formalism and New Criticism to discuss a work of literature for what it is--a work of art with pieces and parts that can be identified and analyzed on their own. We have been using this in class in our in-class discussions. I also spent quite a bit of time with you explaining a Structuralist approach, particularly the Mythological approach of Joseph Campbell, which also has great leanings into the Psychological theories of Carl Jung, Otto Rank, and others. Below is an example of a historical approach, particularly the new historical approach, where some element of the story is examined in context. In this case, important dates and names of rulers aren't really the important things (the old historical approach), but rather the way people lived and the way people did things in those times might lend a new way to understand a particular text from a particular period. The History Channel excerpt below, also embedded from YouTube, explains new theories on the historical possibility--or, at least influence--of the Trojan Horse concept found in Greek and Roman epics:

19 September 2008

Next is an experiment to see if any of you are really reading what I take the time to post on the blog before and after each class meeting. The following twelve questions will be on today's reading check. You will be asked to answer three of them. As usuay, readings checks are pass/fail and recorded on turnitin.com as either a "1" (pass) or a "0" (fail) and count toward your final grade for the couse (see our syllabus). To get a pass, you must get a majority of the questions correct so, in this case, 2/3 correct (or better) equals a pass.

From Book VIII of Virgil’s The Aeneid, “The Shield of Aeneas.”

1. Who was the gleaming goddess that “came down amid high clouds […] Bearing her gifts”? (line 1)
2. Identify the mother of Aeneas. (summary)
3. Venus, known first to the Greeks as “Aphrodite,” was the goddess of love. Who was her consort?—hint: he was the god of fire. (summary, lines 5-7 and lines 24-29)
4. What gift did the god Vulcan create for his spouse Venus to give to Aeneas? (lines 6-7, 22-23)
5. Identify each of “the gifts [Venus] promised” to Aeneas that were “Forged to protection by [her] husband’s craft”? (lines 6 and lines 22-23)
6. One of the presents Aeneas received was a “cuirass of hard-bronze, blood-red and huge—Like a dark cloud burning with sunset light.” (lines 19-20). Explain what a cuirass is.
7. Although Virgil’s Aeneid is about events in his own distant past, he does manage to make allusions to his own time period (e.g., Augustus Caesar and Agrippa) and works them into the story. What device does he employ to do this—in other words, how did he do it?
8. According to the book summary, on Aeneas’s shield was carved “a representation of the future glories of Rome.” Name just ONE of those future glories mentioned in Book VIII. (line 23 to the end of the book)
9. Of what significance were “the twin boys” who nursed from a “mother wolf, lying in Mars’ green grotto”? In other words, who were they and what was their destiny? (Line 30 and footnote 8)
10. On the “upper quarter” of Aeneas’s shield was a depiction of Manlius’s battle with the Gauls. The “Gauls” are vividly described in Book VIII. Describe specifically the physical appearance of the Gauls. (Line 65 and footnote 5)
11. Looking into the future, Aeneas sees on his gift a scene of Apollo pulling his bow. While Apollo is doing this, what do the Egyptians, Indians, Arabians, and Sabaens do? (lines 128-131)
12. Although Aeneas knew “nothing of the events” on his gift, what emotion did he feel as a result of seeing them? (lines 163-165)

