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August 16, 2008

Casting Light on Jonathan Safran Foer's _Everything is Illuminated_


Image Source: https://modernmaterialculture.files.wordpress.com/2012/05/tumblr_m3viy7qlet1rvayo1o3_500.jpg

Class,

In the comment box below,

. . . the note-taker/scribe from each group should retype the question your group discussed today in class and provide an answer with quotations from the text to support your answers. You MUST put the page number (or, paragraph number if there are no page numbers) in parentheses after any quotation used.

Enter your work on this text as prescribed in class. For example:

Remember: I have to "approve" all comments so you won't see it immediately after posting. After hitting submit, you should see a screen that confirms this.

We are beginning to use some concepts in our discussions that you may or may have had practice using before. I want to be sure that you have a clear understanding of the words we use in class (no more blank stares!) so be sure you are looking up words you don't feel you yet "own" (means, making it a part of your personal vocabulary) by utilizing your dictionaries to the fullest.

Dr. Hobbs

_____________________________________

To see other English-Blog entries on the subject of Literature, please click HERE.

Posted by lhobbs at August 16, 2008 11:50 PM

Readers' Comments:

Chera Pupi
March 26, 2008
EL267
Paper Proposal

Inequality of all kinds (in literature and real life) is an interesting topic for me. I am quite passionate about gender inequality in particular; therefore, for my research paper, I will focus on the gender inequalities that appear in Susan Glaspbell’s, “A Jury of Her Peers,” and Earnest Hemingway, The Sun Also Rises. Gender inequality plays a large role in both of these works in some form or another. Although the two works are similar in that they both contain gender inequalities, they differ in the genders that are portrayed or referred to as unequal. Through the men’s condescending and patronizing comments in “A Jury of Her Peers,” it is quite clear that women are the inferior sex, and therefore unequal to men in the men’s eyes; because of Bret’s unequal treatment by her ex-husband in The Sun Also Rises, she in turn has begun to treat men as unequal by using them for her own personal gain (sexual and material).
In this paper, I will argue and support with evidence from the text that the women in “A Jury of Her Peers” are treated as less than equals by the men in the story. I have found over 15 separate lines of dialogue that indicate this. From Minnie and John Wright, to the attorney, the sheriff, and Mrs. Hale and Mrs. Peters, the women are consistently treated poorly and unequally by males. I will use the fact that the women for the majority of the story are (with the exception of Minnie) are referred to as “Mrs. [husband’s last name]” indicating that they are nothing more than property of their husbands. Similarly, the women only refer to their husbands as “Mr…” showing a level of distance and superiority of the men over the women. I will also use the condescending comments that the men make towards the women to support my claim.
I will argue that as a result of being treated as unequal herself by her husband in The Sun Also Rises, Bret has turned to treating men as unequals. I will use the fact that when Romero tries to “feminize” her, Bret immediately turns away and refuses to do what he asks to support this claim. Similarly, Bret uses men for whatever she happens to need at the moment. She has no regard for their feelings or for their basic humanity. She cheats on them in front of each other, and through an odd role reversal, takes on the stereotypical male role. She never has to justify herself or be concerned with her appearance, yet the men are constantly concerned with proving their masculinity, and are usually forced to do so as a result of her actions in some form.

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Comments from Instructor:

Good job Chera. You have designed a nice proposal. Others learn: based on what Chera has written, we now know (1) what texts she is going to write about, (2) what thematic or theoretical approach she is going to use, and (3) a few specifics about her argument.

My advice to Chera is to make ONE thesis statement that incorporates both of your works. It seems that you have two theses going right now, one for each work. Decide what you are really hypothesizing about both of the works as a pair and state that in your first paragraph. In the following paragraphs, tell me how, briefly, how you will argue in favor of your thesis (you don't have to develop those arguments yet, you'll do that in the paper).

For example, in both "Plato's Cave" and "The Matrix" a person who learns the truth about his existence tries to free his fellows from their bondage so that they too can be free. In both cases, the protagonist is met with resistance. There is a conflict between those who desire to know and those who do not wish to know. (continued)

Posted by: Chera P at March 24, 2008 02:43 PM

(continued) *You see, that's the thesis. Then, in the following paragraphs--two might be enough--you'll briefly explain what evidence from the texts you'll present to "prove your case" (imagine that this is a court case):

In "Plato's Cave," the person was (?) and he did this (page number), that (page number), and the other (page number) to try and help his own kind. At (?) he was met with this kind of resistance (page number) and with (?) he had this kind of conflict (page number), and finally he had to....

In "The Matrix," repeat with similar logic...

...Together, what all this means/signifies is....(your conclusion).

So, just tweak yours a bit and everyone else do the same!

~Lee Hobbs

Posted by: Lee at March 24, 2008 03:34 PM

Samantha Graham
March 25, 2008
EL 276
Proposal

Often times, popular books are adapted into major motion pictures because of the prosperity of the book. However, motion pictures do not portray the book exactly as written. In my paper I will discuss the various techniques used in transforming adaptations from the book to the screen through editing, adding, and substituting elements. "Everything is Illuminated," written by Johnathan Safran Foer, is one such adaptation that was created by Liev Schreiber in 2005.

-----------------------

Samantha, I'm afraid you're going to have to be a lot more specific here.

See the advice I gave your classmate on the blog and let me know what elements you plan to concentrate on difference in structure? Reinterpretation of characters? Missing plot elements? Added plot elements? Different beginnings, endings?, etc. Dialogue differences?

Try again and I'll repost your changes on the blog (but not on Turnitin.com)

Lee Hobbs

Posted by: Samantha G at March 25, 2008 11:07 PM

Candice S
26 March 2008
EL 267
Research Paper Proposal
One of the reasons I am a fine arts major is because I believe that we serve society in a very powerful an inflicting manner, through the soul. In my field of music, and especially in my forte of being a vocalist, it is the constant challenge of the performer to delve into her or her spiritual self. Therefore, the topic I will examine will be the spiritual and religious aspects of the works “One” by Metallica and “Everything is Illuminated” by Jonathan Safran Foer. However, I’m going to argue this topic as it relates to secularization of society. There are very obvious examples of religious spirituality in modern American literature, despite the unfortunate secularization of society.
First, I plan to make my statement and then I will showcase some simple but powerful examples of the secularization of society. For example, I will use the elimination of prayer in public schooling and the elimination of the name “God” in many public respects (i.e. money, the Pledge of Allegiance).
Next, I plan to make the connection that God is alive and well in modern American Literature and fine arts. First, I’ll make the general Christian argument as stated in the pleading for death throughout the song “One” by Metallica. Then I will examine the statements made from the Jewish standpoint in “Everything is Illuminated” by Safran Foer. An example being in the letter on page 25 when Jonathan’s faith is tested by his friend Alexander.
My next two arguments will go hand in hand as I will first explain how the beliefs of the protagonists, though challenged, keep them together and keep them alive and searching. Then I will explain that these are statements from the authors to the world. It would seem that in a secularized society religion cannot die in the fine arts. I will also ue some small examples that these are not the only two examples of this idea, there are many more.

Posted by: Candice S at March 25, 2008 11:13 PM

Defined as being unfair in action or treatment, injustice encompasses every facet of a social, political, and economic structure. Injustice is in direct opposition with ethical and moral reasoning, which provokes in me a compassion toward those who have suffered injustices based on attributes, innate or not, such as race, class, gender, religion, or other defining difference that can constitute a bias.

Injustices noted in The Sun Also Rises by Ernest Hemingway can be compared with those seen in Langston Hughes’ “On The Road” to show that no matter the situation or location, individuals can be treated unfairly. Analyzing some of the injustices in the two works will likely result in similarities in treatment of characters who live under distinctly different circumstances. Readers will be able to deduce that injustices are not reserved for any certain group or class of people.

Posted by: Vivian Lee C. at March 26, 2008 09:57 AM

Hallie Geary
American Lit

Proposal
Both Kosinski’s Painted Bird and Welty’s “A Worn Path” reveal social inequality between ethnicities; however, they use contrasting differences to show that the ethnicities are all truly equal. Kosinski contrasts the poor, rural German farmers against the Kalmuks and the Red Army/Russian Soviets (it is nearly impossible to use the Jewish ethnicity in this comparison because so few appear in the novel that it is difficult to tell if their treatment would have differed from the main characters, and also it is difficult to tell if the main character’s differed much from that of any loner or vagabond at that time). Welty compares a poor African-American woman to the white ethnicity.
Both stories show a subjugated ethnicity that is highly superstitious, but contrasts this with the atheist or apathetic ideas of the higher class. The subjugated ethnicity is shown as unsophisticated, brutish, and unintelligent, but the higher ethnicity is shown as immoral and capable of extreme violence. Both ethnicities are shown as capable of both acts of kindness and acts wickedness. In the end, both stories leave the reader with a feeling that neither ethnicity is actually any better or different than the other. All of the contrasting differences only emphasize the equality of the ethnicities, showing that only strength and the power to subjugate another causes any ethnicity to be better than any other.

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Hallie,

What clues in the text lead you to believe that the peasants are Germans? Also, what clues lead you to believe that the protagonist (not the author) is Jewish rather than Romany?

You'll need to explain that since it’s a specific about a really unspecific experience of a little boy.

Work on it a little more and repost to the English blog (don't worry about turnitin.com)

Lee Hobbs

Posted by: HallieG at March 26, 2008 11:09 AM

Heather Stull
Professor Hobbs
EL267.01
March 26, 2008


In “The Painted Bird”, author Jerzy Kosinski documents his experiences as an abandoned child during World War II. “Everything is Illuminated”, a novel by Jonathan Safran Foer, focuses also on World War II. The protagonist, named for the author, travels to the Ukraine to find a woman whom he believes may have saved his grandfather from the Nazis. Throughout both novels there exist many conflicts. In my paper, I will be focusing on a conflict that three of the major characters face, characters through whom I believe that when examined, will provide fertile ground for a deeper understanding of the experiences of both of the authors and what they were trying to communicate through writing these novels. The focus will be on Man vs. Society conflict influenced by ethnic/racial prejudices.

From “The Painted Bird” I will be focusing on the protagonist, a representation of Mr. Kosinksi himself. I will examine the impact of his experiences during the war… how his appearance influenced the behavior of his caretakers, and how these experiences were central in shaping his view of himself and the world he lived in. I will be studying two characters from “Everything is Illuminated”. The first will be Jonathan Safran Foer. I will examine the difficulties he faces on his journey to discover his grandfather’s past. What challenges does he face as a Jew in contemporary Eastern Europe and are there any connections between what his grandfather dealt with and his current day struggles? The second character will be Brod, Jonathan’s great, great, great (etc.) grandmother who was rescued from the river of the local shtetl. I will examine how her differences alienate her from the rest of the shtetl and how this impacts her decisions and the course of her life, ultimately affecting Jonathan’s life. Other characters such as the gypsy girl and the three generations of Alex’s (two of which accompany Jonathan on his journey) will be used as supporting examples of the effects of these conflicts/prejudices on relationships.

Aside from the novels, I will be consulting interviews with both Jonathan Safran Foer and Jerzy Kosinski. Also, outside sources of Jewish memoirs from those both imprisoned inside and outside of concentration camps will be used to further examine the circumstances of the parents in “The Painted Bird” , the other children housed with the boy at the end of the novel, and the members of the shtletl in “Everything is Illuminated”. Ultimately, I hope to find further connections between the two authors and the inspiration for these novels, and the consequences of such conflicts/prejudices on the adolescent mind and how it affects the children of generations to come.

---------------------------

Heather, before you get too deep into this as you've laid out, "carefully" read the introduction to the Painted Bird again and then let me know how you will justify positioning the protagonist as a representation of the author.
In what way? Is this an autobiography? What does Kosinski himself say about it?

The interviews might slow down the paper and you, so remember that you don't need outside research for this. I'm really looking for what you can read from the text itself. What theory can you formulate and back up with textual examples. No outside research. You may, of course, use the introductions in the books we are using, etc. as long as they are cited correctly.

Definitely connect the stories. But try to do so with theme and/or theory.

Do that, rework it, and resubmit to the English Blog (don't worry about turnitin.com)

Best,

Lee Hobbs

Posted by: Heather S. at March 26, 2008 11:12 AM

A Pittsburgh native, August Wilson, wrote the Pulitzer and Tony Award winning playwright, “Fences”. The play takes place in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania at the time that Hank Aaron led the Milwaukee Braves to the World Series beating the New York Giants. The main character of the story, Troy, was a baseball player in the Negro Leagues but was too old when African Americans were being drafted into the Major Leagues. He moved on with his life and works for the sanitation company lifting garbage cans into the dump truck. This step back from being a professional athlete depresses him. His son Cory, is offered to play baseball for a recruit coming into town. Troy does everything in his power to prevent Cory from having the same high hopes and expectations that he did with the Major Leagues in hopes that Cory will keep his job instead. A similar theme can be seen in the song, “One” by Metallica.
In the song, “One” by Metallica, the interpreted themes are of struggle, failure, and of deep depression. Troy experiences all of these emotions and hardships in the play, “Fences” and can be correlated with one another.
Through science and technology, the main characters’ bitterness towards athleticism in Wilson’s Play, “Fences” can be seen in parallel to the song “One” written by Metallica’s James Hetfield and Lars Ulrich.

----------------------

Bob,

You've done a good job here in explaining struggle, failure, in Fences but not deep depression. I'll need to see your take on that.

You'll also need to develop in your proposal, how the themes of struggle, failure, and of deep depression are represented in the lyrics of One.

Finally, I can see how science and technology can be apparent in One, especially if you use Trumbo as a third research source, but how is science and technology apparent to "bitterness," as you say, in Fences?

You'll need to give the reader a better understanding of these issues I've addressed.

Rethink what you are really trying to say, give some specifics, and resubmit to the English-blog (but, not to turnitin.com).

Best,

Lee Hobbs

Posted by: RD at March 26, 2008 11:23 AM

Thesis:

Through ones travels through life the daunting task of perceiving the truth is influenced by nature’s existence.

Proposal:

In all three texts: “Worn Path” by Eudora Welty, “One” by Metallica, and “The Allegory of the Cave” by Plato all reveal some part of the destructive side of human nature. There has been an outside agent that has caused darkness to all characters. For instance in The One there was a bomb, in Worn Path there was disease and a struggle on a journey to help the loved one, and in Plato’s short story it is perception –vs- reality (shadows).
In this paper I will show and support how nature plays a role in the text. For instance within “The Worn Path” I will explain and prove that some sort of nature played a role in Phoenix’s journey. I will show that even though the protagonist is on a hard journey, love will conquer all. The perception is that she doesn’t stop to interpret everything around her. The reality is, is that she needs to get into town. I will also show and support nature’s role in “The One”. Within this short text by Metallica, it shows the destructive side of human nature. The perception of life has been lost and the reality was getting through the perception that he needs to die. It is the nature of warfare and destruction to all. I will also show nature’s role in Plato’s “The Allegory of the Cave”. Within the story, it shows how four men need something-they need freedom. The perception is that the shadows are real and that is all they know. The reality is that they are only shadows and there is more than meets the eye.

Posted by: Amanda F. at March 26, 2008 01:37 PM

“Hallie,
What clues in the text lead you to believe that the peasants are Germans? Also, what clues lead you to believe that the protagonist (not the author) is Jewish rather than Romany?
You'll need to explain that since it’s a specific about a really unspecific experience of a little boy.
Work on it a little more and repost to the English blog (don't worry about turnitin.com)
Lee Hobbs”


I don’t know why I put Germany. I must have been thinking about the Nazis at the time.


The author is specifically pretty vague about the actual origins of the people that the narrator lives with, and there are clues that this might be to prevent anti-Polish feelings (which is where the author was). Some of it also comes from the narrator not knowing where he is, so it might be better to say “rural European peasants.”


The comparison I was thinking of making there wasn’t whether or not the author was Jewish (because that is never mentioned) simply that it’s assumed that he’s a Jew (or a Gypsie, which are also hated) but because there are so few Jews that have any interaction in the novel (other than the ones on the train and what the narrator is told about them, I believe only the little boy who fell off the train and the girl who got off the train had any specific information about their treatment) and so many of the peasants, I decided to run the comparison between the rustic, backwards peasant people and the technologically advanced armies. The peasant people are generally horrible to the narrator, beating and misusing him. However, some of their violence comes from their superstitions and their lack of education, and also the fact that they are a violent people in a violent world. Also, despite his cruel treatment, the narrator would not be alive without them, and they do prove themselves capable of love and devotion on several occasions (like hiding the narrator from people who would hurt them, Lekh’s love of Ludmila, and a few others). Meanwhile, the more technologically advanced Kalmuks come in and destroy and entire village, raping and pillaging in a gruesome chapter, proving that having more technology does not change the true nature of humans. And even the Red Army, although they are far more civilized and just than any of the others, proves that the true nature of humans is still present when the sharpshooter goes into the village and takes revenge for his friends by shooting random peasants. As the final nail in the coffin of this prediction, even the children are shown to be just as cruel and merciless as the adults, showing that in adversity humans will always resort to their basic, brutal instincts in order to survive.


Obviously Painted Bird has far more depth than “The Worn Path” but there is a feeling of equality in that story as well. The first instance that comes to mind is that the white man tells Pheonix that he would give her money if he had any and then drops a coin. Pheonix, in response, gets the man to chase the stray dog so that she can pick up the coin. This shows an equal ability to sin from both ethnicities.


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Ok, much better now! Thanks for clarifying that!

Best,

Lee Hobbs

Posted by: HallieG at March 26, 2008 01:39 PM

"Journey"
In my research paper, I am going to relate the short story, “On the Road” by Langston Hughes, and the novel, “Johnny Got His Gun” by Dalton Trumbo, in the hopes of correlating the two by their similarities and parallelism of the representation of journey throughout their stories. In both of these stories, they display a lot of hidden meanings, metaphors, biblical personification, and an incredible amount of imagery to make you more insightful as to what the author wants you to think is going on. Both of these stories are very similar in a sense that “On the Road”, entails a man that is on a journey through town in hopes of finding shelter and food, and during his journey ends up meeting Jesus, much like the novel “Johnny Got His Gun”, where a man goes to war and experiences many hardships in hopes of informing other Americans of the dangers of war, and along his “Mind Journey”, he meets Jesus and asks him what he should do because of his unfortunate mishap in war where he looses all senses, touch, sight, smell, hearing and taste.

Thomas A.

Posted by: Thomas A. at March 26, 2008 01:41 PM

T. Wineland
Am. Lit 1915-Present
Professor Hobbs
March 26, 2008

A dominant individual’s influence over another gender can create a false persona and force a person to put their real opinions and beliefs aside while they uphold the dominant individual’s values in order to please them. There are several examples of this in “A Jury of Her Peers” and many connections in Plato’s “The Allegory of the Cave.” I plan to point out how another influence over us, especially of another dominant gender, can have a profound affect over how we view the world and how a realization of that hold can help us break free of the same, even if just for a moment, to express our true selves.

In both Plato’s “The Allegory of the Cave” and “A Jury of Her Peers” individuals begin to think and see things in a manner in which they previously were ignorant, and out of this new realization they make decisions based upon their own opinions and not that of what was previously told to them. In “A Jury of Her Peers” Mrs. Peters has portrayed a Sheriff’s wife and lived life based upon what was best for her husband and the law. However, she is forced to break out of the shell she has created for herself and do what she believes is the right thing even though it goes against everything she has been known to believe as true. The same happens in Plato’s “The Allegory of the Cave”. The individual who is freed from the cave can now see the truth and is able to step outside of what has always been known to be true and look at things differently, making decisions based upon his/her own decisions and not those thrust upon him/her.

Posted by: T. Wineland at March 26, 2008 01:54 PM

Jodi Schweizer
March 26, 2006
EL 267
Paper Proposal

As an English Literature major working towards a teaching certificate, assignments that mesh together the beauty of the written form and the intricate workings of the human mind especially interest me. This is the main reason I chose to explore psychological issues evident in Earnest Hemmingway’s “The Sun Also Rises” and Susan Glaspell’s “A Jury of Her Peers”. Although “The Sun Also Rises” and “A Jury of Her Peers” were written at different places in time, both stories show the harmful effects caused by many psychological and mental defects, especially depression and post traumatic stress disorder.
In Hemmingway’s “The Sun Also Rises, ” there is plenty of evidence that numerous characters, including Jake, Lady Brett, and Robert Cohn exhibit classic signs of depression, including sleeplessness, alcohol dependency, crying, and extreme mood swings. Jake is also a perfect argument to the effects of post traumatic stress disorder after serving in the war. I will back up these findings by using both Hemmingway’s text, and numerous valid psychology sources.
“ A Jury of Her Peers” by Susan Glaspell also exhibits sign of depression by the character Minnie Foster. Although the reader never sees Mrs. Foster, they are told of her pitiful plight by Mrs. Peters and Mrs. Hale. The two women tell the reader of Minnie never being permitted outside to visit with her neighbors, of a beautiful singing voice that has been silenced by her husband, and the sad shell that remained of the beautiful woman after she married her husband. These signals by the other characters also clue in the reader to the fact that Minnie Foster was most likely being abused by her husband. This abuse will be the reason for Minnie Foster suffering from post traumatic stress disorder. These arguments will also be backed up using the text and numerous valid psychology sources.
After reading the arguments proving the authors use of psychological and mental disorders, the readers (members of the class and the professor) will easily be able to view the serious effects suffered by the characters, and consequently suffered by other characters due to their disorders .

Posted by: Jodi S at March 26, 2008 02:27 PM

Michelle Eaglehouse
March 26, 2008
American Literature
Research Proposal

Thesis: Although the decision to enter or begin a war is in the hands of people in power of nations, those that actually fight in the war or live in the countries involved with the war are greatly affected by the war in a number of ways, while those that decide to make the decision to enter a war are not affected in the same ways.
The main idea I want to cover in my paper from “Johnny Got His Gun” is that Joe was greatly affected by the war that he did not make the decision to fight in to begin with. He did not want to go to war at all, but he was drafted and did not have a choice but to go and fight. As a result of the war, he was stuck in a hospital bed for the rest of his life. He could not move, talk, eat, breath on his own, see, or hear anything. He was basically a vegetable although he still had cognitive capabilities. The people that decided to go to war walked into a room and gave him a medal for fighting in the war. They were still able to walk in the room without a problem, as far as he knew. These people that he was fighting for were not affected by the war in the same ways as him.
The main idea I want to cover in my paper from “The Painted Bird” is that the boy had to leave his whole family because he was not safe with them. He was Jewish and the Nazi people were killing all of the Jewish people at this time. As a result, the six-year-old boy was sent to a village where his parents thought he would be safe. He had to fend for himself once he arrived. He moved from village to village all of the time and was always trying to fit in. Since he had dark hair and eyes and light skin, the people could tell that he was Jewish and did not accept him. Although this boy did not fight in the war because he was too young, he was greatly affected by it. He did not decide for the country to go to war, but the war had a greater effect on him than it did for the officials that made the decision to go to war.

Posted by: Michelle E. at March 26, 2008 02:48 PM

A common metaphor represented in Plato’s parable of the cave and Jackson’s short story, “The Lottery” is that isolation causes ignorance. In Plato’s parable, the people have been held captive in a cave their whole life, only seeing shadow puppets on a wall. They perceived these images to be reality. These people have been isolated from society their entire lives. Their minds have been confined to only knowing things they have learned from being inside of the cave. By that, the people are not willing to accept anything else as reality, causing ignorance toward the outside world. In Jackson’s short story, “The Lottery”, the society which people live in is based on traditional values. These traditional values keep them isolated from advancing with the rest of the world. The people in the story believe in a lottery where a person is chosen to be stoned. They believe the lottery is a civil and normal tradition. Their isolation caused them to not realize that their traditional beliefs are barbarous and have become out-dated.

Posted by: Ryenn Micaletti at March 26, 2008 02:56 PM

Chris King
3-26-08
English Lit.
Proposal
I chose the Novel “Everything is Illuminated” and the short story “Everyday Use” with religion/spirituality as the focus. I feel this is something that can greatly improve my perspectives on religion considering I come from a very religious background. I believe it will show both pros and cons in different situations and circumstances. Also, I feel this will be interesting for me, as a Christian, and not as a Jew
How does religion (Judaism in particular) impact Jonathan’s views during the trip he is on? Judaism and the holocaust obviously have a lot to do with one another. I feel that Jonathan’s trip, to find out his families’ history, was impacted by religion. I will discuss how it impacts his journey. Also, I will be discussing the religious title Jonathan hold as a “Jewish-American” and how that impacts his life/journey. Does that mean something different to Jonathon than it did for others during the holocaust? I will also touch upon the three different stories with in the novel. How does religion play, or not play, into each of the stories. Is it predominant throughout? Does it impact the plot line? Impact the characters? If so, how?
Does not possessing any religious views affect your life style and situations that are encountered? The family (mother and two daughters) doesn’t seem to share any religious views, which could be considered as a religious view in itself. I have always been reinforced with Christian views, but I think I can show how this family’s nonreligious views impacts their life compared to how it may if they did have religious views. Christianity, for example, supports the views of honesty, faith, trust, etc... If the mother imposed these view on her children, would their lives be different? Would Dee’s boyfriend be a different person? Also, let’s say the Maggie, for example, was the one who imposed religious views, would she be an outcast in her family? Would she better the family? Could she offer “betterness” to the family? All of these different situations are ones that I will talk about. They will show/describe the pros and cons of both believing/beholding a religious view, or not.
I will argue my points through references I use these to support my findings.

Posted by: chris king at March 26, 2008 02:57 PM

Proposal-----

Throughout reading the “The Painted Bird” by Jerzy Kosinski, I have noticed a commonality between it and “Johnny Got His Gun” by Dalton Trumbo. Both of these novels involve war and dramatically develop the consequences that come with war. More specifically, each of these novels describes a person’s fight with war. “Johnny Got His Gun” involves an adult male who has fought in the war and suffered extreme consequences. “The Painted Bird” is about a young boy who is not fighting in the war but does face cruel consequences because of the war. In each of these novels, war is represented as a violent and destructive monster that affects all people, whether they fight in the war or not.
For my research paper, I will write about the outcomes of war that are represented in each of the novels, whether it be a direct consequence from fighting in the war or an indirect consequence that is felt outside of the battle itself.

Posted by: C. Bell at March 26, 2008 03:04 PM

Shantavia Burchette
March 26, 2008
EL267
Paper Proposal

Great Literature takes you on a journey. A journey that either moves through the story or through the characters mind. This can be seen in Art, Novels, Poetry, and Short Stories. The journey doesn't have to be an obvious one but it will leave the reader with a sense of beginning and end. I would like to analyze "journey" in a sense of time and placement in reference to Langston Hughes' "On the Road" and the play we will read. I think that time can refer to years or hours and placement can refer to setting or mental state.
This ties into "On the Road" perfectly because Sargeant goes on both a mental journey and a physical journey. It will be interesting to see how these two works will tie together in the end.

Posted by: Shantavia Burchette at March 26, 2008 04:09 PM

Paper Proposal


Many times when I read a novel, I find it hard to differentiate what is actually happening to what is a memory. Sometimes it is also difficult to fully understand metaphors or hidden meanings without visual aid. It is easier to define these things when reading for pleasure but squeezing reading in for class occasionally leaves holes in the reader’s understanding.
I will be using the novel “Johnny got His Gun” by Dalton Trumbo along with the movie counterpart. I will focus on sections of the book which contain metaphors/foreshadowing/etc. and compare it to that section in the movie. I would also like to particularly focus on the flashbacks, dream sequences and the section of the book/movie which feature Jesus Christ. I found the section about Jesus very interesting after watching the movie. There were many visuals in the movie which gave a greater understanding to that section of the book.

Posted by: Natasha Hill at March 26, 2008 04:16 PM

In the two short stories, Everyday Use by Alice Walker and The Lottery by Shirley Jackson, there is a representation of materialism. When one is materialistic, they become greedy; wanting something and maintaining it so others will be jealous. Walker presents materialism in the form of the character Dee and Jackson presents materialism in the form of the whole town, in my opinion.
In my paper, I will write about the similarities and differences of materialism in both short stories; as well as comparing them to the movie Mean Girls- which id the epitome of materialism. I think I will be able to shed an interesting light by comparing the materialism found in the text with the materialism found in the movie. I will help the reader gain a better sense of materialism and how it is prevalent in today’s society and how it can relate all throughout history, shown in these two short stories, which were written in 1948 and 1973.

Posted by: Melissa L. at March 26, 2008 04:35 PM

For my research paper, I will be discussing the representations of reality in August Wilson’s Fences. The main character Troy Maxson has several characteristics that represent reality. Troy is in his forties and has become a very bitter man. He has experienced many hardships in his lifetime that have made him become this way. Because of his bitterness, Troy tends to push the people who love him the most away and also have an affair. These are all representations of things that happen in real life. In my paper I will try to compare these situations to real life.

Posted by: Shayla Sorrells at March 26, 2008 04:56 PM

One complimentary conflict in Earnest Hemingway’s “The Sun Also Rises” and Alice Walker’s “Everyday Use” is a main character in each story desires something that ultimately they can not receive. Realistically this is a conflict that people confront everyday of their life. Interestingly enough, Jacob from “The Sun Also Rises” and Dee from “Everyday Use” are completely different characters with completely different outcomes. However, both characters face the same conflict on some level.
Jacob wants throughout the entire story to be with his love Brett. Whereas Dee desires more materialistic needs in wanting a quilt that were constructed by her grandmother. Even though Jacob and Dee desire two totally different items both are shallow to an extent. Jacob does himself no justice by following Brett around like a puppy for nearly the entire book hoping for something that will never be because of his impotence. Whereas Dee desires something that was promised to his younger sister and condescends her sisters needs and use for the quilt.
Jacobs’s shallowness lies in the simple fact that he is doing himself no good longing for Brett and Dee makes herself look like a shallow fool. In the end neither Jacob nor Dee get what they desire and in Jacobs case he realizes at the end of the book it is for the better. Dee, on the other hand, doesn’t realize that it was better her sister Maggie received the blanket for practical reasons and in the end would serve Dee no more purpose than a trophy.

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Erin, as with all reading responses submitted to the English-Blog for EL 267, you must first submit the response to the proper space on www.turnitin.com (the date for which it was assigned). To get credit, the response must be present in both places by the deadline. Submissions to only one will not receive credit, so beware!

Posted by: Erin at March 26, 2008 05:14 PM

Joe Bonham, a blind, deaf man with neither a face nor limbs attempts to communicate with the outside world in hopes of teaching others about the outcome of war. Sargeant, an African American homeless man tries to find a place to sleep for the evening, while attempting to knock down the racial barriers he is faced with. Two men, with hardly any obvious similarities, both share their journeys as they overcome challenging obstacles.
Both these men are treated poorly by society, and are hardly heroic. However, they embark on a journey to beat the odds and to be that change in the world. Joe hopes to educate others, and frighten families enough to hold their children and loved ones back from entering the war. Sargeant wants justice and equality, and is willing to fight for what he believes in and stand up for himself.
Joe and Sargeant undergo significant changes in characters. Sargeant follows all of the rules and behaves humanely. He politely knocks at the Reverends door, asking for help, however is shunned immediately when the door is shut in his face. Expecting the rejection, he moves on until he sees two church doors. When the doors are locked, he attempts to pull them open, however fails. His breaking point occurs when the police pull at him, demanding him to let go. They beat him until he blacks out, which is when the threshold of adventure is crossed from the ordinary world to the special world. Sargeant meets Jesus, who becomes a companion for him to talk to about his problems. He is not the almighty Jesus as Christians believe; he has no advice or knoweldge to instill in Sargeant. In attempts to get away to a new place, Sargeant jumps onto a train, but is beat again until he wakes up. He is prison being beat by the guards. Although it appears as though he is defeated, he does not give up. He knows the battle is not over for him.
Joe wakes up in the dark, unable to open his eyes because they are no longer a part of his face. After a few moments he realizes that he has no face. He later learns that he has no arms and legs, and solely consists of a midsection, neck, and back of the head. All he has left are his memories in which he flashes back to regularly. Joe feels helpless and useless. He feels dead even though he is alive. His mind races and memories haunt him. His threshold to adventure is crossed when Joe is successful in learning how to develop a concept of time. He becomes ecstatic and proud of his successes, and begins to embark on a new adventure. Joe practices Morse code every time a person enters the room, hoping he/she will understand. His new nurse becomes his ally, as she does everything possible to understand what he is trying to communicate. She brings him in a man who understands Morse code to communicate with Joe. The man asks Joe what he wants, and when Joe explains that he wants to be an exhibit to teach others about the outcome of war, the man explains that it would be against regulations. Joe is defeated, left there hopeless to die.

Amanda S.

Posted by: Amanda Swartz at March 26, 2008 08:37 PM

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The answers to the midterm examinations (both versions) and scans of the research proposal sign-up sheets (the sheet for topics and the sheet for theories) are all on J-Web in the section "Handouts assigned on 12 March 2008." Pay special attention if you were absent that night and missed the details of the assignment (e-mail me with your choice[s]).

The discussion questions we covered in class are also there. Remember, I won't be "collecting" the questions for you anymore. For the final exam, be sure you are taking notes in class, reading the blogs, and keeping your own list of questions asked, whether they are in a quiz or in group/class activities.

*NOTE* The deadline for this assignment has now passed. Any comments listed below are *ONLY* for the reposting of proposals that I asked to be revised. Any posted below that missed the deadline will not get credit for the assignment. Please note, however, that you cannot turn in a final paper without doing a proposal. So, even if you missed your chance to get credit for it, you *STILL* have to do one.

Posted by: Lee at March 26, 2008 10:27 PM

A Pittsburgh native, August Wilson, wrote the Pulitzer and Tony
Award winning playwright, "Fences". The play takes place in Pittsburgh,
Pennsylvania at the time that Hank Aaron led the Milwaukee Braves to the
World Series beating the New York Giants. The main character of the story,
Troy, was a baseball player in the Negro Leagues but was too old when
African Americans were being drafted into the Major Leagues. He moved on
with his life and works for the sanitation company lifting garbage cans into
the dump truck. This step back from being a professional athlete and
having to settle with a "Joe" job depresses him. His son Cory, is offered
to play baseball for a recruit coming into town. Troy does everything in
his power to prevent Cory from having the same high hopes and expectations
that he did with the Major Leagues in hopes that Cory will keep his job
instead. Similar themes of struggle, failure, and depression can also be
seen in the song, "One" by Metallica.
In the song, "One" by Metallica, the interpreted themes are of
struggle and deep depression. In the song, "One" , Metallica describe the
feelings and struggles with everyday life of the main character of the song,
as well as book and movie "Johnny Get Your Gun; a World War I veteran who
had his ears, throat, sight, arms and legs blown off by a land mine. Such
struggle, where he had failed on several occasions to accomplish some of his
daily goals. This is based off of the book, the movie, as well as the
interpretation of the song. Suffering from deep depression is easily seen
in "Fences". It is also seen and well understood that the veteran would
suffer from great depression as well. Evidence of depression in the song is
seen in the refrain, "hold my breath as I wish for death, oh please God wake
me..." Troy experiences all of these emotions and hardships in the play,
"Fences" and can be correlated with one another.
Through the advances of science and technology, the main characters'
bitterness towards athleticism and evidence of depression and struggle, and
in Wilson's Play, "Fences" can be seen in parallel to the song "One" written
by Metallica's James Hetfield and Lars Ulrich. This connection is seen as
the advancements in technology and science, the fields too, as if a person,
had undergone struggle and depression as the veteran and Troy had endured.

Posted by: RD at March 29, 2008 10:50 AM

Inequality of all kinds (in literature and real life) is an interesting topic for me. I am quite passionate about gender inequality in particular; therefore, for my research paper, I will focus on the gender inequalities that appear in Susan Glaspbell’s, “A Jury of Her Peers,” and Earnest Heminway’s, The Sun Also Rises. Gender inequality plays a large role in both of these works in some form or another. Although the two works are similar in that they both contain gender inequalities, they differ in the genders that are portrayed or referred to as unequal. Through the character’s actions and dialogue, it is quite clear that women in “A Jury of Her Peers,” and men in The Sun Also Rises are indeed unequal to the opposite gender within the individual stories, and are somehow inferior.
In this paper, I will argue and support with evidence from the text that the women in “A Jury of Her Peers” are treated as less than equals by the men in the story. I have found over 15 separate lines of dialogue that indicate this. From Minnie and John Wright, to the attorney, the sheriff, and Mrs. Hale and Mrs. Peters, the women are consistently treated poorly and unequally by males. I will use the fact that the women for the majority of the story are (with the exception of Minnie) are referred to as “Mrs. [husband’s last name]” indicating that they are nothing more than property of their husbands. Similarly, the women only refer to their husbands as “Mr…” showing a level of distance and superiority of the men over the women. I will also use the condescending comments that the men make towards the women to support my claim.
I will argue that as a result of being treated as unequal herself by her husband in The Sun Also Rises, Bret has turned to treating men as unequals. I will use the fact that when Romero tries to “feminize” her, Bret immediately turns away and refuses to do what he asks to support this claim. Similarly, Bret uses men for whatever she happens to need at the moment. She has no regard for their feelings or for their basic humanity. She cheats on them in front of each other, and through an odd role reversal, takes on the stereotypical male role. She never has to justify herself or be concerned with her appearance, yet the men are constantly concerned with proving their masculinity, and are usually forced to do so as a result of her actions in some form.


*Is the thesis statement better now?

