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September 21, 2005

English-Blog Request for Articles and Submissions

Wanna Contribute?

Articles, that is, not money. Of course, you can ALWAYS contribute $ by just clicking on any of the ads, but what this entry is all about is your writing contributions.

Are you an aspiring writer? Got tons of good ideas floating around in your head but no where to show them off? Then, . . .

. . . the English-Blog would love to hear from you! But not just in the comments box that follows every entry.

Many excellent ideas are simply lost in a sea of bad ones in the comment areas of the blog, so we are asking you to, instead, write a short article for our subscribers. You'll get your own dedicated feedback this way!

I currently have a very consistent and successful readership (see this site's statistics HERE) and, by contributing, you would be exposing yourself to a lot of new and thoughtful readers.

By contributing an article to the English-Blog, your suggestions and ideas will have much wider distribution and become part of a permanent publication archive that you can reference (and cite) for professional development.

As a popular internet "cafe" of ideas devoted to the field of teaching (and learning) English literature, composition, rhetoric, linguistics and ESL, the English-Blog can give you a very large audience for your teaching philosophies, ideas, and experiences. You can make a difference with your article published on the English-Blog.

NEED any more reasons to write for the English-Blog?

  • Connect with other English professionals

  • Promote your own blog /organization / work / thoughts / ideas

  • Improve your professional credits by becoming a published author
  • Please email lee.hobbs[at]eslemployment[.com] with your article proposal and get started publishing your thoughts today!

    All the best,

    Lee Hobbs
    Editor-in-Chief, ESLemployment Publications

    Posted by lhobbs at September 21, 2005 01:48 PM

    Readers' Comments:

    Dear Mr Lee Hobbs,

    This is not exactly a comment. I guess its more of an inquiry. I have prepared many articles and I'd really like to send them to you.
    Before I start submitting my articles to you, I thought it would be best to make sure that the topics of my articles are in line with those that you want to publish in your journal.As soon as yousay OK, I'll start sending them ......about 15 full-length articles.How long would it take for you to publish them? Or at least how soon would you be able to send me an acceptance of publication letter?

    I have great interest in the field of using the English Language Tanslated Versions of the Quran as literary material for the teaching of English Language and Literature.I have done extensive research in this area for many years(since 1992) with many case studies, classroom obervations when I tried out the materials, substituting the text with the Quranic text using various teaching techniques in the Literature Classroom,questionnaires, stylistics analysis, comparative studies of the English language Translated Version of the Quran by two translators, analyzing verses linguistically, conducted a sort of Forum with experts in this field, etc.....
    But in doing all of this, I tried to project my intention of not looking at the religious value of the verses but the literary value that is so abundant in the English language translated versions as well as the original Quran.
    And with all the data and documentation, I was able to put together actually prepare many articles. I hope you are intersted in publishing my articles upon which I will start sending them to you.

    I am at present a Lecturer in the English Department at The British University in Egypt, El Shourouk City, Cairo. I am a US citizen with a PhD in English Literature and Applied Linguistics- Stylistics, Masters Degree in ESL and Post Graduate teaching Diploma in ESL.
    How long would the process take before I can receive an acceptance of publication letter from you?I am awaiting your reply.

    Dr Lubna

    Posted by: Dr Lubna Almenoar at July 31, 2009 05:43 AM

    Antonette Boynes
    HON ENG 226: Survey of World Literature II
    Dr. B. Lee Hobbs
    01-21-2010