In-Class Discussion Questions about Virgil’s The Aeneid

1. Recall when Aeneas descended into the underworld. Using what you know now about the monomyth, speculate on what stage of the hero’s journey best describes this stage of Aeneas’s journey. Be prepared to explain why and any other areas of the story that might seem to fit into the same stage.
2. Recall when Aeneas receives the presents from Venus, which were made by Vulcan. Using what you know now about the monomyth, speculate on what stage of the hero’s journey best describes this stage of Aeneas’s journey. Be prepared to explain why and any other areas of the story that might seem to fit into the same stage.
3. Recall that Aeneas came originally from Troy. Using what you know now about the monomyth, speculate on what world in the hero’s journey best describes this particular location in Aeneas’s journey. Be prepared to explain why and any other areas of the story that might seem to fit into the same stage.
4. Recall that Aeneas hometown, Troy, is burned and he must leave. This is a tragic change for him. Using what you know now about the monomyth, speculate on what stage of the hero’s journey best describes this part of Aeneas’s journey. Be prepared to explain why and any other areas of the story that might seem to fit into the same stage.
5. Understand that ultimately, Aeneas fulfills his own destiny. That is, he “restores” his people from a state of disgrace. They have fallen but he brings them back into fame by founding Rome, another great empire even more famous than Troy was. Recall when Aeneas descended into the underworld. Using what you know now about the monomyth, speculate on what stage of the hero’s journey best describes this part of Aeneas’s journey. Be prepared to explain why and any other areas of the story that might seem to fit into the same stage.
6. Why is it significant that the “chosen” ancestors of the Romans, according to the legend created by Virgil, were the Trojans? Why not the “Greeks”? Weren’t they the ones who even created the Wooden Horse? Why not the Indians, the Egyptians, Arabians, or Sabaens?
7. Aeneas was the ancestor of Romulus and Remus, two children who were raised by a wolf. Knowing what you know about the Roman empire, why might this have been significant to the Romans sense of pride, patriotism, and national identity? What does it say about their personality?
8. Sure, the gods made Aeneas shield, but what was the larger significance of Aeneas’s shield. Why was it an important gift. Hint: Think of what it “did.” What psychological role would that play for Aeneas?
9. In an earlier class meeting, we compared the tales of Noah and Utnapishtim. Now, compare Ishtar, a character in The Epic of Gilgamesh and Venus/Aphrodite, a character in The Aeneid. Are they synonymous counterparts? Or, are they different? Explain in detail.
10. We have discussed the role of women in the various epics we have read thus far: The Epic of Gilgamesh, Noah’s Flood, and Medea. What role(s) do women play in The Aeneid. Are they minor or significant characters? Do they have speaking roles? How are “common” women (not Goddesses) represented? If they are noticeably absent, what does this suggest about Virgil and the “intended audience” of Virgil, i.e. his readers? Be prepared to share your theories with the rest of the class.


See you in class,

Dr. Hobbs

Posted by lhobbs at September 15, 2008 01:07 PM

Readers' Comments:

11.

The special word that is in the Aeneid story is the world of death. It is a world known as the underworld. Aeneas is guided down to this world by his dead father that appeared to him in a dream. He is rewarded by seeing his father but that comes with a sacrafice. He will die before his people have become comfortable in there new surroundings.

Posted by: Alex Slavin at September 15, 2008 05:54 PM

5.) "What original language was The Aneid translated from English into?"

The original language that Virgil wrote the Aneid in was Latin.

Posted by: Jonathan T. at September 15, 2008 07:39 PM

Kamille G 15/09/08

2. Discuss briefly what takes place in Book II of The Aneid, a section called “How They Took the City.” Specify characters and plot details.
In book two of “The Aeneid,” Aeneas retells his story of how the Greeks made their way to the city of Troy. Aeneas gives an account of how the Greeks, inspired by Minerva, constructed a wooden horse with a hollow belly in which they hid their bravest and fully armed soldiers. The Trojans find the horse in a deserted battlefield and they are curious to find out about the horse, and are tempted to go near it. However, a priest, Laacoon, warns them to stay away from the horse since he did not trust the Greeks.
The Trojans find Sinon, a Greek youth, near the horse who tried to trick the Trojans into thinking that the Greeks wanted to put him up for sacrifice but he escaped. Little did the Trojans know that this was only a trick by the Greeks to protect themselves while in the horse. Sinon informs the Trojans that Minerva will not harm Troy if they do not damage the horse. Laacoon and his two sons are then devoured by two serpents after they throw a spear at the horse. The Trojans become frightened that Minerva will destroy Troy, and so they drag the horse to Troy in an attempt to pacify Minerva. In the city, Sinon releases the Greeks from the horse and the Greeks to destroy Troy. Aeneas is warned in a dream about the war. Aeneas and his men try to fight back at the Greeks, but because they were outnumbered they were unable to succeed in their fight. Aeneas ends his story informing us of the gruesome death of Priam and his son. Aeneas then leaves Troy with his son, father, and many other Trojans in search of a new home and new wife which his wife, Creusa, in the form of a spirit had told him about.