Posted by: Chera P at March 30, 2008 11:41 AM


Heather Stull
Professor Hobbs
EL267.01
Revision 4-2-08


In “The Painted Bird”, author Jerzy Kosinski tells the story of an abandoned child during World War II. “Everything is Illuminated”, a novel by Jonathan Safran Foer, focuses also on World War II. The protagonist, named for the author, travels to the Ukraine to find a woman whom he believes may have saved his grandfather from the Nazis. Throughout both novels there exist many conflicts. I will be focusing on a conflict that three of the major characters face. The type of conflict is Man vs. Society influenced by ethnic/racial prejudices.

From “The Painted Bird” I will be focusing on the protagonist himself. I will discuss the difficulties that this character faces as a result of being “different”. Does he try to change himself to fit in? Under what circumstances is he accepted, if at all, by the other villagers? Also, when he is reunited with his own family, is he able to act as before or has he been forever altered by his experience as an outcast?
I will be studying two characters from “Everything is Illuminated”. The first will be Jonathan Safran Foer. I will examine the difficulties he faces on his journey to Eastern Europe. How is he received by his guides? What difficulties does he face on this journey as a foreigner? Secondly, I will look at Jonathan’s translator, Alex. Is he an “outsider” in any way? What difficulties doe he face throughout the novel? What is the reason behind his strong bond with Jonathan? Although these characters exist in two different time periods, the root of their conflict is the same. Ultimately, I hope to uncover similar responses from these characters to the struggles that they encounter.

Posted by: Heather S. at April 2, 2008 01:21 PM

7 April 2008
EL 267
Research Paper Proposal (revised)
In my paper I will be exploring how Joseph Campbell’s Monomyth and the theme of journey is paralleled in the novel “Johnny Got His Gun” by Dalton Trumbo and “Siddhartha” by Herman Hesse. I will be assessing the similarities between these two works in how they are similar in the journey to find enlightenment, and how enlightenment has different definition for both of them. The universal idea of journey brings many protagonists to their personal enlightenment, and the journey in each work is very similar and can be modeled in Joseph Campbell’s Monomyth.
I plan to split the paper up into three parts like the novel, Siddhartha. The first part of the book refers to Siddhartha attempting to find enlightenment through him and his friend’s joining of a group of nomadic people. I will compare this to the relationship with Joe’s family and friends back home. The first section will focus on the use of family and friend relationships as a catalyst to enlightenment. I will use this as the departure phase of the journey.
The second part of the book is based on “the temptation of the woman” and I will use this as a comparison between Siddhartha and his lover and Joe and the many women he encounters in the book. I will examine how Joe’s relationship with Kareen, the nurse, and other minor female characters compares to Siddhartha’s love interest and compare the relationships to the monomyth. This part will be the first half of the initiation phase.
The last part of the book is about the self- finding enlightenment. Therefore, I will look at the Joe’s path to enlightenment and compare it to Siddhartha’s path. Joe’s path to enlightenment was very different in that he was forced away and it was not his choice to find enlightenment through seclusion. Siddhartha’s path was chosen, but they both reach an end that is very different literally, but symbolically similar. This last part I will use as an example of the end of the initiation phase and the beginning of the return phase.

Posted by: Candice S at April 8, 2008 02:10 PM

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23 April 2008

Ok class, the results of your new assignment (as discussed in class tonight) will now be displayed below this remark. By now, your thesis should be much more refined than it was in your proposals.

Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: Dr. Hobbs at April 23, 2008 01:04 PM

Amanda Farabaugh
April 24, 2008

Thesis:
Perceiving the truth is through nature’s existence in a literature text.

3 Main Points:

Within both texts: Eudora Welty’s “A Worn Path” and Metallica’s “One”, both show nature symbolizing something else within their texts. Eudora used the world around Phoenix as ways to bring out natural symbolism. I will show that they do exist within the text. For example, when Welty writes that the worn path (something in nature) actually symbolizes the natural symbolisms that surround her on her journey. Each natural symbolism has another meaning behind what is written and I will show throughout the paper how nature plays a part in natural symbolisms.

In Metallica’s “One”, natural symbolisms are in the form of his lyrics. James Hatfield uses symbols to describe the protagonist’s feelings. For example when he writes that he is back in the womb, this actually symbolizes without being able to move, speak, hear, see it’s like there is a womb that is covering him; like an unborn child in the womb. I will show the symbolisms throughout the text and their meanings.

Also within the texts nature’s role is also through perception verses reality. Both characters in the two texts are trying to deal with reality that surrounds them, while only being able to perceive things as they see them. I will show and explain how perception verses reality affects natures role in texts.

Posted by: Amanda F. at April 24, 2008 11:19 PM

Thesis: Brett and Rose, though total opposite in character, play very strong feminist roles in The Sun Also Rises and Fences.
Argument: Their Beliefs
How they live their lives
The period of time they lived in
And the choices they make

Posted by: Erin at April 25, 2008 04:52 PM

Blog 8
Thesis: The universal idea of journey brings many different types of protagonists from both eastern and western literature to their personal enlightenment, and most of these journeys can be traced through Joseph Campbell’s Monomyth.
Arguments:
1. Both of the protagonists try to use friendship as a catalyst to enlightenment through the departure phase. This idea fails for both of them, but the experiences help them grow as a person and they learn from them.
2. In the initiation phase both of the protagonists turn to the temptation of women and peace with the father. This idea, again helps the protagonists grow as people, but it does not aid them in their path to enlightenment.
3. In the return phase of both Joe and Siddhartha’s Journey they find enlightenment through the peace and contentment within themselves.

Posted by: Candice S at April 26, 2008 12:01 PM

In both The Painted Bird and Everything Is Illuminated, the characters are sometimes pulled together by the violent acts of racism, but far more often their lives are disrupted and pulled apart.

Alex and Jonathan’s friendship is born from the discovery that they share the same heritage. The boy of The Painted Bird, despite being reunited with his parents, is never able to return to his former self after his experiences during the war. His close relationship with Gavrila and Mitka serve to further complicate the situation.

The boy of The Painted Bird is separated from his home and family due to an extreme cultural prejudice.
Jonathan must journey away from his country to trace the history of his ancestors who were forced to flee because of their ethnicity.

Ethnic conflict keeps the boy of The Painted Bird alienated from the peasants and Brod, from Everything is Illuminated, from the members of the shtetl. Both suffer acts of violence because of their ethnicity.

Posted by: Heather S. at April 27, 2008 09:27 AM

Thesis:
Audiences will often comment that the movie is not as “good” as the book because the movie adaptation, in this case, does not fully illuminate the characters by just using illuminating effects and leaving out the past events that lead to the illumination.

1.) The movie does not even include most of the major flashbacks from the movie, making the the flashbacks that are incorporated difficult to understand.
2.) There are specific flash backs not included that diminish the illumination of not only Alex's grandfather, but Jonathan's grandfather as well.
3.) Even when the illumination effect is used in the movie, the illumination is still lacking as the viewers do not know the entire back story to how the character became illuminated.

Posted by: Samantha G. at April 27, 2008 05:03 PM

Inequities noted in Ernest Hemingway’s The Sun Also Rises may be compared with those seen in Langston Hughes’ “On the Road” to show that no matter the situation or location, individuals can be treated unfairly.

Injustice is in direct opposition with ethical and moral reasoning yet is still a a composite characteristic of many. Injustices are not reserved as a form of treatment toward only the downtrodden and less fortunate; inequities based on gender and religion are often seen as a part of daily life.

The themes of gender bias and religious intolerance will be discussed as found within the two texts.

Posted by: Vivian Lee C. at April 27, 2008 07:20 PM

Chera Pupi
April 30, 2008
Paper Thesis and Arguments

THESIS: Through the character’s actions and dialogue, it is quite clear that women in “A Jury of Her Peers,” and men in The Sun Also Rises, are indeed unequal to the opposite gender within the individual stories, and are somehow inferior.

MAIN ARGUMENTS:
1. The men constantly degrade the women’s livelihood and intelligence in “A Jury of Her Peers.”
2. Women do not have their own identities in “A Jury of Her Peers.”
3. Women’s husbands treat them as property.
4. Every instance in which the men and women are together, the men are making fun of the women.
5. Brett totally controls the men in her life.
6. Brett has no regards for the basic humanity of the men.
7. Brett never has to justify her actions, but the men do.
8. Brett manipulates and degrades Jake.

Posted by: Chera P at April 28, 2008 02:09 PM

Joe Bonham, a blind, deaf man with neither a face nor limbs attempts to communicate with the outside world in hopes of teaching others about the outcome of war. Sargeant, an African American homeless man tries to find a place to sleep for the evening, while attempting to knock down the racial barriers he is faced with. Two men, with hardly any similarities both share journeys as they overcome challenging obstacles, as outcasts of society. Joe and Sargeant embark on their journeys to beat the odds and to be that change in the world. They are both rejected, silenced, and stopped, but they remain strong willed as they attempt to break through barriers.

Amanda S.

Posted by: Amanda S. at April 28, 2008 09:02 PM

Thesis: Those that fight in the war and those that live in countries that are involved with the war are greatly affected by the war, which is portrayed in both Johnny Got His Gun by Dalton Trumbo and The Painted Bird by Jerzy Kosinski.

Points covered:
1. Joe lost his legs, arms, and face due to the war. He was greatly affected by the war even though he did not want to fight in it.
2. The boy had to leave his parents and was on his own traveling from village to village. He did not fight in the war but was greatly affected as well.
3. War will effect people no matter if they are in the war or if they are outside the war.

Posted by: Michelle E. at April 29, 2008 05:43 PM

Representation of Journey in “On the Road” and “Johnny Got His Gun”
A journey in a story is a process that someone must go through, easy or difficult, to get to a common objective or goal. My objective is to relate the short story, “On the Road” by Langston Hughes, and the novel, “Johnny Got His Gun” by Dalton Trumbo, in the hopes of correlating the two by their similarities and parallelism of the representation of journey throughout the two stories. In both of these stories, they display a lot of hidden meanings, metaphors, biblical personification, and an incredible amount of imagery as to guide the reader in the direction that the author would like one to believe is happening.

Thomas A.

Posted by: Thomas A. at April 30, 2008 12:00 AM

Thesis: In Jonathans Safran Foer’s novel “Everything is Illuminated” and Alice Walkers’s short story “Everyday Use”, religion is a central theme. By comparing the religion in each story, to one’s own religion, it is possible to not only see the differences, but also that even those who do not practice an organized religion are practicing their own beliefs in their own way.
Three main points:
1 The Uprights vs. the Slouchers- what caused the split and why they are still split.
2. Alex’s Impression of Jewish People- Alex has a vision of Jewish people that is not correct. He assumes Jonathan looks like a “Jew”.
3. Showing of “non-religion” in “Everyday Use” by choosing who will get the quilt. The Family does not hold and religious view, this hinders them as a family.

Posted by: chris king at April 30, 2008 01:47 PM

Revised Thesis:

The outcomes of war are represented in Johnny Got His Gun and The Painted Bird, whether it is a direct consequence from fighting in the war or an indirect consequence that is felt outside of the battle itself.

Posted by: C. Bell at April 30, 2008 02:08 PM

My thesis is "Isolation of his/her mind causes their perception of reality to be very vague and can be identified in the short stories "The Allegory of the Cave" and "The Lottery", the novel The Giver as well as our reality."

The arguments that are presented in my paper are (1)Seclusion of one's mind causes lack of knowlege. (2) Finding out the truth may cause a great deal of pain. (3) Isolation causing ignorance is present in our world today.

Posted by: Ryenn Micaletti at April 30, 2008 02:16 PM

Am. Lit II
Revised Thesis and Three Arguments

Thesis:
Both Jerzy Kosinski’s The Painted Bird and Eudora Welty’s “A Worn Path” reveal a definite difference in the power of two ethnicities; however, both also reveal equality between the two by contrasting their views on civility and religion, and by the different outcomes of the main character’s journey.

Argument 1:
Although the two ethnicities in both books have different levels of power, neither ethnicity is civilized and both are capable of acts of immorality and savagery.

Argument 2:
Although one ethnicity uses religion/superstition and one uses order, both ethnicities use a ritual to gain a feeling of safety and control over their own lives.

Argument 3:
The main characters of both stories see flaws in both cultures, and both characters must choose whether they are willing to return to their home with this knowledge.

Posted by: HGeary at April 30, 2008 03:35 PM

Although The Sun Also Rises and “A Jury of Her Peers” were written at different historical places in time, both stories show the harmful effects caused by many psychological and mental defects that humans experience, especially depression and post traumatic stress disorder.

The first argument in proving this thesis is that Lady Brett and Jake, characters from "The Sun Also Rises" both suffered from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder following WWI. Secondly, Lady Brett and Jake also both suffer from depression in conjunction with alcoholism. Finally, the character Minnie Foster in "A Jury of Her Peers" also suffers from depression.

Posted by: Jodi S. at April 30, 2008 05:11 PM

Natasha Hill

When movies are made about books the movie sometimes adds scenes or eliminates rather important ones. In my paper I will be proving that the film version of Trumbo’s novel enhances the experience of the reader. It makes metaphors, dream sequences and the reactions of others towards the main character more understandable and clear. This film is an excellent companion to the novel. Three sections of the book/movie I will cover particularly are the 1) separation between dream and reality, 2) The presence of Jesus in Joe’s dream, and 3) The ending of the book as compared to the film.

Posted by: Natasha Hill at April 30, 2008 05:18 PM

Reading a good novel is a very good journey. The journey is not only follow the characters’ trip in the novel, but also the readers need to feel the characters’ sprint, their emotion and their personal development. All the things that have the meaning in the story are the nature. Nature could be humans, things, the environment, and everything else that could influence the story. In “Everyday Use” and Everything is Illuminated the nature and culture greatly influence the characters and changed their personal value.

Posted by: Yichuan Sun at April 30, 2008 05:45 PM

Yichuan Sun
Professor: Professor Hobbs
EL 267 America Lit.
April 30, 2008

The Nature and Culture Influence in Novel
Reading a good novel is a very good journey. The journey is not only follow the characters’ trip in the novel, but also the readers need to feel the characters’ sprint, their emotion and their personal development. All the things that have the meaning in the story are the nature. Nature could be humans, things, the environment, and everything else that could influence the story. In “Everyday Use” and Everything is Illuminated the nature and culture greatly influence the characters and changed their personal value.
Alice Walker’s “Everyday Use” is a story that confronts us with three characters (mother and two daughters) with different opinion about how to deal with their grandmother’s remnant. And it’s actually the conflicting ideas about their identities and ancestry. The way they think about the grandmother’s quilt actually shows their different personal value.
The mother narrates the story of the day one daughter, Dee, visits from college and clashes with the other daughter, Maggie, over the possession of some heirloom quilts. We can easily find the mother and the younger daughter, Maggie are represent the old traditional black women, while the older daughter Dee who had became really different from them. Through describe the complete difference mother and daughter; I think the culture influence which is the “nature” outside that makes this happen.

The theme centers on Mama’s awakening of one daughter’s superficiality and to the other’s deep-seated understanding of heritage. Dee has a total different understanding of the meaning of the heritage from her mom and sister, Walker describe her as a selfish and arrogant woman, but what makes her has so much difference with her sister and mom. Dee left her small country home town and went to the college. Her college experience completely changed her. She got the education from the school that her mother and sister never got and met a lot of people from the different background such as her boy friend. Those things that changed her personal value are the nature and the culture.
Alice published “Everyday Use” in 1973 which was a time that black culture in the heyday, the Afro hairstyle was in fashion and Blacks were seeking their cultural roots in Africa. At the same time, black’ culture get violent strike form the white culture in U.S.A. Dee is a typical black girl which actually been influenced by the white culture. Walker described Dee’s movements when she was determined to take the quilts show how she is an ego girl. “She held the quilts securely in her arms, stroking them;”
In this story, Walker use grandmother’s quilts symbolized as the traditional African American black culture heritages, which Dee’s selfish make she does not understand. “Dee moved back just enough so that I couldn’t reach the quilts. They already belonged to her.” (Walker 6) In Dee’s mind the quilts is just quilts which only should account its financial and aesthetic value.
The white culture completely changed Dee to another girl, because she went to the college before. The “Nature” which is the outside world around her changed everything, the outside world is a world which with full of the white culture. Mum and Maggie doesn’t want be changed by the outside they want themselves just to adopt the pure Africa American culture heritage like they trying to save their grandmother’s quilt. Compared with her sister Maggie is a pure, kind, timid and even innocent black girl. She enjoyed live with her family like the tradition things, in her mind the quilts themselves, as art, are inseparable from the culture they arose from. In both of them were scraps of dresses Grandma Dee had worn fifty and more years ago. Bits and pieces of Grandpa Jarrell's Paisley shirts. And one teeny faded blue piece . . . that was from Great Grandpa Ezra's uniform that he wore in the Civil War." (Walker 6) The quilts means the history of the family. That’s also the “nature” influence her family and the family’s culture make her become such a girl like this she think the quilts is not just quilts which should account its emotional value. Obviously, Walker thinks the pure and traditional culture is right. Culture must be put into “Everyday use” situation to keep it alive and active.
In Everything is Illuminated that written by Jonathan Safran Foer, in this story, the culture conflict is basically shown on the outside world and the environment. The story about the Everything is illuminated is about a young American writer Jonathan who travelled to Ukraine in 1998 and trying to find his grandfather’s life in there. He wants to find a women who saved his grandfather’s life from the Nazis and his grandfather’s hometown – Tachimbrod.
The journey of the story is the way that three main characters trying to find that village are also the journey in their mind and spirit world, their memories and themselves. There are three main characters in this book which are Jonathan, Alex and Alex’s grandpa also named Alex and named Eli before the war.
Alex’s Jonathan’s guide throughout his trip to Ukraine he is completely different with his family like his dad and grandpa. Alex is deeply influenced by the U.S.A and western culture. His language, his clothes and his jewelry are all like a fashion U.S.A young people. Ukraine used to be a really traditional and conservative country because it’s used to a part of Soviet Union. But the nature environment around them is start being changed. U.S culture has come to everywhere. Alex spoke hilariously incorrect English and he’s proud of it. The nature make Alex try his best and do whatever he can to be a U.S people, but the first U.S. young people he now which is Jonathan, actually is not like he imagine. Jonathan is such a traditional American writer, if we didn’t heard what they said, maybe we will confused the country Alex and Jonathan come from.
In the book we can see Alex is the same age with Jonathan. They are both 20 years old and the nature they live made this country influence to them and turn Alex like a American hippy and Jonathan like a traditional Ukraine people.
In their journey, memory is very important thing that be a nature to influence them, especially for the grandfather, on the way they are travelling ,his memories are also have a trip make him back to the War, his memory are full of pain and conflict, he refused to acknowledge them at the first, but in the end, the journey changed him, the nature helped him to face the foretime and the sin he made in the war, at the last part of the book with the grandfather’s death, we can say grandfather find the peace and himself.
Alex’s journey is a way to find himself, growing and become mature. Alex is a person like lost himself at the very beginning of the story. He is trying to make himself like an American young people, but actually he does not know what he want, but things being changed when Alex start writing. At first Alex writes exaggerates wildly, but he becomes honest in the end, with writing he is able to be honest with himself about his life--and stand up to Father.
In the end of the book, Alex’s grandfather finally called him Alex which he usually called him Sasha. That means the grandfather approved Alex’s growth, he thought Alex is now a man like himself in young age. That means Alex successfully proved himself. The nature influence is their journey completed changed them, and make them growth, find themselves or face the sin.


Works Cited
Safran Foer, Jonathan. Everything is Illuminated. New York: Harper Perennial, 2002.
Walker, Alice. “Everyday Use.” 1973. Literature: An Introduction to Fiction, Poetry,
Drama,and Writing. Eds. Kennedy, X.J. and Dana Gioia. 5th Compact Ed. New York: Pearson-Longman, 2006.
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This paper is submitted to Foer's blog because in my paper I talked about how those characters in Foer’s book have a mind and inside journey and develop or face themselves in the end.

Posted by: Yichuan Sun at April 30, 2008 11:27 PM

Chris King
EL 267
Dr. Hobbs
30 April 2008
Organized Religion vs. Personal Belief Systems in Jonathan Safran Foer’s Everything is Illuminated” and Alice Walker’s “Everyday Use”
In Jonathans Safran Foer’s novel “Everything is Illuminated” and Alice Walkers’s short story “Everyday Use”, religion is a central theme. By comparing the religion in each story, to one’s own religion, it is possible to not only see the differences, but also that even those who do not practice an organized religion are practicing their own beliefs in their own way.
Jonathan’s Foer’s “Everything is Illuminated” is broken up into three different sections. The first section is Jonathan’s interpretation of the family’s history. Second section is Alex’s interpretation of the trip in present day. The third section describes with the letters in which the two boys sent back and forth between one another. Within the story line, Jonathan is attempting to research his Grandfather’s life while in the Ukraine. This young Jewish-American is searching to find his grandfather's shtetl, Trachimbrod. He has but only a name, a map, and some photographs. The name, Augustine, is said to be the name of a person who rescued and saved his grandfather from the Nazis during the holocaust. Within the Ukraine, Jonathon acquires a guide named Alex. Their driver is Alex’s grandfather (who claims to be blind, but isn’t). Also tagging along for the trip is grandfather’s seeing-eye dog, Sammy Davis, junior, junior. (Foer, Everything is Illuminated)
Obviously religion is correlated with the holocaust. In a beginning chapter of Foer’s “Everything is Illuminated religion is used when saying that the shtetl is divided into two sections, the Jewish Quarter and the Human Three-Quarters (Foer’s Everything is Illuminated). The Jewish Quarter is associated with being sacred, whereas, the Human Quarter is secular. While I am not Jewish, I do see that there is a fine line being split between the two sections of the shtetl. Each is stereotyped into being either religious (sacred) or not religious (secular).
Within the synagogue of the shtetl, people pray to God through shouting (Foer’s, Everything is Illuminated). This isn’t typical of anything I am used to within religion, and doesn’t seem to be the norm of the Jewish faith either. Suprizingly this tradition is two hundred years old within the shtetl. The townspeople also developed a tradition of hanging from the ceiling while in prayer. They clung to a rope with one hand and clutched a prayer book with the other in an attempt to be closer with God. Their faith is tested one time through a fly’s annoyance in the synagogue. The fly tickled the men while they hung from the ropes. Most of them passed this test by letting go of the rope instead of letting go of the prayer book proving their dedication to their God and not letting go of his word. They continued this tradition annually and these are the people who stayed to pray at the synagogue, known as the Upright synagogue members. There were, however, people who did let go of the prayer book instead of the rope for fear of falling. They chose to believe in the “flesh” of themselves rather than to believe that the holy word of God would save them. For this reason, they become known as Slouchers and these people had to wear sewed fringes on their sleeves to remind them of their disappointing non-faith. It was at this point where the two different congregations began to split becoming more and more different. The Upright congregation retained a sacred sense, whereas, the Slouchers developed a secular sense of everything. The two groups leave each other alone except when they struggle to push the Upright Synagogue, which is on wheels, further toward either the Jewish Quarter or the Human Three-Quarters (Foer’s, Everything is Illuminated).
I feel as though the Slouchers really did not trust in the religion that they had once believed in. I pondered why such people of faith would not feel safe in the mists of a God they worship. In my beliefs of Christianity, what God says and commands will be done if it is his will. In Judaism, the beliefs are of God not Jesus Christ (Religious Facts). If it is his will, whether in Judaism or Christianity, God will provide you help where it is asked for. If these Slouchers believed that God would save them no matter what, then why did they let go of the prayer book and not the rope? Also, after they “sinned” against God by not obeying, would they not try and repent for their sins rather than accept the fate of being “Slouchers” for the rest of their lives?
Women up to this point were not allowed in the synagogue, however, this changed temporarily. In 1763, the congregation tried to implement a compromise hoping to allow women into the synagogue. For a time it worked, however, as the women looked up from the basement, through the glass floor, the men became distracted. Again, the women were banned from the synagogue except for looking through a hole in the wall from the outside (Foer’s, Everything is Illuminated).
I find it interesting that the women are banned from the synagogue this late in history. Definitely in early times of the world, women were not allowed to do such things and even in present day, women are still being restricted in many ways, but I would think that women of this time would be allowed to venture into the synagogue if they so desired. Perhaps the reason is due to the Holocaust being currently prominent. This would defiantly alter views and actions taken in this era of time.
I feel that Foer’s “Everything is Illuminated” houses many religious conflicts and meanings. The two groups mentioned are starting to form the believers and non-believers of religion. The Upright congregation is confident in their beliefs, as they have always been, whereas, the Slouchers have chosen the path of a non-belief, for they have not been able to keep full faith. This is hard to comprehend. If at one time the Slouchers believed in God and happened to make a mistake, “sinning” against him, would they not be forgiven with repentance (as is typical of religion)? It seems they believe that there is no forgiveness and also that they are inferior to Godliness. It is also interesting how all of the townspeople are Jewish and should share the same beliefs, but they don’t, they are split by religion rather than by a faith-based belief.
While talking to Jonathon through letters, Alex develops an impression of Jonathan. He has seen the pictures of Jews from the holocaust and has seen Americans in magazines. Alex feels confident in picking Jonathan out of a crowd, fast. However, Alex finds that the Jewish American traits he was expecting were sadly incorrect. Jonathan is not but a simple, normal looking person; A typical American. Alex, for some reason, associated holocaust pictures with Jonathan’s appearance even though it is of a different time era and the holocaust happened many years prior (Foer’s, Everything is Illuminated). I find it interesting that Alex would make such a bold, solid image in his mind before meeting Jonathan. I feel as though people use religion or religious views in making assumptions about other people. As minute as this one is, it still carries a pretty deep meaning into Alex’s original view of Jews and how he portrayed them in his head.
Does not possessing any religious views affect your life style and situations that are encountered? The family (mother and two daughters) doesn’t seem to share any organized religious views, which could be considered as a religious view in itself. I have always been reinforced with Christianity views, but I think this family’s nonreligious views impacts their lives negatively compared to how it may if they did have religious views.
Within Alice Walker’s short story “Everyday Use”, the family really does not possess any real organized religious beliefs, which I think to be a belief in itself. Before the oldest daughter, Dee, comes home to visit from college, the younger daughter, Maggie, and the mother are living their lives without religious beliefs. Dee finally arrives home from college to visit her family. With her is her current boyfriend at the time, Asalamalskin (Walker’s Everyday Use). I feel that from a Christianity sense, Dee does not find any wrong in how she acts with this boyfriend. The story line doesn’t outline their relationship in-depth, but they seem fine and very suited together, but how far does that go? I wonder if they are looking for marriage in the future. Also, I wonder, in a Christianity sense, if they have performed this relationship according to those laws of God or not? Abstinence is a big deal with relationships and religion. Are they abiding by this rule of God? Through actions of the story, I feel they have not and I feel that this hurts their relationship. Already, mom is not thrilled about the new boyfriend coming to visit (Walkers, Everyday Use). Perhaps this is due to a religious view, but sadly, it probably is not.
Towards the end of the story, the two sisters begin to fight over some quilts that the mother has. The oldest daughter wants them for herself and doesn’t think about her younger sister. Maggie, however, wants the quilts, but is not up to fighting about it. The mother finally decided that Maggie deserves the quilts rather than Dee (Walker’s, Everyday Use). I feel that the mother has really “played God” in this situation. She ultimately made the decision changing everyone’s life, as minute as it may seem. I also feel that if they were a Christian family, the decision would have been easier to make and would not have had so much arguing involved.
The family relationship, in general, does not seem very understanding, forgiving, or even close. The older sister is a cast away, which could be because she is a college student not living at home. However, I feel that if the family shared a common background, like religion (Christianity in particular), then they would be more appreciative, understanding, and compassionate towards one another.
In my experience, typically Christians and family of the same, show more love and compassion than those who are not. It is in this that I see more reason to be religious rather than not. Simply because it seems to make situations turn out for the better rather than for the worse. People of a religious background house one commonality between one another, religion. In Foer’s “Everything is Illuminated”, the Jewish faith would be the common ground of Jonathan’s life, whereas, the family in Alice Walker’s “Everyday Use” shares a common ground by not housing any religious views. Jonathon found himself believing in Judaism, whereas, Alex and his grandfather did not share a religion. Alex and his grandfather were not as modest, loving, kind, or polite in any sense. Because of this, I feel that they are not any of those words because they do not have religious views. Likewise, if the family from “Everyday Use” held a religious view, the family may be more kind to one another. Religion is something that both, or all parties can contribute to, whether the persons believe the same morals, idea, or beliefs. Each is to their own, as it should be, but it is what a person chooses and what they do with their decisions that make the difference.


Works Cited
Religion Facts. 2008. "Christian Holidays." ReligionFacts. 8 February 2007. [from "Updated:" on the left of the article] Accessed 8 December 2007 [date you accessed the article] .>
Foer, Jonathan Safran. "Everything is Illuminated ." New York: Hougnton Mifflin Company, 2002.
Walker, Alice. "Everyday Use ." n.d.

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This paper is placed under Jonathon Safran Foer's Blog because in this paper I analyzed Religious views within his novel, "Everything is Illuminated".

Posted by: Chris King at May 1, 2008 12:10 PM

Heather Stull
Dr. Hobbs
EL267.01
30 April, 2008
The Pulls of Racism
In
Jerzy Kosinski’s The Painted Bird and Jonathan Safran Foer’s Everything is Illuminated
In both The Painted Bird and Everything is Illuminated, the characters are sometimes pulled together by the violent acts of racism, but far more often their lives are disrupted and pulled apart. The protagonist’s of Everything is Illuminated, Alex and Jonathan, form a friendship that develops out of their journey to Trachimbrod. Initially, the two are at odds with one another. Jonathan, a Jewish American, is ridiculed by Alex and his grandfather, his Ukrainian guides. Although they are living after World War II, Alex and his family exhibit many prejudices against Jewish people.
Alex is ignorant of his people’s history. He does not understand how the Poles and Ukrainian’s had treated the Jews during the War (Foer 62). He is filled with disbelief at the things Jonathan says to him and continues the historical trend of his ancestors by remaining skeptical of another culture’s practices and point-of-view. Near the end of their journey, new truths are exposed and Alex discovers the true history of his family, one that unites him indefinitely with Jonathan’s past. Through this they embark on a journey of self-discovery which shapes their friendship. Each documents the story of how they uncovered their past and in the history the line between them becomes blurred: “We are talking now, Jonathan, together, and not apart. We are with each other, working on the same story, and I am certain that you can also feel it. . . . I am you and you are me” (Foer 214). Although these two characters are brought together in the end, they are still greatly affected by the cultural divide that has persisted since the war. It pervades their initial relationship and also causes tension between all male members of Alex’s family. Most tragically, it separates the family from grandfather when he commits suicide to make atonement for the sins of his past.
The young boy of The Painted Bird is brought together with two officers of the Soviet Army, Gavrila and Mitka. Although these friendships are a result of the boy’s alienation, they aid him in becoming further alienated from his past self. Taking over the boy’s education, Gavrila provides texts which expose him to Soviet leaders and ideals. Gavrila tells him that: “people themselves [determine] the course of their lives and [are] the only masters of their destinies” (Kosinski 187). These teachings, along with Mitka’s radical demonstrations of justice, cause the boy to learn to depend only on himself, on no other human being, or even God. As a result, he begins to cherish the solitude of his earlier experiences as an orphan and tries to make the sensation endure. Thus, he is disturbed over the reunion with his parents; he “could not readily accept the idea of suddenly becoming someone’s real son. . . . A boy of my age. . . . should be able to choose for himself the people whom he wished to follow and learn from” (Kosinski 226-227). He feels smothered by the structure of everyday life and would rather be wandering alone, living a life of unpredictability (Kosinski 229). The boy has been forever changed, despite being reunited with his parents, he is never able to return to the son they once knew.
A result of the cultural discord within both novels is the separation from that which is familiar. The boy of The Painted Bird is forced away from his family and his home because of his ethnicity and the repercussions he may endure because of it. In what was initially an attempt to shelter him from severe circumstances and change, he is deposited into a world in which everyone looks and acts quite differently from him. He is persecuted for his uniqueness. The act that was supposed to deliver him from harm provided, in his solitude, an even larger arena for cruelty and prejudice.
In Everything is Illuminated, Jonathan journey’s to a country where he will face criticism for his heritage to discover the roots of his past and the stories of his ancestors who were pushed away for these same criticisms. On his journey, he faces opposition from his guides on many issues ranging from his appearance to his views about his culture’s history. The Ukrainian’s are prejudiced against him before ever meeting him. In Alex’s family, assumptions about the Jewish have been passed down and accepted from generation to generation. Alex idolizes Jonathan because he is American but does not embrace the Jewish side of him as if it somehow taints him.
Although he eagerly solicits knowledge of Americanisms from Jonathan, he ridicules the things that Jonathan tries to teach him about Jewish language and culture. This reaction is present not only with Alex and his grandfather but with several other Ukrainians such as the hotel keeper and the two waitresses. On his journey, Jonathan not only experiences the history of his ancestors physically- by being in the country of his grandfather’s birth, but mentally, as he is subjected to the criticisms and alienations that initially separated the Poles and Ukrainians from the Jews. In order to discover his ancestors Jonathan is forced to experience the modern existence of the prejudices that forced his people to flee.
Alienation is another result of racial prejudice. Ethnic conflict keeps the boy of The Painted Bird alienated from the peasants. Brod, from Everything is Illuminated is alienated from the other members of her shtetl. Both suffer acts of violence because of their ethnicity. After being torn from his home and family, the young boy is put in the care of a foster mother. She dies after only two months of caring for him and the boy is forced into wandering, seeking shelter in a remote village (Kosinski 3). He finds himself the object of scorn in a community filled with superstitions, many of which revolve around beings such as him self. The rich, educated boy from the city must now beg for food and shelter. Devoid of proper attention and love, the boy becomes like a roaming animal, being abused in the hands of all that take him in because of his ethnicity.
In addition to learning the social structures of the villages and the craft of homeopathic medicine, the superstitions of the villagers begin to etch themselves on the boys mind. As a younger child, he readily accepts the notions that his dark eyes can be the cause of great tragedy and hold the power to curse others. He becomes a victim of the prejudices and immediately begins to lose touch with all that was familiar. Even his parents, who share his appearance, seem to join the hierarchy of the villagers in his mind: “Did they [my parents] know that they should never drink or smile in the presence of evil-eyed people who might count their teeth? I would remember my father’s broad, relaxed smile and begin to worry; he showed so many teeth that if an evil eye were to count them, he would most certainly die very soon” (Kosinski 10).
Through each person that takes him in, the boy is exposed to deplorable, inhumane conditions. He is acquired, not out of love or kindness, but to fill a need that exists for his master. He is subjected to inhumane treatment, suffering from beatings, poor care, witnessing murders, and often forced to fight for his own life. While living this nightmare, the boy is growing up, defining himself and the world around him. Through his treatment as an outsider, exposed to brutal treatment and harsh living conditions in an ignorant society, the boy of The Painted Bird is forever changed. The experiences of his childhood have changed him into a person, that when reunited with his parents, is barely recognizable to them. Like the painted bird, the boy has been driven back to his kind (Kosinski 227). His only chance of living is to escape again. The attempt to save him from racial prejudice has caused him to be humiliated, abused, and transformed. His alienation from the peasants grows as he does, and soon encompasses not only his past but also his future with his parents.
Brod, of Everything is Illuminated, is immediately alienated by her cultural differences. Despite being lusted over for her beauty and mystery by some of the male shtetl members, she is ignored. Even the men who adore her do so in secret, joining in with the rest of the community in ridiculing her. From the start, she is an object to them, purely fulfilling sexual fantasy but not worthy of human love or kindness. She grows up alone as each generation discourages the next from associating with her. The villagers mock her, calling her “dirty river girl” and “water baby” (Kosinski 75). Because of the questionable details of her arrival into the shtetl, she is forever viewed with suspicion as if she were a curse set upon the town. In fulfillment to her own prophecy, she is raped one evening on her way home. Like the boy of The Painted Bird, her adolescence has been marked by abuse. The idea of the curse sets in upon her mind and she realizes that in order to escape this abusive alienation she must alienate herself even further by fleeing the shtetl.
As subjects of modern novels, the characters of The Painted Bird and Everything Is Illuminated, serve to illustrate two points. One, that far more often, cultural and ethnic discord ultimately cause destruction, alienation, and chaos. And two, that although the focus of the novels’ ethnic conflict, World War II, is in the past, the members of the Jewish community have been the subject of intense cruelty and ridicule in the past (Brod), the present (the boy of The Painted Bird), and the future (Jonathan).

Works Cited
Foer, Jonathan Safran. Everything Is Illuminated. New York: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2002.
Kosinski, Jerzy. The Painted Bird. New York: Grove Press, 1976.
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I chose to submit my final paper to this blog entry because the characters of Safran's novel were central to my thesis. I examined the experiences and ideas of Jonathan and Brod; as members of the Jewish community, and of Alex and his grandfather as Ukrainians.