    Reflection on Moliere’s Tartuffe and Other Plays
    At first, I was reluctant to read Tartuffe, and even more confused after reading the preface. As I completed the first page of the play, I was quite delighted to find out how much I liked the play and I had barely read any of it. I am quite a funny person who enjoys comedy, and at times I could turn even a tragedy into a comedy by laughing at situations that most people would consider depressing and heartbreaking. On the contrary, Moliere’s Tartuffe was bold-faced comedy that kept me wanting to read on resulting in me reading the whole play in a few hours.
    In today’s world, manipulation is a major mechanism for many people. They prey on the gullible with schemes, or how they appear on the outside is a total different inner being. Perhaps one of the major and most occurring themes throughout the play is manipulation. It is the central motif that can be incorporated with all other major themes such as injustice, gullibility, hypocrisy and so on. Almost every character in the play is either manipulated or expresses some kind of manipulative traits.
    Clearly after reading the play, it is without doubt that Tartuffe is the most manipulative character, but the funny part is that he didn’t work hard to manipulate Orgon and Madame Pernelle. His techniques were rather calm and nonchalant which was probably why it had such a great effect on Orgon, who then fundamentally persuaded Madame Pernelle. Tartuffe as a major con artist expressed himself in such a religious manner when in the presence of Orgon that it was very hard for Orgon to see the ugly truth behind his mask. His succession was primarily based on the gullibility of his puppets. He used the flaws of his believers to his own advantage and success. His absence until the third act gave readers an anticipation of his presence and what his character would be like when he finally did make an appearance. It was quite funny at first to see how naïve and foolish Orgon and his mother were towards Tartuffe, but then it became annoying to the point where I got upset with the book. It sort of reminded me of being at the movie theatre and everyone is yelling at the actors/actresses that they are making the wrong decision; dramatic irony, but they continue, and furthermore they can’t hear us anyways.
    Although Tartuffe was the main character, I realized that Dorine was indispensible to the play and too possessed some manipulative ways though not for the identical reasons as Tartuffe. Her function was very similar to Tartuffe I found, in that both of them used sarcasm to cause verbal irony, what they said is not what they meant. Her wittiness added a hint of similar opposition to Tartuffe meaning that their ways were similar but for different causes. Even Orgon demonstrated this recurrent trait when he attempted to force Tartuffe on his daughter in marriage, which by the way I am totally against. Sure enough though, my favorite scene of manipulation was when Elmire fooled Tartuffe by proceeding to seduce him in an attempt to expose him. I’ve been in situations like this before where people don’t believe what I’m saying and I would do just about anything to prove to them how right I am and how wrong they are. It made me so mad that when I finally proved to them that I was right I wanted to laugh at the foolish looks on their face and rub it in days, possibly weeks after if I could.
    Even though it may be quite vile to say, I did enjoy when Tartuffe revealed his true colors and lowered Orgon and his family to his mercy while threatening to possess all of their fortune. It teaches more than a valuable lesson to his idiotic and irrational thoughts, words, and actions throughout the play. But as we all know, the bad guy never gets away and is somehow brought down. Tartuffe was a horrible man and this reading shows how deceitful people can be and why you should never judge a book by its cover. Justice was served.

    Posted by: Antonette Boynes at January 27, 2010 11:06 PM

    Kenneth Kelly
    Dr. Hobbs
    ENG 300
    29 January 2013
    Analysis Option 6: Maus II, Page 275
    On this page from Maus II, the frames are ruptured by the cluttered images of photographs which appear to be falling from the top of the page and pile up at the bottom. Frames 1, 2, 3, and 4 are mostly visible, but the cluttered snapshots make it difficult to discern thepanels remaining; especially since the snapshots have the same white border as the frames of the page. These pictures overwhelm the frames and could represent Vladek Spiegelman’s ever-lasting memory of the Holocaust. these photograph’s are significant in that they all that keeps the faces of his loved ones from fading into oblivion. In panal 7 at the bottom of the page, the only image not fully or partially covered by photos is the image of Vladek slumped forward in the couch, looking down upon what remains of his life before the World War 2 and the Nazi’s. You can almost hear Vladek’s gloomy voice when you read his speech bubble at the top of the frame: “Anja’s Parents, the Grandparents, her big sister Tosha, little Bibi and our Richieu … ALL what is left it’s the photos.”
    Something else to take note of is that on this page, as well as in other areas in Maus that are obstructed by images of photos, other comics, etc. is that they are unnumbered. Why would Spiegelman choose to leave them this way? More than likely this could be because even though Vladek showing his son the pictures happens chronologically within the present timeline, the thought behind them is infinite. The grief of lives lost and memories that are no more can’t be kept on a single page. The end of a page illustrates the end of a particular event in the story, but these memories are always present.