Kamille G
Eng 225 Sec. 1
15/09/08

Posted by: Kamille G at September 16, 2008 08:29 PM

4. Who wrote The Aneid and from what time period (roughly) did the author write? Virgil wrote Aneid and i was in the time period between 29 and 19 BC.

Posted by: John Daniel at September 16, 2008 09:25 PM

D.J. Garry
Dr. Hobbs
English 225 CA 01
16 September 2008
4. Who wrote The Aneid and from what time period (roughly) did the author write?
Virgil, around 30 b.c.

Posted by: David G. at September 16, 2008 09:57 PM

Myles Godet
September 16, 2008
English 225
12:30

6. Briefly describe Aeneas: Who is Aeneas? What is Aeneas’s background? Why is Aeneas “famous”?
Aeneas was the son of Ancheses and Venus and he was also cousin to, King Priam, The King of Troy. Aeneas was one of the most respected Trojan heroes and also the leader of Troy’s Dardanian allies during the Trojan War. He was such a fierce warrior that when Troy fell to the Greeks he fought until he was commanded by the gods to flee. Despite his ferocity in battle he was rescued by the gods on two separate occasions. During the fall of Troy he lost his wife but was able to escape with his son and his father who he carried on his back. Aeneas and the rest of the surviving Trojans fled to Italy, but on their journey to Italy they end up in the city of Carthage. It was here where he fell in love with Dido the queen of Carthage who he was forced to leave behind. After leaving the city of Carthage he and the rest of the Trojan survivors arrived in Italy. In Italy Aeneas befriended King Latinus. He also became the suitor of Latinus’ daughter Lavinia. It was Turnus, Lavinia’s former suitor, who declared war against Aeneas and the Trojans because he was jealous of Aeneas. After killing Turnus in battle he and Lavinia founded the city of Lavinium. Finally, when Aeneas died he became the god Indiges.

Posted by: Myles Godet at September 16, 2008 10:09 PM

Eng 225 MWF 12:30-1:20pm
3. Discuss briefly what takes place in Book IV of The Aneid, a section called “The Passion of the Queen.” Specify characters and plot details.

The Passion of the Queen in book four of the Aneid shows Queen Dido confiding her passion and her thoughts of marrying Aeneas to her sister, Anna. The Queen of gods, Juno creates a thunderstorm that drives Aeneas and Dido into the same cave where they are to get married. The thunderstorm also separates all the hunters which is what allowed for Aeneas to get away into the cave with Dido. Aeneas not paying much attention to his mission spends all his days with Dido. Their relationship reaches the public and it becomes known that Queen Dido is neglecting her royal duties as queen and Aeneas is not focusing on his noble mission to found a new Troy.

Mercury, messenger of the gods, delivers a message to Aeneas from Jupiter, the king of gods that he shall leave Carthage and carryon his mission to found a new Troy in Italy. Aeneas begins to prepare for his mission without telling Dido. However, Dido finds out about Aeneas’s mission and tries to stop him with all that she had. Dido is unable to stop Aeneas and is so devastated and does not want to be without Aeneas and suffer, that she plans her suicide and constructs a funeral pyre. Shortly after Aeneas sets out of Carthage with his fleet, Dido takes Aeneas’s sword and impales herself upon it.