Posted by: Heather S. at May 1, 2008 08:46 PM

Samantha Graham
Professor Hobbs
EL 267
25 March 2008

Jonathan Safran Foer’s Everything is Illuminated and the Illumination of Characters
Oftentimes, books that have developed large audiences are adapted into major motion pictures because of the popularity of the book. Everything is Illuminated, is one such adaptation of a book written by Jonathan Safran Foer, and was created by Liev Schreiber in 2005. However, motion pictures do not portray a book exactly as written. Audiences will often comment that the movie is not as “good” as the book because the movie adaptation, in this case, does not fully illuminate the characters by just using illuminating effects and leaving out the past events that lead to the illumination. I will discuss the effects used on the flash backs that were included in the movie adaptation as well as how leaving out certain flashbacks has taken away from the full experience of the work. I will first focus on a scene that is close to the end of the movie that takes place once the protagonist, Jonathan, and his tour guides have reached Trachimbrod. In this section of the book, a flash back occurs, as opposed to the movie where the characters in the present simply retell the story of how the Nazis came and made the Jews spit on the Torah
The scene that will be focused on first occurs in two places in the book; the earliest is in chapter eighteen, “Falling in Love”. In this chapter, Jonathan and his party first run into the woman who they quickly mistake for Augustine, the woman in the photo with Jonathan’s grandfather. It is not until chapter twenty-three, “What we saw when we saw Trachimbrod, or Falling in love”, that the woman they mistake as Augustine retells what happened during the annihilation of Trachimbrod. ‘“She is not Augustine,” I told the hero. “I thought that she was, but she is not”’ (Foer 151). Throughout the book, flashbacks are sections that develop the characters from the past. Since the movie adaptation leaves out many of these flashbacks, it is nearly impossible to incorporate and make sense of the Trachimbrod flashback.
The movie adaptation differs greatly from the book because of the fact that the movie leaves out the flashbacks that develop the past tense characters. It is understandable that to make a reasonably timed movie, cuts need to be made. However, this greatly takes away from the drama and emotion of the scenes like the bombing of Trachimbrod when there is no opportunity to get to know or relate to the past tense characters as the tragedy strikes them.
Also, because of the lack of flashbacks and past tense character development, there are a lot of missed connections between characters and story. The past tense characters that are not included make up a greater part of the story. Instead, in the book, readers follow the past tense characters’ journey to find out events from the past. One might even argue that the past is the actual story and the present tense characters are there to make up the side story to tell the story of the past.
The movie begins with Jonathan standing in a graveyard, whereas the book starts with an introduction to Alex, Jonathan’s Translator’s, family life. The book then moves to the past. “It was March 18, 1791, when Trachim B’s double axel wagon either did or did not pin him against the bottom of the Brod River” (Foer 8). In this chapter the past tense characters start to develop and already, the movie is missing this quality because it skips this scene and shows no signs of telling the past events that Jonathan and Alex have discovered.
There are many more examples of past events being left out of the movie. “Yankel didn’t have the heart to tell her that he was not her father, that she was the Float Queen of Trachimday not only because she was without question the most loved young girl in the shtetl…” (Foer 77). These chapters show a lot of development in the illumination of Jonathan’s grandmother that is absent in the movie adaptation. All three chapters are retellings of the past that include past tense character and story line development. The aforementioned quote above is talking about how Jonathan’s great-great-great-great-grandmother was a very popular girl at Trachimbrod and how Yankel was not her real father.
Leaving out those developments in the movie diminished the big scene when Jonathan, Alex, and Grandfather finally reached Trachimbrod. It was still effective in one way as Lista’s [Augustine’s] reaction is visible. The viewer had no connection to the past tense characters, or their history, making the climax of this scene weak in comparison to the book.
In the movie, the viewer travels along with the characters through their journey, but the full effect of illumination is not experienced. Throughout the whole book, Illumination is the knowledge gained by Jonathan of his family’s past. In learning about the past of his family, he learns about himself as well: “I do not think that there are any limits to how excellent we could make life seem” (Foer 180). This quote refers to the literal sort of illumination of embellishing the truth. At this point in the story Alex has written to Jonathan saying that they could even add Jonathan’s grandmother into their story if they wished to. It is the Illumination of the writer’s imagination to make things seem more beautiful or exciting. A form of Illumination that the movie greatly covers is that of memory. Grandfather and Lista are both trapped in a way by their memories, as neither can move forward to anything else. In the movie adaptation, the effect of Illumination is portrayed by a white light shining and slowly whiting out the screen.
The illumination effect is dispersed throughout three major points in the movie. The first is when Grandfather is driving Alex and Jonathan through what appears to be nothing but a grassy field, as they try to navigate their way to Trachimbrod. At one point they run out of gas and are forced to stop for the night. Grandfather wanders through the fields to some old stone structures that look like they once made up a building. Flashbacks are then used to show Grandfather standing in a line with other Jews, and Nazi soldiers in a firing line ready to shoot them. The soldier lifts his gun to shoot, and then the illumination effect takes place, whiting out the scene back to the present.
The movie deals a lot with the illumination of Grandfather, and yet there are important flashbacks that are either left out completely, or not fully explained. “…he went to the next man in line and that was me who is a Jew he asked and I felt Herschel’s hand again and I know that his hand as saying please please Eli please I do not want to die please do no point at me…” (Foer 250). In the movie, the flashback Grandfather has refers to the quote above that takes place in chapter 29 “Illumination.” Herschel was Grandfather’s friend. Then the Nazis invaded Kolki and lined up everyone in front of the Synagogue and told them that if they did not point out someone who was a Jew, they would be shot.
When it came time for Grandfather, who was Jewish himself, to point out a Jew, he had no choice but to point out his best friend Herschel in order to save his wife and child. Though the viewer would not know exactly what this scene is about, since the flashback Grandfather has is not portrayed exactly as it is in the book, the illumination effect used in the movie serves to show that a piece of Grandfather’s past has been illuminated or made known.
The next significant time that the illumination effect is used in the movie occurs at the very end of the book after Grandfather has written a suicide note for Alex to send to Jonathan: “If you are reading this, it is because Sasha [Alex] found it and translated it for you. It means that I am dead, and that Sasha is alive” (Foer 274). In the book, Grandfather commits suicide at home while everyone else is asleep after writing to Jonathan to tell him that Alex has kicked Father out of the house and taken over responsibility for his mother and little brother. He tells Jonathan that he is proud of Alex for doing the right thing, by telling Father to leave and not come back.
At the end of the book another important key to Grandfather’s illumination is left out of the movie. “…and it is not because I cannot endure. Do you understand? I am complete with happiness, and it is what I must do, and I will do it” (Foer 276). This quote is Grandfather telling Jonathan that he must go through with this, but not because he cannot keep going on through life, but because he has found total happiness. In the movie, Grandfather commits suicide when he, Alex, and Jonathan return to the inn the night before they have to take Jonathan back to the train station. Alex finds him in the morning, not understanding why Grandfather has committed suicide. The scene is of Grandfather with his wrists slit lying in the bathtub. The picture whites out in an illuminating effect from Grandfather driving the car, to the scene of him lying in the bathtub.
The illumination in this case goes to show that Grandfather has come to terms with his past, and it is now no longer a mystery. Alex knows who his grandfather was, as does Jonathan. Alex’s grandfather is finally freed of his past. He didn’t want Alex be held back by the past. To make it possible for Alex to move on, Grandfather kills himself so that he will not be around to remind Alex of the past.
The last scene in the movie, where the illumination effect takes place, is at the very end of the movie. Jonathan is riding down the escalator at the airport and the illumination effect takes place yet again as he is standing in front of his grandfather’s grave stone just where he started in the beginning of the movie. This illumination represents that the past has been illuminated, and that Jonathan has found out about himself or been illuminated himself by finding out about the past.
There are three key examples of illumination in the movie, but the full effect is still not gathered because the development of the past has been left out. The viewer does not experience the same feel, as they do not get the chance to know the past tense characters, or the building of the story of the past as Jonathan and Alex write the story together. It is always an interesting experience to see a movie adaptation of a book, but it still stands that the full effect of the main themes cannot be grasped by simply the movie alone. In a way it could be related to taking Plato’s “Allegory of the Cave” and only showing the person who was freed leaving the cave without the background to what they were leaving. It is also related as leaving the cave and going into the light being knowledge or illumination. You cannot grasp the full effect of illumination or knowledge without knowing the entire back story.
Works Cited

Everything is Illuminated. Dir. Schreiber Liev. Perf. Elijah Wood, Eugene Hutz, and Boris Leskin. DVD. Warner Independent Pictures, 2005.

Foer, Jonathan S. Everything is Illuminated. New York: Harper Perennial, 2002.
"Plato's Cave." Mit.Edu. 5 Mar.-Apr. 2008 .

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This paper has been submitted to this blog because it was written about, and based off of the book Everything is Illuminated. The paper covers the topic of characters being Illuminated, and how certain aspects of Illumination are missing from the movie adaptation.

Posted by: Samantha G. at May 2, 2008 02:01 AM

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*NOTE* The deadline for this particular assignment has now passed. Any comments listed below are *ONLY* for the reposting of comments that I specifically asked to be revised or are ones from non-student posters. Any 'student' posts below that missed the assignment deadline will not get credit for the assignment. ~ Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: Dr. Hobbs at May 6, 2008 10:58 AM

Augustine and Jonathan are similar in the fact that they both share Safran Jonathan’s grandfather. Augustine was in love with Safran and helped him when the Nazis were invading Trechinbrod. Jonathan and Alex are similar in the fact that both of them are writers and in their twenties still searching for themselves. Jonathan and the grandfather are both again connected trough Safran, and Trechinbrod. The major thing all of these people share in common are that they are Jewish and were affected by the Nazi’s in World War II, and they all lost Trechinbrod.

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Note from Professor:

John, what is your question number? The rest of you should remember to (1) First, retype your question then (2) leave a blank line by hitting return twice, and then post your answer. Be specific and please check your spelling.

Dr. Hobbs

Posted by: John Baron at October 17, 2008 12:31 PM

7. Jonathan claims that he collects things so that he won’t forget them. Is collecting the only way to remember something? Why is remembering important (or, unimportant)? What purpose does remembering serve?


To Jonathan collecting something is a way of remembering it. Jonathan could have easily just kept a journal, like Alex did; but writing things down doesn't work for Jonathan. He is more of a kinetic learner. He needs to use all of his senses. Remembering is important so a person won’t repeat the same mistake twice. It is even more important for a person to know and understand their past. The purpose collecting serves is to be able to pass it down from generation to generation. It’s important to know your own family history, to know where you come from.

Posted by: Mary Chuhinko at October 21, 2008 10:56 AM

10. What is significant about Jonathan sharing dirt from the river with Alex’s grandfather? Is this a symbolic act? If so, of what? Does it foreshadow anything? If so, what?


I think it is very significant that Jonathan shared the dirt with Alex because that means that Alex's family has gained the knowledge that they are jewish. Also it is like Alex's grandfather being forgiven by the rest of the people of his community and being able to be braved and remember the correct way for a Jewish person. I think it foreshadows the fact that the family of Alex will be living the Jewish way for that point on. Alex throwing the dirt in means that they are not angry with him and that they still loved it. To add to that, they are proud to be Jewish and finally finding where Alex fits in. I think it means so much to the family to know where they come from and the truth.

Posted by: Danielle Dunlevy at October 21, 2008 12:48 PM

Response to question 1:

I think the chief conflict in the film is past and the present. From what I understood, it seems that the grandfather seems to not be able to grasp or "make peace" with his past. Almost like he assumed that he was supposed to die at the hands of the firing squad.

Posted by: Martin Mune at October 21, 2008 02:11 PM

6.) Foer's story about secrets. What secets are held by the film's two gradfathers: Jonathan;s and Alex's? Do any other charactes have secrets? What are some other ways to phrase the idea that secrets have been revealed?
Answ: Alex's grandfather hold the biggest secret in the movie. He was very anti-sematic and held a grudge against Jews. However, in the end it is revealed that he was a Jew and was almost killed for it at the location where they were looking for. He probly knew Johnathan's grandfather and knew exactly where it was all along, but didn't want to go so he kept asking for "bogus" direction because he knew that almost everyone from that place was just about dead. It was a dark secret that he didn't want to reveal and when it was illuminated he committed suicide. Johnathan's grandfather left the town two weeks before the Nazi's came and executed everyone. He left behind his fiance who he never say again.

Posted by: thomas moona at October 21, 2008 06:26 PM

8. What is symbolic about Alex’s shirt which is discovered to be inside-out? Think about Jonathan’s attempt to explain the concept to Alex. Did Alex understand Jonathan? Did he acknowledge its importance or did he dismiss it?


Alex's shirt which is discovered to be inside out is symbolic because it sures the language barriers between him and Jonathan. It also helps to illustrate that Alex is not being true to himself. He is lost to what he really is and is looking to from himself. The shirt shows that he is trying to be American and truely does not understand the culture itself, he is looking to find himself just like Jonathan. He dismissed it at first, but at the end of the story when he had seen just how many things him and Jonathan had in common he acknowledge it, and it was like a barrier had been broken between them.


Posted by: Dominique Smith at October 21, 2008 10:27 PM

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*NOTE* The deadline for this particular assignment has now passed. Any comments listed below are *ONLY* for the reposting of comments that I specifically asked to be revised or are ones from non-student posters. Any 'student' posts below that missed the assignment deadline will not get credit for the assignment. ~ Dr. Hobbs

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16 October 2008

ENG 122 Students,

In our previous class meeting, we finished part two of our two-part screening of Liev Schreiber's Everything is Illuminated, the cinematic adaptation of the novel of the same name by American writer, Jonathan Safran Foer. Today, we discussed the following questions. I've asked you to post what you discussed in class (or, didn't get a chance to discuss in class today) in the comment box below. Please re-write your question, double space, and then leave a paragraph or so that summarizes your response.

1. One way to discuss literature AND film is to identify the conflicts. What is the chief conflict in Everything is Illuminated? What are the minor conflicts? It might help to begin by identifying ALL of the conflicts and then decide on the chief one.
2. Discuss the symbolism of Jonathan’s dream of the river. In the dream, Jonathan saw himself standing on the other side. What might the dream mean? What might it foreshadow? Did dreams play a role elsewhere in the story?
3. At first, it would appear that Jonathan and Alex are markedly different people. Yet, as the story goes on, they DO bond. Discuss how the ice was finally broken (the turning point) and the connections that Jonathan and Alex were finally able to forge. How were the bonds significant to the story? What other character “pairs” bond in the story?
4. In what way(s) is/are Augustine and Jonathan similar? Jonathan and Alex? Jonathan and Grandfather? How do these similarities between certain characters enrich the story? What other characters in the story share similarities?
5. Augustine mentioned that there were still many items lying beneath the ground by the river. What symbolism can be discovered in this revelation? What other references to the “earth” are made in the film?
6. Foer’s story is largely about secrets. What secrets are held by the film’s two grandfathers: Jonathan’s and Alex’s? Do any other characters have secrets? What are some other ways to phrase the idea that “secrets have been revealed?”
7. Jonathan claims that he collects things so that he won’t forget them. Is collecting the only way to remember something? Why is remembering important (or, unimportant)? What purpose does remembering serve?
8. What is symbolic about Alex’s shirt which is discovered to be inside-out? Think about Jonathan’s attempt to explain the concept to Alex. Did Alex understand Jonathan? Did he acknowledge its importance or did he dismiss it?
9. In his flashback to the past, the young grandfather cast off his jacket in a very dramatic scene. Since nothing was said, what was really happening in this scene? What is the symbolic significance of the act of casting off something?
10. What is significant about Jonathan sharing dirt from the river with Alex’s grandfather? Is this a symbolic act? If so, of what? Does it foreshadow anything? If so, what?
11. Foer’s story is also about journeys. What journeys take place in the narrative? Which characters engage in a quest or take a journey (remember, journeys can be symbolic as well as literal).
12. It has been said that Americans typically expect a happy (rather than an open) ending. Does Foer’s story have a happy ending? What is resolved? Why did Grandfather take his own life? How did this help/hurt things?
13. Like all good journey stories, characters are transformed in Everything is Illuminated. By the end of the story, which characters are transformed? Explain how the characters were before the transformation and how the characters were after the transformation.

We will discuss the questions we didn't get to in our next class meeting. WORK ON YOUR PAPERS!

Best,

Dr. Hobbs

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*FROM: April 30, 2008*



Caption: Jonathan Safran Foer, Author of Everything is Illuminated

Image Source: ">http://www.motherjones.com/arts/qa/2005/05/foer_265x335.jpg

EN 267 Students,

If you are submitting to this blog post for your final exam, remember to add a few comments (after a line separator) at the END of your entry after the works cited (should be the FINAL, not first, revision of your term paper) explaining why this post was one of the most appropriate to your paper's topic/thesis. Don't forget that you need to do this for two blog entries and you need to submit a paragraph informing me of which two blog entries you submitted to and an explanation why to turnitin.com. All of these steps need to be completed to get credit for the final exam.

Good luck,

Dr. Hobbs

"Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire." ~ William Butler Yeats

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*FROM April 23, 2008*


Image Source: ">http://k.b5z.net/i/u/2183976/i/calvin-writing.gif

EN 267 Students,

First, your paper proposals were due here for an earlier assignment.

Now, I want a statement of your thesis and your primary arguments as discussed in tonight's class. Enter them in the comment box (see more instructions below):

Per the final exam: Based on the class election we held Wednesday night, there will be a take-home examination with ten questions (two-points each), similar to the mid-term but based on Jerzy Kosinski, August Wilson, and Jonathan Safran Foer. It will be due on turnitin.com by Friday May 2nd at 8:00am (no later). You will get the take-home exam in our next class meeting. I will enter grades the morning of May 2nd so I can’t accept it any later than that---you snooze, you lose!

Next week will still be a regular class meeting so expect a quiz as usual. You should finish reading the rest ofEverything is Illuminated. We will still do a regular homework assignment so also expect that. In the next meeting, a stapled, hardcopy of your revision of the term paper is due. You should do a new, revised version of the draft you have brought tonight based on the corrections you will received tonight in the peer-review. Your homework tonight will be to go to the same page on the blog where you previously submitted your proposal (show on overhead) and enter a new comment that states clearly your thesis in one sentence and your chief three arguments for proving that thesis.

If you were absent or late to class, here are the questions from the quiz covered. Again, you are responsible for this material.

1.Who is the protagonist of Foer’s Everything?
2.Circle the correct answer: A “shtetl” is (a) the Ukrainian word for “Jew” (b) a small Jewish village (c) none of the above
3.Why does Alex/Sasha speak in a strange/funny way?
4.State the country that most of the action in Foer’s Everything take place.
5. Circle the correct answer: Who narrates the parts of the story about the twentieth-century? (a) Jonathan (b) Alex/Sasha’s Grandfather (c) Alex/Sasha (d) Sammy Davis, Jr., Jr. (e) Yankel
6.What does Jonathan find ironic about Grandfather’s bigotry and the name of Grandfather’s dog?
7.Who wrote Everything Is Illuminated?
8.Circle the correct answer: Alex/Sasha and his family are (a) Polish Immigrants (b) Ukrainian Orthodox (c) Ukrainian Jews.
9.What is “Trachimbrod”?
10. What does “Sasha” mean and why do Alex’s family call him that? (If you don’t know the answer to that you may tell me what “Shapka” means).
11.Circle the correct answer. Everything concerns, primarily, (a) the story of Jonathan’s trip to the Ukraine (b) the history of Jonathan’s distant relatives (c) none of the above (d) both a and b.
12.The author and one of the chief protagonists of Everything have the same name. Circle the correct answer: Is this narrative (a) fiction or (b) non-fiction?

We then watched a film clip from the beginning half of the cinematic adaptation of Everything is Illuminated by Liev Schreiber (2005) and answered the following questions (see below). If you missed class and don't have a copy of the film, a lot of various clips can be found on Google Video HERE.

How is the story being told in the film as opposed to how it is being told in the book.
So far, you have read the first half of the book. As you watch the first part of the film version, what is missing?
What has been added?

Also, some of you wanted to know about the "free" knock-off version of Microsoft Office called OpenOffice.org. I often use it; it is very similar and has a version of powerpoint, excel, access, and word, etc. It's a free download and the address is: http://www.openoffice.org/

Just a reminder that anyone who has NOT submitted the FIRST DRAFT of your final paper to turnitin.com will automatically fail the term paper assignment. Please note that submitting your FIRST DRAFT to turnitin.com was a REQUIRED component of the term paper. I am looking at the record now and see that only about 2/3 of the class submitted the FIRST DRAFT of their papers to turnitin.com. For those of you who did submit their FIRST DRAFTS, you can ignore this warning. For those of you who did not submit your FIRST DRAFTS, I will open the folder up for ONE more day. The folder will be closed after Tuesday so BEWARE your final grade!

See you in our final meeting next week. It's been a pleasure!

Dr. Hobbs

*NOTE: As with all reading responses submitted to the English-Blog for EL 267, you must first submit the response to the proper space on www.turnitin.com (the date for which it was assigned). To get credit, the response must be present in both places by the deadline. Submissions to only one will not receive credit, so beware!

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To see other English-Blog entries on the subject of Holocaust Studies, please click HERE

Posted by: Dr. Hobbs at October 21, 2008 11:06 PM

Ashley Gross
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
13 November 2014

"Grandfather has not been healthful. He has altered to our residence for permanent"(Safran Foer 25).

Question- Pages 25-26:
In the main character's opinion, what has made grandfather unhealthful?

Answer:
He believes that grandfather's gloomy personality has made him ill. "I have the opinion that the melancholy is what makes Grandfather unhealthful, and it is what makes him blind, although he is not truly blind of course"(Safran Foer 25).

Posted by: Ashley Gross at November 13, 2014 09:18 PM

Bronwen Burke
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
12 November 2014

“Excellent, Alex. Excellent. You must nullify any plans you possess for the first week of the month of July.”

(Ch 1. An Overture to the Commencement of a Very Rigid Journey: Everything is Illuminated. Kindle Edition. Page 4, par. 1)


Question: Why did Alex’s father tell him to cancel any plans that he may have?

Answer: Alex’s father “obtained a telephone call from the American office of Heritage Touring. They required a driver, guide, and translator for a young man who would be in Lutsk at the dawn of the month of July” (Foer, 4). After the reader learns of the intended journey, his father tells him to cancel any plans that he may have. We can conclude that Alex’s father wants him to partake in the journey.

Posted by: Bronwen Burke at November 13, 2014 09:34 PM

Ashlee English
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
13 November 2014
“Is this why you think you are chosen by … about yourself?” (Safran Foer 25)
QUESTION:
How does Alex view Jonathan? What does this viewpoint say about their relationship?
ANSWER:
Alex’s view of Jonathan ranges from curiosity to stereotyping. Due to their difference in upbringing and culture. However, Alex changes his viewpoint after meeting Jonathan, “I apologize for the last line… a spoiled Jew” (Safran Foer 24), which is evident throughout Alex’s letter. Moreover, there is an air of playful banter “I will counsel… whole-witted” (Safran Foer 25). Therefore, this letter is evidence of their potential friendship to come, “I will be in suspense… of your novel” (Safran Foer 26).

Posted by: Ashlee English at November 13, 2014 10:30 PM

Claudia Pierre
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
14 November 2014


“I know how momentous the box was for you, for both of us, and how its ingredients were not exchangeable. Stealing is an ignominious thing, but a thing that occurs very repeatedly to people on the train from Ukraine” (Safran Foer, 23)

QUESTION:
What is going on in this scene? What was stolen from Jonathan?

ANSWER:
Jonathan is taking a trip from Ukraine. While he is on the train a guard on the train stole a box from Jonathan that contained very important things. While on the trip the men visited six villages, did not have the opportunity to find the woman named Augustine. They believed if they had more days to search for her, they would have found her.

Posted by: Claudia Pierre at November 14, 2014 01:09 AM

Jacob Gates
Dr. Hobbs
Journeys in Narrative ENG 220 CA01
14 November 2014

Question: On page 21, why is the Rabbi described as having great authority on “large, extra large, and extra extra large matters of the jewish faith,” but has so much trouble giving advice on day to day matters regarding jewish life?

Analysis: I think Foer is trying to point out what most religious leaders, and specifically jewish leaders, seem to do, and that is that they lose the forest through the trees. Many religious leaders become so caught up in the most minute details of a religion that they forgot the original purpose of the faith, and that was to help people.

Posted by: Jacob Gates at November 14, 2014 05:44 AM

Aaron Virelli
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
13 November 2014

Question: what happened to mans box on the train? Would he have chance to get it back? (Safranfoer p 23)

Answer: on the train the man's box gets stolen out of nowhere and has not much of an Idea what happened. “Stealing is an ignominious thing, but a thing that occurs very repeatedly to people on the train from Ukraine”.(Safanfoer 23) On these trains, it was very unlikely that you would find out who had or just get them back in general. The man says that if you do not have a name on the end of your finger tips for the guard who stole it there’s not much hope in getting it back.(Safanfoer 23) this is a confirmation that there is no way there finding their bag, and it is something that will have to do without.

Posted by: aaron Virelli at November 14, 2014 08:46 AM

Zachary Sabo
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL- On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
14 November 2014

Pages 1-3

Question: Why does Alex decide to translate for Jonathon Safran Foer?

Answer: The novel opens up with Alex talking about all of the different names people have called him throughout his life, and eventually it is said that he knew a lot of people named Alex, so they had to call him something different so they could distinguish. “There are even many people named Alex. (Three in my house alone!)” (Foer 2) Alex admits that his life is rather ordinary, and the segment about his name is his main argument to show how he doesn’t have much excitement in his life. If he were to go and translate for the author, then it would be something out of the ordinary, so that is why he decides to go.

Posted by: Zachary Sabo at November 14, 2014 09:00 AM

Erin Gaylord
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
14 November 2014

“…and tucked her makeshift crib in the ark while the men in long black suits hollered prayers at the top of their lungs” (Foer pg. 17, par. 1, ch. The Lottery 1971).

Question:
Why were the men screaming prayers at the top of their lungs, and how long had they been doing this?

Answer:
“…screaming for more than two hundred years” (Foer 17). They were screaming prayers because the Venerable Rabbi told them that they were always drowning and the prayers rescue them from “deep under the spiritual waters” (Foer 17).

Posted by: Erin Gaylord at November 14, 2014 09:50 AM

Olivia Ago-Stallworth
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
14 November 2014

“‘I would also like to eat to eat black bread,’ Little Igor said, not looking at the father.” (Dear Jonathan, Page 26, par. 11)

Question: What did the Father call Little Igor and why?

Answer: The Father called Little Igor “Clumsy One,” because he fell down and made his eye blue again.

Posted by: Olivia Ago-Stallworth at November 14, 2014 09:53 AM

Jonah Robertson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA02
November 14 2014

"The soul was not ready to transcend, but was sent back, given a chance to right a previous generation's wrong. This, of course, doesn't make any sense. But what does?" (Chapter 2, Page 16, Par. 7)

Question: How does this statement tie is with the style in which the book is written?

Answer: The writing style of the book is very odd, and very postmodern. The dialogue is italicized instead of in quotes. All in all, the style of the book makes what is written quite difficult to understand, just like the philosophy that is discussed in this quote.

Posted by: Jonah Robertson at November 14, 2014 10:56 AM

Sharrad Forbes
Dr. B. Lee. Hobbs
ENG220 CL: Journeys in Narrative (CA02)
14 November 2014

“SHOULD WE NOT ACT LIKE IT? AND SHOULD WE NOT SOUND LIKE DESPERATE PEOPLE? So they screamed, and had been screaming for the two hundred years since.” (Chapter 3: The Lottery 1791, pg. 17, para 12)

QUESTION:
In the book “Everything is Illuminated” the Upright Synagogue has many peculiar traits they follow from 200 years ago. Using your own words, and quoted passages from the text describe some of these traits.

ANSWER:
One of the traits of the Upright Synagogue was “hollering prayers at the top of your lungs” (Foer 17). Apparently, this act of screaming was going on “for more than two hundred years” (Foer 17). Ever since the Venerable Rabbit enlightened that the people were “always drowning” while their prayers were “nothing less than pleas for rescue” (Foer 17) from the deep spiritual waters. It was this reasoning why they hollered, as “IF OUR PLIGHT IS SO DESPERATE…SHOULD WE NOT ACT LIKE IT? AND SHOULD WE NOT SOUND LIKE DESPERATE PEOPLE?” (Foer 17).
Next, they would grip the prayer book with one hand while the other held the rope from the pulleys clipped on their belts, whilst the “crowns of their black hats” brushed against the ceiling. According to Venerable Rabbi, if one aspired “TO BE CLOSER TO GOD…SHOULD WE NOT ACT LIKE IT? AND SHOULD WE NOT MAKE OURSELVES CLOSER?”

Posted by: Sharrad Forbes at November 14, 2014 10:57 AM

Kendra Hinton
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL: Journey of Transformation in Narrative CA01
13 November 2014

Question: What did Jonathan inquire to his Father and what was his father respond?

Answer: “I inquired Father if I could go forth to America when I made to graduate from university (Foer, 28).” His father respond was that he did not want his son to move to America. The boy father did not care about his decision; however, he want to inform his that their roots are from Odessa.

Posted by: Kendra Hinton at November 14, 2014 12:36 PM

Britney Polycarpe
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CL Journey into narratives
11 November 2014

A few days before the hero were to arrive, I inquired father if I could go to forth to America when I made to graduate from university "No" he said. "But I want to" I informed," ( Foer 28)
Question: what was different about the response of the main character this time after his statement when he said, "I do not care what you want"?
Answer: Instead, the conversation would settle with just that statement. But not this time it was followed with a questioning statement, " but not this time, I asked why?" (Foer 28 )

Posted by: Britney Polycarpe at November 14, 2014 03:08 PM

Britney Polycarpe
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CL Journey into narratives
11 November 2014

“ I was finally able to prevail on the here to give his documents. He stored them in a thing on his belt.” (Foer 28)
Question: Why did the man wear fanny packs? was it for fashion or because he needed one to keep his information close to him>
Answer: well can say both but it was mostly to keep his information close to him , “ later he told me that fanny packs are not cool in America , and told doing a fanny pack because a guidebook said he should don one to keep his documents close to his middle section. “ (Foer 63)

Posted by: Britney Polycarpe at November 14, 2014 03:33 PM

Matt Basin
Eng 220 CL- On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
14 Nov 2014

“And we missed our entrance to the superway. “ please do not punch me,” I said, “but I made a minute error with the map.” Grandfather kicked the stop pedal and my face a high-five to the front window” (Safranfoer pg. 30, paragraph 8).

Question:
(a.) How many questions did the grandfather ask to the young boy after he missed the exit and (b.) how did the grandfather feel about Lvov?

Answer:
He asked him four questions after he missed the exit they needed to take. “Did I ask you to drive a car?” he asked. “I do not have a license to drive the car," I said. “Did I ask you to prepare my breakfast while you roost there?” he asked. “ No,” I said. “Did I ask you to invent a new kind of wheel?” he asked. “ No,” I said. “I wouldn’t not have been very good at that” (Safranfoer pg. 30). The grandfather hates being there. “ We arrived in Lvov in only eleven hours but yet traveled at once to the train station as father ordered. It was rigid to find, and we became lost people many times. This gave Grandfather anger. “ I hate Lvov!” he said” (Safranfoer pg. 30).

Posted by: Matthew Basin at November 15, 2014 01:19 PM

Bronwen Burke
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
14 November 2014

“When we found each other, I was very flabbergasted by his appearance. This is an American? I thought. And also, This is a Jew?”

(Ch 4. An Overture to Encountering the Hero, and then Encountering the Hero: Everything is Illuminated. Kindle Edition. Page 31, par. 3)


Question: Why was Alex flabbergasted by Jonathan’s appearance?

Answer: In Alex's opinion, Jonathan did not appear as a typical American Jew. “He did not appear like either the Americans I had witnessed in magazines, with yellow hairs and muscles, or the Jews from history books, with no hairs and prominent bones” (Foer, 32). Jonathan “was severely short. He wore spectacles and had diminutive hairs which were not split anywhere, but rested on his head like a Shapka” (Foer, 32-33).

Posted by: Bronwen Burke at November 16, 2014 02:29 PM

Anet Milian
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
16 November 2014
Question (29-30): What does the writer compare the City Lvov to and why does he not like it as much as Odessa.
Answer: He said that the city Lvov is like New York City because it had many tall buildings and comprehensive streets. He said that although Lvov is big and impressive, he enjoyed Odessa better because it was very beautiful and had many famous beaches where girls were lying.
Work Cited
Foer, J. S. (2003). Everything Is Illuminated . New York: Perenial.

Posted by: Anet Milian at November 16, 2014 09:05 PM

Anet Milian
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
16 November 2014
Question (56-57): “Can you please get this dog away from me… I really don’t like dogs.” Which character is speaking?
Answer: Jonathan.
Work Cited
Foer, J. S. (2003). Everything Is Illuminated . New York: Perenial.

Posted by: Anet Milian at November 16, 2014 09:13 PM

Caitlin Christian
Dr. Hobbs
ENG-220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
16 November 2014

“(You may decide not to read this part, if it makes you a boring person. I would understand, although please do not inform me.)”

Question pg 25-26:
Through pages, 25 and 26 Alexander writes a letter to Jonathan in which discusses many aspects of his life, including his English and the works he has read because of him. The letter begins to seem lengthy however, what is the most important information the reader learns about the characters within these pages?

Answer:
Grandfather and father I believe are the two characters, which the reader seems to learn more about within these two pages. Grandfather seems to become more depressed, we learn from Alexander and father seems touchy on the subject of grandfather’s depressed state. We learn also that Augustine has not been found and this news is continually upsetting for those all around. This is information, which is important for the reader to keep up with because it helps grasp the emotions of every character.

Posted by: Caitlin Christian at November 16, 2014 09:38 PM

Maria Aguilera
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220-CA02 Journeys in Narrative
17 November 2014

“I am regretted to end this letter. It is as proximal a thing as we have to talking.” (Safran Foer page 54 par. 5).

QUESTION:
For whom was this letter written to and from whom?

ANSWER:
Alexander wrote this letter to Jonathan; he was responding to a letter that he received from Jonathan.

Posted by: Maria Aguilera at November 16, 2014 10:00 PM

Caitlin Christian
Dr. Hobbs
ENG-220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
16 November 2014

“It was pending this five-hour car drive from the Lvov train station to Lutsk that the hero explained to me why he came to Ukraine.” (Safran Foer 59)
Question pg. 58-59:
Throughout these two pages, the author takes the reader on a journey to discover much information to be uncovered about grandfather. Through quoted passage, explain what information has been cleared up and discovered about grandfather and this journey.

Answer:
“He explained to me that we were not looking for the family, but for this girl. She would be the only one still alive.” (59) The reader discovers that there is a picture of this girl that grandfather is continually looking for. We also discover this woman was taken during the war, much was occurring around them as they were trying to escape the Nazis. It is important for the reader to understand that this girl is the center of the grandfather’s happiness. This woman takes up much of the journey and is a very important theme.

Posted by: Caitlin Christian at November 16, 2014 11:05 PM

Kendra Hinton
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
16 November 2014

Question: Why did the some of the Jews wanting to go with the Nazis?

Answers: “At the beginning of the war, a lot of Jews wanted to go to the Nazis to be protected from the Ukrainians (Foer, 62).” The Ukrainians was treating the Jew terrible. Therefore, some of the Jews felt protected with the Nazis.

Posted by: Kendra Hinton at November 17, 2014 12:25 AM

James Sierra
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL - ON THE PROVERBIAL ROAD: JOURNEYS OF TRANSFORMATION IN NARRATIVE CA02
16 November 2014

Pages 60-61:
Question:
Why did “the hero” think the name of the girl in the picture with his grandfather is Augustine?

Answer:
The hero, Jonathan, thought that the name of the girl in the photo he had was Augustine because of the inscription on the back. The inscription states, “This is me with Augustine, February 21, 1943 (Foer page 60).” From this he assumed the girl’s name is Augustine.

Posted by: James Sierra at November 17, 2014 01:05 AM

repost:
James Sierra
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL - ON THE PROVERBIAL ROAD: JOURNEYS OF TRANSFORMATION IN NARRATIVE CA02
11 November 2014

Pages 20-21:
Question:
Alex states in one of his letters that he “Must eat a slice of humble pie” for what happened to Jonathan on the train. To what is he referring?

Answer:
Alex is referring in his letter to a box that was stolen from Jonathan. Alex states in his letter, “Stealing is an ignominious thing, but a thing that occurs very repeatedly to people on the train from Ukraine (Foer 23).”

Posted by: James Sierra at November 17, 2014 01:22 AM

Aaron Virelli
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
17, November 2014

Question what did the man trade for a spot in the newsletter. Who was this man? What did he want? (Chpt. Another Lottery pg 50)

Answer the man made a trade with the Shimon T’s newsletter. This man had a different way for bartering for what he wanted he offered “Paid with a half a dozen eggs and a handful of berries. The man was a well-regarded rabbi who was trying to spread the word. He proclaimed “a vote! We shall take it to a vote.” He goes on to say, “and if we believe that every sane, strictly moral, above average, property holding, observant adult Jewish male born with a voice that must be heard, shall we not hear them all?” (Safranfoer pg. 50). He wants all voices to be heard
And wants it to be open to all of the righteous men having interest.

Posted by: aaron Virelli at November 17, 2014 08:56 AM

Nathanael Jones
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
17 November 2014

“Now what was his name exactly? Menasha asked, touching quill to tongue.”
(The Beginning of the World Often Comes, pg. 12, par. 4)

Question:
Who was the man/victim in the carriage?

Answer:
“No, Sofiowka said. That man’s was Trachum with a u. This is with an I” (Foer 9). Trachim with an I, the victim in this crash was believed to be married to a wife with “voluptuous tits” (Foer 10) and he himself with “a scar from his eye to his mouth, or his mouth to his eye” (Foer 11). Other than those details, the life of Trachim remains very mysterious, with only one or two sightings by Sofiowka. In death as in life, he remains a mystery for the crash itself had only one witness and what happened stands uncertain.