    Posted by: Kenneth Kelly at January 29, 2013 03:42 PM

    Kenneth Kelly
    Dr. Hobbs
    ENG 300
    29 January 2013
    Analysis Option 6: Maus II, Page 275
    On this page from Maus II, the frames are ruptured by the cluttered images of photographs which appear to be falling from the top of the page and pile up at the bottom. Frames 1, 2, 3, and 4 are mostly visible, but the cluttered snapshots make it difficult to discern thepanels remaining; especially since the snapshots have the same white border as the frames of the page. These pictures overwhelm the frames and could represent Vladek Spiegelman’s ever-lasting memory of the Holocaust. these photograph’s are significant in that they all that keeps the faces of his loved ones from fading into oblivion. In panal 7 at the bottom of the page, the only image not fully or partially covered by photos is the image of Vladek slumped forward in the couch, looking down upon what remains of his life before the World War 2 and the Nazi’s. You can almost hear Vladek’s gloomy voice when you read his speech bubble at the top of the frame: “Anja’s Parents, the Grandparents, her big sister Tosha, little Bibi and our Richieu … ALL what is left it’s the photos.”
    Something else to take note of is that on this page, as well as in other areas in Maus that are obstructed by images of photos, other comics, etc. is that they are unnumbered. Why would Spiegelman choose to leave them this way? More than likely this could be because even though Vladek showing his son the pictures happens chronologically within the present timeline, the thought behind them is infinite. The grief of lives lost and memories that are no more can’t be kept on a single page. The end of a page illustrates the end of a particular event in the story, but these memories are always present.

    Posted by: Kenneth Kelly at January 29, 2013 03:42 PM

    “The Water Cell” Question 4
    Question:
    Why does God return after a long absence?
    Answer:
    At the end of the section titles “the Water Cell” God returns after a timely absence while Marji was taking a long bath in order to experience the same feelings her grandfather experienced while imprisoned in a cell filled with water. She had just learned that her grandfather was the son of the emperor overthrown by Reza, father of the Shah. She had thought beforehand that the Shah was in power because God had chosen him to be, and upon hearing the fallacy of this thought, as well as her family’s involvement, she is emotionally upset. This is why God comes to her while she is immersed in the bathtub on page 29, where he asks her what she’s doing in frame eight. She is simply confused, and God knows this and tries to comfort, although she doesn’t respond to his question, and ends in the last frame comparing her wrinkled hands to her grandfather’s.

    Posted by: Kenneth Kelly at January 31, 2013 04:07 PM

    Kenneth Kelly
    Dr. Hobbs
    ENG 300
    2 February 2013
    Persepolis Section 8 Question 10
    Fereydoon is the uncle of Anoosh and great-uncle of Marji. When Anoosh (Marji’s uncle) was a teenager, Fereydoon proclaimed the independence of an Iranian province called Azerbaijan and elected himself Minister of Justice. With Anoosh as his secretary, he planned to liberate Iran one piece at a time; to divide and conquer. He had a chance to run away with Anoosh and the others, but decided to stay and take responsibility for what he believed in. In the end, he was imprisoned by the Shah’s soldiers and executed, but not before conceiving a child with his girlfriend. Anoosh remarks about his cousin, saying in frame 9 of page 58: “I heard he looks a lot like his father.”

    Posted by: Kenneth Kelly at February 3, 2013 02:04 PM

    Kenneth Kelly
    Dr. Hobbs
    ENG 300
    2 February 2013
    Persepolis Section 8 Question 12
    After the Shah’s soldiers imprisoned Fereydoon, Anoosh fled to his parents’ house before fleeing to Russia. Once he reached Russia he went to Leningrad and then Moscow where he received a doctorate in Marxism-Leninism, married, and had two children. He shows Marji a picture of himself with his wife and two girls, but the wife’s head is marked out. He tells Marji in frame 7 that Russians aren’t like Iranians. Out of childlike innocence, Marji asks “What? Don’t they have heads?” But Anoosh begins crying and says that hearts are what Russians lack. He doesn’t say anymore about his personal life, and shortly afterwards he is imprisoned again and executed. So far, we don’t know as readers whether or not Anoosh’s family will ever appear. However, Marji cherishes that her uncle wanted to see her, and only her before he was put to death. She sees him as a real hero, not just because he was imprisoned, but because he was a good person who stood up for what he believed in.