Posted by: Brandon Mckoy at September 16, 2008 10:41 PM

Anna R.
Engl 225
CAo1
Dr. Hobbs


9.Think about the model of the monomyth. Aneas has several “tests” and tribulations along his “road of trials.” Identify and explain one of Aneas’s “trials.”

Aneas wants to be with Juno. They fall in love and start a relationship without really getting married. However, Aneas has to go back to Italy in order to carry out his duties and leave Juno behind since she can't leave her country either. Aneas doesn't know how to tell Juno this and is afraid to break her and his own heart. This is why he plans to leave in secret without anyone, especially not Juno, knowing. However, Juno finds out and tries to hold him back from leaving. When he leaves for Italy anyway, Juno is heartroken and kills herself. I think this is a huge trial and test for Aneas to go through since he has to live with the fact that someone killed themselves for him and because he left them alone.

---------------------------------------

Note from Professor:

No Anna, much of your answer is incorrect. Juno is a deity of which does not have relations with Aneas. In fact, Juno conspired to have Aeneas fall in love with Dido, the queen of Carthage. It is Dido that killed herself, not Juno. You have the names of your characters mixed up.

~Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: Anna R. at September 16, 2008 11:02 PM

12. From our past two lectures and the information I repeated on the English-blog, who is credited with authorship of the “hero’s journey” or the “monomyth” model?
Joseph Campbell

Posted by: PaolaS at September 16, 2008 11:19 PM

7. Briefly describe Dido: Who is Dido? What is Dido’s background? Why is Dido “famous”?, etc.
Dido is the Queen mentioned in book IV and also the sister of Anna. She had a husband who was murdered by her brother out of jealousy. She was forced by Cupid to fall in love with Aeneas who then left her because the gods told him to. She ended up killing herself from feelings of remorse and curses the Trojans.

Posted by: Quinten J at September 17, 2008 07:49 AM

8. There are several conflicts in The Aeneid. Identify and explain one primary conflict.
In the Aeneid, the one of the conflicts found within the story would be the fight which broke out between Aeneas, and the herdsman who was to marry the king’s daughter Turner. The conflict which arose during between the two characters happened when Turner kills the son of his friend Evander. The death of Evander’s son causes Aeneas to lose his temper and goes on a rampage. Turner and Aeneas end up fighting each other but decide to make peace so they could end all the violence as well as conflict between the people so they could bury the dead properly.
S.Tavares
Eng 225 CA01
12:30-1:20

Posted by: S.Tavares at September 17, 2008 08:45 AM

Walter Perkins
Eng 225
CA01
Dr. Hobbs

1. Virgil declares the subject in the prologue, which is “warfare and man at war”. The story starts with Aeneas fleeing the city of Troy so he can get away from the war between the Achilles and the Greeks. He is on a journey to Italy to start a new life there. Aeneas finds the city in Italy named Carthage, which has become a powerful city during this time. He is advised by Venus to go talk to the queen of the city. The name of the queen is Dido and Aeneas asks her for aid in rebuilding their fleet and she gladly grants their request. She asks the Trojan heroes to dine with her and they do later that evening. Venus sends down cupid, the god of love in the form as Aeneas son and the cupid inflames the queen’s heart with passion for Aeneas.

Posted by: Walter P at September 17, 2008 11:09 AM

Myron Kirchner
Eng 225
\In the hero’s journey model, all heros “depart” from somewhere (their ordinary world) as they begin their adventure in a “special world.” Identify and explain the ordinary world of Aneas.

I think Aeneas ordinary world is his home back in Troy. He has never been outside the city, so when Troy is sacked by the Greeks he is thrown into a new world he hasn’t seen before. His Journey to Italy, in which he makes a number of unscheduled stops along the way, is when he departs into the special world .His ordinary world is quite and peaceful , while his special world is riddled with chaos and heartbreak.

Posted by: myron Kirchner at September 17, 2008 12:22 PM

10. In the hero’s journey model, all heros “depart” from somewhere (their ordinary world) as they begin their adventure in a “special world.” Identify and explain the ordinary world of Aneas.