Work Cited

Foer, Jonathan Safran. Everything Is Illuminated. New York: Houghton Mifflin, 2002. Print.

Posted by: Nathanael Jones at November 17, 2014 08:56 AM

Zachary Sabo
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL- On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
17 November 2014

Pages 52-55

“I know that you asked me not to alter the mistakes because they sound humorous, and humorous is the only truthful way to tell a sad story, but I think I will alter them.” (Page 53 Par 4)

Question: Why is the topic of grammar coming up between Alex and Jonathon?

Answer: Since Alex is the translator for Jonathon, they discuss the novel quite frequently. Although Alex’s English is good enough to be considered a translator, he still has some struggles when it comes to idioms, such as “shit a brick” and “to come in handy”. (Foer 53) The clarification is needed for these sorts of terms, and Alex is optimistic in the work he is doing and he hopes to translate it to the wishes of Foer.

Posted by: Zachary Sabo at November 17, 2014 09:10 AM

Sharrad Forbes
Dr. B. Lee. Hobbs
ENG220CL: Journeys in Narrative (CA02)
27 October 2014

“He awoke each morning with the desire to do right, to be a good and meaningful person, to be, as simple as it sounded and as impossible as it actually was, happy.” (Chapter 7: Falling In Love, pg. 47, para 13)

Question:
In the story a character goes through deep depression, sadness, and a longing to return back home. Who is this Character? Describe how their sorrow eventually led them back home.

Answer:
The character Safran referred to as Yankel upon his return to the village, who was found guilty of unfit practices. Once, Safran had left the village to escape his shame he would only find a life of despair, from morning to evening. As the day went on “his heart would descend from his chest into his stomach” (Foer 47). He would be distraught with the feeling that “nothing was right, or nothing was right for him” (Foer 47) by early evening. Where the “desire to be left alone” (Foer 47) would overcome him. Once evening had come his transformation would be complete. Safran would be “alone in the magnitude of his grief”, “alone in his aimless guilt”, “alone even in his loneliness” (Foer 47).

Safran would try and lie to himself, spending most of his days convincing himself that he was not sad because his life had “unlimited potential for happiness” (Foer 47). In that, it was an “empty white room” (Foer 47). He had tolerated this sorrow for three years before he returned to the shtetl, where he now referred to himself as Yankel, and attempted to begin anew.

Posted by: Sharrad Forbes at November 17, 2014 10:09 AM

Jonah Robertson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA02
November 17 2014

"WE SHALL TAKE A VOTE...AND IF WE BELIEVE THAT EVERY SANE, STRICTLY MORAL, ABOVE-AVERAGE, PROPERTY-HOLDING, OBSERVANT ADULT JEWISH MALE IS BORN WITH A VOICE THAT MUST BE HEARD, SHALL WE NOT HERE THEM ALL?" (Page 50, Par. 2)

Question: Why is this quote from the Rabbi important? What role does it play in this chapter?

Answer: This quote in particular seems to be criticizing the voting structures in certain nations, especially how some say they have a democratic representation and then give some ridiculous requirement like the passage above in order to be able to vote. The line "ADULT JEWISH MALE" (Foer 50) specifically brings to mind debates about women having the right to vote alongside men, which is obviously not the case in this shtetl.

Posted by: Jonah Robertson at November 17, 2014 10:56 AM

Ashlee English
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
17 November 2014
“The what Dihl … Memory” (Safran Foer 36)
QUESTION:
What character does Dihl play in the novel? What insight does it give into the Sloucher religious practices? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

ANSWER:
Dihl is ‘Rabbi’ of the Slouchers. The Slouchers represent a different perspective of religion in comparison to the upright followers. As such their approach can be deemed as more philosophical, “It is the act of remembering…of our past” (Safran Foer 36). Thus, Dihl encourages his members to share their 'dreams', “But first…to go forward” (Safran Foer 37). Therefore, it can be inferred that their religious practices are based on honoring the dreams of their ancestors.

Posted by: Ashlee English at November 17, 2014 11:27 AM

Anet Milian
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
17 November 2014
Question (Page 112): What did Jonathan try to give the attendant at the gas station as a tip?
Answer: Marlboro Cigarettes.
Work Cited
Foer, J. S. (2003). Everything Is Illuminated . New York: Perenial.

Posted by: Anet Milian at November 17, 2014 01:34 PM

Matt Basin
Eng 220 CL- On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
17 NOV 2014

“The waitress returned and said, “Here is what I have to say. We can make concessions to give him two potatoes, but they are served with a piece of meat on a plate. The Chef says that this cannot be negotiated. He will eat it” (Safranfoer pg. 66, paragraph 19)

Question 66-67:
(a.) What got on the kids nerves about what the hero asked him to do and (b.) What did the Grandfather do to the potato when it was on the ground?

Answer:
The hero asked the kid to remove the piece of meat of his plate for him because he didn’t like to touch it. “When the food arrived, the hero asked for me to remove the meat off his plate. “ I’d prefer not to touch it,” he said. This was on my nerves to the maximum. If you want to know why, it is because I perceived that the hero perceived he was too good for our food” (Safranfoer pg. 66). He picked the potato up with his fork, cut it into four pieces and each of the boys had to each of their pieces. “Grandfather inserted his fork in the potato, picked it up from the floor, and put it on his plate. He cut it into four pieces and gave one to Sammy Davis, Junior, Junior under the table, one to me, and one to the hero. He cut off a piece from his plate and ate it. Then he looked at me. I didn’t want to, but I knew that I had to” (Safranfoer pg. 67)

Posted by: Matthew Basin at November 17, 2014 07:21 PM

Kyle VanBuren
Dr. Burgsbee Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL
12 November 2014

“But I am a man who toils, and I must go where I must. We need currency for famous nightclubs, yes? I am doing something I hate for you” (Foer 27).

Text source: “Everything is Illuminated,” By Jonathan Foer

Question: With reference to the passage, who is Alexander Perchov talking too and what drives him to do something that he hates?

Answer: Perchov is talking to one of his daughters and is explaining to her that he does a job that he hates because he loves his family very much. He is “in love” with them. Foer writes, “This is what it means to be in love” (Foer 27). The reason why he is having this discussion with his daughter was because he works a lot and had to miss is daughter’s birthday.

Posted by: Kyle VanBuren at November 17, 2014 07:22 PM

Kyle VanBuren
Dr. Burgsbee Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL
14 November 2014

“They do not desire anything more than everything they have known. OK, but this is not for me, and it will not be for little Igor” (Foer 28).

Text source: “Everything is Illuminated,” By Jonathan Foer

Question: With reference to the quoted passage, what road in life does Perchov not want to take? What path has his friends chose that he wants nothing to do with?

Answer: Foer writes, “My friends are appeased to stay in Odessa for their entire lives. They are appeased to age like their parents, and become parents like their parents”
(Foer 28). Perchov does not want to live his life like is friends; he wants to venture off to America and live his own unique life after he graduates (Foer 28).

Posted by: Kyle VanBuren at November 17, 2014 07:23 PM

Kyle VanBuren
Dr. Burgsbee Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL
17 November 2014

“Every night before putting her to sleep, Yankel counts her ribs, as if one might have disappeared in the course of the day and become the seed and soil from some new companion to steal her away from him” (Foer 76).

Text source: “Everything is Illuminated,” By Jonathan Foer

Question: With reference to the passage, whom is Perchov taking about and how does Perchov imagine what this past human being looked like?

Answer: Perchov is talking about his great-great-great-great-great-great grandmother referred to as dirty river girl or waterbaby (Foer 75). Perchov explains his visionary picture of her as, “She’s a bit short, even for her age- not short in the endearing, childish way, but as a malnourished child might be short. The same is true for how skinny she is (Foer 76). Although Perchov never met this old relative of his he still imagines her as he hears various stories about her and her reputation.


Posted by: Kyle VanBuren at November 17, 2014 07:24 PM

Matt Basin
Eng 220 CL- On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
17 NOV 2014

“I have never heard of it,” said one of the men, with his cigarette at the side of his mouth. “Nor have I”, saint another, and they exhibited their backs. “Thank you,” I said. The hero punched my side with the bend of his arm” (Safranfoer pg. 113, paragraph 16).

Question 113:
According to the men, what was the town that they never herd of?

Answer:
The town was called “Sofiowka." “It didn’t matter because the men were not giving any attention to us. “Oh yes,” I said to the men. They didn’t rotate to glance at me. “It’s also called Sofiowka. Do you know this town?” “We never 've heard of it," one of them said without discussing the matter with the others” (Safranfoer pg.113).

Posted by: Matthew Basin at November 17, 2014 07:29 PM

Claudia Pierre
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On The Proverbial Road: Journey of Transformation in Narrative CA02
18 November 2014

“Grandfather ordered me to thank you for the duplicate photograph. It was benevolent of you to post it and not to demand him for any currency” (Safran Foer, 100)

QUESTION:
What is the discussion between Alex and Jonathan? What else is happening during this day?

ANSWER:
In the letter between Alex and Jonathan, Alex thanks Jonathan for sending him a duplicate photograph of his grandfather Augustine. Alex also expressed in the letter that him and his father fight because Grandfather Augustine will not accept the payment from his son (Alex’s’ father). He also believes that the payment would have been nice for him to have since he is saving up to take a trip to America.

Posted by: Claudia Pierre at November 18, 2014 01:20 AM

Leroy Pianka
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
18 November 2014

“Poor Trachim, I didn’t know him well, but I sure could have. Or I miss you, Trachim. Without having ever met you, I do. Or Rest, Trachim, rest. And make safe our flour mill.”

Question:
The passage above is three different statements from three different people. What were they doing and why did they make those statements?

ANSWER:
This particular group of people believed that Trachim would never be found because they thought that the sediment washed dirt over Trachim’s body. This group also made monthly cemetery rounds and laid stones by the shore side while making these statements.

Posted by: Leroy Pianka at November 18, 2014 12:52 PM

James Sierra
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL - ON THE PROVERBIAL ROAD: JOURNEYS OF TRANSFORMATION IN NARRATIVE CA02
18 November 2014

Pages 110:
Question:
Grandfather states, “Inform him the sand on the beaches is like the inside of a woman’s mouth.” To what city is he referring to?

Answer:
Grandfather is answering a statement Jonathan had made to tell him about it. “I’d like to hear about it (Foer 110)”. Jonathan and Alex are having a conversation about Odessa, and Alex defers the inquiry to his grandfather.

Posted by: James Sierra at November 18, 2014 07:59 PM

Kendra Hinton
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
19 November 2014

Question: In the passage Recurrent Secrets, 1791-1943 pages 86-87, what item mean so much from Jonathan where he can escape from the world and express himself.

Answer: Jonathan diary is important to him. “It occurred to me this afternoon that there is nothing in the world I like so much as writing in my diary (87).” Jonathan feels that his diary “never misunderstand me and I never misunderstand it (87).” They are “perfect lovers, like one person (87).” He cherish is diary.

Posted by: Kendra Hinton at November 19, 2014 03:12 AM

Sharrad Forbes
Dr. B. Lee. Hobbs
ENG220 CL: Journeys in Narrative (CA02)
19 November 2014

“She is such a smart bitch.” (Chapter 15: The Rigid Journey, page 106, paragraph 3)

Question:

The characters Jonathan and Alex are discussing what has happened during their sleep. To whom are they referring in the quote? What has transpired during their slumber that caused this conversation?

Answer:

Upon awakening after a night of slumber, Jonathon has realized that Sammy Davis, Junior, Junior has eaten all of his documents. She apparently got through the maps, his id, and most of his passport before Jonathan was “able to wrestle free” (Foer 105) the rest from her clutches. Afterwards, Jonathan and Alex converse about what happened. Jonathan states “she wasn’t in the room” (Foer 106) when he went to sleep because she would have received some form of punishment for eating his things. To this Alex chides “She is such a smart bitch” (Foer 106), in a seemingly sarcastic undertone.

Posted by: Sharrad Forbes at November 19, 2014 03:45 AM

Peter Bellini
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng 220CL On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
November 19, 2014


“He must have witnessed the sign I was holding, because he punched me on the shoulder and said, "Alex?" I told him yes. "You’re my translator, right?" I asked him to be slow, because U could not understand him. In truth I was manufacturing a brick wall of shits. I attempted to be sedate. "Lesson one. Hello. How are you doing this day? "What" "Lesson two. OK, isn't the weather full of delight?" "You’re my translator,"


Question Pg. 31-32:


How does this conversation foreshadow the relationship between the main characters?


Answer:


Alex first meets Jonathan at the train station and immediately here is some comical conflict. With the great detail taken in the description of punches in Alex’s family, it is comical that John should greet him with a punch. This punch meets with a very prompt and seemingly inadequate example of Alex’s translation skills. This interaction is a great precursor for events to unfold throughout the story.

Posted by: Peter Bellini at November 19, 2014 05:33 AM

Peter Bellini
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng 220CL On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
November 19, 2014


“I witnessed a hand on the chair that Grandfather likes to view television in. But it was not Grandfather’s hand. I tried to see more, and I almost fell over. I know that I should have recognized the sound that was a little less than crying. It was Little Igor. (I am such a stupid fool.) This made me a suffering person. I will tell you why. I knew why he was a little less than crying. I knew very well, and I wanted to go to him and tell him that I had a little less than cried too, just like him”


Question Pg. 68-69:


What is Little Igor crying about?


Answer:


Alexander comes home from nightclubs regularly and many times witnesses his grandfather crying in the television chair. This particular night he assumes it is his Grandfather but discovers it is Little Igor who is crying. Alex assumes that he is crying over not having a premium life like his big brother, but the reader can be led to think otherwise. I assume that Igor could be crying over the fact that his grandfather comes and goes every other night and watches TV crying.

Posted by: Peter Bellini at November 19, 2014 05:34 AM

Peter Bellini
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng 220CL On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
November 19, 2014


“I thought one of you was supposed to be the trained and certified Heritage guide. I paid for a certified guide, you know.” Grandfather punched the car’s horn, and it made a sound. HONK. “Grandfather is certified!” I informed him, BARK, which was faithfully faithful, although he was certified to operate an automobile, not find lost history. HONK. “Please!” I said at Grandfather. BARK. HONK. “Please! You are making this impossible!” HONK! BARK! “Shut up,” he said, “and shut the bitch up and shut the Jew up!”


Question Pg. 108:


What is the relationship between Jonathan, Alexander and the Grandfather?


Answer:


Alexander and his Grandfather are guiding Jonathan on a journey to trace his Jewish roots in Ukraine. Jonathan is the leader of the trip and pays for the expenses, and the Grandfather is the driver who captains the car for the trip. Alexander serves as a medium and a translator and conveniently the point of view for the reader. Their roles have little purpose though as Jonathan is slightly abused by the other two men. The group functions in an unorganized and comical way, but all in one that embraces the cultural clashes and forages on through their journey.

Posted by: Peter Bellini at November 19, 2014 05:35 AM

Nathanael Jones
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
19 November 2014

“He assumed the Well-Regarded Rabbi was requesting his financial services, as had happened so many times in the past, piety being as expensive as it was those days. What can I do for you?”
(The Book of Recurrent Dreams, 1791, pg. 41, par. 7)

Question:
What was the task the Well-Regarded Rabbi asks of Yankel, and how did Yankel react to this news?

Answer:
“YOU WILL BE THE FATHER OF THE BABY FROM THE RIVER!” (Foer 41) “Chosen” by the baby, the rabbi now lays the job of father on Yankel without asking or warning about this development. However, not necessarily a bad thing, a job such as this comes as a shock if improper notification occurs. As such, Yankel responds not with joy, like the others in the room, but with the fear of death. Thinking of when his parents, brother, and children all died, Yankel is left to wonder/worry about having to once again raise a child, full of life, when he himself has lived a life surrounded by death.

Work Cited

Foer, Jonathan Safran. Everything Is Illuminated. New York: Houghton Mifflin, 2002. Print.

Posted by: Nathanael Jones at November 19, 2014 07:20 AM

Aaron Virelli
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
19, November 2014

Question: what was the festival being celebrated? What are these events comparable to? Did the community like brod? (Safranfoer pg 96)

Answer: in Jerusalem there was one holiday that the Jewish family lights a candle eight nights in a row. These are known as the eight nights of Chanukah. This is one of the most highly recognized events this brings people out into the street the author states, “Trachimday is the only time all year when the tiny village of Trachimbrod.”(safranfoer 96) this is a comparable event to “New york City on Valentines day or Dublin on St Patrick’s day.” (safranfoer 96) You can tell that there is a negative attitude between the people and Brod. There are not many nice things said about her in the book as she's walking back home women sneered at her, to brush against he men also used dumb drunk excuses to bump her also.(safranfoer 96)

Posted by: aaron Virelli at November 19, 2014 09:05 AM

Zachary Sabo
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL- On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
17 November 2014

Pages 98-99

“My grandmother struggles to her feet-old, even then- and says, with many different kinds of tears in her eyes, Etz vunderful!” (Page 99 par 1)

Question: Why does watching the Apollo land on the moon bring such joy to grandma?

Answer: The joy the two ladies get from watching the man walk on the moon goes beyond what they are actually seeing. The astronaut says “there’s definitely something out there” (Foer 99) when talking about what he sees in space, but it is a very symbolic quote. The feeling of joy that the ladies get is a sense of hope they have that they are able to succeed in the world, and that there is something out there for them to do. Before this landing on the moon, it seemed impossible that anyone would ever be able to reach this feat, but now the impossible has been done, so the boy’s mother and grandmother are filled with joy because now they feel they can accomplish anything.

Posted by: Zachary Sabo at November 19, 2014 09:15 AM

Abrar Nooh
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL
19 November 2014

“You don’t have to be the Float Queen, you know” “But of course I do” (Chapter 11, page 91)

Question: Brod is participating as the Float Queen for the 13th Trachimday festival. She had agreed that it was a foolish idea. Why this time she thought she needed to participate? Which float was Brod riding? And what did she throw into the water as part of the ceremony?

Answer: Brod was convinced that she was the most beautiful girl in Trachimbrod. “But we agreed that ceremony and ritual are so foolish.” But we also agreed that they are foolish only to those on the outside. I’m the center of this one” (Foer 91) said Brod. She knew that she would be the center of attention since she would be riding the Trachimbrod float dressed as a mermaid. This float was covered in blue butterflies, and Brod was sitting on a raised platform surrounded by other princesses dressed in blue (Foer 93). From this float, Brod threw some sacks into the water for men to dive into the water and go after them. Jonathan’s great-great- great-great-great-grandfather came back to the shore with a sack containing eighteen gold coins which were equal to half a year’s salary (Foer 94).

Posted by: Abrar Nooh at November 19, 2014 09:39 AM

Abrar Nooh
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL
19 November 2014

“’What is wrong with you?’ I asked him. ‘It is just the way I am,’ he said. ‘Hamburger?’ ‘No.’ ‘Tongue?’” (Chapter 8, page 65)

Question: Alex and his grandfather could not believe that Jonathan, the hero, was a vegetarian. What was Alex thinking about the hero when he refused to touch the meat in his plate? How did Alex’s grandfather fix the situation when the hero dropped his potato?

Answer: In the beginning, Alex and his grandfather could not believe that the hero did not eat meat at all. They were asking him several times if he would eat meat, sausage, chicken, veal, pork, etc. When they arrived at the restaurant, the waitress told them that the only way he could get potatoes was with a piece of meat. “When the food arrived, the hero asked for me to remove the meat off his plate. ‘I’d prefer not to touch it’ he said” (Foer 66). At this point, Alex was so annoyed, and he thought that the hero was too good for their food. As they were eating, the three were having a conversation, and Alex asked the hero for the maps. When the hero was reaching for the maps, a potato fell as Sammy Davis, Junior, Junior played with the table’s legs. The hero took no action but to stare at the potato on the floor. At this point, Alex’s grandfather picked the potato from the dirty floor with his own fork, gave a piece to Alex, one to the hero, one to Sammy Davis, Junior, Junior and kept one for himself. Then, Alex’s grandfather took a bite, and Alex took a bite. As the hero was cutting a piece to take a bite, Alex’s grandfather said, “Welcome to Ukraine” (Foer 67), and they all laughed in a dark manner.

Posted by: abrar nooh at November 19, 2014 09:42 AM

Olivia Ago-Stallworth
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
19 November 2014

“Yankel had lost two babies,...” (Chapter: Falling in Love, 1791-1796, page 44, par. 3)

Question: How did Yankel lose two babies?

Answer: Yankel lost two babies to a fever and the other was because of an industrial flour mill.

Posted by: Olivia Ago-Stallworth at November 19, 2014 10:14 AM

Olivia Ago-Stallworth
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
19 November 2014

“THE ALARM made a noise at 6:00 of the morning, but it was not a consequential noise,...” (Chapter: THE VERY RIGID SEARCH, page 105, par. 1)

Question: Why was the alarm not a consequential noise?

Answer: The alarm was consequential because, “Grandfather and I had not manufactured even one Z among them (Foer, 105).”

Posted by: Olivia Ago-Stallworth at November 19, 2014 10:23 AM

Maria Aguilera
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220-CA02 Journeys in Narrative
17 November 2014

“My mother is also crying, each tear unique. They cry together, cheek to cheek. And neither of them hears the astronaut whisper, I see something, while gazing over the lunar horizon at the tiny village of Trachimbrod.” (Safran Foer page 99 par. 1).

QUESTION:
What do their tears symbolize?

ANSWER:
Their tears symbolize the hardships in their family, and the struggles of humanity as a whole, in light of a new beginning as man lands on the moon.

Posted by: Maria Aguilera at November 19, 2014 11:22 AM

Ashlee English
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
19 November 2014

“She wanted to bile him…for dinner” (Safran Foer 103)
QUESTION:
What does this letter tell Jonathan about Alex’s father? How is Alex seen as older brother? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

ANSWER:
In this response to Jonathan’s previous letter, Alex is excited as he now has a pen pal so to speak, and to be helping him comment on his book. Thus, as an avenue of venting the realities he faces within his family, “He eats… late at night” (Safran Foer 103), that his father is verbally abusive and a drunk. Consequently, Alex does not care what his father does but only about Little Igor “To be truthful, I… ‘Everything for Little Igor’” (Safran Foer 103).Alex is determine to shield him from the harsh realities of their father’s behavior similar to the character in Jonathan’s novel when he comments on his work thinking that he would do “Everything for Little Igor” (Safran Foer 103).

Posted by: Ashlee English at November 19, 2014 11:24 AM

Kendra Hinton
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL: JOURNEYS OF TRANSFORMATION IN NARRATIVE CA01
19 November 2014

Question: What happen to Jonathan father when he did not “spit” on the Torah?

Answer: The General came to Jonathan father demanding him to spit on the Torah, but she said no. The General put the gun in “her mother’s mouth.” “No the hero said without volume.” Then, the General killed her mother. These actions continue to go on, where the general went to his four-year-old younger sister and put a gun to her mouth. “Spit he said, spit or.” “No she said.” The father did not spit and then the general shot his younger sister. Last, but not least the general went to the older sister who was pregnant put the gun in between the lady's legs, and told the father to spit on the Torah he did not spit on it. The general shot the sister in between the legs and left her to die in pain and agony. He did not spit, because he does not believe in God. (Foer, 186)

Posted by: Kendra Hinton at November 19, 2014 11:56 PM

Britney Polycarpe
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CL Journey into narratives
20 November 2014

“Tips are for small things like directions or for the valet” (foer 109)
Question: What did grandfather thinks when he said valet?
Answer: Grandfather thought he was talking about meat. “Valet ?”He does not eat meat” ( Foer 109)

Posted by: Britney Polycarpe at November 19, 2014 11:59 PM

Britney Polycarpe
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CL Journey into narratives
20 November 2014
“Grandfather interrogates me about you every day” (Foer 145)
Question: what made grandfather interrogate him?
Answer He questioned what he told him,“ he desires to know if you forgive him for the things he told you about the war, and about Herschel.” (Foer 145)

Posted by: Britney Polycarpe at November 19, 2014 11:59 PM

Britney Polycarpe
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CL Journey into narratives
21 November 2014

“there is so much that I want to inform you, jonathan but I cannot fathom the manner.”( Foer 178)
Question: what does he mean?
Answer: He is saying that there is so much going on that he wants to state the positive and not the negative first.

Posted by: Britney Polycarpe at November 20, 2014 12:00 AM

Aaron Virelli
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
19, November 2014
139-141

Question: how did Brod name her child? Why was the reason for this name rather then others?(Safranfoer pg 139)

Answer: Brod wanted to name the child after Shalom, Kolker, or Safran these were the names of men who had already passed away. She didn’t know when her husband had died, so it was not allowed unless it was before birth of the child. “Jewish custom forbade the naming of a child after living relative.”(Safranfoer 139) This was known as bad luck. The name she decides to give her child is Yankel like he other two children. (Safranfoer 141)

Posted by: aaron Virelli at November 20, 2014 12:00 PM

Aaron Virelli
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
21, November 2014

Question: what was the one thing in the painting she noticed above all? (safranfoer pg. 165)How did this affect his early life for mother?(Safranfoer pg. 166)

Answer: The girl always seems to notice one thing about paintings and that was the teeth on her grandfather as a young boy and she goes on to say, “ The physician must have shrugged, as physicians used to do when that couldn’t explain a medical phenomenon, and comforted my great grandmother with talk of good omens.”(Safranfoer pg.165) This was the thought at first not knowing how bad it might hurt when breastfeeding they took another portrait months later and her grandmother had a frown. That was from all of the breastfeeding and bloodied up nipples. Because of the horrible breastfeeding they never had another child. His teeth were also the reason for him being pulled prematurely out of the womb not getting the nutrients his callow body needed.(Safranfoer pg. 166)

Posted by: aaron Virelli at November 20, 2014 04:13 PM

*redo*
Sharrad Forbes
Dr. B. Lee. Hobbs
ENG220 CL: Journeys in Narrative (CA02)
21 November 2014

“The ground is still filled with rings, and money, and pictures, and Jewish things. I was only able to find a few of them, but they fill the earth.” (Chapter 18: Falling in Love, page 152, paragraph 12)

Question:

Explain the quoted passage above. What is the context of this quote? How does it relate to the town of Trachimbrod?

Answer:

The idea of burying one's belongings in the earth was a “Just in case” (Foer 152) measure many of the townspeople employed. They did this because they were never certain when they would get taken away.

Many of the townspeople met horrible fates, such as Herschel and Eli who “were best friends” (Foer 152), and were forced to kill one another. For if Eli did not shoot Herschel, “they would shoot him” (Foer 152).

The lady continues on about stories of the many Jewish people that inhabited the town and how, one by one, they all disappeared. Each item in the box with the word “R E M A I N S” (Foer 151) written on it, held a name and a story of a person long since passed.

Posted by: Sharrad Forbes at November 21, 2014 11:18 AM

Ashlee English
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
21 November 2014

“I love you…poisoned” (Safran Foer 133)
QUESTION:
What was the relationship between Brod and Alex’s very great grandmother? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

ANSWER:
Brod and Alex’s very great grandmother had a very typical romance story, “She felt it again, the same…face him” (Safran Foer 133), indicative of the tension between them. Moreover, Brod becomes the ‘chaser’ courting Alex’s very great grandmother as he gives her a gift, “She opened…it was subtle” (Safran Foer 132). In addition to this, she cared for Brod after he was injured thus showing the feelings she had for him and the nature of their relationship, “It’s OK…Until I’m gone” (Safran Foer 133).

Posted by: Ashlee English at November 21, 2014 12:33 PM

Kendra Hinton
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
21 November 2014

Question: When Brod gave his girlfriend the surprise gift, why did she spaz out? (Pages 132-133)

Answer: When Brod hands her a gift, “What is this, she said.” He asked her to open her gift, but she said no. The young woman putdown the gift and began to cry. Brod tries to console her, but she pushing him away. The young women eventually, told Brod “I don’t love you.” He tries putting his hand on her shoulder, but she hollered, “get off me” pushing herself off him. She starts running around the house. Until, Brod finally caught up with her and asked her “did you ever love me” she respond, “No. Never.” Brod had genuinely loved for the young women, but she did not have the same love as him. (Foer, 132)

Posted by: Kendra Hinton at November 21, 2014 06:15 PM

James Sierra
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL - ON THE PROVERBIAL ROAD: JOURNEYS OF TRANSFORMATION IN NARRATIVE CA02
26 November 2014

Question pages 142-143:
Alex states in one of his letters to Jonathan, “Perhaps you should be a drug user.” Why does he suggest this?

Answer:
Apparently, in Jonathan’s letters he has stated that he does not like to be portrayed as having a lot of anxiety. Alex replies to him, “This is difficult to achieve, because you are a person with very much anxiety (Foer 142).” Alex suggests this as a way to deal with his anxiety.

Posted by: James Sierra at November 26, 2014 07:31 PM

Claudia Pierre
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CL On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
26 November 2014

“His condition worsened. In time, Brod could expect a sound beating every morning before the Kolker went to work – where he was able, to the bafflement of all doctors, to refrain entirely from outbursts – and every late afternoon before dinner” (Safran Foer, pg.130).

QUESTION:
What was his condition? How bad of a condition was it?

ANSWER:
The condition seemed really bad that he got violent with her. He would beat her in the kitchen, in the living room in front of the children, and in the pantry. But she would never run from the beatings he will give her, she took all of the hits; she believed that her bruises were not marks of violence, but violent love. The Kolker was taking control of Brod.

Posted by: Claudia Pierre at November 26, 2014 11:31 PM

Claudia Pierre
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CL On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
26 November 2014

“But where are you going? That’s not all, he said, grabbing her skinny arm. Didn’t your father teach you to listen when you’re being talked at, or to, or under, or even in?” (Safran Foer, pg.203).

QUESTION:
What was Brod’s reaction to Sofiowka being aggressive with her? What did she promise her father?

ANSWER:
Brod promised her father that she will eat pineapple with him after the parade. Sofiowka told Brod that she is using the promise word too loosely, and that she is a liar. He is being aggressive with her and not letting her go to meet with her father as she promised him that she will after the parade. It seems like he is keeping her hostage.

Posted by: Claudia Pierre at November 27, 2014 12:10 AM

Sharrad Forbes
Dr. B. Lee. Hobbs
ENG220 CL: Journeys in Narrative (CA02)
27 November 2014

“It is said that the Messiah will come at the end of the world.” (Chapter 23: What We Saw When We Saw Trachimbrod, or Falling in Love, page 189, paragraph 10)

Question:
In the story the woman, whom the characters believe to be Augustine, discusses with Grandfather the idea of God and the rapture. Explain her view on God, and how it relates to what the Nazi’s did to Trachimbrod.

Answer:
The women believed to be Augustine recites a story of her older sister, whom after watching her friends and families murdered in front of her barely escaped with her life. When she returned to the village, people expected she would find “her house and her friends and even the relatives that she saw killed” (Foer 189). By reincarnation, they would all find new life because this was the end of the world. Although, Grandfather states that “it was not the end of the world” (Foer 189), to the people that experienced this atrocity, “it was” (Foer 189).

Through the horrors of the story, this leads the women to state “there is no God” (Foer 189). Not only did he not come during their time of need, but believe in someone that “would challenge faith like this” (Foer 189) is hard. Furthermore, it is hard to “believe in a God that could not stop what happened” (Foer 189). The notion that it was in Gods power to not only stop this atrocity from happening, but prevent it in the first place, makes it hard for Augustine to believe in his existence at all.

Posted by: Sharrad Forbes at November 27, 2014 11:13 AM

Caitlin Christian
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
Dr. Hobbs
28 November 2014

“He had many duplicates, and removed one like a playing card.” (Foer 111)

Question:

Through this page, Foer explains how infatuated everyone is with Augustine’s photo. As a reader, explain the infatuation and the detail the characters go into with just one photo of a woman.

Answer:

“Augustine had such pretty hairs. They were thin hairs. I did not need to touch them to be certain. Her eyes were blue. Even though the photograph lacked color, I was certain that her eyes were blue.” (111) The great detail that goes into Augustine by all characters shows the love and appreciation they have for her. Just one photo and one story brings so much life and emotion to the story and grabs the reader through the journey.

Posted by: Caitlin Christian at November 28, 2014 12:19 PM

Matt Basin
Eng 220 CL- On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
28 NOV 2014

“There’s is a sense in which the bride’s family had been preparing their house for her wedding since long before Zosha was born, but it wasn’t until my grandfather reluctantly proposed – on both knees rather than one – that the renovations achieved their hysterical pace” (Safranfoer pg. 161 paragraph 1).

Question 161-162:
(a.) What was covered all over the hard wood floors and tables in the living room and (b.) Why did they bring in new curtains and got rid of the old ones?

Answer:
The hardwood floors were covered with white canvas, and the tables were set in line with precisely positioned name cards. “ The hardwood floors were covered with white cloth, and tables were fixed in a line stretching from the master bedroom to the kitchen, each feathered with precisely positioned name cards, whose placement had been agonized over for weeks” (Safranfoer pg. 161). The new curtains were brought in because Zosha was getting married. “ New curtains were bought for the new windows, not because there was anything wrong with the old curtains on the old windows, but because Zosha was to be married and that called for new curtains and windows” (Safranfoer pg.161).

Posted by: Matthew Basin at November 28, 2014 01:01 PM

Matt Basin
Eng 220 CL- On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
28 NOV 2014

“ Immediately after the left, the Uprighters and Slouchers joined together to lift and move the synagogue all the way into the Human Three-Quarters, making it, if for only one hour, the Human Whole” (Safranfoer pg. 207 paragraph 45).

Question 207-208:
(a.) What was the note that Joseph left underneath the door and (b.) What happened to Sarah and Joseph?

Answer:
The note said, “I have considered everything you have told me, and I do believe that the stars are silver nails.” “They remarried four days later, when Joseph left a note under the door of Sarah’s parents’ house: I have considered everything you have told me, and I do believe that the stars are silver nails” (Safranfoer pg.208). Sarah died from heart failure, and Joseph drowned himself in the bath. “ They were sixty and fifty-eight at their last marriage, only three weeks before Sarah died of heart failure and Joseph drowned himself in the bath”(Safranfoer pg. 208).

Posted by: Matthew Basin at November 28, 2014 01:28 PM

Caitlin Christian
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
Dr. Hobbs
28 November 2014

Page 140-141
Question:
Often Foer uses the passage in order to describe to the reader details about a mysterious character. A character that the reader needs to know more about in order to be knowledgeable about the journey is introduced. The Dials is described through the pages; in what was, does Foer describe the Dials. Use quoted passage to explain the Dials details.
Answer:
“The old folks told him their secrets, hoping he might be amused, take pity on them, grant a few more years.” (Foer 140) This quote describes the Dials as a man of all trades; being able to cover all. He will never be given a task too large; this is a man that many become. Many men within the family believe they have become this man and fear this personality; it is loved and needed by many.

Posted by: Caitlin Christian at November 28, 2014 01:58 PM

Maria Aguilera
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220-CA02 Journeys in Narrative
29 November 2014

“She cut a small hole in the wall to allow him to speak to her from the adjoining bedroom to which he had exiled himself […]” (Safran Foer page 134 par. 1).

QUESTION:
Why did the Kolker exile himself? What happened that day through that hole?

ANSWER:
The Kolker exiled himself because he had a habit of abusing his wife; he would beat his wife every morning so he exiled himself for the last year of their marriage. That day they found themselves making love through that tiny hole on the wall that she made. This experience felt more intimate for them than any other time. “Life was a small negative space cut out of the eternal solidity, and for the first time, it felt precious – not like all of the words that had come to mean nothing, but like the last breath of a drowning victim” (Safran 135)

Posted by: maria aguilera at November 29, 2014 05:42 PM

Maria Aguilera
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220-CA02 Journeys in Narrative
29 November 2014

“He lived a double life: lover of not only grievers, but women untouched by grief’s damp hand, those closer to their first death than their second.” (Safran Foer page 54 par. 5).

QUESTION:
What about his life outside of these women? What did he do?

ANSWER:
Safran “had a life above his waist as well” (Safran 195). He went to school and was successful there; however, he found school boring. He thought “Books are for those without real lives. And they are no replacement” (195).

Posted by: maria aguilera at November 29, 2014 05:44 PM

Caitlin Christian
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
Dr. Hobbs
29 November 2014

Pg. 173-174
Question:
Often Foer goes in and out of many stories leading the reader down many paths. Through pages 173-174, the author is taking the reader through a journey from the past. As a reader, describe the setting with details from quoted passage. What does this setting mean to the reader because of the many journeys?
Answer:
The reader is taken to the theatre with grandfather and a young woman. In this setting grandfather is in his younger years and is being described as a man that has been with many different women. The setting within these two pages describes the play in which everyone is watching. The play is interrupted by Bitzl Bitzl R, “I say, what is going on over there? Bad Tankel, step away from the Rabbi’s twin female daughters!” (Foer 173) This setting described for the reader shows the past of grandfather. This shows the reader how much history grandfather takes around with him from the many situations he encountered. Going forth this is very important for the reader to remember for later evidence.

Posted by: Caitlin Christian at November 29, 2014 11:18 PM

Bronwen Burke
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
19 November 2014

“The women of the shtetl raised their impressive noses to my great-great-great-great-great-grandmother.”