    Posted by: Kenneth Kelly at February 3, 2013 02:17 PM

    Kenneth Kelly
    Dr. Hobbs
    ENG 300
    Section 11 questions
    Question 1 Response
    After seeing the Iraqi airplanes bomb Tehran, Marji and her father rush home to make sure that Taji, Marhi’s mom, is ok. While driving home, Marji interrogates her dad as to whether or not he’s going to fight for Iran. In frame three of page 81, he responds with “What are you talking about? Of course I’m not going to fight. Why should I fight?” He says this because, as he states in the next frame, that the real problems he needs to be worried about are the internal issues with Iran’s own government, as well as the mindset that since Iran hadn’t done anything to help his family, then Iran doesn’t deserve to have him fight for them. I personally think that both of these ideas contribute to his response.

    Question 2 Response
    There are several humorous events that happen on page 81 after Marji’s dad tells her he will not fight against Iran. In frame five, after a statement from Marji, her dad puts his two-cents worth in by saying “And worse, they drive like maniacs...” Number one, if this statement were fact, it has nothing to do with their invasion of Iran, and two, Marji’s dad is in such a rush to get home that he himself is driving like a maniac. Then, when they get home, Marji and her dad burst in on her mom, Taji, who is soaking wet and in the shower. Out of panic, they frantically grab her in a bear hug and tell her what happened. She responds rather nonchalantly by stating in the last frame “Well, I guess I should dry off."

    Posted by: Kenneth Kelly at February 9, 2013 12:41 PM

    Kenneth Kelly
    Dr. Hobbs
    ENG 300
    Section 15 questions
    Question 2 Response
    Question:
    What are Marji’s motives for breaking her parents’ rules?
    Answer:
    Marji feels that her parents, and especially her mother, are behaving like dictators like the regime that leads Iran. When she comes home from cutting class, her mom interrogates her just as the guardians of the revolution who torture, imprison, and kill the revolutionaries in Iraq. Even though in the past her mother had been proud that she’d stood up to her teachers, especially in her religion classes, her mother isn’t happy that she cut class. Marji thinks that her mom is being a hypocrite, and questions her mother’s actions at her age. She eventually storms off, calling her the “guardian of the revolution of this house!” She later smokes her first cigarette in rebellion to her mother’s “tyranny” and literally says goodbye to her childhood.
    Question 4 Response
    Question:
    What is the relationship like between Marji and her mother?
    Answer:
    Marji’s relationship with her mother is like a roller-coaster. They truly care for each other, but they are so alike in their personality and stubbornness that they butt heads constantly. Her mother praises her for certain actions and crucifies her for others. For example, she jumps all over her for cutting class, but sticks up for her at other times when she wants to help her parents protest. It’s ironic that she gets on to Marji for cutting class is ironic, since it is possible through what we know that she most likely behaved in the same way, and she is most certainly acting that way in the current series of events. Her protests are evident of that.

    Posted by: Kenneth Kelly at February 9, 2013 01:07 PM

    Kenneth Kelly
    Dr. Hobbs
    ENG 300
    Homework Question

    Quagmire:
    As according to Webster’s National Dictionary – wet, boggy ground yielding under the feet.

    Question:
    Basu claims “Satrapi’s memoir refuses to be ‘under western eyes.” How exactly is this refusal enacted? Explain.

    Answer:
    Satrapi’s memoir refuses to be read under western eyes because instead of focusing a gaze at third world women and their rights by western feminists it revolves around the hegemonic western world and the liberated western female. She deconstructs the way we view the western and eastern world and allows us to look at problems in a world familiar to us.