Aeneas’s ordinary world puts him as a brave warrior capable to lead and inspire his men. In contrast, he is also capable of compassion and sorrow. On his way to Italy though, he is put through a sequence of problems caused by gods and mortals and is driven out of the ordinary world he resides in.

Posted by: strahil s. at September 17, 2008 12:26 PM

Question 3
What did Sibyl tell Aeneas, he needed to do before he could go into the underworld?
Sibyl told Aeneas that he needed to go to the forest and get a golden bough so that he could give the Proserpina. If Aeneas is able to pick the bough then that meant he would be fated to go into the underworld, and be able to leave afterwards. Before all of this he must bury a member of his crew which doesn’t really make sense.

Posted by: Quinten J at September 18, 2008 08:42 AM

Kamille G 19/09/08

3. What does the sibyl tell Aeneas that he must to enter the underworld?

In Book seven of “The Aeneid,” Sibyl tells Aeneas that in order for him to enter into the underworld he has to find a golden branch in the nearby forest which she showed “the bough … hidden beneath her dress ” to Aeneas (pg.1110 line 175-176). She told Aeneas that if the bough breaks off the branch easily then he is destined to enter into the underworld. But if the bough does not break off the branch, then Aeneas should not enter the underworld because he will not return.

Kamille G
Eng. 225 Sec.1
19/09/08

Posted by: Kamille G at September 19, 2008 12:56 AM

Aeneas starts by saying that the sorrow brought by telling this story will be great. Then proceeds to tell how the Greeks with their cunning build a trap. By offering a wooden horse made to appease Apollo the Trojans favorite god, horses being his symbol. They hid inside the horse waiting for nightfall so that the gate could be opened from the inside; for no force could breach the walls of Troy from the outside. Then proceeding to tell of the Greeks success at sacking the city with only a few escaping one group being Aeneas’.

Posted by: John Anderson at September 19, 2008 11:30 AM

#4

The significance of the doves is that they act as a guide for Aeneas. It is after he says a prayer that the doves appear and lead him to through the forest to the tree that has the golden branch that he must carry as an offering. It is therefore clear that the doves are sent by the gods as a form of help to Aeneas.


6. Briefly describe Aeneas: Who is Aeneas? What is Aeneas’s background? Why is Aeneas “famous”?
Aeneas was the son of Ancheses and Venus and he was also cousin to, King Priam, The King of Troy. Aeneas was one of the most respected Trojan heroes and also the leader of Troy’s Dardanian allies during the Trojan War. He was such a fierce warrior that when Troy fell to the Greeks he fought until he was commanded by the gods to flee. Despite his ferocity in battle he was rescued by the gods on two separate occasions. During the fall of Troy he lost his wife but was able to escape with his son and his father who he carried on his back. Aeneas and the rest of the surviving Trojans fled to Italy, but on their journey to Italy they end up in the city of Carthage. It was here where he fell in love with Dido the queen of Carthage who he was forced to leave behind. After leaving the city of Carthage he and the rest of the Trojan survivors arrived in Italy. In Italy Aeneas befriended King Latinus. He also became the suitor of Latinus’ daughter Lavinia. It was Turnus, Lavinia’s former suitor, who declared war against Aeneas and the Trojans because he was jealous of Aeneas. After killing Turnus in battle he and Lavinia founded the city of Lavinium. Finally, when Aeneas died he became the god Indiges.

Aeneas in the Underworld

Aeneas was instructed to venture to the underworld in order to visit the soul of his father, but in order to reach he had to take a ferry across the Styx. Before he could make this voyage he first had to find a golden branch/ bough in the forest which he then had to present to the ferryman Charon as a form of payment. This was necessary due to the fact that Charon had stopped ferrying the living to the underworld after numerous accounts of thievery. Along the ferry ride they pass a number of dreadful sights and still press on. He reaches his father Anchises who tells him about the proceeding bloodlines of the Trojan descendants.