(Ch 11. Falling in Love, 1791-1803: Everything is Illuminated. Page 75, par. 2)


Question: In this quote, Alexander is speaking of his ancestor, Brod. (a.) What did the women of the shtetl call Brod? (b.) What did the women do to ensure she had “no friends of her own age” (Foer, 75)?

Answer: The women of the shtetl called her “dirty river girl and waterbaby under their breath” (Foer, 75). They ensured that Brod had no friends her own age by destroying her reputation. For example, they would tell their children that she, “was not as much fun as the fun she had, or as kind as her kind deeds” (Foer, 75). They also suggest that Brod is promiscuous – “she associated only with Yankel and any man of the shtetl who was brave enough to risk being seen by his wife” (Foer, 75).

Posted by: Bronwen Burke at November 30, 2014 12:47 PM

Gabriela Caminero
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in a Narrative CA01
28 November 2014

Question: What happened to Jonathans documents when they stopped at a hotel for the night?

“I put them on the bedside table when I went to sleep, and when I woke up this morning she was chewing them “( Foer 105)

Answer:
Sammy Davis, Junior, Junior ate Jonathans documents when he was let into his hotel room to sleep.

Posted by: Gabriela Caminero at November 30, 2014 06:27 PM

Gabriela Caminero
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in a Narrative CA01
28 November 2014

Question: What accident did The Kolker suffer while working at the factory? What were the consequences of this injury.

“… except for the blood from his nose and ears, and the blade seems to be holding everything together in its good and right place, more or less” (Foer 126).

Answer:
A disk- saw blade broke loose from a machine, and ended up getting lodged into the middle of his head. He became very violent towards Brod at random moments.

Posted by: Gabriela Caminero at November 30, 2014 06:39 PM

Gabriela Caminero
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in a Narrative CA01
28 November 2014

Question:
What did Safran do the night of his wedding reception?

“After thoroughly satisfying the sister of the bride against the wall of empty wine racks” (Foer 253).

Answer:
Safran had sex with his wife’s sister.

Posted by: Gabriela Caminero at November 30, 2014 06:48 PM

Gabriela Caminero
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in a Narrative CA01
28 November 2014

Question:
What issue did Jonathan have the first night they went to eat?

“What do you mean he does not eat meat?”(Foer 65).

Answer:
Jonathan is a vegetarian and a main staple of their meals is meat so it is difficult to find meat free foods.

Posted by: Gabriela Caminero at November 30, 2014 06:56 PM

Gabriela Caminero
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in a Narrative CA01
28 November 2014

Question:
Why was Jonathan reluctant to get into the car with Alex and his grandfather when he first arrived at the airport?

“Where’s the dog going to be” (Foer 34).

Answer:
He is afraid of dogs because he had a bad experience with one.

Posted by: Gabriela Caminero at November 30, 2014 06:59 PM

Olivia Ago-Stallworth
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
30 November 2014

“It appeared that a part of him wanted to write everything, every word of what occurred, into his diary. And a part of him refused to write even one word. He opened the diary and closed it, opened it and closed it, and it looked as if it wanted to fly away from his hands.” (Chapter 15: Falling in Love, page 154, par. 19)

Question: What caused the hero to go into a shock and resulted in him to have conflicts to write about what occurred or not?

Answer: The hero is shocked because of his reaction from the photograph that was handed to him by Alex.

Posted by: Olivia Ago-Stallworth at November 30, 2014 08:46 PM

Zachary Sabo
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL- On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
1 December 2014

Pages 142-143

“I will begin with the less rigid matter, which is the writing.” (Foer 142)

Question: Why does Alex consider the writing to be less rigid?

Answer: In regards to Alex communicating with the author, Jonathon Safran Foer, it is easier to talk about translating his book, rather than discuss his opinions about topics with Jonathon. It is much simpler to just ask questions about what he literally needs to translate, as it is usually just an objective and obvious answer. After he asks these questions, then he can move on to asking more serious questions about his opinions and whatever he wants. “I will tell you that I was at first a very perplexed person.” (Foer 142)

Posted by: Zachary Sabo at November 30, 2014 09:07 PM

Olivia Ago-Stallworth
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
30 November 2014

“‘Spit, he said.’ ‘Did he?’ ‘No,’ she said, and she said no
as if it was any other word from any other story, not having the weight it
had in this one.” (Chapter 20: What we saw Trachimbrod, or Falling in Love, page 186, par. 9)

Question: Why was the spitting in this part of the novel so significant?

Answer: The spitting in this scene was so significant because according to Alex’s Grandfather was involved with acts of torture that the General was portraying on Izzy’s wife and made Alex’s Grandfather curse at Torah.

Posted by: Olivia Ago-Stallworth at November 30, 2014 09:07 PM

Bronwen Burke
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
21 November 2014

“She eased them off her ankles with extraordinary deliberateness, as if that action alone could have justified her birth, every hour of her parents’ labors, and the oxygen she consumed with every breath.”

(Ch 16. The Dial, 1941-1804-1941: Everything is Illuminated. Page 119, par. 1)


Question: What is happening in this scene and who is the woman in it?

Answer: In this scene, there is an unknown woman who is removing her underwear. She used her thumbs to pull the lace panties from her waist, allowing her engorged genitalia the teasing satisfaction of the humid summer updrafts…” (Foer, 119). The woman then, "folded the panties over themselves six times into a teardrop shape and slid them into the pocket of his black nuptial suit..." (Foer, 119). “She silenced with a kiss whatever he was about to say, and pushed him to go” (Foer, 119).

Posted by: Bronwen Burke at November 30, 2014 09:54 PM

Erin Gaylord
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journey in Narrative CA01
30 November 2014

“She gave birth to me in a secret dwelling, far away from everything that I would grow to know” (Pg. 39, par. 1, Foer).

Question:
What was his dream at 4:52?

Answer:
He dreamt that he was “born from a stranger’s body” (Foer 39). He expressed the love and bond he had with the woman he called mother during and after his birth.

Posted by: Erin Gaylord at November 30, 2014 10:04 PM

Erin Gaylord
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journey in Narrative CA01
30 November 2014

“Love me, because love doesn’t exist, and I have tried everything that does” (Pg. 82, par. 2, Foer).

Question:
Did Brod love Yankel? Did Yankel love Brod? Provide examples.

Answer:
Brod did not love Yankel. “In reality she hardly knew him” (Foer 82). Although he raised her and tried to give her the best life he could, they were never close; the age difference was too immense. Yankel did show love toward her. He thought if he died, “Who would sing to her and continue to tickle her back, in the particular way she liked, long after she’d fallen asleep” (Foer 83). “…he would die for was not Brod, exactly, but his love for her” (Foer 83).

Posted by: Erin Gaylord at November 30, 2014 10:15 PM

Bronwen Burke
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
1 December 2014

“I stood with the hero in front of this monument for many minutes while Augustine and Grandfather walked off into the darkness.”

(Ch 23. What We Saw When We Saw Trachimbrod, or Falling in Love: Everything is Illuminated. Page 190, par. 1)


Question: Alex and Jonathan stood in front of a monument in Trachimbrod. What was the purpose of this monument?

Answer: Isreael's prime minister dedicated the monument to Trachimbrods who were "killed at the hands of German fascism" (Foer, 189).

Posted by: Bronwen Burke at November 30, 2014 11:02 PM

Ashlee English
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
1 December 2014

“The Flour Mill… untimely deaths” (Safran Foer 198)
QUESTION:
What is The Book of Antecedents? How does it influence the life of the members in the shtetl? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

ANSWER:
The Book of Antecedents is a recording of the happenings of the significant, not so significant events, and very insignificant events in the shtetl, “What Jacob…black bread” (Safran Foer 205). As such, individuals in the shtetl who read the book will be aware of the trials and problems faced by their forefathers and learn how to deal with similar future problems, “The time … Herzog’s counter” (Safran Foer 199). Additionally the individuals also believed that they could return from the future and warn them from making the same mistake recorded in The Book of Antecedents.

Posted by: Ashlee English at December 1, 2014 01:02 AM

Rebeccah Braun
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
1 December 2014


“I said from the back, which made me feel like such a proud person, because I think it was the first occasion I had ever said it in the loud, and I could perceive that it also made Grandfather a proud person” (Everything is Illuminated, page 146, par. 2, Jonathan Safran Foer)

Question: What made both Sasha and Grandfather feel proud?


Answer: Sasha was proud to say that he was his Grandfather’s grandson. Grandfather was equally as happy to hear this.


Posted by: Rebeccah Braun at December 1, 2014 01:38 AM

Rebeccah Braun
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
1 December 2014


“First, I must describe that Augustine had a very unusual walk…” (Everything is Illuminated, page 146, par. 2, Jonathan Safran Foer)

Question: Besides her walk, what else did Sasha notice about Augustine?


Answer: Sasha observed that Augustine had a strange walk and apartment. “It was not similar to any house that I have seen, and I do not think that I would dub it a house,” (Foer, 147). He compared her leg to damaged goods, and then went on to describe her two-roomed house and all of the items within it.

Posted by: Rebeccah Braun at December 1, 2014 01:40 AM

Rebeccah Braun
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
17 November 2014

“YOU WILL DRINK THE COFFEE UNTIL I CAN SEE MY FACE IN THE BOTTOM OF THE CUP!” (Everything is Illuminated, page 107, par. 6, Jonathan Safran Foer).

Question: Did Sasha yell at the Hero and did he drink all of the coffee until his face reflects in the cup?


Answer: Sasha got mad at the Hero because he did not like the coffee. “It is one thing for him to not eat meat, and it is another thing for him to make Grandfather loiter in the car asleep, but it is another thing for him to slander our coffee” (Foer, 107). The Hero did drink the rest of the coffee. However, the cup was made of clay, so his face did not reflect in it.

Posted by: Rebeccah Braun at December 1, 2014 01:43 AM

Rebeccah Braun
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
14 November 2014

“Which? The one who does not eat meat, the one with his head in his hands, or the bitch who is masticating her tail?.” (Everything is Illuminated, page 65, par. 18, Jonathan Safran Foer).

Question: Who was engaging in this conversation and who were they referring to?


Answer: This conversation took place inside the restaurant and was between the waitress and Grandfather. The waitress asked what was wrong with the Hero because he was “the one who does not eat meat” (Foer, 65).

Posted by: Rebeccah Braun at December 1, 2014 01:45 AM

Rebeccah Braun
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
12 November 2014

“I observed distress in his smile of our hero.” (Everything is Illuminated, page 33, par. 17, Jonathan Safran Foer).

Question: What caused the hero to look distressed for the second time this novel?


Answer: The Hero looked distressed because as they were returning to the car, they saw that the driver, Grandfather, was sleeping. “When we arrived at the car, Grandfather was loitering with patience as father ordered him to. He was patient. He was snoring” (Foer, 33).

Posted by: Rebeccah Braun at December 1, 2014 01:46 AM

Ashley Gross
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
1 December 2014

“I order you not to go, he said, knowing that would never work” (Safran Foer 91).

Question- Pages 90-91:
Why didn’t Yankel want Brod to be float queen?

Answer:
He did not want her to be float queen because it was against everything she believed. They talked of how foolish things of that nature are and how she did not want any part of them. “They are so silly, turning back to Yankel”(Safran Foer 90). Also, he believed that she was too young and joked that she needs to wait until he passed away. “Wait until I pass, closing his book. Then you can have your choice of them. But not while I’m still alive” (Safran Foer 90).

Posted by: Ashley Gross at December 1, 2014 08:06 AM

Ashley Gross
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
1 December 2014

“I also feel shy, she said, which, in spite of the fact that they had seen each other’s naked body hundreds, and probably thousands, of times, was true”(Safran Foer 134).

Question-Pages 133-134:
What two intimacies had Brod and Shalom never encountered before?

Answer:
Although they had seen each other naked many times, they had never had the intimacy that comes with distance and silence. “They had never known the deepest intimacy, that closeness attainable only with distance. Then she backed away from the hole. He went to it and looked at her for several more silent minutes. In the silence they attained another intimacy, that of words without talking” (Safran Foer 134).

Posted by: Ashley Gross at December 1, 2014 08:08 AM

Ashley Gross
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
1 December 2014

“But Menachem was most proud of the scaffolding” (Safran Foer 162).

Question- Pages 161-162:
Why was Menachem most proud of the scaffolding?

Answer:
To him, the scaffolding was a symbol of things always changing and getting better. “The symbol that things were always changing, always getting a little better” (Safran Foer 162).

Posted by: Ashley Gross at December 1, 2014 08:10 AM

Summer Taylor
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
1 December 2014

"A few days before the hero was to arrive, I inquired Father if I could
go forth to America when I made to graduate from university. “No,” he
said." (Ch. 2. An Overture to Encountering the Hero, and Then Encountering the Hero: Everything is Illuminated. Kindle Edition. Page 27, par. 4)

Question: Why did Alex's father not want him to go to school in America?

Answer: " Also, you are going to toil at Heritage Touring when you are
graduated" (Foer 28). Alex's father believes that the life the he and his father is good enough for his son. He wants Alex to do the same thing their family had for generations and follow exactly in his footsteps.

Posted by: summer taylor at December 1, 2014 08:56 AM

Summer Taylor
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL- On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
1 December 2014

"No one said anything as Yankel read the note, and no one ever said anything afterward, as if the disappearance of his wife weren't the slightest bit unusual, or if they hadn't noticed that he had been married at all." (Ch. Falling in Love 1791-1796: Everything is Illuminated. Kindle Edition. Page 2, par 2)

Question: How did Yankel's wife "disappear?"

Answer: Yankel's wife left him for another man. She left him a note a the door that said she "had to do it for herself." She was sick of her old life at home and needed something new in her life. He never once blamed her
for fleeing to Kiev with the traveling and mustachioed bureaucrat who45
was called in to help mediate the messy proceedings of Yankel’s shameful
trial; the bureaucrat could promise to provide for her future, could take
her away from everything, move her to someplace quieter, without thinking, without confessions or plea-bargaining" (Foer 46).

Posted by: summer taylor at December 1, 2014 09:11 AM

Zachary Sabo
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL- On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
1 December 2014

Pages 167-168

“He was happy to give his arm.” (Foer 168)

Question: In Grandfathers first “love affair”, why does he give his arm up to the widow?

Answer: His grandfather gives his arm to a widow so that she is able to “reread yellowing letters, and lived outside herself, and outside her life.” (Foer 169) This showed how grandfather was a caring individual who wanted to help those around him in any way that he was able to. The act itself was just letting his “dead arm” provide some comfort for the widow and did not mean much to him, but he knows that it made a world of difference to this woman.

Posted by: Zachary Sabo at December 1, 2014 09:13 AM

Summer Taylor
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
1 December 2014

"The boy falls asleep, and the girl puts her head on his chest. Brod wants
to read more—to scream, READ TO ME! I NEED TO KNOW!." (Ch. Recurrent Secrets 1791-1943: Everything is Illuminated. Kindle Edition. Page 89, par. 5)

Question: Why does Brod get so upset about not being able to hear or see more of the story the children are reading?

Answer: Brod gets upset because the story the children are reading is titled "The First Rape of Brod D." Brod is looking through her telescope and looking at different scenes of her life. She feels like she cannot turn that page of that story herself and needs somebody to turn the page for her so she can keep reading what happens in that story. "-—but
they can’t hear her from where she is, and from where she is, she can’t
turn the page. From where she is, the page—her paper-thin future—is
infinitely heavy" (Foer 89).

Posted by: summer taylor at December 1, 2014 09:24 AM

Summer Taylor
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
1 December 2014

"I also feel shy, she said, which, in spite of the fact that they had seen
each other’s naked body hundreds, and probably thousands, of times, was
true." (Ch. The Dial: Everything is Illuminated. Kindle Edition. Page 133, par. 8)

Question: Why were both of the couple shy about taking off their clothes in front of the other if they had seen each other naked many times?

Answer: This seemed more intimate for the both of them, knowing that the husband would die. Brod also had never really looked at her husband like that because she had admitted to him that she had never loved him. "They had never known the deepest intimacy, that closeness attainable only with distance" (Foer 134).

Posted by: summer taylor at December 1, 2014 09:42 AM

Summer Taylor
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
1 December 2014

" Help me, please help me, I am dying.” “Did they?” Grandfather asked. “No." (Ch. What We Saw When We Saw Trachimbrod, or Falling in Love: Everything is Illuminated Kindle Edition. Page 187, par 4)

Question: Why would nobody help the girl after she had been shot and called for help? Does Alex agree with their decision?

Answer: The people knew that if they helped the girl then them and their families would have been killed as well. At first Alex does not agree with the peoples decision, but then he thought of his little brother. " (I thought
about this for many moments, and I understood that he was correct. I188
only had to think about Little Igor to be certain that I would also have
turned away and hid my face)" (Foer 187-188).

Posted by: summer taylor at December 1, 2014 09:50 AM

Nathanael Jones
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
30 November 2014

“You are Yankel. You love Brod.”
(Falling In Love, 1791-1803, pg. 85, par. 1)

Question:
To what extent does the book suggest that Yankel loves Brod?

Answer:
In what can be assumed, Yankel adds an entry into the Book of Recurrent Dreams, called “The Dream of living forever with Brod” (Foer 84). During his dream/entry, Yankel states that once he does die, the idea of Brod finding someone else to love fills him with jealousy. “She will marry and have children and touch what I could never approach,” (Foer 84) though a little vague if you look at the language and nature of relationship between Yankel and Brod, the suggestive nature of a deeper love does not seem out of place. Throughout the text, Foer describes how Brod loved no one but Yankel and vice versa, and they do little things to make the other person feel loved and not strange, such as spilling on each other’s pants to make the other not feel alone (Foer 83). The love he feels though protective and sweet, in a lonely man such as Yankel could suggest that he loves her further than one would typically see in a child.

Work Cited

Foer, Jonathan Safran. Everything Is Illuminated. New York: Houghton Mifflin, 2002. Print.

Posted by: Nathanael Jones at December 1, 2014 09:56 AM

Anet Milian
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
30 November 2014
Question: Who is speaking? “My grandfather was in love with the smell of women.”
Answer: Jonathan. (Page 172)
Work Cited
Foer, J. S. (2003). Everything Is Illuminated . New York: Perenial.

Posted by: Anet Milian at December 1, 2014 11:30 AM

Matt Basin
Eng 220 CL- On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
1 Dec 2014

“Why did he leave? Why did you leave?” (Safranfoer pg. 247 paragraph 17).

Question 247-248:
(a). What was the explanation of why the grandfather leave in the first place and (b). Did the father considered himself to be a good father or a bad father?

Answer:
His explanation was “Because I did not want your father to grow up so close to death. I did not wish him to know of it, and live with it. This is why I never informed him of what occurred” (Safranfoer pg. 247). He said that he was the worst father and a bad influence on his son. “I was the most unfortunate father. I desired to remove him from everything that was bad, but instead I gave him badness upon badness. A parent is always responsible for how his son is. You must understand” (Safranfoer pg. 247).

Posted by: Matthew Basin at December 1, 2014 06:30 PM

Claudia Pierre
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
2 December 2014

“I told all of this to Jonathan as Grandfather told it to me, and he wrote all of it in his diary. He wrote: Herschel did not possess a family of his own. He was not such a social person” (Safran Foer, 243)

QUESTION:
What did Herschel usually write in his diary, and what did he enjoy to do besides write?

ANSWER:
Herschel was known as poet, and he had the opportunity to showcase most of his poems. When writing he would be in his room and not around people. He would usually write about love, if it was not about love then most of the poems were funny and silly at times. When not writing, he enjoyed reading very much.

Posted by: Claudia Pierre at December 2, 2014 01:03 AM

Sharrad Forbes
Dr. B. Lee. Hobbs
ENG220 CL: Journeys in Narrative (CA02)
2 December 2014

“The “M” was taken from the army that would take his mother’s life: German front advances on soviet border” (Chapter: Falling In Love, 1934-1941, page 233, paragraph 19)

Question:

In the letters Safran makes for the Gypsy girl the actual letters he uses is taken from various newspaper headlines of the impending Nazi invasion. How does the author allude to what will happen in the future through these headlines?

Answer:

As seen in the quoted passage above, the author uses Safran and his letters to depict what will happen in the story. The idea that the “M,” which was "taken from the army that would take his mother’s life” (Foer 233) shows us what will eventually happen. The “eet” from the headline “Nazi fleet defeats French at lesacs” (Foer 233). The “me” from “Germans surround Crimea,” with the “und” from “American war funds reach England” (Foer 233). Lastly, the “er” from “Hitler renders nonaggression pact inoperative” (Foer 233).

As the letter spells out Safrans wish to meet the Gypsy girl we can see that this is a “love that could never be” yet, a “war that could” (Foer 233). The notion that Safran is so caught up in what he believes is love with the Gypsy girl that he cannot see the impending danger is ironic. One could say that his ignorance in regards to the newspaper headings he is using in his letter adds to this irony.

Posted by: Sharrad Forbes at December 2, 2014 08:06 PM

Britney Polycarpe
Dr. Hobbs
Eng 220 journeys into narrative
2 December 2014
“I am not lying why would lie you can Kill me please and then the General Shotthminthead and said I am becoming tired of this and went to the next man in line. “
Who did he choose in the line?
A jew

Posted by: Britney Polycarpe at December 2, 2014 10:41 PM

(Do over) Olivia Ago-Stallworth
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
3 December 2014

“This is not reasonable, Jonathan it is not,” (Chapter 28: Dear Jonathan, page 240, par. 3)

Question: Why was Alex so upset at Jonathan? What would Alex have done differently than Alex? Why did Jonathan do what he did to his grandfather and the Gypsy woman?

Answer: Alex is upset at Jonathan because Jonathan is writing that his grandfather and the Gypsy do not get married or at least together when they obviously should be together. Alex is writing a letter criticizing Jonathan about his writing styles and telling him that if he had written it then, it would have been better in Alex’s perspective. Jonathan did not want to put the grandfather and the Gypsy girl together so the story line had a conflict. If there was not a conflict then, the story would be too short and would not be as fulfilling as if there were one.

Posted by: Olivia Ago-Stallworth at December 3, 2014 12:53 AM

Nathanael Jones
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
3 December 2014

“It was an opportunity that their hurried marriage had never allowed for: coyness, slowness, discovering one another from a distance. They had their seventh, eighth, and ninth conversations.”
(The Dial, 1941-1804-1941, pg.129, par. 15)

Question:
What event occurred that allowed these further conversations, and what were these conversations about?

Answer:
“After badly injuring Brod in several night incidents, he decided (against her will) that the doctor with the broken nose was right, they must sleep apart” (Foer 129). Due to the accident at the sawmill, with the saw blade being stuck in his head, Kokler started to break down and burst out in violent rampages. Worried for Brod, he decides to sleep in a different room and because of this fact, they finally have conversations seven, eight, and nine. “They would explain their dreams to each other over bread and coffee the next morning and describe the positions of their restlessness” (Foer 129). Though not severely different from when they did sleep in the same room, the lack of contact caused them to result in talking and from talking about their dreams and nightly habits, they finally began to connect.

Work Cited

Foer, Jonathan Safran. Everything Is Illuminated. New York: Houghton Mifflin, 2002. Print.

Posted by: Nathanael Jones at December 3, 2014 07:34 AM

Maria Aguilera
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220-CA02 Journeys in Narrative
3 December 2014

“They made love for the last time, unaware that the next seven months would pass without any words between them.” (Safran Foer page 236 par.1).

QUESTION:
Who is this quote referring to?

ANSWER:
Safran and the Gypsy girl.

Posted by: maria aguilera at December 3, 2014 08:18 AM

Zachary Sabo
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL- On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
3 December 2014

Pages 224-225

“The man in the picture. It’s you.”

Question: This quote comes from Alex questioning his grandfather because he believes grandfather is the man in the photo from Lista. Why is it a big deal that grandfather is the man in the photo? How does he react to the boys figuring this out?

Answer: It is shocking to Alex to see his grandfather as a young man in this photo. Firstly, grandfather had told them that he was from a different village, but it turns out that that was a lie. With this in mind, now the question comes into play asking what else does grandfather know that he previously lied about. It turns out that there was more, and the boys are surprised to hear this. Grandfather responds to this by saying, ”I am a good person who has lived in a bad time.”(Foer 227) He understands what he has done in his past, and it has made him upset over time, but he is confident that he was doing the right thing, and just was in the wrong place.

Posted by: Zachary Sabo at December 3, 2014 08:55 AM

Aaron Virelli
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
2, December 2014
236-237

Question: why did they not talk to one another after making love the one night? When was the next time he unexcitedly saw her?( Safranfoer 236)

“They made love for the last time, unaware that they would not see each other for the next seven months”(Safran Foer 236) this statement shows how long they will have to be apart. The reason for not seeing each other stems from his family and makes him have to hide what he has done. They saw each other all the time but ignored each other always and everywhere. (Safran Foer 236) The next time he would see this woman was running out of his house. This had frightened him for he did not know what she had done. It was harmless his mom was out, and dad was in the back washing off. She goes to say how the ordering of his books is stupid and should not be ordered by color.

Posted by: aaron Virelli at December 3, 2014 09:02 AM

Ashley Gross
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
3 December 2014

"He put his finger beneath the face of the man, and I must confess, there could be nothing more truthful to do but admit, he looked like me"(Safran Foer 225).

Question-Pages 226-227:
Why did the man in the picture look so much like Alex?

Answer:
Alex looks so much like the man in the picture because the man was Alex's grandpa. "The woman in the photograph is your grandmother. She is holding your father. The man standing next to me was our best friend, Herschel"(Safran Foer 228).

Posted by: Ashley Gross at December 3, 2014 09:37 AM

Anet Milian
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
1 December 2014
Question (Pages 248-249): In the story Grandfather is telling Jonathan and Alex about Hershel, why does he tell grandmother to return upstairs with the baby.
Answer: The soldiers were punching every door with their guns and investigating the house to be certain that everyone was in front of the synagogue. Grandfather feared that they would discover them in the basement and shoot them because of their hiding.
Work Cited
Foer, J. S. (2003). Everything Is Illuminated . New York: Perenial.

Posted by: Anet Milian at December 3, 2014 10:59 AM

Jonah Robertson
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL CA02
December 3 2014

"This time I could see his eyes voyage this and that over the photograph. They stopped on each person and witnessed each person from feet to hairs." (Page 226)

Question: Why is so much attention paid to the paragraph?

Answer: Because he is attempting to determine the relevance of the image. He later determines that members in the photo appear to be similar to Alex (Foer 226).

Posted by: Jonah Robertson at December 3, 2014 10:59 AM

Anet Milian
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative
29 November 2014
Question (138-139): What did Grandfather tell Brod when he was dying?
Answer: He told her that he was scared and he also confessed to Brod that Yankel was not her real father. “
Work Cited
Foer, J. S. (2003). Everything Is Illuminated . New York: Perenial.

Posted by: Anet Milian at December 3, 2014 11:09 AM

Caitlin Christian
ENG 220 Journeys of Transformative Narrative CA02
3 December 2014
Dr. Hobbs

Pages 227-228
Question:

“I am not a bad person,” he said. “I am a good person who has lived in a bad time.” (Foer 227)
Often in a story, the author will use a climactic moment that hooks the reader to lead to the next chapter. The climactic moment may not mean the story is ending but another journey or discovery is beginning. This archetype pure gold if the author uses it correctly to capture the reader. Through this knowledge where does this archetype occur and what knowledge does the reader learn in order to continue reading? Use quoted passage in your answer.

Answer:
“Everything I did, I did because I thought it was the correct thing to do.” (Foer 228)The hero within these two pages is explaining his past, which is coming up because of the box that Sasha gave to the group. The box read ‘IN CASE’ and carried many treasures from the past. Many pictures were found in the box and the hero is explaining each one he has knowledge about. Foer seems to add suspense to these pages through the translation process between the hero and the rest of the group. Everything being repeated makes the journey longer and grabs the reader. “Herschel is wearing a skullcap in the photograph because he was a Jew.” “He was my best friend. And I murdered him.” (228) This knowledge gained by the reader at the very end of the chapter holds an element of suspense.

Posted by: Caitlin Christian at December 3, 2014 11:32 AM

James Sierra
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL - ON THE PROVERBIAL ROAD: JOURNEYS OF TRANSFORMATION IN NARRATIVE CA02
30 November 2014

Question pages 230-231:
Safran hated to hold hands in public. What did he do to avoid holding hands?

Answer:
Safran would try to find ways to avoid holding hands in Public. He would use the hand the Gypsy girl was trying to hold “to comb his hair, to point at the spot where his great-great-great-grandfather spilt the gold coins onto the shore like golden vomit from the sack – and then would insert it in his pocket, ending the situation (Foer 230).”

Posted by: James Sierra at December 3, 2014 08:39 PM

James Sierra
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL - ON THE PROVERBIAL ROAD: JOURNEYS OF TRANSFORMATION IN NARRATIVE CA02
2 December 2014

Question pages 263:
While speaking with the Dial, Safran confesses his love for only one girl. Who is the one that he is in love with?

Answer:
The Dial assumes that Safran is saying that he was in love with the Gypsy girl. However, he realizes that the girl Safran loves is his unborn daughter. Safran says, “It’s not her that I love. It’s my girl. My girl (Foer 263).”

Posted by: James Sierra at December 3, 2014 09:05 PM

Kendra Hinton
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL: Journey of Transformation in Narrative CA01
December 3, 2014

“Do you love me? He asked. Did you ever?” (Jonathan Safran Foer, pg.238)

: In this passage, who grandfather was having a conversation with, in pages 238-239?

Answer: Grandfather was having a conversation with Gypsy girl.

Posted by: Kendra Hinton at December 3, 2014 10:35 PM

Aaron Virelli
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220 CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
4, December 2014
265

Question: what did they have to say about the house that his great great great grandmother stayed in? (Safran Foer 265)

Answer: “it had wood floors, long windows, and enough room for a large family.” (Safran Foer) I was a very nice house and the only problem that she talked about was the noise from the water. It also became humid in the house sometimes.

Posted by: aaron Virelli at December 4, 2014 09:59 AM

Kendra Hiinton
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL: Journey of Transformation in Narrative CA01
3 December 2014

Question: What was the Trachimbrod citizens accommodated to during Holocaust?

Answer:
“They hadn’t forgotten, but accommodated, the memory that took place of terror (262),” which was the war, regarding to Nazis destroying Trachimbrod. The resident was trying to forget about the war that was starting to happen in their town. “The memories of birth, childhood, and adolescence resonated with greater volume than the din of exploding shells (Foer, 262).” The citizens had to get adjusted to the changes that was taking place in Trachimbrod.

Posted by: Kendra Hinton at December 4, 2014 03:29 PM

Ashley Gross
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
4 December 2014

“You see! Safran pleaded, barely able to support his kneeling body. This is what it’s like! What what’s like? Love” (Safran Foer 264).

Question-Page 264:
What example does Safran give for the true meaning of love?

Answer:
He talked about how his wife would take care of him after his accident, even though he would have fits of rage and attack her. “Every morning, she’d clean me of my excrement, bathe me, dress me, and see that my hair was combed like a sane man’s, even when it meant an elbow to the nose or a broken rib. She polished the blade. She wore my teeth marks on her body like other wives might wear jewelry. The hole didn’t matter. We paid it no attention. We shared a room. She was with me. She did all of those things and so many more, things I would never tell anyone, and she never even loved me. Now that’s love”(Safran Foer 264).

Posted by: Ashley Gross at December 4, 2014 05:58 PM

Bronwen Burke
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
3 December 2014

“The Gypsy girl cried, and when my grandfather asked her what was wrong, she did not say...”

(Ch 21. Falling in Love, 1934-1941: Everything is Illuminated. Page 234, par. 1)


Question: What secret did Safran tell the Gypsy girl that made her cry?

Answer: Safran told the Gypsy girl that his love for his mother has remained the same. “He told her his darkest secret: that unlike other boys, his love for his mother had never diminished” (Foer, 234). He would also “rather have a kiss from her than anything in this world” (Foer, 234).

Posted by: Bronwen Burke at December 4, 2014 06:03 PM

Bronwen Burke
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
5 December 2014

“After the bombing was over, the Nazis moved through the shtetl. They lined up everyone who didn’t drown in the river.”

(Ch 26. The Beginning of the World Often Comes, 1942-1791: Everything is Illuminated. Page 272, par. 1)


Question: What further unfortunate events followed the drowning of the citizens of the shetl?

Answer: The Nazis lined up the remaining citizens and commanded them to spit on the Torah – “’Spit, or else’” (Foer, 272). Then, they tossed the Jews and The Book of Recurrent Dreams into the burning synagogue, which became a “bonfire of Jews” (Foer, 272).

Posted by: Bronwen Burke at December 4, 2014 06:43 PM

Olivia Ago-Stallworth
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
4 December 2014

“Finally he was ready. His father could not believe this thing.” (Chapter 34: Dear Jonathan, page 274, par.3)

Question: What did Sasha do for his father after talking to him?

Answer: Sasha forgave him, and his dad, and him got into a fight.

Posted by: Olivia Ago-Stallworth at December 4, 2014 11:57 PM

Peter Bellini
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng 220CL On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
December 5, 2014


“Because she thinks you’re perfect. She told me so. And your wedding day is no time to change. Not even into something more comfortable? Your wedding day is no time to be comfortable. Oh, sister, he said, and kissed her where her cheek became her lips. A sense of humor to match your beauty. She slid her lace panties from under his lapel. Finally, pulling him into her arms, any longer and I would have just burst.”


Question 163-164:


How does Safran feel about his new sister? How is this related to his actions with the other women of the Shtetl.


Answer:


Safran finds himself physically aroused by his sister and they soon “become carnal” during the wedding as Alex would say. This action is in relation to the way Safran enjoys the company of all the women in the village. His wife Zosha, on the other hand, feels that Safran is perfect and saves her virginity for him all the while not recognizing the infidelity that is going on between her new Husband and their sister.

Posted by: Peter Bellini at December 5, 2014 01:47 AM

Peter Bellini
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng 220CL On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
December 5, 2014


“Brod had three sons with the Kolker, all named Yankel. The first two died in the flour mill, victims, like their father, of the disk saw. (See Appendix G: Untimely Deaths.) The third Yankel, conceived through the hole after the Kolker’s exile, lived a long and productive life, which included many experiences, feelings, and small accumulations of wisdom, about which none of us will ever know.”


Question 209-210:


What was so different about how the third child was conceived and raised by Brod? How did this reflect on his success in contrast to his two older, deceased brothers?


Answer:


The Kolker and Brod have three children together the first two were conceived together in the same room and raised by the parents together. These children eventually follow their fathers footsteps being raised in an abusive environment, and eventually they die due to this toxic environment and the lessons learned there. The third child was shot forth from the Kolker's family jewels and conceived in Brod's womb and her room alone. This separation is one of the more intimate moments for the lovers who make love through a “Gloryhole” and soon the Kolker passes away. The third child is raised in a much healthier environment just as the environment they were conceived in thus resulting in a more fruitful life.

Posted by: Peter Bellini at December 5, 2014 01:48 AM

Peter Bellini
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng 220CL On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
December 5, 2014


“The Dial tiptoed across the cobblestones like a chess piece and hid himself under the breasts of the prostrate mermaid ...There is still time”


Question Pg. 270-271:


What is there still time for?


Answer:


There is still rapidly decreasing time to run away from the Nazi invasion that is soon to arrive in the village. The Nazis have perfected their sickening method of first breaking the Jews religion and then murdering them essentially taking their life and salvation. The people of the village much like the Dial, who was once a villager named the Kolker find shelter in the Brod symbolized by the mermaid. This act of hiding in the river actually saves many villagers from a much more gruesome death and ends up being the lesser of two evils to befall them.

Posted by: Peter Bellini at December 5, 2014 01:48 AM

Sharrad Forbes
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG220 CL: Journeys in Narrative (CA02)
5 December 2014

“He thought, as he performed the act that he had practiced to perfection, about the Gypsy girl” (Chapter 31: The First Blasts, and Then Love, 1941, page 256, paragraph 1).

Question:

As Safran makes love to his new wife Zosha for the first time, what ideas or thoughts crosses his mind regarding the Gypsy girl and his mother? Describe your answer using quoted passages from the text.

Answer:

Safran is in deep thought about the Gypsy girl and the idea of “running away with her” (Foer 256). Although, he does “love his family” at least his "mother, anyway” (Foer 256), he ponders how long it will be for him to stop missing them.

The idea of running away goes deeper as Safran ponders whether or not there is “anything he couldn’t leave behind?” (Foer 256). It is these thoughts “so ugly and true” (Foer 256) that fill his mind. Safran, consumed by the fact that everyone could die but the “Gypsy girl and his mother” and he would still be "able to go on” (Foer 256).

Posted by: Sharrad Forbes at December 5, 2014 02:49 AM

Zachary Sabo
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL- On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
5 December 2014

Page 266

“Every parent who loses a child finds a way to laugh again. The timbre begins to fade. The edge dulls. The hurt lessens. Every love is carved from less. Mine was. Yours is. Your great-great-great-grandchildren’s will be. But we learn to live in that love.”

Question: Why does the dialogue include a reference to Safran’s great-great-great-grandchild?

Answer: This chapter is written by Jonathon Safran Foer, who is telling about what happens to his ancestral grandfather. It is not known for sure what was told to Safran, but since Jonathon is the writer, he is able to put phrases like “great-great-great-grandchildren because it applies directly to him. Safran nods his head in response to this statement “as if he understood”, simply because he was not aware of the implication of those words at that time.