    Posted by: Kenneth Kelly at February 12, 2013 04:36 PM

    Kenneth Kelly
    Dr. Hobbs
    ENG 300
    Homework Question

    Limn (verb):
    As according to Webster’s National Dictionary – to draw or outline as a picture

    Question:
    After reading the entire article, first explain Davis’s definition of “comics,” and then Satrapi’s “use of comics,” as first mentioned in the paper’s abstract.

    Answer:
    According to Rocio G. Davis, the juxtaposition (closeness) between the images and words in a comic or graphic novel create a new “artistic, literary, and creative experience” (264). Not only is the story being narrated by the author, but we are actually able to get a visual image of what’s going on; for example, we don’t have to guess what a characters reaction looks like. Satrapi uses the graphic memoir/novel order to clearly relate to her audience the memories of childhood adolescence and adulthood and her take on family, government, and religion.

    Posted by: Kenneth Kelly at February 12, 2013 04:52 PM

    Kenneth Kelly
    Dr. Hobbs
    ENG 300
    14 February 2013

    Question (pgs. 259-60):
    Malek states in her article that the “Iranian exiles’ state of liminality has enabled new hybrid cultural forms to emerge” (259). Having read the article, how does Satrapi use this potential of exile in Persepolis?
    Answer :
    In Persepolis, Satrapi uses the western genres of comics and memoir to illustrate her cultural identity and Iranian history. Through this she is able to accomplish several things. She is able to illustrate western concepts regarding Iranian societal structure, and find channels that connect Iran and the outside world. By finding similarities and differences between her old and new homes, she is able to better understand herself.

    Posted by: Kenneth Kelly at February 17, 2013 12:30 PM

    Kenneth Kelly
    Dr. Hobbs
    ENG 300
    Naghibi and O’Malley response

    Question:
    ` After reading the article, how and why do Iranian women writers like Satrapi use the autobiographical form?
    Answer:
    Iranian women write in this way because it helps them come to terms with what transpired during the 1979 Iranian revolution. This style of writing helps them with finding their own identity in a new world that has taken over the old. Old stereotypes of the meek and humble Iranian woman are put aside to give them a vice of their own in a culture that suppresses them. Going one step further by writing their memoirs in comic book form, they juxtapose familiar people, places and ideas with those we don’t know of in a way that is clear and concise.

    Posted by: Kenneth Kelly at February 21, 2013 06:30 PM

    Kenneth Kelly
    Dr. Hobbs
    ENG 300
    Chute Article response

    Question:
    On page 52 of Persepolis, Marji learns from Siamak that Ahmadi, a revolutionary prisoner, was killed and his body cut into many pieces. The page ends with a wide frame showing Ahmadi cleanly cut into seven pieces and arranged on a table. What does this representation signify, and why would Satrapi have included this image?
    Answer:
    Satrapi includes this imaging of Ahmadi cut cleanly into numerous pieces because she is signifying that the young Marji cannot realistically imagine the event. By drawing in instead of writing it, she is more capable of depicting the traumatic idea of the man’s fate better than simply writing it, which from the young Marji’s perspective would have remained cynical; an unobtainable idea.

    Posted by: Kenneth Kelly at February 24, 2013 02:02 PM

    Kenneth Kelly
    Dr. Hobbs
    ENG 300
    Midterm Final Question and Response

    Question:
    According to Whitlock, comics offer a “unique mediation of trauma in ‘boxes of grief’.” How do these “boxes” mediate this trauma through a combination of both drawing and writing?
    Answer:
    By combining images with text in comic books and graphic novels, audience members who would normally be considered “lookers” become interested in the engagement of reading. This is why artists like Maus’s Art Spiegelman don’t focus too strongly on detail in the illustrations in his work. In Whitlock’s article, in an excerpt of Spiegelman’s own words, he explains this in further detail: “I didn't want people to get too interested in the drawings. I wanted them to be there, but the story operates somewhere else” (968). What he means here is that neither writing nor illustrations should be valued over the other. The real story lies between the pictures in the “frames” and the narration. Both should be drawn from in order to feel the emotion in the tale.

    Posted by: Kenneth Kelly at February 24, 2013 02:28 PM

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