Posted by: Myles Godet at September 19, 2008 12:25 PM

8. Sure, the gods made Aeneas shield, but what was the larger significance of Aeneas’s shield. Why was it an important gift. Hint: Think of what it “did.” What psychological role would that play for Aeneas?

Besides being a good form of armor the gifts, in particular the shield, acted as a form of psychological motivation due to the fact that on the face of the shield was the depiction of the Trojans defeating the Romans in battle. This was a form of motivator because it would have instilled in Aeneas an even greater sense of courage. I say this because the face of the shield depicted the battle between the Trojans and the Romans, with the victory in the favor of the Trojans. This image would have made Aeneas fight even harder since it was a sign from the gods.

---------------------------------------

Note from Professor:

No Myles, much of your answer is incorrect. The shield would not have shown the Trojans defeating the Romans since (1) The Trojans had already been defeated long ago, (2) It was the Greeks who fought the Trojans, not the Romans, and (3) The Romans, according to this tale, are the descendants of the Trojans no their former enemies. So a scene showing Trojans defeating Romans really doesn't make sense now does it? The idea of Rome was still in the future. In the "present" of Aneas, himself a Trojan, Troy had recently been destroyed.

~Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: Myles Godet at September 19, 2008 10:49 PM

8. The psychological role receiving the shield would play to Aeneas is the inspiration including the motivation to succeed in winning the upcoming battle. Given the ability to see the future of his ancestors having big impacts on history gave Aeneas an additional boost to winning the war. If Aeneas did not foresee a good destiny for his ancestors it would cause him to lose focus and not be motivated in fulfilling his own destiny deemed to him by the gods.
S.Tavares
Eng 225 12:30-1:20
CA01

Posted by: S.Tavares at September 20, 2008 03:16 PM

7. When Aeneas descended into the underworld the part of the stage that best describes this is the Belly of the Whale stage. This stage is separation from the hero’s known world and himself. This is when Aeneas was on his way to meet his father and in the process he meets Dido his lover. It was very clear that he did not want to leave Dido. This was unknown and very frightening to him to leave the old world and go into the new world. However, Aeneas knew that this was his destiny and that he must leave. This seems to be the lowest part his journey because he has to leave his lover. After he leaves Dido, there seems to be no more low points throughout his journey. Aeneas is willing to let his old self go to become a new person and to follow his destiny.

Posted by: Nichole T. at September 21, 2008 04:27 PM

Walter Perkins
English 225
CA01
Dr. Hobbs

6. It was significant because it was thought of to be somewhat rebellious against norm. The Trojans help lead the Romans out of the Dark ages into modern day Italy. It was significant because it rewarded the Trojans for their courageousness when they created the Trojan horse to destroy the Greek dynasty as they went to Apollo planning burn their camp. The Trojans played a trick by pretending that the horse was a gift when in reality it was filled with Trojan soldiers, who sooner destroyed the Greek society. The Trojan War was looked upon as the greatest war of the century during the Roman era. Virgil, the writer of Aeneid admired how the Trojans impacted Roman culture and what the Romans became after the fall of the Trojans.

---------------------------------------

Note from Professor:

No Walter, this answer is incorrect. You have your facts very confused. You need to re-read the story so that you understand who is fighting who. The Greeks built the horse and hid themselves inside of it to trick the Trojans. It is called the Trojan Horse because it was built FOR the Trojans, not BY the Trojans. As a result of the Greeks' trick, the Trojan dynasty was defeated, not the Greek dynasty.

~Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: Walter P at September 21, 2008 07:46 PM

Anna R
Engl 225
CA01
Dr. Hobbs

5.
There are three different stages, departure, initiation and return. Aeneas goes through all three of these stages as he departs for the underworld in which he seeks advice and in which he goes through trials. This is also considered his initiation phase. However, he goes back to the "real world" as the return phase in order to carry out his duties. He is considered the grandfather of Rome since his descendents are Romulus and Remus, the founders of Rome. He will go on and take care of Rome and keep living his life after returning there.