Posted by: Zachary Sabo at December 5, 2014 09:13 AM

Matt Basin
Eng 220 CL- On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
5 Dec 2014

“Just as my grandfather’s first orgasm was not intended for Zosha, the bombs that inspired it were not intended for Trachimbrod but a site in the Rovno hills” ( Sanfranfoer pg.258 paragraph 1).

Question 258-259:
(a) What actions did the Wisps and Gypsies on the day of June, 18 1941?

Answer:
“The Wisps of Ardisht turned their cigarettes backward, cupping their mouths around the lit ends to prevent their being spotted from a distance” (Sanfranfoer pg.258). “The Gypsies in their hamlet took down their tents, dismantled their thatch shanties, and lived uncovered, clinging to the earth like human moss” (Sanfranfoer pg.258).

Posted by: Matthew Basin at December 5, 2014 09:47 AM

Summer Taylor
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
5 December 2014

"... he knew were all untrue, were bad nottruths, even, but he nodded and tried to convince himself to be convinced,
tried to believe her..." (Chapter Falling in Love 1934-1941: Everything is Illuminated. Kindle Edition. Page 230, par. 2)

Question: What did Safran know the gypsy was lying about? Why did he continue to listen to her lies?

Answer: Safran knew that the gypsy was lying about her wild stories of the things she has done and what she has seen. "She had been to Kiev, he learned, and Odessa, and even Warsaw. She had lived among the Wisps of Ardisht for a year when her mother became
deathly ill" (Foer 230). Safran kept listening to her because he wanted to believe her and wanted "to live among presences" (Foer 230).

Posted by: summer taylor at December 5, 2014 10:46 AM

Summer Taylor
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
5 December 2014

"I can wear my hair in a ponytail if you think that would make me more
pretty" (Chapter: The Persnicketiness of Memory 1941: Everything is Illuminated. Kindle Edition. Page 263, par 2)

Question: Why was the young bride upset and worried about her husband?

Answer: She was upset because she thought she was not able to please her husband with good enough sex on their wedding night. Her new husband had been bedridden after their wedding night and she was worried that it was her fault for not being good or pretty enough. And last night. Did I please you? I will learn. I’m sure I will. You were wonderful, he said. I’m just not feeling well. It’s nothing with
you. Everything with you is wonderful" (Foer 263).

Posted by: summer taylor at December 5, 2014 11:03 AM

Ashlee English
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
5 December 2014

“I know that . And I’m sure you know that I don’t love you” (Safran Foer 234)
QUESTION:
What is the nature of the relationship between Safran and the Gypsy girl? What impact does this relationship have on Safran? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

ANSWER:
The nature of their relationship is likened to that of a secret budding romance. Due to Safran’s and the Gypsy’s, difference in social stature in society at the time their relationship was a disdainful act hence a secret. Although they pretended to admit to their true feelings of love, it was obvious that they were, “I don’t… love you” (Safran Foer 234). As such, Safran becomes weary of his upcoming nuptials to Zosha “My parents…be happy” (Safran Foer 234-235), indicative of his real feelings for the Gypsy.

Posted by: Ashlee English at December 5, 2014 11:12 AM

Ashlee English
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
5 December 2014

“Canopies of thin white string… afternoon” (Safran Foer 267)
QUESTION:
What insight does this give into the relationship of Grandfather(Safran) and Zosha? Use quoted passages from the text to support the part of your answer that appears in your own words.

ANSWER:
The day is decorated as it on Trachimday cognisant of the festive holiday. Safran had his wife with him, “My grandfather… worse now” (Safran Foer 267), painting the picture of a family. He also enjoyed the ‘kickings’ of his unborn child illustrating that the marriage although arranged seem to be working and strive towards normalcy, “Oh…extraordinary!” (Safran Foer 268).

Posted by: Ashlee English at December 5, 2014 11:26 AM

Joshua Natonio, Kyle Van Burren, Tyler Sommers
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA01-On the Proverbial Road: Journeys in Narrative
05DEC2014

Question:
On pages 265-266, Jonathan writes, “Every widow wakes one morning, perhaps after years of pure and unwavering grieving, to realize she has slept a good night’s sleep, and will be able to eat breakfast, and doesn’t hear her husband’s ghost all the time, but only some of the time.” How do the characters in Everything Is Illuminated live their lives in the wake of tragic events? What roles do stories play in reconciling ourselves with the past?

Answer:
In Everything Is Illuminated Jonathan’s grandfather is searching for his former shtetl, Trachimbrod. During their journey Jonathan and his grandfather are looking for Augustine, a woman who is said to have saved Jonathan’s grandfather from the Nazis. Years after dealing with the tragedies of war-torn Europe, Jonathan’s grandfather fondly remembers his lost shtetl and the woman who acted as a savior during chaos. Jonathan’s grandfather is able to move on with his life in the wake of the tragic events, but he never forgets his former life in Trachimbrod. Stories present how people deal with certain situations and ordeals, which allows the readers to learn and critique both the hero’s journey and their own personal journey.

Posted by: Tyler Sommers, Kyle Vanburren, Joshua Natonio at December 5, 2014 11:39 AM

Jonah Robertson, Peter Bellini, Jake Gates, and Joanna Ozog
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA02
December 5 2014

Question: Many things and people are split in the novel: the two narratives; the twins, Hannah and Chana; the Kolker, his head literally split by a saw blade; the Double-House in Trachimbrod. What other doubles are there? Why do you think this is such a prominent theme in the novel? What does it reflect about human nature? How does it relate to the question of how we write about historical events, as made clear by the opening sentence of the second chapter: "It was March 18, 1791, when Trachim B's double axle wagon either did or did not pin him against the bottom of the Brod River."

Answer: The presence of dichotomies in this story is a direct representation of the fact that there is never only one side of a topic, there are always more faces to uncover. This is represented in Jonathan's idealized Trachimbrod that he represents in his story, and the historical Trachimbrod he eventually encounters. Similarly, Alex sees his Grandfather as one person, and then another side of his Grandfather is apparent after they meet Not Augustine. This relates to how historical events are written about, because there are always two viewpoints on any historical happening, but only one is often recorded. After all, history is written by the victors.

Posted by: Jonah Robertson at December 5, 2014 12:16 PM

Olivia Ago-Stallworth, James Sierra, Caitlin Christian, Sharrad Forbes
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
5 December 2014

Question:
Guilt is a big theme in Everything Is Illuminated. On page 187, Alex's grandfather, responding to the account of the Nazis' murdering innocent Jews, tells Alex: "You would not help somebody if it signified that you would be murdered and your family would be murdered." On page 227, Alex's grandfather says, "I am not a bad person. I am a good person who has lived in a bad time." Do you think Alex's grandfather did anything wrong? Should he feel in any way guilty? If your answers to the two questions are different, how can that be? Are we responsible for the bad things that others do if we do nothing to stop them? Should we feel guilty if a family member did
something bad in the past? Can we free ourselves from guilt for past deeds?

Answer:
Alex’s grandfather did do the right thing but felt guilty for getting his friend, Herschel, killed. To the extent we are responsible for the bad things that others do if we do nothing to stop them. We should not feel guilty if a family member did something bad in the past because that event happened already, and there is nothing usually to be done to fix the fact. The only way to free ourselves from guilt is to let time heal all wounds and acceptance of what happened during the event. The statement, “what does not kill you makes you stronger,” applies tremendously in this case as a form of a healing process.

Posted by: Olivia Ago-Stallworth at December 5, 2014 12:19 PM

Leroy Pianka
Claudia Pierre
Bryce Veller
Ashlee English
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
Eng220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
5 December 2014

Group 8
On page 79, Jonathan writes that Brod “would never be happy and honest at the same time.” And on Page 117, Alex, frustrated by not finding Augustine, explains that “not-truths hung in front of me like fruit. Which could I pick for the hero? Which could I pick for Grandfather? Which for myself?” What roles do lies and deception play in Everything Is Illuminated? When and why are lies sometimes necessary? When do they hurt either the liar or the ones they lie to?

Answer:
The roles that lies and deception play in Everything Is Illuminated is for protection, both emotionally and physically. Sometimes lies are necessary to protect someone from emotional scars. An example of protection from emotional scar would be how Yankel never told Brod that he was not her real father. Another example would be Lista lies to protect herself from the emotional trauma of the Trachimday. She lost her baby and family and also the community.

Posted by: Leroy Pianka at December 5, 2014 12:23 PM

Tyler Sommers
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA01- On the Proverbial Road: Journeys in Narrative
28Nov2015

Pg24-25
“He altered to our residence for permanent. He reposed on Little Igor’s bed with Sammy Davis Junior Junior, and Little Igor reposed on the sofa.”
Question
What was the reason the grandfather had to move in with them permanently?
Answer
The grandfather had to move in with them permanently because he was starting to become ill. It was easier to care for him and attend his needs while he was living with his family.

Posted by: Tyler Sommers at December 5, 2014 03:12 PM

Tyler Sommers
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL CA01- On the Proverbial Road: Journeys in Narrative
01DEC2015

Pg123-124
“That’s wonderful, honey. Aren’t you going to ask what kind of list? I figured you’d have told me if you wanted me to know. When you didn’t, I just assumed it was none of my business. Do you want me to ask you?

Question:
What was the kind of list that they kept referring to while they spoke to one another?

Answer:
The list that was being referred to was a list of how many conversations they have had since they had been married. “Ive kept a list of the number of conversations we’ve had since we’ve been married. Would you like to guess how many?”(Foer pg124)

Posted by: Tyler Sommers at December 5, 2014 03:25 PM

Matthew Basin
Tommy Meseroll
Rebeccah Braun
Brittney
Eng. 220CL- Journey’s in the Narrative CA 02
5 Dec 2014

Question 12:
On pages 265­6, Jonathan writes, "Every widow wakes one morning, perhaps after years of pure and unwavering grieving, to realize she has slept a good night's sleep, and will be able to eat breakfast, and doesn't hear her husband's ghost all the time, but only some of the time.” How do the characters in Everything Is Illuminated live their lives in the wake of tragic events? How do we both move on and still remember\these events? What roles do stories play in reconciling ourselves with the past?

Answer:
They only one we can think of his grandmother but we also think it encompasses to that a widow can still be grieving but is able to move on. Small things that we are thinking of that can make us remember events like the death in the family or death of a friend. If there was something, they liked to do as a hobby or did something that people remembered by. We can move on from these events by picking up from where our lives once left off at.

Posted by: Matthew Basin at December 5, 2014 06:45 PM

Blake Bromen
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
06 December 14

Question:
“Father removed three… from the refrigerator, and punched me.” (Foer 29)What was it that Alex’s father grabbed from the fridge just before punching him? Why did he punch Alex? (Chapter 4, page 29, par. 1) Use quoted passages from the text to support your answer.

Answer:
Alex’s father removed three ice cubes from the fridge just before punching him (Then handed them to Alex, so his face did not swell). He punched Alex for wanting to disobey his wishes after graduating from university, and not wanting to follow his heritage and do as generations had done before him.

Posted by: Blake Bromen at December 6, 2014 10:26 PM

Blake Bromen
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
06 December 14

Question:
“He says from the superway it is not more than two hours from Lutsk.” (Going Fourth to Lutsk, Page 58, par. 1-2) What is later said to have caused the two hour trip to take five hours? Use quoted passages from the text to support your answer.

Answer:
Grandfather's driving and emotions while driving caused the trip to take much longer than expected. “Because Grandfather is a grandfather first and a driver second. He made us lost often and became on his nerves.” (Foer 58)

Posted by: Blake Bromen at December 6, 2014 10:32 PM

Blake Bromen
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
06 December 14

Question:
Alex writes Jonathan saying, “I have a dream of one day changing residences to America.” (A Parade, a Death, a Proposition, Page 100, par. 1-2) Later Alex says he is saving up for a luxurious apartment in Times Square. Where does Alex say he is keeping his currency? Who does Alex wish to bring with him to America? Use quoted passages from the text to support your answer.

Answer:
He is keeping his savings in a cookie box in the kitchen. “It is a place that nobody investigates, because it has been ten years since Mother manufactured a cookie.” (Foer 100) Alex wants to bring Little Igor with him to America. “Little Igor must go forth with me, of course, whatever occurs.” (Foer 101)

Posted by: Blake Bromen at December 6, 2014 10:41 PM

Caitlin Christian
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
Dr. Hobbs
7 December 2014

“News reports (Nazis kill 8,200 on Ukrainian border) examined with the care of editors, plans of action drawn up and crumpled up, large maps spread out on the table like patients waiting to be cut open.” (Foer 262)

Question pg. 262:

Often time’s authors will spend time-sharing the setting of the characters surroundings. This is often when a journey is occurring. At momentous occasions, the author will carefully take the time to describe the emotions of the characters to inform the reader. Through this page Foer often describes the emotions through short sentences. Use quoted passage to show when this occurs and how it seems to guide the reader.

“So nothing was done. No decisions were made. No bags packed or houses emptied. No trenches dug or buildings fortified. Nothing.” (Foer 262) These short sentence help the reader see the fast pace emotions and keep up with the journey. During this time, everyone was on edge wondering if a war was beginning or a bomb was going to be dropped. No one wanted to be prepared they would rather be dead. People were surrounding thinking about their lives and memories to hold on too. The author portrayed this to every reader through his descriptive writing.

Posted by: Caitlin Christian at December 7, 2014 12:07 PM

Claudia Pierre
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
7 December 2014

“All is for Sasha and Iggy, Jonathan. Do you understand? I would give everything for them to live without violence. Peace. That is all that I would ever want for them. Not money and not even love. It is still possible. I know that now, and it is the cause of so much happiness in me. (Foer, 275)

QUESTION:
Why is this letter being written to Jonathan and Sasha?

ANSWER:
The best is wanted for Sasha and Iggy. Jonathan as Sasha father should understand that he should want the best for his children, and Jonathan should take care of his family.

Posted by: Claudia Pierre at December 7, 2014 05:08 PM

Gabriela Caminero
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in a Narrative CA01
7 December 2014

Question:
What did Alex and Jonathan found out that the old woman was not Augustine, what was the name of the box of photographs that she brought out?

“She returned with a box from the other room. The word REMAINS brimmed with may photographs” (Foer 151).

Answer:
The box had the words, remains, written across from it.

Posted by: Gabriela Caminero at December 7, 2014 09:14 PM

Gabriela Caminero
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in a Narrative CA01
7 December 2014

Question:
In a scene of the book, Jonathan and his grandfather are talking about a photograph where he sees his grandfather’s best friend Herschel. What happened to him?

“And I murdered him” (Foer 228).

Answer:
His grandfather killed Herschel as a way to protect his family. It was either he dies or his entire family dies.

Posted by: Gabriela Caminero at December 7, 2014 09:21 PM

Ashley Gross, Bronwen Burke, and Abrar Nooh
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
7 December 2014

Question:
What roles do lies and deception play in Everything is Illuminated? When and why are lies sometimes necessary? When do they hurt either the liar or the ones they lie to?

Answer:
Lies run throughout Everything is Illuminated. Grandfather is lied to about his heritage and in turn he lies about his past to his family members. Grandfather claims that he lied about his past because he wanted to protect his family, but, it end up causing him inner turmoil for years and upsets his loved ones when the truth comes out. "Everything I did, I did because I thought it was the correct thing to do" (Safran Foer 228).

Posted by: Ashley Gross at December 7, 2014 10:01 PM

Blake Bromen
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
06 December 14

Question:
Alex writes, “I must inform you something now. This is a thing I have never informed anyone, and you must promise that you will not inform it to one soul.” (The Dial, 1941-1804-1941, Page 144, par. 2) One big reoccurring theme in this story is all of the “not-truths” that Alex is fixated with telling. At the end of the paragraph stated above, Alex informs Jonathan of why he tells the “not-truths.” Why does Alex tell Jonathan that he tells all the “not-truths?” Use quoted passages from the text to support your answer.

Answer:
He tells all of the not-truths so his brother, Little Igor will look up to him. “I manufacture not-truths for Little Igor, I desire him to feel that he has a cool brother… whose life he would desire to impersonate one day… to boast about to his friends about his brother, and want to be viewed in public places with him.” (Foer 144)

Posted by: Blake Bromen at December 7, 2014 10:22 PM

Aaron Virelli, Blake Bromen, & Zach Sabo
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
05 December 14

Question #10: On page 54, following the realization that he has not found Augustine, Alex writes that “I persevered to think of her as Augustine, because like Grandfather, I could not stop thinking of her as Augustine.” Why do Alex and his Grandfather refuse to acknowledge that the woman they meet is not Augustine? Why do they want her to be Augustine? Who is the woman really?

Answer:
Alex and his grandfather refuse to believe that it is not Augustine because they exhausted all their efforts looking for Augustine. Grandfather is saying that she is lying about being Augustine because he is a chronic liar and wants to believe that she is as well. They want it to be Augustine because he wants to help Johnathan to finish what he started. The woman’s name is Sasha, she is the last remaining person from Trachimbrod who is there “in case anyone comes looking.” (Foer 227)

Posted by: Blake Bromen, Aaron Virelli, and Zach Sabo at December 7, 2014 11:26 PM

Nathanael Jones
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
8 December 2014

“It was so dark that sometimes I had to skew my eyes to view her white dress. It was like she was a ghost, moving in and out of our eyes.”
(What We Saw When We Saw Trachimbrod, pg. 184, par. 4)

Question:
What is the significance of them following Not-Augustine?

Answer:
As the group follows Not-Augustine into the fields, woods, and dirt roads, they follow Not-Augustine into a field of nothing that once housed the town of Trachimbrod. As if Augustine turned into a ghost to enter a literal ghost town, where nothing remained, the group also transported themselves into the inner cave of the story. “When I utter that there was nothing, what I intend is there was not any of these things, or any other things” (Foer 184). Typically, when the word nothing is used to describe a scenario, it truly means little; however, when the group reached Trachimbrod, they soon realized when Not-Augustine said nothing was left, she meant it. Nonetheless, the protagonists gained his wish and got to visit Trachimbrod, even though not one thing remained.

Work Cited

Foer, Jonathan Safran. Everything Is Illuminated. New York: Houghton Mifflin, 2002. Print.

Posted by: Nathanael Jones at December 8, 2014 08:22 AM

Blake Bromen
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
06 December 14

Question:
“Unaware of the nature of his errands” (The Thickness of Blood and Drama, 1934, Page 169, par. 1) This quote is referring to Safran, Who was it that was unaware of his errands and what were those errands? Use quoted passages from the text to support your answer.

Answer:
The Sloucher congregation was the group of people unaware of his errands. The congregation was paying Safran to visit Rose once a week, and are thankful that he is so generous with his time. However, Safran’s errands included having affairs with Rose and other women in Trachimbrod. “The Sloucher congregation paid my grandfather (Safran) to visit Rose’s house once a week, and came to pay him to perform similar services for widows and feeble ladies around Trachimbrod.” (Foer 169)

Posted by: Blake Bromen at December 8, 2014 08:34 AM

Blake Bromen
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
06 December 14

Question:
“She, of course, could never be seen near his house.” (Falling in Love, 1934-1941, Page 229, par. 2) Who is this quote referring to and why was she never to be seen near Safran’s house? Use quoted passages from the text to support your answer.

Answer:
This quote is referring to the Gypsy girl that Safran was in a relationship with. She could not be seen near Safran’s house because they had to keep their relationship a secret. The relationship was kept in secret because she was a Gypsy and Safran was a Jew, in this time period it was a big deal to marry out of your religion and or class. They would meet at the theater or in front of her thatched-roofed shanty in the Gypsy hamlet. (Foer 229)

Posted by: Blake Bromen at December 8, 2014 08:36 AM

Nathanael Jones
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
8 December 2014

“He put his head in her lap and fell asleep. Before leaving that evening, he gave Lista the book that he still had with him from his house – Hamlet, with a purple spine – that he had taken from the shelf to have something to hold.”
(Falling in Love 1934-1941, pg. 238, par. 17)

Question:
What caused Safran to go to Lista’s to begin with?

Answer:
“I’m all alone, he said” (Foer 237). Lost in the confusion of his emotions with the Gypsy girl, and lost in the over bearing news of his arranged marriage, Safran needed someone to talk to about everything that was occurring. “Well, you’ve got nothing to worry about. Everybody gets nervous before being wed” (Foer 238). As if needing a vote of confidence, Safran just needed a little guidance when it came to the clarity of his necessity, and possible future. Like the book, Lista was just something Safran needed to hold, to feel human contact that he could trust but with no strings attached. The book then became a symbol for Lista of the deed she did for Safran, he affirming his knowledge of love that he had lost sight of between Zosha and the Gypsy girl.

Work cited

Foer, Jonathan Safran. Everything Is Illuminated. New York: Houghton Mifflin, 2002. Print.

Posted by: Nathanael Jones at December 8, 2014 08:38 AM

Nathanael Jones
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
8 December 2014

“The only thing more painful than being an active forgetter is to be an inert rememberer.”
(The Persnicketiness of Memory, 1941, pg. 260, par. 3)

Question:
Why were the people of Trachimbrod trapped in their memories?

Answer:
As the bombings of the Nazis neared Trachimbrod, the reality of the war came with them. Until now, the war was just an occurrence outside the realm of Trachimbrod, that had no direct effect amongst its people. However, now that the bombing occurs over the hills next to the town, the reality of the war can no longer escape the town. As if trapped with flashbacks of their lives, as the town’s people come to grips with their impending doom. “Memory was supposed to fill the time, but it made time a hole to be filled” (Foer 260). Typically, memories serve as good or bad times to reminisce and tell stories about to friends and family, but now with the memories being the undesired object to relish on, time crawls. Even Safran fell victim to the memories, asking “What was the meaning of what?” (Foer 260), searching not for joy, but as reflections. Faced with their deaths, the people of Trachimbrod, trapped in their memories, reminisced, searching for the what if and why of their memories.

Work Cited


Foer, Jonathan Safran. Everything Is Illuminated. New York: Houghton Mifflin, 2002. Print.


Posted by: Nathanael Jones at December 8, 2014 08:50 AM

Erin Gaylord, Nathanael Jones, Gabby Caminero
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG-220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
8 December 2014

Question:
Guilt is a big theme in Everything Is Illuminated. On page 187, Alex's grandfather, responding to the account of the Nazis' murdering innocent Jews, tells Alex: "You would not help somebody if it signified that you would be murdered and your family would be murdered." On page 227, Alex's grandfather says, "I am not a bad person. I am a good person who has lived in a bad time." Do you think Alex's grandfather did anything wrong? Should he feel in any way guilty? If your answers to the two questions are different, how can that be? Are we responsible for the bad things that others do if we do nothing to stop them? Should we feel guilty if a family member did something bad in the past? Can we free ourselves from guilt for past deeds?

Answer:
In the eyes of society, Alex’s grandfather did what he needed to do to survive. Where his source of guilt comes from, is a personal inward guilt where he may wish that he can go back and change what occurred during the raid. When in danger, humans revert to protecting themselves and the closest around them, this applies in the scenario with Herschel. On a normal basis, when a danger does not exist on your own life, saving others should fall on the shoulders on the stander by; however, Grandfather’s life and his family’s lives were put in danger. If danger is present, if something occurs that causes a loved one to be put in danger with the risk of you dying, the loved one understands that you cannot save them. In regards to Grandfather and Herschel, Herschel probably understood that by him dying, Grandfather had the ability to save himself and his family, if he died, and accepted that to relieve Grandfather of the guilt. Though deeds may seem dark and can cause shadows in one’s future, people need to remember that the event happened in the past, and if one can comes to term with the event and be honest about the event guilt can taper away. In the account of feeling guilty for the deeds other have done, if the deed does not involve you, then you should not feel guilty, because the deed is out of your control.

Work Cited:

Foer, Jonathan Safran. Everything Is Illuminated. New York: Houghton Mifflin, 2002. Print.

Posted by: Nathanael Jones at December 8, 2014 08:57 AM

Summer Taylor
Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL On The Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA02
8 December 2014

Posted by: summer taylor and Tashanna Harris Kendra Hinton at December 8, 2014 10:25 AM

Kyle VanBuren
Dr. Burgsbee Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL
19 November 2014

“He was also aware of his place among married men, all of whom had given their vows of fidelity with their knees planted on the same ground on which his now were” (Foer 121).

Text source: “Everything is Illuminated,” By Jonathan Foer

Question: With reference to the quote, who is being referred to in this excerpt and why was this character kneeling on the ground?

Answer: The man being referred to in the quote is Alex Perchov’s grandfather. He was kneeling because he came to realize his place among married men and of the vows and responsibilities he promised to keep many years ago.

Posted by: Kyle VanBuren at December 9, 2014 08:53 PM

Kyle VanBuren
Dr. Burgsbee Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL
21 November 2014

“He had a rough face and thick brown hair… He was not very tall. Maybe as tall as you. So much had been taken from hi. I saw him once and he was a boy, and in two years he became an old man” (Foer 191).

Text source: “Everything is Illuminated,” By Jonathan Foer

Question: With reference to the quotation, who is telling Jonathan about his grandfather and how is this protagonist significant in the story?

Answer: The woman speaking in the quotation is Augustine, the woman apart of the family who saved Jonathan Safran Foer’s grandfather from a Nazi raid many years back. Augustine is the last living relative from the heroic family.

Posted by: kyle VanBuren at December 9, 2014 08:54 PM

Maggie Izquierdo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
6 April 2015

"The next morning, he found fifty-two notes fanned like a peacock's plumage under the Upright Synagogue's front door." (Chapter 3: The Lottery 1791, pg. 21).

Question: This passage refers to the homes offered to the baby girl. How did the priest choose a home for the baby girl? Who was chosen to be her father?

Answer: Women were allowed to look through a small hole at the synagogue. But the hole was to small to really see the baby. The women began to hate her unknowability. So the priest paid for an ad in the newsletter that any righteous man who would have this baby as his daughter, the priest would give her to him. Once different men wrote back, he put the names in the baby's crib. Days later he found only Yankel's name in the crib, therefore he would be chosen. (Foer 20-22).

Posted by: Maggie Izquierdo at April 6, 2015 01:30 PM

T.J. Pagliaro
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220 Journeys in Narrative CA02
6 April 2015
Chapters 1-5 Second Half of Everything is Illuminated

“I hanker for this letter to be good. Like you know, I was not first rate with English. In Russian my ideas are asserted abnormally well, but my second tongue is not so premium…If you are not happy with what I have performed, I command you return it back to me. I will preserve to toil on it until you are appeased.” (Chapter 4, pg. 23, par. 1, Foer)

Question: What does Alex do to help Jonathan in his search of the woman who helped his grandfather during the war? What does Jonathan give to Alex to help him with his English?

Answer: Alex writes a letter to Jonathan about the summaries of his trip to Ukraine. However, since Alex did not do well in his English class, Jonathan gives him a thesaurus to aid him in writing the letter. Foer writes, “I undertaked to input the things you counseled me to, when my words appeared too petite, or not befitting” (Foer 23). This clearly states that Alex needs help with speaking the English language. Throughout the letter, Alex makes awkward substitutions such as manufacture for make and premium for good. Enclosed in the letter are postcards of Lutsk, census ledgers of six villages before World War II, and some photographs Jonathan asked Alex to keep for him. Foer also writes, “I have girdled in the envelope the items you inquired, not withholding postcards of Lutsk, the census ledgers of the six villages from before the war, and the photographs you had me keep for cautious purposes” (Foer 23). This must mean that these items are important to Jonathan. Hopefully they will help him find the woman.

Posted by: Timothy Pagliaro at April 6, 2015 08:47 PM

Hatim Shami
Doctor Hobbs
ENG220 Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
06 April 2015

“This is my occasion to utter thank you for being so long-suffering and stoical with me on our voyage” (Foer 23)

Question: what is Alexander specifically thanking him for?

Answer: Alexander is thanking him for the different favors Jonathan accomplished throughout the faculties in their work experiences together. Alexander also thanked Jonathan for even the little promises that he kept. In the letter to Jonathan, Alexander states, “And thank you, I feel indebted to utter, for not mentioning the not-truth about how I am tall” (Foer 24). Alexander is specifically appreciative of Jonathan throughout the letter, and exhibits gratitude to Jonathan as an acquaintance and better yet, a good friend.

Posted by: Hatim Shami at April 7, 2015 10:26 PM

Hatim Shami
Doctor Hobbs
ENG220 Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
07 April 2015

“I toiled very hard on this next section. It was the most rigid yet. I attempted to guess some of the things you would have me alter, and I altered them myself.” (Foer 54)

Question: What is the main focus of Alexander’s letter?

Answer: Throughout the letter, Alexander mentions and clarifies different experiences he encountered throughout his life. In the letter, Alexander states, “There is one additional item. I did not amputate Sammy Davis, Junior, Junior from the story, even though you counseled that I should amputate her” (Foer 55).

Posted by: Hatim Shami at April 7, 2015 10:57 PM

Kelsey Williams
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
6 April 2015

“That’s from a dog bite,” he said. “What is?” “That.’ “What?” “This thing.” “What thing?” “Here. It looks like two intersecting lines.” “I don’t see it.” “Here,” he said. “Where?” “Right here,” he said, and I said “Oh yes,” although in truth I still could not witness a thing. “My mother is afraid of dogs.” “So?” “So I’m afraid of dogs. I can’t help it.” I clutched the situation now.” (Safran Foer 35; An Overture to Encountering the Hero, and Then Encountering the Hero)

Question: What kind of information does this short, somewhat comical, conversation show in regards to both Alex and Jonathan (the hero)?

Answer: This passage shows a disconnect in the understanding of fear. In the example of Alex not comprehending why Jonathan’s fear of dogs is relevant to his mother’s since “grandfather informs me that is no one is afraid of dogs” (35). Whether this is a kind of cultural disconnect or merely the opposition of the grandfather. This passage also downplays Jonathan’s concern for the scar he has from the dog bite since Alex “still could not witness a thing” (35).

Posted by: Kelsey Williams at April 8, 2015 12:37 AM


Kelsey Williams
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
9 April 2015

“The Well-Regarded Rabbi counted the ballots that evening. It was a tie; every name got one vote: Lutsk Minor, UPRIGHTLAND, New Promise, Fault Line, Joshua, Lock-and-key… Figuring that the fiasco had gone on long enough, he decided, reasoning that this is what God would do in such a situation, to pick a slip of paper randomly from the box and name the shtetl whatever it should say. He nodded as he read what had become familiar script. YANKEL HAS WON AGAIN, he said. YANKEL HAS NAMED US TRACHIMBROD.” (Safran Foer 51; Another Lottery, 1791)

Question: Despite the shtetl being named Sofiowka “no one in Sofiowka called it Sofiowka” (51). When the well-regarded rabbi holds this new vote, what is his purpose and why do you think he acts as he does?

Answer: Sofiowka is the name that is considered disgraceful despite its use of census information. The rabbi is willing to rename the shtetl for the name of its citizens alone. Despite this, all of the members have their recommendation to what the unofficial name should be, such as “Hannah” or “Borderland” (51). While the rabbi did not necessarily want to go through all of the submissions. So instead, he did “what God would do” to settle the dispute.

Posted by: Kelsey Williams at April 8, 2015 10:34 AM

Maggie Izquierdo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
8 April 2015

"YOU WILL BE THE FATHER OF THE BABY FROM THE RIVER! hollered the taller. YOU WILL BE THE FATHER! echoed the short, squat one." Chapter 6: The Book of Recurrent Dreams, 1791, pg 41).

Question: This passage refers to the two men in black hats who announced to Yankel he will be the father of the baby. What was Yankel's reaction to the news? Where might this have stemmed from?

Answer: He felt a fear of dying all of a sudden. This might come from the fact that his parents died of natural causes, his brother died in the flour mill, his children died, and what it means to die. (Safran Foer 41-2).

Posted by: Maggie Izquierdo at April 8, 2015 12:23 PM

Adam Alexander
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220 On The Proverbial Road CA01
8 April 2015
"We were both regarding the same question: what did he do during the war?"
Question: Why does the narrator ask this question? What characteristics does the grandfather have that create mystery?
Answer: In the hotel, Alex and Grandfather are sharing a room, and as they go to sleep, Alex notices how restless the grandfather sleeps. He says, "His body rotated over and over. The bed sheets moved, and the pillows made noises as he rotated over and over, and then over again. I heard his large breathing.It was like this all night," (Page 74, Chapter 10, Everything is Illuminated). The grandfathers actions during his sleep lead Alex to believe his is dreaming or having bad thoughts as created from a mysterious part of the Grandfather: his actions in the war. This mystery is also influenced by the Grandfathers mood swings and his mentioning of "the past" before and later in the novel.

Posted by: Adam Alexander at April 8, 2015 12:35 PM

Bryan Hess
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys In Narrative CA02
8 April 2015

“This is the face I’ve worn my entire life.”
- Chapter 10. Page 88. Paragraph 1. Second sentence.

Question: In this paragraph, Brod is reflecting on the looks of the woman she sees with her telescope. How does Foer describe the woman?

Answer: Foer describes the reflection that Brod sees in the plate as a woman who has skin that is so severely wrinkled and sagging that it looked, “as if her face were some animal of its own, slowly descending the skull each day” (page 88). Foer also describes the woman as singing a song to herself that Brod imagines her mother would have sang to here would she still be alive.

Posted by: Bryan Hess at April 8, 2015 01:17 PM

T.J. Pagliaro
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220 Journeys in Narrative CA02
8 April 2015
Chapters 5-10 Second Half of Everything is Illuminated

“The well-regarded Rabbi paid half a baker’s dozen of eggs and a handful of blueberries for the following announcement to be printed in Shimon T’s weekly newsletter: that an irascible magistrate in Lvov had demanded a name for the nameless shtetl, that the name would be used for new maps and census records, that it should not offend the refined sensibilities of either the Ukrainian or the Polish gentry…” (Chapter 8, pg. 50, par. 1 Foer)

Question: On what issue does the Rabbi proclaim there will be a vote on?

Answer: The Rabbi proclaims a vote among a select portion of the, and they all cast ballots for names that serve their personal interests. The official announcement the next day proclaims that the town is now known officially as Sofiowka. We now learn the exact location of the shtetl. Foer writes, “By morning it was official; resting twenty-three kilometers southeast of Lvov, four north of Kolki, and straddling the Polish-Ukrainian border like a twig alighted on a fence was the shtetl of Sofiowka” (50-51 Foer). This would be the exact coordinates of the town until its death.

Posted by: Timothy Pagliaro at April 8, 2015 01:17 PM

Cody Jean-Baptiste
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Narrative CA02
8 April 2015
“he began writing fragments of his life story on his bedroom ceiling with one of Brod’s lipsticks that he found wrapped in a sock in her desk drawer (Foer 83).

Questions: The following passage explains how the main character began writing his inner thoughts. Why did the main character do that at the moment?


Answers: He started to feel that his mental state was starting to “deteriorate” and want to record any memories he had left on the ceiling. He explains “This way, his life would be the first thing he would see when he awoke each morning, and the last thing before going to sleep each night.”

Posted by: Cody Jean-Baptiste at April 8, 2015 02:17 PM

Sergio Velazquez
Dr. Hobbs
English
4 September 2015

Question) As Jonathon , is accompanied by his allies Alex, the bling man and his seeing eye dog. What intimacy is found in chapter 11 falling in love
Brod is viewed by the men in her Shtetl as a stubborn woman, but her idiosyncrasy’s attract all the men in town, she has a great awareness about the world around her and has feel in love with the thought of love, and sometimes she allows men to court with her so that a breath moment in time she can pretend to feel like life is worth living. The only intimacy Brod, can admit to having is intimacy of though even though she is in a relationship, she views it as titillation to pass the time.

Posted by: Sergio Velazquez at April 8, 2015 02:18 PM

Jeffrey Wingfield and Kelsey Williams
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
8 April 2015

Question: In Jonathan Safran Foer’s novel Everything is Illuminated, Jonathan and Alex have separate ordinary worlds. What are characteristics of these worlds?

Answer: Jonathan and Alex’s Ordinary World are both physically and mentally very different from the other. Jonathan’s Ordinary World consists of life in the United States as a reserved young man as an aspiring writer. Jonathan has the comfortability to live as a vegetarian and fearful of dogs. While in comparison, Alex’s Ordinary World is Odessa, Ukraine. Alex lives a kind of ignorant lifestyle of promiscuity and trying to Americanize himself. Alex’s life seems to be guided by the needs and knowledge of others, despite his ability to speak English.

Posted by: Kelsey Williams & Jeffrey Wingfield at April 8, 2015 03:18 PM

Wyatt Burttschell, Joe Marrah
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220: Journeys Into Narrative CA02
8 April 2015

Question: What is the refusal of the call for Jonathan? What is the refusal of the call for Alex?

Answer: From the very beginning Jonathan seems ready to accept the call to adventure. Jonathan is filled with enthusiasm about exploring his family’s history. It seems that Jonathan does not really challenge or refuse the call to adventure. Alex embraces Jonathan's adventure with little criticism. Alex even wants Jonathan to be well rested for the adventure. After hearing Jonathan be restless all throughout the night Alex comes to the conclusion “We were both regarding the same question: what did he do during the war?” (74) The restlessness of Alex and Jonathan suggests that they both hold some excitement for the adventure.

Posted by: Wyatt Burttschell, Joe Marrah at April 9, 2015 07:34 PM

Cody Jean-Baptiste
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Narrative CA02
10 April 2015
“don’t forget: the wedding of the daughter of
TOVA
and her husband
june 18, 1941
you know the house (Foer 163).”

Questions: The following passage is the wedding invitation that sent out. Who were excluded from the wedding and why?