Posted by: Anna R at September 21, 2008 10:17 PM

Kamille Garness 19/09/08
2. Recall when Aeneas receives the presents from Venus, which were made by Vulcan. Using what you know now about the monomyth, speculate on what stage of the hero’s journey best describes this stage of Aeneas’s journey. Be prepared to explain why and any other areas of the story that might seem to fit into the same stage.

When Aeneas receives the presents from Venus, which were made by Vulcan, he is at the departure phase of his journey specifically in the Supernatural aid stage. It is known that this is the stage that Aeneas is at, because he is challenged to take on a war with King Turnus, his call to adventure, which is also a part of the Departure phase. The supernatural aid stage of any hero’s journey is defined by the appearance of a guide or magical helper which assists the hero before he undertakes his quest. This is specifically the Supernatural aid stage of Aeneas’s journey because at this point Aeneas has committed to his quest for victory in the war with Turnus, but he is in search of protection which is offered by the “guardian of fire”, his magical helper, and sent to him by his mother, Venus, the guide who appears to him coming “down amid high clouds” (pg. 1125 line 2). In Book XII, supernatural aid is again offered to Aeneas when he is struck in the leg by a spear “His knees gave way, His blood ran cold and froze,”and then offered a healing balm sent down by Venus to give to the physician to heal Aeneas’s wound.(pg.1133 line152-153).

Kamille G
Eng.225 Sec.1
19/09/08

Posted by: Kamille G at September 21, 2008 11:16 PM

Question 7
Aeneas was the ancestor of Romulus and Remus, two children who were raised by a wolf. Knowing what you know about the Roman empire, why might this have been significant to the Romans sense of pride, patriotism, and national identity? What does it say about their personality?

Wolves are very territorial creatures that hunt and travel in packs. The Romans conquered much of the surrounding land and ruled it with much fury. This could be a reference to being like wolves since up near where the Romans occupied, was farmlands. On those farmlands were animals like sheep and cows that probably got attacked often by wolves. Romans would conquer surrounding villages and kingdoms so they could take over more land.

Posted by: Quinten J at September 22, 2008 09:27 AM

9.) Compare and contrast Ishtar and Venus

Both Ishtar and Venus were the goddess of love in their respective mythologies. However Ishtar also has war in her domain as well. They both also wished to shower the hero with the gifts of the heavens. However there are key differences. Isthar wanted to make a lover out of Gilgamesh, while Venus was Aeneid's mother.

Posted by: Jonathan T. at September 22, 2008 11:04 AM

Test Question #4
A shiel, sword, chest armor, and spear.

Question # 9
Romolus and Remus were said to be Aeneas's descendants and the founders of the Roman Empire (Romulus).

Question # 11
They were all in chaos and fled.

Question # 1 - Discussion
When Aeneas goes into the underworld he is in the "belly of the whale" stage of the monomyth. He is seperated from the world he knows to the world of self. Aeneas leaves Dido behind, this shows the person's willingness to undergo a metamorphosis, to die to him or herself.

Posted by: Paola S at September 22, 2008 01:47 PM

umm ...[Students]...I've translated the Aeneid, some of you haven't done your homework, for example, the Trojan horse was filled with Greeks not Trojans, the shield of Aeneas showed the future of Rome... not Trojans defeating Romans as some of you said...Aeneas and Juno never had a relationship you are thinking of Dido...do your homework folks!

-----------------------

Thanks for your remarks Steve. Don't worry, all of that has been noted--students with incorrect responses have not received credit for their answers. Too bad that you are not in my class.

~Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: steve at November 25, 2008 09:57 AM

Google
My Blog

Creative Commons License
This weblog is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Some rights reserved. 2006.