Answers: The only people that were excluded were The Trachimbroders. The reason was that they “weren’t, in Tova’s estimation, worthy of an invitation were not at the reception, and hence not in the guest book, and hence not included in the last practical census of the shtetl before its destruction, and hence forgotten forever (Foer 163).”

Posted by: Cody Jean-Baptiste at April 10, 2015 12:18 PM

Bryan Hess
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys In Narrative CA02
10 April 2015

“Please say hello to your family from me, except your grandmother, of course, because she is not aware that I exist.”
- Chapter 14. Page 104. Paragraph 3. First sentence.

Question: In this sentence, Alex mentions that Jonathan’s mother is not aware of his existence. We know the same to be true of Alex’s grandmother. How did Alex’s grandmother die and how did her death affect those around her?

Answer: In Everything is Illuminated, Alex informs the reader that hat his grandmother died, 2 years before the story takes place, of “a cancer in her brain” (Foer, Page 5). Because of this, the grandfather claims to be blind and retarded. In order not to further antagonize the grandfather and his pretend issues, Alex’s father, Alex, and Little Igor refrain from mentioning the grandmother around the grandfather.

Posted by: Bryan Hess at April 10, 2015 12:37 PM

Wyatt Burttschell
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220 Journeys Into Narrative CA02
10 April 2015

Question: What do the bright illuminations symbolize? When evidence is given that Brod loses her virginity at the end of the chapter.
Answer: In this chapter it is revealed that “From space, astronauts can see people making love as a tiny speck of light.” The glow represents love making. At the end of the chapter when Brod returns home she discovers the smells of death and decay. She finds Yankel dead on the floor. While facing Shalom she says “Then you must do something for me.” Then Johnathan writes “Her belly lit up like a firefly’s bulb – brighter than a hundred thousand virgins making love for the first time.” (Safranfoer, 98)

Posted by: Wyatt Burttschell at April 10, 2015 12:38 PM

Maggie Izquierdo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
10 April 2015

"You are Yankel. You love Brod." (Chapter 11: Falling in love 1791-1803, pg.85).

Question: This passage refers to what Yankel sees on the ceiling above him every night and repeats to himself. What was Yankel worried about concerning Brod? What did he do to handle that worry?

Answer: Yankel was afraid what would happen to Brod after he died because he was already 84 years old and she was 12 years old. He tried to eat good meals even when he was not hungry. He took long walks every afternoon even though he had leg pains. He took a bit of vodka. He also would write in the ceiling wall with Brod's lipstick for fear of losing his memory. (Safran Foer 83).

Posted by: Maggie Izquierdo at April 10, 2015 01:01 PM

William Pereira
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
6 April 2015

Everything is illuminated
She smiled as I became proximal to her, and I could see that she did not have any teeth. Her hairs were white, her skin had brown marks, and her eyes were blue. She was not so much of a woman, and what I signify here is that she was very fragile, and appeared as if she could be obliterated with one finger. I could hear, as I approached (CH. 15 pg. 116)
According to the end of the chapter where did the lady say that they had finally reached?
She says that they had finally made it to Trachimbrod. I pointed to the car. “We are searching for Trachimbrod.”“Oh,” she said, and she released a river of tears. “You are here. Iam it.” (CH. 15 pg.118)

Posted by: William Pereira at April 10, 2015 01:30 PM

William and Celina
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220 Journeys in Narrative CA02
6 April 2015

Meeting of the Mentor
The mentor to Alex in the story is Jonathan. He is the one showing him the new world of what America is. The grandfather Boris as a acts as a mentor in the sense that he is the older and wiser of the journeyman and he slowly starts revealing himself. “For the storyteller Meeting with the Mentor is a stage in rich potential for conflict, involvement, humor, and tragedy. (116 Vogler)

Posted by: Will and Celina at April 10, 2015 01:31 PM

T.J. Pagliaro
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220 Journeys in Narrative CA02
8 April 2015
First Half of Recurrent Secrets of Everything is Illuminated

“(Yankel) He reads Brod’s diary while she bathes, which is a secret, which is a terrible thing, he knows, but there are some terrible things to which a father is entitled, even a counterfeit father.” (Chapter 12, pg. 86, par. 2, Foer)

Question: What does Yankel read about in Brod’s diary?

Answer: Yankel reads in Brod’s diary about how the young and old are lonely in their own ways, and that her diary is the closest thing she has to a lover. Foer writes, “Deep down, the young are lonelier than the old. I read that in a book somewhere and it’s stuck in my head” (Foer 87). Brod keeps her own life a secret. Throughout the diary, she repeats lines from several books she has read (Biography of Copernicus, and The Bible) until she cannot remember whether the lines are true or not. Yankel realizes that they both keep their lives a secret.

Posted by: Timothy Pagliaro at April 12, 2015 11:32 AM

William Pereira
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
6 April 2015
“His arm. It would be possible to look through all of the photographs many times and still miss what’s so unusual. But it occurs too frequently to be explained as the photographer’s choice of pose, or mere coincidence.” (Ch. 20 pg.166 para. 2)
Why was his arm so unusual? And how did it become like that?
His arm was dead because he was born with a full set of teeth. The teeth prevented his mother from feeding him and therefore since he was malnourished his arm died. “So it was because of his teeth, I imagine, that he got no milk, and it was because he got no milk that his right arm died.” (166)

Posted by: William Pereira at April 12, 2015 10:05 PM

Hatim Shami
Doctor Hobbs
ENG220 Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
09 April 2015

“When the coffee arrived, the hero drank only a small amount. “This tastes terrible,” he said. It is one thing for him to not eat meat, and it is another thing for him to make Grandfather loiter in the car asleep, but it is another thing for him to slander our coffee.” (Foer 107).

Question: Explain the grandfather’s attitude.

Answer: The grandfather seems bitter towards specific aspects in his life. The grandfather is particularly picky on details pertaining to non-important factors, such as breakfast food.

Posted by: Hatim Shami at April 12, 2015 11:51 PM

Joe Marrah
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220 Journeys in Narrative CA02
6 April 2015
Chapter 5 first Half of Everything is Illuminated

"Less than you think you deserve, and more than you deserve." (Safranfoer 27)

Question: Why does Alex never seem to get what he wants from his father?

Answer: It seems that no matter what the topic at hand is, Alex can never agree with his father. I think my favorite quote from the book so far comes from Alex's father "Less than you think you deserve, and more than you deserve." (Safranfoer 27) Alex was asking how much money he would be making for his upcoming adventure. His father, once again makes sure that his son never gets what he wants. No matter the circumstances, Alex's father always gets the last word, which increases Alex's desire to move away one day.

Posted by: Joe Marrah at April 13, 2015 01:10 PM

Maggie Izquierdo
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
13 April 2015

"Let's hope it's not true, the father of the bride tried to joke over the shuffle, that it all goes downhill after the wedding!" (Chapter 19: The Wedding Reception was so Extraordinary or It All Goes Downhill After The Wedding, 1941, pg.164 ).

Question: This passage refers to . Who is Maya? What happened between Safran and Maya in the wine cellar?

Answer: Maya is Zosha's, the bride's, younger sister. They talked about how Zosha will be disappointed in Safran. He then kisses her and she slides her panties from under his lapel. She then pulls him into her arms. Eventually they make love. (Safran Foer 164).

Posted by: Maggie Izquierdo at April 13, 2015 01:14 PM

Jeffrey Wingfield
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
12 April 2015

Question : What is Alex’s suggestion about Brod? Why does he suggest this?

Answer: Alex requests that Brod be happy and perhaps thar Brod and Augustine be the same person. He is deeply moved by Brod’s tragedy. “I was also very moved — is this how you use it? — by what you wrote about how impossible it must have been for your grandmother to be a mother without a husband”(Foer 143).

Posted by: Jeffrey Wingfield at April 13, 2015 01:45 PM

T.J. Pagliaro
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220 Journeys in Narrative CA02
10 April 2015
First Half of Everything is Illuminated “17 November 1997”

“Humph. I feel as if I have so many things to inform you.” (Chapter 17, pg. 142, par. 1 Foer)

Question: In his letter to Jonathan, what does Alex write about that he needs to inform Jonathan about?

Answer: Alex gives his point of view about intergenerational relationships. He expresses that people are taught to honor their grandparents. Many people think that honoring them means keeping secrets from them as though they would not want to know the secrets. According to Alex, to honor them is to be honest at any cost, even if it means acknowledging one’s own grandparent’s weakness or making them cry. Foer writes, “I beseech you to forgive us, and to make us better than we are. Make us good” (Foer 145). This creates a moment for Alex to tell us how we should treat our elderly.

Posted by: Timothy Pagliaro at April 13, 2015 02:08 PM

Marie Destin

Dr.Hobbs

ENG 220CL Journeys in Narratives CA01

1 April 2015

An Overture to Encountering the Hero, And Then Encountering the Hero

“An American in Ukraine is so flaccid to recognize. I made shit of a brick because he was an American, and I desired to show him that I too could be an American. (Chapter 5, Pg. 28, Para 2)

Question: How would you describe Alex's view of Jewish people? What about his grandfather's? Do these views change as the journey progresses?

Answer: Alex view towards Jewish people that they had stuff between their brains. That his only saw Jewish people paying his father money so they can trips from the U.S to Ukraine. That he thought that Jewish people were stupid. That Alex grandfather has the same mindset as Alex that all Jewish people were not intelligent. However, when he met Jonathan Safran Foer, he changed Alex mindset of Jewish people. When Alex saw Jonathan for the first time, he was astonished by how different he look it is stated in the text that Jonathan “He was severely short. He wore spectacles and had diminutive hairs that were not split anywhere, but rested on his head like a Shapka (Foer 31). Alex stated in the text “He did not appear to either Americans I had witnessed in magazine or Jews from history books with no hairs and prominent bones (Foer 32 ).

Posted by: Marie Destin at April 15, 2015 02:26 AM

Celina Tahsini
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
6 April 2015

“'I couldn’t even tell her I was coming to the Ukraine. She thinks I’m still in Prague.'” (Foer 61)

Question: Why didn't he tell her the truth about where he currently was?

Answer: She has a bad memory and history in Ukraine. She struggled the most in her life when she was in Ukraine, so in respect, he did not mention he was in Ukraine so that she may not have to reminisce even more on the killings in her family when they were in Trachimbrod. In their discussion, he states, "Her memories of the Ukraine aren’t good. Her shtetl, Kolki, is only a few kilometers from Trachimbrod. I figure we’d go there too. But all of her family was killed, everyone, mother, father, sisters, grandparents.” “Did a Ukrainian save her?” “No, she fled before the war" (Foer 61). He explains that Ukraine is the biggest nightmare that she had to endure and experience.

Posted by: Celina Tahsini at April 15, 2015 10:19 AM

Celina Tahsini
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220 Journeys in Narrative CA02
8 April 2015

"There were those who thought that Trachim would never be found, that the current brushed enough loose sediment over him to properly bury his body." (Foer 14)

Question: What do some people think happened to Trachim?

Answer: A variety of different stories have been mentioned pertaining to what most believed caused his death or caused him to go missing. Some believe he started a life traveling across Poland or even he drowned in a large body of water. In the chapter it says, " It’s possible that he, or some part of him, washed up on the sands of the Black Sea, or in Rio, or that he made it all the way to Ellis Island" (Foer 15). There were all sorts of assumptions as to what happened to Trachim, and they yet still question his missing.

Posted by: Celina Tahsini at April 15, 2015 10:31 AM

Marie Destin

Dr.Hobbs

ENG 220CL Journeys in Narratives CA01

6 April 2015

Going Forth To Lutsk

“I couldn’t even tell her I was coming to the Ukraine. She thinks I’m still in Prague.” (Chap 6, Pg 61 , Para 5 )

Question: Why can't Jonathan tell his grandmother about his trip? How did Ukraine’s treated Jews ?

Answer :That his grandmother did not have good memories in Ukraine. That the grandmother left her whole family while the war was going on. Jonathan stated in the text “No, she fled before the war.She was young and left her family behind (Foer 62). That in Jonathan mind he still could not believe his grandmother left her family behind. Alex told Jonathan that people of Ukraine treated Jews as if they were garbage. In the text, Alex stated, “The Ukrainians, back then, were terrible to the Jew s. They were as bad as the Nazis (Foer 62 ).

Posted by: Marie Destin at April 15, 2015 11:28 AM

Kelsey Williams
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
15 April 2015

“So it was because of his teeth, I imagine, that he got no milk, and it was because he got no milk his right arm died. It was because his right arm died that he never worked in the menacing flour mill, but in the tannery just outside the shetl, and that he exempted from the draft that sent his schoolmates off to be killed in hopeless battles against the Nazis.” (Foer 166, Ch. 16)

Question: Referring to “my grandfather”, the narrator identifies these positive and negative effects of the limp arm’s effect on the grandfather. Overall, based on the text, would you say the grandfather feels regarding his disability?

Answer: Not only does the grandfather live based on the effects of having a limp arm, it also “had the power to make any woman who crossed his path fall in hopeless love with him” (Foer 166) making him the shetl’s ‘lady’s man’. This limp arm saves him from the draft, attempting to travel to Ellis Island, but is also “kept him from swimming back” (Foer 166) to save his love. There is a give-and-take relationship between his handicap and the world around him. His diary entries seem to downplay his escapades since he does no reference them or show emotion in regards to the women.

Posted by: Kelsey Williams at April 15, 2015 12:55 PM

Wyatt Burttschell, Joe Marrah
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220: Journeys Into Narrative CA02
15 April 2015

Question: What lines from Alex’s letter to Jonathan appeal to a deep friendship?

Answer: In Alex’s letter to Jonathan he opens by expressing “Let us not mention each other’s writing ever again. I will post you my story, and I beg you (as does Little Igor) that you continue to post yours, but let us not make corrections or even observations. Let us not praise or reproach. Let us not judge at all. We are outside of that already” (Foer 214). In addition Alex writes more comfortably to Johnathan. He reveals how he is saving his money and how he feels so lonely and abandoned at nightclubs. In this letter Alex truly opens himself to Jonathan. Alex concludes his letter by writing “You are the only person who has understood even a whisper of me, and I will tell you that I am the only person who has understood even a whisper of you.” (Foer 218)

Posted by: Wyatt Burttschell at April 15, 2015 12:55 PM

Kelsey Williams
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys of Transformation in Narratives CA01
15 April 2015

“She had been to Kiev; he learned, and Odessa, and even Warsaw. She had lived among the Wisps of Ardisht for a year when her mother became deathly ill. She told him of ship voyages she had taken to places he had never heard of, and stories he knew were all untrue, were bad not-truths, even, but he nodded and tried to convince himself to be convinced, tried to believe her, because he knew the origin of a story was always an absence, and he wanted her to live among presences” (Foer 230, Ch. 21)

Question: Why does the gypsy choose to tell these stories to grandfather? Do you think the stories she says are true based on where she has traveled or is grandfather right?

Answer: Some of the stories she tells are far fetch, such as the couple “who make(s) love from miles apart” or a “stone woman” (Foer 230). Based on the information provided, the gypsy may have been to these places but may not have experienced these stories. Despite the secrecy of the couple’s relationship, the fact that he can go on adventures may provide an escape from the rest of the world since “not one of his friends” knew about the relationship. (Foer 232).

Posted by: Kelsey Williams at April 15, 2015 01:15 PM

Marie Destin

Dr.Hobbs

ENG 220CL Journeys in Narratives CA01

8 April 2015

The Very Rigid Search

“YOU WILL DRINK THE COFFEE UNTIL I CAN SEE MY FACE IN THE BOTTOM OF THE CUP!” (Chapter 15: The Very Rigid Search, pg. 107)

Question: Why is Alex upset with Jonathan? Why waitress ask if she can Jonathan horns?

Answer: Alex is upset with Jonathan because he insulted the Ukraine coffee.That Alex was doing Jonathan a favor but asking him to take the coffee because he knows Jonathan does not eat meat.However, stated in the text Jonathan exclaimed that the coffee was disgusting. In the text stated “ The problem is that I felt more awful after uttering it. “Oh,” she said. “I have never seen a Jew before. Can I see his horns?” (It is possible that you will think she did not inquire this, Jonathan, but she did (Foer 107).That when going to the restaurant the waitress thought Jonathan had horns. Do she thinks all Jews are something satanic or animal like because only these two things have horns? Alex did state that people of Ukraine do not like Jews because of they were different .


Posted by: Marie Destin at April 15, 2015 01:53 PM

Sergio Velazquez
Doctor Hobbs
ENG220 Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
16 April 2015

Chapter 23, “What we saw in Trachimbrod.” We talk about, Safrons father and his crippled arm and how women love him even the he is cripple, and even admire him for it.

Posted by: Sergio Velazquez at April 15, 2015 02:06 PM

Marie Destin

Dr.Hobbs

ENG 220CL Journeys in Narratives CA01

10 April 2015

The Dupe of Chance

“His arm. It would be possible to look through all of the photographs many times and still miss what’s so unusual (Chapter 20, Pg .166, Para .3)

Question: Was the Grandfather’s arm and growing teeth was it a cure or a blessing?

Answer: Those Grandfather teeth was a curse for his parents because that stopped them from making love that made them have one child.That when grandfather uses breastfeed from his mother that his mother’s breasts were damaged which made her sleep on her side. It was stated in the text “It was because of those teeth, those wee dinky molars, those cute bicuspids, that my great-grandparents stopped making love and had The Dupe of Chance, only one child. It’s because of those teeth that my grandfather was pulled prematurely from his mother’s well and never received the nutrients his callow body needed (Foer 107). Also, his teeth cause his mother stop breastfeeding him which cause him to have a deformed arm.However, the division became a blessing towards grandfather life because it became an attraction towards women.

Posted by: Marie Destin at April 15, 2015 02:22 PM

William Pereira
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
15 April 2015

Chapter 22.

“ Dear Jonathan,
Salutations from Ukraine. I just received your letter and read it many times” (178)
Who does Alex read Jonathan’s letter to and why?
Alex reads the letter to Igor his little brother, because it is a way for them to bond and laugh. Alex writes “I read aloud to Little Igor. (Did I tell you that he is reading your novel as I read it? I translate it for him, and I am also your editor.) I will utter no more than that we are both anticipating the remnants. It is a thing that we can think about and converse about. It is also a thing that we can laugh about, which is something we require.”(Ch. 22 pg. 178.)

Posted by: William Pereira at April 15, 2015 06:57 PM

Bobbi Ausmus
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220
16 April 2015

Chapter 8: “BUT WE MUST HAVE A REASONABLE BAME FOR OUR OWN PURPOSES.” (Foer, 51).
Q: How was the name of the town decided, and why would it have been done in this way?
A: The town name, was decided by a lottery of the people in town casting their vote for what name they favor. Despite, that the name they pick will not be used as the official name of their town, they wish to have a name that they prefer better. The reason for using the lottery method, is because it would be one of the easiest ways in which a decent amount of people could accomplish such a task as this one. “YAKEL HAS NAMED US TRACHIMBROD.” (Foer, 51). The town’s unofficial name, is just as odd as the town itself, and holds the same mystery. Why such a name as “Trachimbrod” (Foer, 51). Perhaps it had special meaning to Yakel or it could be random.
Chapter 13: “I order you not to order me, she said” (Foer, 91).
Q: Why would this chapter be considered important?
A: This chapter, helps to give background information about the great to the power of five grandmother of Jon. It helps give light, to the person who part of the story of another being searched for. The two life’s tie together to form one. “Aren’t we so terribly lucky to have one another?” (Foer, 91). The two words terribly and lucky seem like they shouldn’t be used in the same sentence as one another, but much like the story of the two it somehow works and makes sense.
Chapter 18: “The hero must have been acquiring some Ukrainian, because he put hid hand on his stomach.” (Foer, 146).
Q: Why is this chapter important for the character of Jon?
A: For Jon’s character, he has finally found someone who can give him answers he has sought out in his long journey. It is here, that he first starts to truly learn about his grandfather, as well as his grandmother. “Her life was a book of photographs. One was with the hero’s grandfather, and now one was with us.” (Foer, 148). The old lady who tells Jon more about his grandfather and mother, lives much of her live thru photos; just as Jon does with his photos and odd keepsakes to help him remember times throughout his life. Memories are different to different people as are how they choose to remember the events, which took place.
Chapter 22: “I have learned many momentous lessons from your writing, Jonathan.” (Foer, 178).
Q: How has Alex’s character changed from when he was first introduced?
A: Alex’s character, when first introduced appears to be cocky and seem think of himself as being smarter than he actually is in reality. However as the journey with Jon progresses he becomes more sensitive to outside factors. “We are very nomadic with the truth, yes?” (Foer, 179). Alex has watched Jon, during the journey and seen the odds things, which Jon does and asks or sometimes doesn’t ask. But in the end he and Jon share a mutual respect, for the events of the not so long ago past.
Chapter 27: “Do you think I’m wonderful?” (Foer, 229).
Q: How does this chapter tie into the main idea of the book?
A: Very few stories end with happy endings. The fact that the grandfather has run off with a gypsy, clearing prove that this is true. “Are you saying I am not-wonderful?” (Foer, 229). The situation of these two seemingly star crossed people, is one of tragic ending. The girl kills herself seven months later after all. But for a time the two, seem to have a simple easy life as both friends and lovers. “You are incredibly not-beautiful. You are the farthest possible thing from beautiful.” (Foer, 229). In all honesty, how many people are able to say this to one another and not be slapped in the face? The connection between the two is a special but odd one, which goes to make this story all the more interesting.

Posted by: Bobbi Ausmus at April 16, 2015 02:14 AM

Cody Jean-Baptiste
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL On the Proverbial Road: Journeys of Narrative CA02
17 April 2015
“THAT CHILD IS EXTRAORDINARY! (Foer 268).”

Questions: The following passage is the grandfather showing great admiration. Who was he talking to and why was he excited.


Answers: The grandfather was talking to his wife Zosha after he felt the baby kick. He was happy because “There were fewer handsome men assembled along the shoreline than any year since that first one when everything began, when Trachim did or did not get pinned under his wagon (Foer 268).”

Posted by: Cody Jean-Baptiste at April 17, 2015 11:09 AM

Wyatt Burttschell,
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220: Journeys Into Narrative CA02
17 April 2015

Question: What lines reveal grandfathers past? Who did he kill during the war? What reflections does grandfather offer at the end of the chapter?

Answer: In this chapter Alex, Johnathan and grandfather go through the contents of the box labelled “In case.” Grandfather pulls out a pearl necklace. The necklace reminds grandfather of a similar necklace that he put on his wife when she was buried. They come across photographs and the Book of Antecedents. At the end of the chapter grandfather reveals some information about the photograph. Grandfather explains “I am not a hero, it is true.” He goes on to reveal “Hershel was a Jew. And he was my best friend. And I murdered him” (Foer 228)

Posted by: Wyatt Burttschell at April 17, 2015 01:08 PM

Hanna Kataria
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
17 April 2015

20 July 1997

“I know how momentous the box was for you, for both of us, and how its ingredients were not exchangeable” (Safran Foer 23).

Question: What is the box? Who was it for and does it represent anything?

Answer: The box that Alex is speaking of is something that Jonathan was supposed to bring to him. The box was something from American that Alex would have most appreciated. It was “a slice of humble pie” that a “guard … stole”(Safran Foer 23). The box does not represent anything other than something that was brought from America. It seems like something that Alex deeply wanted to try; a slice of pie from America because he was very interested and fascinated by the American culture.

Posted by: Hanna Kataria at April 17, 2015 01:36 PM

Hanna Kataria
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
17 April 2015

28 October 1997

“I keep all of my reserves of currency in a cookie box in the kitchen… I reason that when the cookie is full, I will have a sufficient quantity to change residence to America” (Safran Foer 100-101).

Question: Why does Alex plan and want to go to America? Why is all of his money [currency] in a cookie box?

Answer: Alex keeps his money in a cookie box because that is last place anyone will look through. He is saving up to go to America so that he can leave the Ukraine, and take his brother with him. He wants his brother to have a better life. In addition, everyone knows that America is the place of opportunities. “Time Square” is a great place for them to settle into (Safran Foer 101).

Posted by: Hanna Kataria at April 17, 2015 01:37 PM

Hanna Kataria
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
17 April 2015

Falling in Love, 1791-1796

“Her body was tattooed with the newspaper print … Sometimes he would rock her to sleep in his arms, and read her left to right, and know everything he needed to know about the world. If it wasn’t written on her, it wasn’t important to him” (Safran Foer 43-44).

Question: Does it seem that Yankel loves the girl very much? Does it seem strange in any way?

Answer: Yankel loves this baby girl as if she was his own child, not saying that she is not, she is now his child. He is trying his hardest to take care of her as a single father. I think he loves, attaches himself to her, and cares more for her because he had “lost two babies … [and] he had also lost a wife … to another man” ( Safran Foer 44). He loves her more because he had lost so much, and he does not want to lose anything else. It shows every much the love in a unique way when it says that “everything he needed to know about the world. If it was not written on her, it wasn’t important to him “(Safran Foer 44). This love for her is very understandable; however, there are still things that are very strange. The most unusual thing is that he set up her bed, in a pan of newspapers placed in the oven. That is the most unusual thing, but it could be that he has no other items for babies. At the same time, he should because he did have two babies before. Either way, it is something that is different and something that people do not hear of.

Posted by: Hanna Kataria at April 17, 2015 01:40 PM

Hanna Kataria
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
17 April 2015

Falling In Love, 1934-1941

“Then you must do something for me, she said. Sofiowka was found the next morning, swinging by the neck from the wooden bridge. His severed hands were hanging from strings tied to his feet, and across his chest was written, in Brod’s red lipstick: ANIMAL” (Safran Foer 205).

Question: What does the quote above mean about Brod, Kolker, and Sofiowka?

Answer: The quote above is about “The First Rape of Brod D” (Safran Foer 203). Sofiowka was the one that raped Brod, after the annual parade when she was thirteen. Kolker was, in a way, the peeping tom that was watching her when Brod was standing by the window naked after she had found Yankel’s dead body. Brod was trying to tell him to “Go away!” but he would not listen, and did not want to leave without her (Safran Foer 205). Since he would not leave, she requested that he did one thing for her. Sofiowka’s dead body and hanging were the request that Brod made. It was not said in words in the text, but it can easily be implied that is what she asked Kolker to do for her. We do know that later on in life at that point, that Kolker and Brod did end up married to each other. So it can also be implied that Sofiowka’s death was the exchange for Brod’s hand in marriage.

Posted by: Hanna Kataria at April 17, 2015 01:42 PM

Hanna Kataria
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
17 April 2015

Falling In Love

“That was Safran. He was the first boy I ever kissed. I am such an old lady that I am too old to be shy anymore. I kissed him when I was only a girl, and he was only a boy. Tell him. … Tell him that he was the first boy I ever kissed” (Safran Foer 153).

Question: Why is it that Non-Augustine is talking as if Safran is still alive? Why does it seem that this is so important to her?

Answer: It seems as if Jonathan has not told her yet that he had died. Jonathan should have told her that he has passed away so that she knows. It may be important to her because that was her first person that she kissed. To some people that is something that is extremely important and significant. She seemed that she wanted to make an emphasis on that. There is more to it than the reader and the character knows; she is holding something back that she does not want to share right now.

Posted by: Hanna Kataria at April 17, 2015 01:45 PM

Celina Tahsini
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
10 April 2015

"By her twelfth birthday, my great-great-great-great-great- grandmother had received at least one proposal of marriage from every citizen of Trachimbrod." (Foer 90).

Question: How does his great-great-great-great-great-grandmother react to all of these offers?

Answer: She denies all of them. She states that her reasoning behind her rejections to all the proposals are due to her age being too young. She says, "Perhaps no. Yankel says I am still too young. But the offer is such a tempting one" (Foer 90). Her reasoning for her actions showed that she has a strong headed mindset about marriage and when it will relate to her life.

Posted by: Celina Tahsini at April 17, 2015 01:50 PM

Celina Tahsini
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA02
6 April 2015

"There is a sense in which the bride’s family had been preparing their house for her wedding since long before Zosha was born, but it wasn’t until my grandfather reluctantly proposed—on both knees rather than one—that the renovations achieved their hysterical pace." (Foer 161)

Question: Based on the introductory statement to this chapter, how major or important is this wedding planning to be?

Answer: This wedding is slowly but surely being prepared for one magnificent wedding which is to be known throughout the people of Trachimbrod. In the chapter it states, "The wedding — the reception — was the event of 1941, with enough attendees that, should the house have burned down or been swallowed by the earth, Trachimbrod’s Jewish population would have completely disappeared. Reminders were sent out a few weeks before the invitation, which was sent out a week before the official arrangement" (Foer 162-163). This statement shows that a mass majority of the Trachimbrod Jew population made it a priority to attend the wedding event which implicates that this wedding was very known throughout the citizens and important to the bride and groom's family, friends, and acquaintances.

Posted by: Celina Tahsini at April 17, 2015 02:08 PM

Hatim Shami
Doctor Hobbs
ENG220 Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
13 April 2015

“I would like to borrow your currency.” (Foer 216)

Question: What was the grandson thinking when his grandfather asked him to borrow his money?

Answer: Alex realizes the importance and the value of his grandfather. He also knows that he should be very responsible for his grandfather. Alex mentioned that grandchild is the one responsible for taking care of his or her grandparent. Alex directly abandoned the idea of going to America for his grandfather especially the fact that he felt home in Ukraine. “This signifies that I will not be able to move myself and Little Igor to America. Our dreams cannot exist at the same time. I am so young, and he is so aged, and both of these facts should make us people who are deserving of their dreams, but this is not a possibility” (Foer 218).

Posted by: Hatim Shami at April 17, 2015 05:51 PM

Hatim Shami
Doctor Hobbs
ENG220 Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
15 April 2015

“And the shtetl folk trembled as if the sites were tattooed on their bodies. From that moment on—9:28 in the evening, June 18, 1941—everything was different.” (Foer 258).

Question: what was different? And what did the men of shtetl decided to do?

Answer: Most of the citizens were sitting around and not thinking of anything to do. The shtetl was miserable and barely engaging with the outside world. The men of the shtetl decided to gather and array their memories by drawing a flow chart, which contains all their memories. “Men set up flow charts (which were themselves memories of family trees) in an attempt to make sense of their memories” (Foer 259).

Posted by: Hatim Shami at April 17, 2015 05:53 PM

Celina Tahsini
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys to Narrative
8 April 2015

"My grandfather was in love with the smell of women. He carried their scents around on his fingers like rings, and on the end of his tongue like words—unfamiliar combinations of familiar odors." (Foer 172)

Question: In Chapter 21, what understanding does Alexander explain about his grandfather, and how does he support his statement?

Answer: In this chapter, Alexander makes clear that his grandfather loved the presence and essence of women. He continues to support his statement by explaining the different women his grandfather had an experience with physically. Each woman had a different impact on his grandfather's mentality of women. In this chapter, it explains times such as, "The day he had sex with his first virgin: Went to the theater today. Too bored to stay through the first act. Drank eight cups of coffee. I thought I was going to burst. Didn’t burst," or "The day he lost his virginity to Rose: Nothing much happened today. Father received a shipment of twine from Rovno, and yelled at me when I ne- glected my chores. Mother came to my defense, as usual, but he yelled at me any- way. Thought about lighthouses all night. Strange" (Foer 170). By explaining his grandfather's different experiences, the reader understands the grandfathers appreciation and interest for women.

Posted by: Celina Tahsini at April 20, 2015 12:54 AM

Celina Tahsini
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys to Narrative CA02
17 April 2015

"Why, then, did I feel that it was the pathetic, cowardly action, and that I was the pathetic coward?" (Foer 241)

Question: Why did he never give the money to his grandfather?

Answer: He believes as though, the lady is still out there. He still has hope that this is not the end of the journey to finding the lady in the photograph. "The woman in the photograph is alive. I am sure she is. But I am also sure that she is not Herschel, as Grandfather wanted her to be, and she is not my grandmother, as he wanted her to be, and she is not Father, as he wanted her to be" (Foer 241). Alexander still has hope that the lady in the photograph is still alive, and he knows that this would be life changing for his grandfather if they found her. He states, "If I gave him the money, he would have found her, and he would have
seen who she really is, and this would have killed him. I am not saying this metaphorically. It would have killed him" (Foer 241-242). Finding the lady in the photograph would change everything, but Alexander still has hope and an instinct that the lady in the photograph can still be found.

Posted by: Celina Tahsini at April 20, 2015 09:35 AM

Late Work T.J. Pagliaro
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220 Journeys in Narrative CA02
13 April 2015
First Half of The Thickness of Blood and Drama 1934

“This time, Safran was seated between the schoolmate and a young Gypsy girl, whom he recognized as one of the vendors from Lutsk’s Sunday bazaar. He couldn’t believe her audacity: to show up at a shtetl function, to risk the humiliation of being seen by the unpaid and overzealous usher Rubin B and asked to leave, to be a Gypsy among Jews.” (Chapter 21, pg. 172, par. 3 Foer)

Question: Safran slept with three women throughout this chapter. What kind of woman was the third woman he slept with?

Answer: The third woman Safran slept with was a Gypsy girl. He met her in the theater and recognized her from a bazaar, where she was a snake charmer. He was struck by her bravery as a Gypsy among Jews. “As the lights went down, he used his left arm to plop the dead one onto the rest between himself and the girl. He made sure that she noticed it-“(Foer 172). This passage refers to Safran making sure that she saw his arm, and she immediately responded with a sexually-charged smile.

Posted by: Timothy Pagliaro at April 20, 2015 04:05 PM

Hatim Shami
Doctor Hobbs
ENG220 Journeys of Transformation in Narrative CA01
17 April 2015

Falling In Love 1934-1941

“What are you doing here? he asked, more afraid that she had revealed their relationship—to his father, who would surely beat him, or his mother, who would be so disappointed—than curious as to why she was there.” (Foer 236)

Question: What is the reason that made him afraid of revealing his relationship with her?

Answer: there is no specific reason, but the last time they met, they have had sex and never talked to each other anymore. They both knew that they should go back seven years when they are relationship was healthier. After the last time they made love, the saw each other in many places, but never said a word to each other. “They made love for the last time, unaware that the next seven months would pass without any words between them. He would see her many times, and she him—they had come to haunt the same places, to walk the same paths, to fall asleep in the shade of the same trees—but they would never acknowledge each other’s existence. They both wanted badly to go back seven years to their first encounter, at the theater, and do it all again” (Foer 236).

Posted by: hatim shami at April 21, 2015 07:27 PM

Chrissy Castro
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220cl: On the Proverbial Road: A Journey in Narrative
6 April 2015

First half of chapter “23 September 1997”
“”Sammy Davis Junior, Junior will jump out.” “Who?” “The Bitch. Her name is Sammy Davis Junior, Junior.” “Is that a joke?” “No, she will go forth from the car.” “His name, though.” “Her name,” I rectified him, because I am first rate with pronouns.” […] “The bitch was named for his favorite singer, who was Sammy Davis Junior.” “A Jew” the hero said.”” (Chapter: 23 September 1997, Page 58, First paragraph on the Kindle App).

Question: What was grandfathers’ reaction after the hero mentioned that Sammy Davis Junior was a Jew?

Answer: Grandfather got very defensive about the Hero referring to Sammy Davis Junior as a Jew. He stated, “”Sammy Davis Junior was not a Jew!” he hollered “He was the negro of the Rat Pack!” (Foer, 58). Throughout the story, Grandfather refers to the Hero as The Jew using the term in a derogatory way.

Posted by: Chrissy Castro at April 24, 2015 02:22 PM

Chrissy Castro
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220cl: On the Proverbial Road: A Journey in Narrative
3 April 2015
First half of chapter “The Lottery 1791”

“He brought her to the Upright synagogue—for not even a baby, he swore, should set foot in the Slouching Synagogue […]” (Chapter: The Lottery 1791, Page 16, First paragraph on the Kindle App).

Question: What was the Upright Synagogue known for? How is this expressed in the book?

Answer: The Upright Synagogue was known for yelling the sermon. “The goers of the Upright Synagogue had been screaming for more than two hundred year” (Foer, 16). In the book, when the Upright Synagogue is speaking, all the words are in all capital letters to emphasize the yelling.

Posted by: Chrissy Castro at April 24, 2015 02:23 PM

Chrissy Castro
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220cl: On the Proverbial Road: A Journey in Narrative
10 April 2015

First half of chapter “The Wedding reception was so extraordinary”

“She slid her lace panties from under his lapel. Finally, pulling him into her arms, any longer and I would have just burst.” (Chapter: The Wedding reception was so extraordinary, Page 164, last paragraph on the Kindle App).

Question: Why did Safran have sex with the bride’s younger sister?

Answer: When Safran went down stairs, he is greeted by the Bride’s younger sister. It is then realized that Maya is the Gypsy girl from an earlier chapter. This is the woman that Safran actually wants to be with and why he has sex with her.

Posted by: Chrissy Castro at April 24, 2015 02:24 PM

Chrissy Castro
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220cl: On the Proverbial Road: A Journey in Narrative
15 April 2015

First half of chapter “24 December 1997”
“I implore myself to paint Trachimbrod, so you will know why we were so overawed. There was nothing. When I utter ‘nothing’ I do not mean there was nothing except for two houses, and some wood on the ground, and pieces of glass, and children’s toys, and photographs. When I utter that there was nothing, what I intend is that there was not any of these things, or any other things.” (Chapter: 24 December 1997, Page 184, First paragraph on the Kindle App).

Question: Why was there nothing in Trachimbrod?

Answer: The Nazi’s invaded Trachimbrod. The woman said that the Nazi’s “burned down the synagogue” […] “that was the first” (Foer 184) She goes on to say that the Nazi’s lined up they lined up the men and “unrolled the Torah in front of them” (Foer 184). They Nazi’s made the men spit on it and if they didn’t, they would kill their families. The Nazi’s completely destroyed Trachimbrod.

Posted by: Chrissy Castro at April 24, 2015 02:34 PM

Emily Buckley
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
5 April 2016

“My legal name is Alexander Perchov. But all of my many friends dub me Alex. ” (Chapter 1: An Overture to the Commencement of a Very Rigid Journey, page 2, par. 1, Jonathan Safran Foer)

Question: This passage refers to a moment when the narrator introduces himself to the reader. He continues to talk about himself. What seems to be Alex’s personality?

Answer: Alex seems to be a brutally realistic person in the way he discusses things. “She has this name because Sammy Davis, Junior was Grandfather’s beloved singer, and the bitch is his, not mine, because I am not the one who thinks he is blind.” (Foer 1) He seems to be arrogant and prideful because he talks about himself in a haughty manner. He says, “I am a very premium person to be with. I am homely, and also severely funny, and these are winning things.” (Foer 2)

Posted by: Emily Buckley at April 5, 2016 01:08 PM

Using Vogler's theory, Who does Yankel most represent? Or using Campbell's theory what narrative element is perceived here?

Posted by: Burke Tomaselli at April 6, 2016 01:48 AM

Brianna Van Tuyl
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL journeys into narrative
6 April 2016


“Father obtained a telephone call from the American office of Heritage Touring. They required a driver, guide, and a translator for a young man who would be in Lutsk at the dawn of the month of July. This was a troublesome supplication. Because at the dawn of July, Ukraine was to celebrate the first birthday of its ultramodern constitution, which makes us feel very nationalistic, and so many people would be on vacation in foreign places.”
Question: Why was this a good thing that this was happening when it was going to happen?
Answer: This was a good thing that was going to happen, because of the fact that not as many people would be in the area at the time when things began to happen, so that was people wouldn’t be distracted as to what all was going on around them.

Posted by: Brianna Van Tuyl at April 6, 2016 02:02 AM

Thomas Egyed
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
8 April 2016

"I banker for this letter to be good. Like you know, I am not first rate with English. In Russian my ideas are asserted abnormally well, but my second tongue is not so premium. I undertaked to input the things you counseled me to, and I fatigued the thesaurus you presented me, as you counseled me to, when my words appeared too petite, or net befitting." (Chapter 4: 20 July 1997, page 23, par. 1, Foer)

Question: In this selection Alex wrote a letter to Jonathan. What character archetype is he playing and does it change at the end of the chapter?

Answer: Alex is playing the Ally archetype. He is helping Jonathan on his journey by providing translations. He also thanks Jonathan about the criticism he received on his translations. His archetype does shift towards the end of the chapter to more of a mentor type. He said "I will counsel you that even after you have presented me more, I may not possess many intelligent things to utter, but I could perhaps of some nonetheless use. Perhaps if I think of something is very half-witted, I could tell you, and you could make it whole-witted." (Foer 25) In a way, they are both sharing the mentor and ally archetype by helping each other and giving advice.

Posted by: Thomas Egyed at April 8, 2016 09:24 AM

Thomas Egyed
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
8 April 2016

"One of the hero's potatoes descended to the floor. When it hit the floor it made a sound. PLOMP. It rolled over, and then was inert. Grandfather and I examined each other. I did not know what to do. 'A terrible thing has occurred,' Grandfather said. The here continued to view the potato on the floor." (Chapter 10: Going Forth to Lutsk, page 66, par. 3, Foer)

Question: This selection refers to a strange moment in their journey. What stage of the journey does this fall under? What happens to the potato?

Answer: This would be part of the Tests, Allies, and Enemies stage. It is a test to prove their loyalty in a way. No one is sure what to do about the potato because of the consequences. What happened was that "Grandfather inserted his fork in the potato, picked it up from the floor, and put it on his plate. He cut it into four pieces and gave one to Sammy Davis, Junior, Junior under the table, one to me, and one to the hero." (Foer 67) "Grandfather started laughing. 'Welcome to the Ukraine,'" (Foer 67) They all started laughing each for their own reason. It helped ease the tension of their journey and to come closer as allies.

Posted by: Thomas Egyed at April 8, 2016 09:25 AM

Emily Buckley
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
8 April 2016


“…you counseled that I should amputate her. You uttered that the story would be more “refined” with her absence, and I know that refined is like cultivated, polished, and well bred…” (Chapter 9 1/2: 23 September 1997, page 55, par. 1, Jonathan Safran Foer)

Question: This passage refers to a moment when Alexander writes back to Johnathan’s suggestion of removing a character from his story. Who was the character Johnathan wanted to be removed? What was Alexander’s reason to keep her in the story?

Answer: Johnathan suggests that Alexander should remove the dog Sammy Davis Junior Junior from the story. “I did not amputate Sammy Davis, Junior, Junior from the story, even though you counseled that I should amputate her.” (Foer 55) Alexander replies that Sammy Davis Junior Junior is an essential character to the story, and is dignified. “I will inform you that Sammy Davis, Junior, Junior is a very distinguished character, one with variegated appetites and seats of passion. Let us view her evolution and then resolve.” (Foer 55)

Posted by: Emily Buckley at April 10, 2016 12:13 PM

Emily Buckley
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
10 April 2016


“Fearing his frequent deficiencies of memory, he began writing fragments of his life story on his bedroom ceiling.” (Chapter 11 1/2: 23 September 1997, page 83, par. 4, Jonathan Safran Foer)

Question: This passage refers to a moment in Yankle and Brod’s story when Yankle starts to lose his memory so he starts writing. What does Yankle use to write? Why does he write?

Answer: Yankle uses a lipstick he found in Brod’s drawer. “…he began writing fragments of his life story on his bedroom ceiling with one of Brod’s lipsticks that he found wrapped in a sock in her desk drawer.” (Foer 83) He writes so he does not forget his life it would be the first and last things he saw morning and night. “This way, his life would be the first thing he would see when he awoke each morning, and the last thing before going to sleep each night.” (Foer 83)

Posted by: Emily Buckley at April 10, 2016 12:47 PM

Thomas Egyed
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
10 April 2016

"She found him in the library. But he was not asleep in his favorite chair, as she suspected he might be, with the wings of a half-finished book spread across his chest. He was on the floor, fetal, clutching a balled-up slip of paper." (Chapter 13: A Parade, A Death, A Proposition, 1804-1969, page 97, par. 4, Foer)

Question: What stage of Brod's journey does this selection take place in? What happened to Yankel?

Answer: Brod's journey could be at the Atonement with the Father Stage. Yankel was in the process of writing a letter of recognition. He wanted to tell her "that she had a good heart (which was worth more than a good brain), and that he was not her real father but wished with every blessing, every day and night of his life, that he was;" (Foer 97) With his old age his memory and wisdom was fading, but in a way it was being transferred to Brod as she was reading everything he gave her and absorbing his knowledge. Yankel died that evening while Brod was at the parade.

Posted by: Thomas Egyed at April 10, 2016 04:36 PM

Brianna Van Tuyl
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys into Narrative
10 April 2016

Chapter 9
“I did not yearn this but I will. Soon I will posses enough currency to purchase a plane voucher to America, Father does not know this. He thinks I’m disseminate everything I posses at famous discotheques, but as proxy for I often go to the beach and roast for many hours, so I do not disseminate currency. When I roast, I think about how lucky you are. “
Question Why does Alex want to get away so badly?
Answer: Alex wants to get away as badly as he does because of the fact that hes looking for a dream that he can reach for, because of the ideas that have been put into his head by others. But at the same time, he doesn’t want his father finding out because if he were to find out he would think that Alex wants something more than he can have which his father would not be proud about.

Posted by: Brianna Van Tuyl at April 10, 2016 05:13 PM

Brianna Van Tuyl
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys into Narrative
10 April 2016

Chapter 14
“It was impossible to see what was going on in the water with all of the splashing. Women and children cheered furiously while men stroked furiously, grabbing and tugging one another’s limbs to gain advantage. They surfaced in waves, sometimes with bags in their mouths and hands and they plunged back down with all the vigor they could summon. The water leapt, the trees swayed in expectations, the sky slowly pulled up its blue dress to reveal night.”
Question: Why was the crowd as rowdy as they were when they first saw all the men coming towards them as they cam closer and closer?
Answer: Everyone was as hyped up as they were because of the fact that the men got what they needed once they reached the other side of the river which made their competition immediately turn around and go back to the beginning point.

Posted by: Brianna Van Tuyl at April 11, 2016 12:08 AM

Brianna Van Tuyl
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys into Narrative
10 April 2016

Chapter 15
“It was impossible to see what was going on in the water with all of the splashing. Women and children cheered furiously while men stroked furiously, grabbing and tugging one another’s limbs to gain advantage. They surfaced in waves, sometimes with bags in their mouths and hands and they plunged back down with all the vigor they could summon. The water leapt, the trees swayed in expectations, the sky slowly pulled up its blue dress to reveal night.”
Question: Why was the crowd as rowdy as they were when they first saw all the men coming towards them as they cam closer and closer?
Answer: Everyone was as hyped up as they were because of the fact that the men got what they needed once they reached the other side of the river which made their competition immediately turn around and go back to the beginning point.

Posted by: Brianna Van Tuyl at April 11, 2016 12:10 AM

Jessica McKinney
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
9 April 2016

“A few days before the hero was to arrive, I inquired Father if I could go forth to America when I made to graduate from university.” (Chapter 5: An Overture to Encountering the Hero, and Then Encountering the Hero pg. 28 par. 3 Foer)

Question: What was Alex’s father reaction when Alex asked could he attend college and obtain a degree?

Answer: Alex’s father answered Alex’s question sternly with a simple “No” (28 Foer) But he explained to Alex why by stating “it is because Great-Grandfather was from Odessa, and Grandfather was from Odessa, and Father, me, was from Odessa, and your boys will be from Odessa. Also, you are going to toil at Heritage Touring when you are graduated. It is a necessary employment, premium enough for Grandfather, premium enough for me, and premium enough for you.” (28 Foer)

Posted by: Jessica McKinney at April 11, 2016 12:53 AM

Jessica McKinney
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journey’s in Narrative CA01
9 April 2016

“Two men in black hats limped in before any of the congregants had time to get up. WE ARE HERE ON BEHALF OF THE UPRIGHT CONGREGATION! Hollered the taller of the two. THE UPRIGHT CONGREGATION! Echoed the short and squat one.” (Chapter 6: The Book of Recurrent Dreams, 1791 pg. 41 par. 1 Foer)

Question: Who were the men looking for and why? What was the reaction of the person they were looking for?

Answer: The two men were looking for Yankel as the one of the men said “IS YANKEL PRESENT?” (41 Foer) They were looking for Yankel because they were delivering news to him saying “YOU WILL BE THE FATHER OF THE BABY FROM THE RIVER!” (41 Foer) Yankel’s reaction to news was overwhelming but joyous. He begins crying and just repeatedly says “Thank you, Thank you so much.” (41 Foer)

Posted by: Jessica McKinney at April 11, 2016 01:31 AM

Emily Buckley
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
12 April 2016

Chapter 17
“If I could utter a proposal…Do you comprehend what I signify? You would have to alter your story very much…” (Chapter 17: 17 November 1997, page 143, par. 2, Jonathan Safran Foer)

Question: In the constructive criticism letter from Alexander to Johnathan Alex requests Johnathan to change his story to make it happier. What does Alexander suggest he should change? What other suggestions does Alex make alongside the main change?

Answer: Alex suggests that Johnathan should make Brod, one of the main characters, happy. “…please allow Brod to be happy. Please. Is this such an impossible thing?” (Foer, 143) Johnathan goes on to suggest, “Perhaps she could still exist, and be proximal with your grandfather Safran. Or, here is a majestic idea: perhaps Brod could be Augustine.” (Foer, 143) Alex tries to suggest ideas that would make the change in the story easier.

Posted by: Emily Buckley at April 14, 2016 10:34 AM

Emily Buckley
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
13 April 2016

Chapter 24 3/4
“The young couple first married on August 5, 1744, when Joseph was eight, and Sarah six, and first ended their marriage six days later…” (Chapter 24: Falling in Love, 1934-1941, page 204, par. 2, Jonathan Safran Foer)

Question: This section of the chapter tells about a couple, Sarah and Joseph, who constantly divorced and remarried. What finally ended the cycle of marriage and divorce? What hung by their front door?

Answer: Death finally ended the cycle of marriage and divorce for Joseph and Sarah. “Sarah died of heart failure and Joseph drowned himself in the bath.” (Foer, 208) Their evolving marriage contract was nailed to their door. “Their marriage contract still hangs over the door of the house they on-and-off shared—nailed to the top post and brushing against the shalom welcome mat” (Foer, 208)

Posted by: Emily Buckley at April 14, 2016 10:38 AM

Thomas Egyed
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
14 April 2016

"'Jon-Fen.' I said, 'Jon-fen, arouse! Look who I have!' 'Huh?' 'Look,' I said, and pointed to Augustine. 'How long have I been asleep?' he asked. 'Where are we?' 'Trachimbrod! We are in Trachimbrod!'" (Chapter 18: Falling in Love, page 146, par. 1, Foer)

Question: The hero and his allies have finally reached their destination. Who do they meet and what is strange about this person? What character archetype does this person follow?

Answer: Jonathan, Alex, and Alex's Grandfather meet Augustine, the girl in the photograph. What is strange is she labels all of her belongings, which take up almost all of the space in her house, with odd names. Some of them were labeled " hair/hand mirrors, poetry/nails/pisces, chess/relics/black magic, stars/music boxes, sleep/sleep/sleep, stockings/kiddush cups, water into blood." (Foer 150) She also claimed that she wasn’t the girl in the photograph and only knew one of the men in it. She is mostly related to the Threshold Guardian. The hero and his allies need to get through to her and then she will take them to Trachimbrod.

Posted by: Thomas Egyed at April 14, 2016 05:35 PM

Thomas Egyed
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
14 April 2016

"'Take me with you,' I said, and again I did not intend to say it, but it released from my mouth, like the articles from Trachim's wagon. 'No,' he said. 'Please,' I said. 'It will be less rigid with me. I could assist very much.' 'I need to find her alone,' he said, and at that moment I was certain that if I gave Grandfather the currency and allowed him to go, I would never see him again." (Chapter 25: 24 December 1997, page 217, par. 6, Foer)

Question: In this selection Alex is on the beach and his Grandfather wants to borrow money to go find Augustine. Alex is persistent in wanting to join his grandfather. But his grandfather will not budge. Why does Alex continue to ask to join?

Answer: Alex has two choices he can make. The first is to refuse to give his grandfather the money and instead go to America like he planned all along. The second choice is to give his grandfather the money and not go to America. He has realized that he no longer needs America to feel at home. He is happy where he is. Alex said, "It is the last thing that he said that left the most permanent mark on my brain. It had not occurred to me until he uttered it, but we have a secret. We have a thing amid us that no one else in the world knows, or could know. We have a secret together, and no longer asunder." (Foer 217) All Alex wants to do is bond with his grandfather.

Posted by: Thomas Egyed at April 14, 2016 09:39 PM

Jonathan Chan Jon Chu
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL CAO1 Journeys in Narrative
10 April 2016
Everything is Illuminated

Chapter 4
Question: In this segment of the story what kind of person is Alex to Jonathan?
Answer: In the fourth chapter Alex has written a letter to correspond with Jonathan to inform him all the things that are transpiring in his life and congratulate him writing his novel. There, it may appear that Alex is an ally, a friend to Jonathan, the hero. Also, Alex professes this feeling by stating, “We became like friends while you were in Ukraine, yes? In a different world, we could have been real friends (Foer 26). Since the visit to Ukraine they have been bonded and as such have been friends.

Posted by: Jonathan Chan Jon Chu at April 15, 2016 01:18 PM

Jonathan Chan Jon Chu
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL CAO1 Journeys in Narrative
12 April 2016
Everything is Illuminated

Chapter 7
Question: What purpose did Brod serve to Yankel-then-Safran?
Answer: Yankel-then-Safran used Brod as a catalyst to attempt to start again and live a “happy” life. As a result of his wife leaving him for his attorney Yankel, Yankel-then-Safran has been distraught being unable to live his life without thinking about what his wife was doing with Yankel, his attorney. What made things even worst was that she left the note “like any other note she would leave for him” and therefore it threw him off-guard (Adams 44). When Brod came into his life, he tried to use her to create a new life that he thought would make him happy. Yankee-then-Safran told her stories of how she was so much like his former wife, stating things like, “She looked like you. She was Beautiful, with those mixed matched eyes, like you,” attempting to fool himself into happiness (Adams 48). This never worked because he would always find the letter that his former wife left him, and he would remember the reality of his unhappiness.

Posted by: Jonathan Chan Jon Chu at April 15, 2016 01:19 PM

Jonathan Chan Jon Chu
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL CAO1 Journeys in Narrative
13 April 2016
Everything is Illuminated

Chapter 14 (first half)
Question: What role does Jonathan play in the life of Alex as the communicate through mail.
Answer: In all honesty, Jonathan is Alex’s mentor. It appears in most of his letter to Jonathan that Alex is looking for Jonathan’s approval or advice. Even he stated this when he said, “I ask leniency if it angered you in any manner, but I want to be truthful and humorous, as you have concealed” (Alexander 101). As he continues to communicate with Jonathan, he is in search to become a better person in the eyes of Jonathan.

Posted by: Jonathan Chan Jon Chu at April 15, 2016 01:19 PM

Jonathan Chan Jon Chu
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL CAO1 Journeys in Narrative
12 April 2016
Everything is Illuminated

Chapter 20 (First Half)
Question: How did Jonathan’s grand father’s deformity prove useful to him?
Answer: Jonathan’s grandfather was born with teeth which lead to him being malnourished because his mother refused to breastfeed him due to the damage it gave her. As a direct result of his malnutrition, Jonathan’s grandfather right arm becomes lame. As he got older, it proved to be a blessing. His deformity saved him from working in the “menacing flour mill,” being “killed in hopeless battle against the Nazis” since he could not be drafted, and later caused Augustine to fall in love with him (Adams 166).The conclusive result of his “dead arm” created situations that protected him and gave his live purpose.

Posted by: Jonathan Chan Jon Chu at April 15, 2016 01:23 PM

Jonathan Chan Jon Chu
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL CAO1 Journeys in Narrative
15 April 2016
Everything is Illuminated

Chapter 23 (second half)
Question: Who was the shadow presented in the story that Augustine shared?
Answer: The shadow of the story was the Geman General, who killed the people of Tachimbrod who did not do as he state and desecrate the holy Torah. As stated in one of the scenes the General requested the people to spit on it…step on it…tear it, but there was on who refused, and he paid a high price (Adams 185). They shot his youngest daughter and wife who died, and later killed the eldest in her vagina and killed her unborn baby. The General did evil harming everyone who stood against him and as such was the shadow of the story.

Posted by: Jonathan Chan Jon Chu at April 15, 2016 01:24 PM

Andre Gilbert
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in the Narrative CA01
11 April 2016

Grandfather put his hands on the wheel. He looked in front of him for a protracted time. He was breathing very large breaths, and his hands were shaking" (Chapter 5, Everything is Illuminated, 34, par. 2).

Question: What role or archetype did grandfather play and was he an obstacle when Jonathan first met grandfather, Alex and Sammy Davis Junior, Junior?

Answer: The grandfather played several roles throughout the novel, "Everything is Illuminated," but in chapter five, he was a herald for the sheer reason that he did not impede Jonathan, in fact, he pushed him to start the journey. Jonathan was afraid of the dog, Sammy Davis Junior, Junior, a threshold guardian. Jonathan or " the hero" as Alex affectionately calls him, "moved his shirt up to exhibit me the remains of a wound" (Foer 35). Jonathan exclaimed, "that's from a dog bite" (Foer 35). Jonathan was not going to get into the car with the dog because of his fear. Ironically, the grandfather played an influential role in announcing that the journey must begin, pushing Jonathan to overcome his fear, and the grandfather said, "No one is afraid of dogs...get in the fucking car..." (Foer 35).

Posted by: Andre Gilbert at April 15, 2016 07:32 PM

Andre Gilbert
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in the Narrative CA01
11 April 2016

“It captured five very long hours. If you want to know why, it is because Grandfather is Grandfather first and a driver second. He made us lost often and became on his nerves I had to translate his anger into useful information for the hero.” (Chapter 10, Everything is Illuminated, 58, par. 1).

Question: What was Jonathan looking for in Trachimbrod, and who were his allies?

Answer: Jonathan was mainly looking for the girl in the photo (Augustine), but he was also interested to see where his grandfather grew up and what it would have been like if he had grown up in Ukraine too. “I want to see Trachimbrod, to see what it’s like, how my grandfather grew up, where I would be now if it weren’t for the war.” (Foer 59). Alex and Grandfather were allied to Jonathan, Although Alex is also a hero, he was an ally, and at times a mentor as well. The grandfather may also be considered a mentor by providing the hero with his insight in this chapter. Many of the characters in "Everything is Illuminated" fit the title of Campbell’s book “The Hero with a thousand faces” because of their dynamic roles. "Tell him to remain in the car" (Foer 63), the grandfather said, he did not want the hotel owner to charge Jonathan twice, he tried to help him out. It shows how grandfather had transitioned into a new role.

Posted by: Andre Gilbert at April 15, 2016 07:52 PM

Andre Gilbert
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in the Narrative CA01
11 April 2016

She found him in the library, but he was not asleep in his favorite chair, as she suspected he might be, with the wings of a half finished book across his chest.” (Chapter 14, Everything is Illuminated, 97, par. 3).

Question: Who found the man in the library and what was his name?

Answer: The man’s name is Yankel, and the girl who found him is called Brod. Alex wrote, “She took the paper from Yankel’s hand which was damp with rain, and fear of death, and death. Scrawled in a child’s writing: Everything for Brod” (Foer 97). Alex writes Jonathan to let him know how he feels about the writings. In his letter, he says, “the ultimate part that you gave me, about Trachimday, was certainly the most ultimate…I am remaining with nothing to utter about it” (Foer 103). The story made Alex sad about Brod, her ordeal, and her emotions. Alex writes in his letter, "why are the painful things always electromagnets?" (Foer 104). Alex confirms his intrigue, and yet he is distressed by what he has read.

Posted by: Andre Gilbert at April 15, 2016 07:59 PM

Andre Gilbert
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in the Narrative CA01
14 April 2016

“The bride’s younger sister was leaning against a shelf of empty wine racks when my grandfather entered the cellar” (Chapter 19, Everything is Illuminated, 164, par. 3).

Question: What happened when the groom met the bride’s younger sister and how was the event similar to the wind that knocked everything over at the wedding?

Answer: Jonathan’s grandfather had an affair with the bride’s younger sister Maya. She was waiting for him in the cellar, “leaning against a shelf of empty wine racks when my grandfather entered the cellar,” Jonathan wrote (Foer 164). They inevitably had sex as explained by Jonathan when she, “…slid her lace panties from under his lapel. Finally, pulling him into her arms, any longer and I would have burst” (Foer 164).
The wind had blown all the wedding paraphernalia over, messing up the order of the wedding, and this could be compared to Jonathan’s grandfather’s wind of passions and infidelity trouble his marriage.

“Zosha and her mother…scurried about trying invasion to reset everything that had been so deliberately arranged, picking up forks and knives, wiping the floors of spilled wine, reentering the centerpieces, replacing the names that had been scattered like a thrown deck of playing cards” (Foer 164). Likewise, the events of Maya and Jonathan’s grandfather’ infidelity mirrored the destruction of the wedding party by the wind.

Posted by: Andre Gilbert at April 15, 2016 08:00 PM

Andre Gilbert
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in the Narrative CA01
14 April 2016

“Even the most delinquent students read the Book of Antecedents without skipping a word, for they knew that they too would one day inhabit its pages, that if they could only get hold of a future edition, they would be able to read of their mistakes (and perhaps avoid them), and the mistakes of their children (and ensure that they would never happen), and the outcome of future wars (and prepare for the death of loved ones).” (Chapter 24, Everything is Illuminated, 196, par. 2).

Question: What did the story show in the Book of Antecedents when a baker’s rolls kept disappearing? What is the moral of the story?

Answer: In the Book of Antecedents, it was explained that there was a time of dyed hands. The author writes, “we will dye the hands of each citizen with a different color” (Foer 199). While it turned out that a mouse was the culprit, the dyed hands tended to create a new problem for the citizens. The book read, “…a mouse…had been sneaking away with the rolls, and no colors ever appeared behind the counter” (Foer 200).
The people began to find colors being smeared in all sorts of places which gave rise to accusations as to how colors got there, revealing too much and leaving much to the imagination. In the story, “Shlomo V found silver between the thighs of his wife, Chebra…and said nothing until he’d painted her breasts green with his hand and then covered those breasts in white semen. He pulled her naked through the gray moonlit streets, from house to house, bruising his knuckles black and blue on the doors. He forced her to watch as he cut off the testicles of Samuel R, who, with raised silver fingers, pleaded for mercy and cried ambiguously, ‘There has been a mistake.’” (Foer 200). It is clear that in society, ignorance is bliss because whether true or not, what might be true is more painful than what is a lie, or what we do not know. Some secrets are best kept, secrets.

Posted by: Andre Gilbert at April 15, 2016 08:00 PM

Andre Gilbert
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in the Narrative CA01
14 April 2016

“Even the most delinquent students read the Book of Antecedents without skipping a word, for they knew that they too would one day inhabit its pages, that if they could only get hold of a future edition, they would be able to read of their mistakes (and perhaps avoid them), and the mistakes of their children (and ensure that they would never happen), and the outcome of future wars (and prepare for the death of loved ones).” (Chapter 24, Everything is Illuminated, 196, par. 2).

Question: What did the story show in the Book of Antecedents when a baker’s rolls kept disappearing? What is the moral of the story?

Answer: In the Book of Antecedents, it was explained that there was a time of dyed hands. The author writes, “we will dye the hands of each citizen with a different color” (Foer 199). While it turned out that a mouse was the culprit, the dyed hands tended to create a new problem for the citizens. The book read, “…a mouse…had been sneaking away with the rolls, and no colors ever appeared behind the counter” (Foer 200).
The people began to find colors being smeared in all sorts of places which gave rise to accusations as to how colors got there, revealing too much and leaving much to the imagination. In the story, “Shlomo V found silver between the thighs of his wife, Chebra…and said nothing until he’d painted her breasts green with his hand and then covered those breasts in white semen. He pulled her naked through the gray moonlit streets, from house to house, bruising his knuckles black and blue on the doors. He forced her to watch as he cut off the testicles of Samuel R, who, with raised silver fingers, pleaded for mercy and cried ambiguously, ‘There has been a mistake.’” (Foer 200). It is clear that in society, ignorance is bliss because whether true or not, what might be true is more painful than what is a lie, or what we do not know. Some secrets are best kept, secrets.

Posted by: Andre Gilbert at April 17, 2016 11:46 AM

Brianna Van Tuyl
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys into Narrative
16 April 2016
Chapter 21
“We are near,” she said many times. “Soon, Soon.” We pursed her off of the road and into a field. “It is OK?” Grandfather asked. “who will prevent us?” she said, and with her finger showed us that there was nobody in existence for a long distance. “She says that nobody will prevent us,” I told the hero. He had his camera around his neck and was anticipating many photographs.” Nothing grows here anymore,” she said. “It does not even belong to anyone. It is only land. Who would want it?” Sammy Davis Junior, Junior galloped unto the canopy of the car, where she sat like a Mercedes sign.”
Question: Why did Sammy Davis Junior gallop over toward the car and not moving once he got there?
Answer” He galloped over to the car the way he did, because he didn’t want to give others any of the ideas that he knew where things were supposed to be going.

Posted by: brianna van tuyl at April 17, 2016 07:09 PM

Jonathan Chan Jon Chu
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL CA01 Journeys in Narrative
19 April 2016
Everything Is Illuminated

Question: 10. On page 154, following the realization that he has not found Augustine, Alex writes that “I persevered to think of her as Augustine, because, like Grandfather, I could not stop thinking of her as Augustine.” Why do Alex and his Grandfather refuse to acknowledge that the woman they meet is not Augustine? Why do they want her to be Augustine? Who is the woman really?

Answer: The Woman, whom everyone perceives to be Augustine is Lista as she stated herself on page 193. She was a beautiful lady and was in an intimate relationship with Safran, Jonathan’s ancestral grandfather. Therefore, it is not difficult to believe why Alex and his Grandfather refused to acknowledge that she was not Augustine. With all the knowledge she possessed about Safran and the level of detail she gave when telling stories about him, it would be difficult to think she was otherwise someone else. Also, they wanted for Jonathan’s sake to find the closure and answers, he desired from finding Augustine, the proposed woman who saved his grandfather. If he did not get his wish, the trip would have been a failure, and he would have left disappointed.

Posted by: Jonathan Chan Jon Chu at April 19, 2016 02:21 PM

Jessica McKinney
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
19 April 2016

“She addressed her world honestly, searching for something deserving of volumes of love she knew she had within her, but to each she would have to say, I don’t love you. Bark-brown fence post: I don’t love you. Poem too long: I don’t love you. Lunch in a bowl: I don’t love you. Physics, the idea of you, the laws of you: I don’t love you. Nothing felt like anything more than what it actually was. Everything was just a thing, mired completely in its thingness.” (Chapter 11: Falling in Love, 1791-1803 pg. 80 par. 1 Foer)

Question: Why did Brod feel this way toward everything around her and the world itself? What was causing her to feel no love?

Answer: Brod felt this way toward everything because “Brod discovered 613 sadnesses…She was like a flailing, reaching for anything that might save her. Her life was an urgent, desperate struggle to justify her life.” (79 Foer) This feeling of not finding love was finally realizing “the world was not for her, and that for whatever reason, she would never be happy and honest at the same time. She felt as if she were brimming, always producing and hoarding more love inside her.” (79 Foer) For this reason, Boer couldn’t understand love let alone find something that she loved.

Posted by: Jessica McKinney at April 19, 2016 08:49 PM

Charis Lavoie
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
12 April 2016
“The mad squire Sofiowka N, whose name the shtetl would later take for maps and Mormon census records, emerged from behind a tree” (Foer 9).
Question: What is the significance of Sokiowka in Jonathon’s story?
Answer: Sofiowka later becomes the name of the town that the people live in by way of a town name lottery.

Posted by: Charis Lavoie at April 19, 2016 09:28 PM

Charis Lavoie
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
15 April 2016
“When the black-hatted men gave him the baby, he felt that he too was only a baby, with a chance to live without shame, without need of consolation for a life lived wrong, a chance to be again innocent, simply and impossibly happy” (Foer 46).
Question: Explain why Yankel wishes to feel once more like a child.
Answer: Yankel has done many wrongs in his life that with the gift of this new child he feels as though he will be able to start fresh.

Posted by: Charis Lavoie at April 19, 2016 09:48 PM

Jessica McKinney
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
19 April 2016

“And each bridegroom knew of how Brod had wept, and hid his work clothes the previous night, and shook him from sleep every few minutes so that he would be too exhausted to leave the house the next day, and refused to make his coffee in the morning, and even tried ordering him.” (Chapter 16: The Dial, 1941-1804-1941 pg. 121 par. 4 Foer)

Question: Why did Brod everyday torture her husband every day to make him not leave the house? Why was this so important to her to do this daily routine? What had she realized about herself?

Answer: She did this because she didn’t want her husband Kolker to leave her and go work at the flour mill which she thought was too dangerous. Brod told her husband not to go to the job every day because she was “too familiar with the flour mill’s curse of taking without warning the lives of its young workers.” (121 Foer) Brod finally found love she thought, this was important because she depended on Kolker for her happiness. “She loved what it felt like to wait for the Kolker, to be entirely dependent on him for her happiness, to be, as ridiculous as she had always thought it sounded, someone’s wife.” (122 Foer) She realized that she found someone who she loved, and that made her genuinely happy, and that’s something that she was afraid to lose.

Posted by: Jessica McKinney at April 19, 2016 09:51 PM

Charis Lavoie
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
19 April 2016
“’I commanded you not to speak English! You understanded me, yes?’” (Foer 113)
Question: Why do the people in the country have such a negative view towards those who live in the city and those from America.
Answer: Those who live in the country of Ukraine are usually impoverished. I think that they do not much care for those who live in wealth.

Posted by: Charis Lavoie at April 19, 2016 10:11 PM

Charis Lavoie
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
19 April 2016
“But it occurs too frequently to be explained as the photographer’s choice of pose, or mere coincidence” (Foer 166).
Question: What was the reason that Jonathon’s grandfather’s right arm was ‘dead’?
Answer: His grandfather was born with teeth; it is believed that because he stopped breastfeeding prematurely he did not get the nourishment needed for proper development.

Posted by: Charis Lavoie at April 19, 2016 10:40 PM

Charis Lavoie
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
19 April 2016
“Why do women love your grandfather because of his dead arm?” (Foer 179)
Question: What do you think is the reason that so many women are submissive to Jonathan” grandfather?
Answer: I think this is because they feel a sort of pity towards him. This could also be due to a feeling of dominance over him.

Posted by: Charis Lavoie at April 19, 2016 10:54 PM

Jessica McKinney
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
19 April 2016

“The day he made love from behind for the first time: I’ve given much thought to what mother said about watchmakers. She was so persuasive, but I’m not yet sure if I agree. I heard her and father yelling in their bedroom, which kept me awake most of the night, but when I finally did sleep, I slept soundly.” (170 Foer)

Question: How does Safran interpret the meaning of love?

Answer: Safran defines love as stating “by love’s definition, impossible to love two people.” (170 Foer) Safran goes more into detail by breaking down the meaning of love by saying “I love you also means I love you more than anyone loves you, or has loved you, or will love you, and also, I love you in a way that no one loves you, or has loved you, or will love you, and also I love you in a way that I love no one else, and never have loved anyone else, and never will love anyone else.” (170 Foer)

Posted by: Jessica McKinney at April 19, 2016 11:27 PM

Jessica McKinney
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
19 April 2016

“The day he made love from behind for the first time: I’ve given much thought to what mother said about watchmakers. She was so persuasive, but I’m not yet sure if I agree. I heard her and father yelling in their bedroom, which kept me awake most of the night, but when I finally did sleep, I slept soundly.” (Chapter 21: The Thickness of Blood and Drama, 1934 pg. 170 par. 4 Foer)

Question: How does Safran interpret the meaning of love?

Answer: Safran defines love as stating “by love’s definition, impossible to love two people.” (170 Foer) Safran goes more into detail by breaking down the meaning of love by saying “I love you also means I love you more than anyone loves you, or has loved you, or will love you, and also, I love you in a way that no one loves you, or has loved you, or will love you, and also I love you in a way that I love no one else, and never have loved anyone else, and never will love anyone else.” (170 Foer)

Posted by: Jessica McKinney at April 19, 2016 11:29 PM

Jessica McKinney
Dr. Hobbs
ENG220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
19 April 2016

Question 2: On page 1, Alex refers to Jonathan Safran Foer as “the hero of this story.” Is he the hero? Why do you think the author Jonathan Safran Foer chose to give the protagonist of the novel his name? Does this decision affect how you read the story? Would the experience of reading Everything Is Illuminated be different if this character had another name?

Answer: Yes, Jonathan Safran Foer is the hero of the book considering the story revolves around his journey in search of the truth of his grandfather Safran. I believe the author Jonathan chose to give the protagonist the novel of his name to reflect his personal life, also possibly being named after his grandfather. This decision partially affects how I read the story because, I wonder if the story is about his real ancestors. The experience may have been different if the character wasn’t given the exact same name as the author. If the character was given a different name, the book may have a different purpose and meaning behind it.

Posted by: Jessica McKinney at April 19, 2016 11:49 PM

Thomas Egyed
Dr. Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
20 April 2016

Question 7: Many of the reviewers of the book have noted the unusual and successful use of
humor in the novel, especially in light of its concern with the tragic history of the
Holocaust. On page 53, Alex writes to Jonathan: "Humor is the only truthful way to tell
a sad story." How would you describe the humor in the novel? How does it relate to
tragedy? What are your feelings about using humor in a novel that deals with the
Holocaust?

Answer: The humor is about accepting the differences and awkwardness, that comes from the differences, between two cultures. The humor in this novel helps lighten the awkwardness when talking about tragedies. I thought it was a very clever way to deal with such a rough event. The humor never offended the Holocaust nor did it devalue the importance of it.

Posted by: Thomas Egyed at April 20, 2016 01:42 PM

Emily Buckley
Dr. B Lee Hobbs
ENG 220CL Journeys in Narrative CA01
19 April 2016

Question 4: On page 3, Alex says, "I had never met a Jewish person until the voyage." How
would you describe Alex's view of Jewish people? What about his grandfather's? Do
these views change as the journey progresses?

Answer: It seems Alex in the beginning of the story views Jonathan as a ‘spoiled Jew.’ His grandfather does not seem to respect him either when he tells the Ukrainians about his diet. Neither one of them really hate him, but they simply do not give him any respect for his views or his culture. By the end of the story their views have changed, after they hear the history and are personally effected by it they do not tease Johnathan so much.

Posted by: Emily Buckley at April 20, 2016 04:14 PM

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